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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Patrick Combemale
Based on 8 articles published since 2009
(Why 8 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, P. Combemale wrote the following 8 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline [Locoregional treatments of brain metastases for patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma: French national guidelines]. 2014

Lubrano, V / Derrey, S / Truc, G / Mirabel, X / Thariat, J / Cupissol, D / Sassolas, B / Combemale, P / Modiano, P / Bedane, C / Dygai-Cochet, I / Lamant, L / Mourrégot, A / Rougé Bugat, M-È / Siegrist, S / Tiffet, O / Mazeau-Woynar, V / Verdoni, L / Planchamp, F / Leccia, M-T / Anonymous610807. ·Service de neurochirurgie, hôpital de Rangueil, CHU de Toulouse, 1, avenue du Professeur-Jean-Poulhès, TSA 50032, 31059 Toulouse, France. · Département de neurochirurgie, hôpital Charles-Nicolle, 1, rue de Germont, 76000 Rouen, France. · Département de radiothérapie, centre Georges-François-Leclerc, 1, rue du Professeur-Marion, BP 77980, 21079 Dijon, France. · Département de radiothérapie-curiethérapie, centre Oscar-Lambret, 3, rue Frédéric-Combemale, BP 307, 59020 Lille, France. · Pôle de radiothérapie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue de Valombrose, 06189 Nice, France. · Service d'oncologie médicale, ICM, institut du cancer de Montpellier Val-d'Aurelle, 208, avenue des Apothicaires, parc Euromédecine, 34298 Montpellier, France. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital Cavale-Blanche, boulevard Tanguy-Prigent, 29609 Brest, France. · Unité onco-dermatologie, centre Léon Bérard, 28, rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon, France. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital Saint-Vincent-de-Paul, boulevard de Belfort, BP 387, 59020 Lille, France. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital Dupuytren, 2, avenue Martin-Luther-King, 87042 Limoges, France. · Service de médecine nucléaire, centre Georges-François-Leclerc, 1, rue du Professeur-Marion, BP 77980, 21079 Dijon, France. · Service d'anatomie pathologique, hôpital Purpan, place Baylac, 31059 Toulouse, France. · Service de chirurgie oncologique, ICM, institut du cancer de Montpellier Val-d'Aurelle, 208, avenue des Apothicaires, parc Euromédecine, 34298 Montpellier, France. · Cabinet médical, 59, rue de la Providence, 31500 Toulouse, France. · Cabinet médical, 3, rue Saint-Sigisbert, 57050 le Ban-Saint-Martin, France. · Service de chirurgie générale et thoracique, centre hospitalier universitaire, 42055 Saint-Étienne, France. · Direction des recommandations et de la qualité de l'expertise, Institut national du cancer, 52, avenue André-Morizet, 92513 Boulogne-Billancourt, France. · Direction des recommandations et de la qualité de l'expertise, Institut national du cancer, 52, avenue André-Morizet, 92513 Boulogne-Billancourt, France. Electronic address: recommandations@institutcancer.fr. · Clinique de dermatolo-vénéréologie, photobiologie et allergologie, pôle pluridisciplinaire de médecine, hôpital Michallon, 38043 Grenoble, France. ·Neurochirurgie · Pubmed #25241016.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The management of metastatic cutaneous melanoma is changing, marked by innovative therapies. However, their respective use and place in the therapeutic strategy continue to be debated by healthcare professionals. OBJECTIVE: The French national cancer institute has led a national clinical practice guideline project since 2008. It has carried out a review of these modalities of treatment and established recommendations. METHODS: The clinical practice guidelines development process is based on systematic literature review and critical appraisal by experts. The recommendations are thus based on the best available evidence and expert agreement. Prior to publication, the guidelines are reviewed by independent practitioners in cancer care delivery. RESULTS: This article presents the results of bibliographic search, the conclusions of the literature and the recommendations concerning locoregional treatments of brain metastases for patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

2 Guideline [Management of patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma: French national guidelines. French National Cancer Institute]. 2014

