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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Scott D. Collins
Based on 3 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Scott Collins wrote the following 3 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline AAD/ACMS/ASDSA/ASMS 2012 appropriate use criteria for Mohs micrographic surgery: a report of the American Academy of Dermatology, American College of Mohs Surgery, American Society for Dermatologic Surgery Association, and the American Society for Mohs Surgery. 2012

Anonymous2680736 / Anonymous2690736 / Anonymous2700736 / Anonymous2710736 / Anonymous2720736 / Connolly, Suzanne M / Baker, Diane R / Coldiron, Brett M / Fazio, Michael J / Storrs, Paul A / Vidimos, Allison T / Zalla, Mark J / Brewer, Jerry D / Begolka, Wendy S / Berger, Timothy G / Bigby, Michael / Bolognia, Jean L / Brodland, David G / Collins, Scott / Cronin, Terrence A / Dahl, Mark V / Grant-Kels, Jane M / Hanke, C W / Hruza, George J / James, William D / Lober, Clifford W / McBurney, Elizabeth I / Norton, Scott A / Roenigk, Randall K / Wheeland, Ronald G / Wisco, Oliver J. ·Department of Dermatology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA. ·Dermatol Surg · Pubmed #22958088.

ABSTRACT: The appropriate use criteria process synthesizes evidence-based medicine, clinical practice experience, and expert judgment. The American Academy of Dermatology in collaboration with the American College of Mohs Surgery, the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery Association, and the American Society for Mohs Surgery has developed appropriate use criteria for 270 scenarios for which Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) is frequently considered based on tumor and patient characteristics. This document reflects the rating of appropriateness of MMS for each of these clinical scenarios by a ratings panel in a process based on the appropriateness method developed by the RAND Corp (Santa Monica, CA)/University of California-Los Angeles (RAND/UCLA). At the conclusion of the rating process, consensus was reached for all 270 (100%) scenarios by the Ratings Panel, with 200 (74.07%) deemed as appropriate, 24 (8.89%) as uncertain, and 46 (17.04%) as inappropriate. For the 69 basal cell carcinoma scenarios, 53 were deemed appropriate, 6 uncertain, and 10 inappropriate. For the 143 squamous cell carcinoma scenarios, 102 were deemed appropriate, 7 uncertain, and 34 inappropriate. For the 12 lentigo maligna and melanoma in situ scenarios, 10 were deemed appropriate, 2 uncertain, and 0 inappropriate. For the 46 rare cutaneous malignancies scenarios, 35 were deemed appropriate, 9 uncertain, and 2 inappropriate. These appropriate use criteria have the potential to impact health care delivery, reimbursement policy, and physician decision making on patient selection for MMS, and aim to optimize the use of MMS for scenarios in which the expected clinical benefit is anticipated to be the greatest. In addition, recognition of those scenarios rated as uncertain facilitates an understanding of areas that would benefit from further research. Each clinical scenario identified in this document is crafted for the average patient and not the exception. Thus, the ultimate decision regarding the appropriateness of MMS should be determined by the expertise and clinical experience of the physician.

2 Article High-throughput screening using patient-derived tumor xenografts to predict clinical trial drug response. 2015

Gao, Hui / Korn, Joshua M / Ferretti, Stéphane / Monahan, John E / Wang, Youzhen / Singh, Mallika / Zhang, Chao / Schnell, Christian / Yang, Guizhi / Zhang, Yun / Balbin, O Alejandro / Barbe, Stéphanie / Cai, Hongbo / Casey, Fergal / Chatterjee, Susmita / Chiang, Derek Y / Chuai, Shannon / Cogan, Shawn M / Collins, Scott D / Dammassa, Ernesta / Ebel, Nicolas / Embry, Millicent / Green, John / Kauffmann, Audrey / Kowal, Colleen / Leary, Rebecca J / Lehar, Joseph / Liang, Ying / Loo, Alice / Lorenzana, Edward / Robert McDonald, E / McLaughlin, Margaret E / Merkin, Jason / Meyer, Ronald / Naylor, Tara L / Patawaran, Montesa / Reddy, Anupama / Röelli, Claudia / Ruddy, David A / Salangsang, Fernando / Santacroce, Francesca / Singh, Angad P / Tang, Yan / Tinetto, Walter / Tobler, Sonja / Velazquez, Roberto / Venkatesan, Kavitha / Von Arx, Fabian / Wang, Hui Qin / Wang, Zongyao / Wiesmann, Marion / Wyss, Daniel / Xu, Fiona / Bitter, Hans / Atadja, Peter / Lees, Emma / Hofmann, Francesco / Li, En / Keen, Nicholas / Cozens, Robert / Jensen, Michael Rugaard / Pryer, Nancy K / Williams, Juliet A / Sellers, William R. ·Oncology Disease Area, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. · Oncology Disease Area, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Basel, Switzerland. · Department of Oncology Translational Medicine, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. · China Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Shanghai, China. · Oncology Disease Area, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Emeryville, California, USA. ·Nat Med · Pubmed #26479923.

