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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Mary-Margaret Chren
Based on 5 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Mary Margaret Chren wrote the following 5 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Teens, Tweets, and Tanning Beds: Rethinking the Use of Social Media for Skin Cancer Prevention. 2017

Falzone, Ashley E / Brindis, Claire D / Chren, Mary-Margaret / Junn, Alexandra / Pagoto, Sherry / Wehner, Mackenzie / Linos, Eleni. ·School of Medicine, the Program for Clinical Research, Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California. · Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies and the Adolescent and Young Adult Health National Resource Center at the University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California. · School of Medicine, the Program for Clinical Research, Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California; Dermatology Service, San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California. · Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worchester, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · School of Medicine, the Program for Clinical Research, Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California. Electronic address: eleni.linos@ucsf.edu. ·Am J Prev Med · Pubmed #28818251.

ABSTRACT: The incidence of skin cancer is rising in the U.S., and melanoma, the deadliest form, is increasing disproportionately among young white women. Indoor tanning is a modifiable risk factor for all skin cancers and continues to be used at the highest rates in young white women. Adolescents and young adults report personal appearance-based reasons for using indoor tanning. Previous research has explored the influences on tanning bed use, including individual factors as well as relationships with peers, family, schools, media influences, legislation, and societal beauty norms. Adolescents and young adults also have high rates of social media usage, and research is emerging on how best to utilize these platforms for prevention. Social media has the potential to be a cost-effective way to reach large numbers of young people and target messages at characteristics of specific audiences. Recent prevention efforts have shown that comprehensive prevention campaigns that include technology and social media are promising in reducing rates of indoor tanning among young adults. This review examines the literature on psychosocial influences on indoor tanning among adolescents and young adults, and highlights ways in which technology and social media can be used for prevention efforts.

2 Review Early detection of melanoma: reviewing the ABCDEs. 2015

Anonymous4130821 / Tsao, Hensin / Olazagasti, Jeannette M / Cordoro, Kelly M / Brewer, Jerry D / Taylor, Susan C / Bordeaux, Jeremy S / Chren, Mary-Margaret / Sober, Arthur J / Tegeler, Connie / Bhushan, Reva / Begolka, Wendy Smith. ·Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota; School of Medicine, University of Puerto Rico, San Juan, Puerto Rico. · Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco, California. · Society Hill Dermatology and Cosmetic Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospitals Case Medical Center, and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio. · Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco, California; Dermatology Service, San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California. · American Academy of Dermatology, Schaumburg, Illinois. · American Academy of Dermatology, Schaumburg, Illinois. Electronic address: wsmithbegolka@aad.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #25698455.

ABSTRACT: Over the course of their nearly 30-year history, the ABCD(E) criteria have been used globally in medical education and in the lay press to provide simple parameters for assessment of pigmented lesions that need to be further evaluated by a dermatologist. In this article, the efficacy and limitations of the ABCDE criteria as both a clinical tool and a public message will be reviewed.

3 Review International prevalence of indoor tanning: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2014

Wehner, Mackenzie R / Chren, Mary-Margaret / Nameth, Danielle / Choudhry, Aditi / Gaskins, Matthew / Nead, Kevin T / Boscardin, W John / Linos, Eleni. ·Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco2Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California3Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England. · Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco4Department of Dermatology, San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California. · University of California, Berkeley. · Department of Internal Medicine, John Muir Medical Center, Walnut Creek, California. · Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England. · Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco. · Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #24477278.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: Indoor tanning is a known carcinogen, but the scope of exposure to this hazard is not known. OBJECTIVE: To summarize the international prevalence of exposure to indoor tanning. DATA SOURCES: Studies were identified through systematic searches of PubMed (1966 to present), Scopus (1823 to present), and Web of Science (1898 to present) databases, last performed on March 16, 2013. We also hand searched reference lists to identify records missed by database searches and publicly available data not yet published in the scientific literature. STUDY SELECTION: Records reporting a prevalence of indoor tanning were eligible for inclusion. We excluded case-control studies, reports with insufficient study information, and reports of groups recruited using factors related to indoor tanning. Two independent investigators performed searches and study selection. Our search yielded 1976 unique records. After exclusions, 161 records were assessed for eligibility in full text, and 88 were included. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS: Two independent investigators extracted data on characteristics of study participants, inclusion/exclusion criteria, data collection format, outcomes, and statistical methods. Random-effects meta-analyses were used to summarize the prevalence of indoor tanning in different age categories. We calculated the population proportional attributable risk of indoor tanning in the United States, Europe, and Australia for nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) and melanoma. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Ever and past-year exposure to indoor tanning. RESULTS: The summary prevalence of ever exposure was 35.7% (95% CI, 27.5%-44.0%) for adults, 55.0% (33.0%-77.1%) for university students, and 19.3% (14.7%-24.0%) for adolescents. The summary prevalence of past-year exposure was 14.0% (95% CI, 11.5%-16.5%) for adults, 43.1% (21.7%-64.5%) for university students, and 18.3% (12.6%-24.0%) for adolescents. These results included data from 406 696 participants. The population proportional attributable risk were 3.0% to 21.8% for NMSC and 2.6% to 9.4% for melanoma, corresponding to more than 450 000 NMSC cases and more than 10 000 melanoma cases each year attributable to indoor tanning in the United States, Europe, and Australia. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Exposure to indoor tanning is common in Western countries, especially among young persons. Given the large number of skin cancer cases attributable to indoor tanning, these findings highlight a major public health issue.