ABSTRACT: Profiling candidate therapeutics with limited cancer models during preclinical development hinders predictions of clinical efficacy and identifying factors that underlie heterogeneous patient responses for patient-selection strategies. We established ∼1,000 patient-derived tumor xenograft models (PDXs) with a diverse set of driver mutations. With these PDXs, we performed in vivo compound screens using a 1 × 1 × 1 experimental design (PDX clinical trial or PCT) to assess the population responses to 62 treatments across six indications. We demonstrate both the reproducibility and the clinical translatability of this approach by identifying associations between a genotype and drug response, and established mechanisms of resistance. In addition, our results suggest that PCTs may represent a more accurate approach than cell line models for assessing the clinical potential of some therapeutic modalities. We therefore propose that this experimental paradigm could potentially improve preclinical evaluation of treatment modalities and enhance our ability to predict clinical trial responses.

3 Article AAD/ACMS/ASDSA/ASMS 2012 appropriate use criteria for Mohs micrographic surgery: a report of the American Academy of Dermatology, American College of Mohs Surgery, American Society for Dermatologic Surgery Association, and the American Society for Mohs Surgery. 2012

Anonymous3140736 / Connolly, Suzanne M / Baker, Diane R / Coldiron, Brett M / Fazio, Michael J / Storrs, Paul A / Vidimos, Allison T / Zalla, Mark J / Brewer, Jerry D / Smith Begolka, Wendy / Anonymous3150736 / Berger, Timothy G / Bigby, Michael / Bolognia, Jean L / Brodland, David G / Collins, Scott / Cronin, Terrence A / Dahl, Mark V / Grant-Kels, Jane M / Hanke, C William / Hruza, George J / James, William D / Lober, Clifford Warren / McBurney, Elizabeth I / Norton, Scott A / Roenigk, Randall K / Wheeland, Ronald G / Wisco, Oliver J. ·Department of Dermatology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #22959232.

ABSTRACT: The appropriate use criteria process synthesizes evidence-based medicine, clinical practice experience, and expert judgment. The American Academy of Dermatology in collaboration with the American College of Mohs Surgery, the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery Association, and the American Society for Mohs Surgery has developed appropriate use criteria for 270 scenarios for which Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) is frequently considered based on tumor and patient characteristics. This document reflects the rating of appropriateness of MMS for each of these clinical scenarios by a ratings panel in a process based on the appropriateness method developed by the RAND Corp (Santa Monica, CA)/University of California-Los Angeles (RAND/UCLA). At the conclusion of the rating process, consensus was reached for all 270 (100%) scenarios by the Ratings Panel, with 200 (74.07%) deemed as appropriate, 24 (8.89%) as uncertain, and 46 (17.04%) as inappropriate. For the 69 basal cell carcinoma scenarios, 53 were deemed appropriate, 6 uncertain, and 10 inappropriate. For the 143 squamous cell carcinoma scenarios, 102 were deemed appropriate, 7 uncertain, and 34 inappropriate. For the 12 lentigo maligna and melanoma in situ scenarios, 10 were deemed appropriate, 2 uncertain, and 0 inappropriate. For the 46 rare cutaneous malignancies scenarios, 35 were deemed appropriate, 9 uncertain, and 2 inappropriate. These appropriate use criteria have the potential to impact health care delivery, reimbursement policy, and physician decision making on patient selection for MMS, and aim to optimize the use of MMS for scenarios in which the expected clinical benefit is anticipated to be the greatest. In addition, recognition of those scenarios rated as uncertain facilitates an understanding of areas that would benefit from further research. Each clinical scenario identified in this document is crafted for the average patient and not the exception. Thus, the ultimate decision regarding the appropriateness of MMS should be determined by the expertise and clinical experience of the physician.