4 Article Skin cancer prevention messages on Facebook: Likes, shares, and comments. 2018

Nosrati, Adi / Pimentel, Matthew A / Falzone, Ashley / Hegde, Roshini / Goel, Shilpa / Chren, Mary-Margaret / Eye, Rachel / Linos, Eleni / Pagoto, Sherry / Walkosz, Barbara J. ·Program for Clinical Research, Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California; Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California. Electronic address: adinosrati@gmail.com. · Program for Clinical Research, Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California. · Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California. · Program for Clinical Research, Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California; Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California. · Klein Buendel Inc, Golden, Colorado. · Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts, Worcester, Massachusetts. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #29518459.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Article Outcomes of Melanoma In Situ Treated With Mohs Micrographic Surgery Compared With Wide Local Excision. 2017

Nosrati, Adi / Berliner, Jacqueline G / Goel, Shilpa / McGuire, Joseph / Morhenn, Vera / de Souza, Juliana R / Yeniay, Yildiray / Singh, Rasnik / Lee, Kristina / Nakamura, Mio / Wu, Rachel R / Griffin, Ann / Grimes, Barbara / Linos, Eleni / Chren, Mary Margaret / Grekin, Roy / Wei, Maria L. ·Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco2Dermatology Service, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California. · Dermatology Service, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California. · Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco. · Department of Dermatology, University of California, San Francisco. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #28241261.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Melanoma in situ (MIS) is increasing in incidence, and expert consensus opinion recommends surgical excision for therapeutic management. Currently, wide local excision (WLE) is the standard of care. However, Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) is now used to treat a growing subset of individuals with MIS. During MMS, unlike WLE, the entire cutaneous surgical margin is evaluated intraoperatively for tumor cells. Objective: To assess the outcomes of patients with MIS treated with MMS compared with those treated with WLE. Design, Setting, and Participants: Retrospective review of a prospective database. The study cohort consisted of 662 patients with MIS treated with MMS or WLE per standard of care in dermatology and surgery (general surgery, otolaryngology, plastics, oculoplastics, surgical oncology) at an academic tertiary care referral center from January 1, 1978, to December 31, 2013, with follow-up through 2015. Exposure: Mohs micrographic surgery or WLE. Main Outcomes and Measures: Recurrence, overall survival, and melanoma-specific survival. Results: There were 277 patients treated with MMS (mean [SD] age, 64.0 [13.1] years; 62.1% male) and 385 treated with WLE (mean [SD] age, 58.5 [15.6] years; P < .001 for age; 54.8% male). Median follow-up was 8.6 (range, 0.2-37) years. Compared with WLE, MMS was used more frequently on the face (222 [80.2%] vs 141 [36.7%]) and scalp and neck (23 [8.3%] vs 26 [6.8%]; P < .001). The median (range) year of diagnosis was 2008 (1986-2013) for the MMS group vs 2003 (1978-2013) for the WLE group (P < .001). Overall recurrence rates were 5 (1.8%) in the MMS group and 22 (5.7%) in the WLE group (P = .07). Mean (SD) time to recurrence after MMS was 3.91 (4.4) years, and after WLE, 4.45 (2.7) years (P = .73). The 5-year recurrence rate was 1.1% in the MMS group and 4.1% in the WLE group (P = .07). For WLE-treated tumors, the surgical margin taken was greater for tumors that recurred compared with tumors that did not recur (P = .003). Five-year overall survival for MMS was 92% and for WLE was 94% (P = .28). Melanoma-specific mortality for the MMS group was 2 vs 13 patients for the WLE group, with mean (SD) survival of 6.5 (4.8) and 6.1 (0.8) years, respectively (P = .77). Conclusions and Relevance: No significant differences were found in the recurrence rate, overall survival, or melanoma-specific survival of patients with MIS treated with MMS compared with WLE.