Leccia, M-T / Planchamp, F / Sassolas, B / Combemale, P / Modiano, P / Bedane, C / Cupissol, D / Derrey, S / Dygai-Cochet, I / Lamant, L / Lubrano, V / Mirabel, X / Mourrégot, A / Rougé Bugat, M-E / Siegrist, S / Thariat, J / Tiffet, O / Truc, G / Verdoni, L / Mazeau-Woynar, V. ·Pôle pluridisciplinaire de médecine, clinique de dermatolo-vénéréologie, photobiologie et allergologie, hôpital Michallon, 38043 Grenoble, France. · Direction des recommandations et de la qualité de l'expertise, Institut national du cancer, 52, avenue André-Morizet, 92513 Boulogne-Billancourt, France. Electronic address: recommandations@institutcancer.fr. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital Cavale Blanche, boulevard Tanguy-Prigent, 29609 Brest, France. · Unité onco-dermatologie, centre Léon-Bérard, 28, rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon, France. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital Saint-Vincent-de-Paul, boulevard de Belfort, BP 387, 59020 Lille, France. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital Dupuytren, 2, avenue Martin-Luther-King, 87042 Limoges, France. · Service d'oncologie médicale, ICM, institut du cancer de Montpellier Val-d'Aurelle, parc Euromédecine, 208, avenue des Apothicaires, 34298 Montpellier, France. · Département de neurochirurgie, hôpital Charles-Nicolle, 1, rue de Germont, 76000 Rouen, France. · Service de médecine nucléaire, centre Georges-François-Leclerc, 1, rue du Professeur-Marion, BP 77980, 21079 Dijon, France. · Service d'anatomie pathologique, hôpital Purpan, place Baylac, 31059 Toulouse, France. · Service de neurochirurgie, hôpital de Rangueil, 1, avenue du Professeur-Jean-Poulhès, TSA 50032, 31059 Toulouse, France. · Département de radiothérapie-curiethérapie, centre Oscar-Lambret, 3, rue Frédéric-Combemale, BP 307, 59020 Lille, France. · Service de chirurgie oncologique, ICM, institut du cancer de Montpellier Val-d'Aurelle, parc Euromédecine, 208, avenue des Apothicaires, 34298 Montpellier, France. · Cabinet médical, 59, rue de la Providence, 31500 Toulouse, France. · Cabinet médical, 3, rue Saint-Sigisbert, 57050 Le Ban-Saint-Martin, France. · Pôle de radiothérapie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue de Valombrose, 06189 Nice, France. · Service de chirurgie générale et thoracique, centre hospitalier universitaire de Saint-Étienne, 42055 Saint-Étienne, France. · Département de radiothérapie, centre Georges-François-Leclerc, 1, rue du Professeur-Marion, BP 77980, 21079 Dijon, France. · Direction des recommandations et de la qualité de l'expertise, Institut national du cancer, 52, avenue André-Morizet, 92513 Boulogne-Billancourt, France. ·Ann Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #24507205.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Recent years have seen the emergence of new molecules for the treatment of patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma, with significant benefits in terms of survival and the opening of new therapeutic perspectives. In addition, many techniques are currently being developed for locoregional treatment of metastatic sites. Management of metastatic melanoma is thus fast-changing and is marked by innovative therapeutic approaches. However, the availability of these new treatments has prompted debate among healthcare professionals concerning their use and their place in therapeutic strategy. AIMS: Since 2008, the French National Cancer Institute (INCa) has been leading a project to define and diffuse national clinical practice guidelines. It has performed a review of these treatment methods, which it aims to circulate, and it is seeking to develop recommendations in order to allow nationwide implementation of innovative approaches while promoting good use thereof. METHODS: The clinical practice guidelines development process is based on systematic literature review and critical appraisal by experts within a multidisciplinary working group, with feedback from specialists in cancer care delivery. The recommendations are thus based on the best available evidence and expert agreement. Prior to publication, the guidelines are reviewed by independent practitioners in cancer care delivery. RESULTS: This article presents the national recommendations for first- and second-line systemic treatment and for locoregional treatment of metastatic sites in patients presenting metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

3 Guideline [Loco-regional treatments of the metastatic sites for patients with pauci-metastatic cutaneous melanoma (without brain metastasis): French national guidelines]. 2014

Sassolas, Bruno / Mourrégot, Anne / Thariat, Juliette / Tiffet, Olivier / Dygai-Cochet, Inna / Mirabel, Xavier / Truc, Gilles / Cupissol, Didier / Modiano, Philippe / Combemale, Patrick / Bedane, Christophe / Derrey, Stéphane / Lamant, Laurence / Lubrano, Vincent / Siegrist, Sophie / Rougé-Bugat, Marie-Ève / Mazeau-Woynar, Valérie / Verdoni, Laëtitia / Planchamp, François / Leccia, Marie-Thérèse. ·Hôpital Cavale Blanche, boulevard Tanguy-Prigent, 29609 Brest, France. · Institut du Cancer de Montpellier Val-d'Aurelle, parc Euromédecine, 208, avenue des Apothicaires, 34298 Montpellier, France. · Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue de Valombrose, 06189 Nice, France. · Centre hospitalier universitaire de Saint-Étienne, 42055 Saint-Étienne, France. · Centre Georges-François-Leclerc, 1, rue du Professeur-Marion, BP 77980, 21079 Dijon, France. · Centre Oscar-Lambret, 3, rue Frédéric-Combemale, BP 307, 59020 Lille, France. · Hôpital Saint-Vincent-de-Paul, boulevard de Belfort, BP 387, 59020 Lille, France. · Centre Léon-Bérard, 28, rue Laënnec, 69008 Lyon, France. · Hôpital Dupuytren, 2, avenue Martin-Luther-King, 87042 Limoge, France. · Hôpital Charles-Nicolle, 1, rue de Germont, 76000 Rouen, France. · Hôpital Purpan, place Baylac, 31059 Toulouse, France. · Hôpital de Rangueil, 1, avenue du Professeur-Jean-Poulhès, TSA 50032, 31059 Toulouse, France. · Cabinet médical, 3, rue Saint-Sigisbert, 57050Le Ban-Saint-Martin, France. · Cabinet médical, 59, rue de la Providence, 31500 Toulouse, France. · Institut national du cancer, 52, avenue André-Morizet, 92513 Boulogne-Billancourt, France. · Hôpital Michallon, 38043 Grenoble, France. ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #24369290.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The last years are marked by the emergence of new molecules for the treatment of metastatic cutaneous melanoma with a significant benefit on the survival. Besides, some techniques are in development for the loco-regional treatment of the metastatic sites, bringing new therapeutic perspectives. However, their respective use and place in the therapeutic strategy are debated by healthcare professionals. OBJECTIVE: The French National Cancer Institute leads a national clinical practice guidelines project since 2008. It realized a review of these modalities of treatment and developed recommendations. METHODS: The clinical practice guidelines development process is based on systematic literature review and critical appraisal by a multidisciplinary expert workgroup. The recommendations are thus based on the best available evidence and expert agreement. Prior to publication, the guidelines are reviewed by independent practitioners in cancer care delivery. RESULTS: This article presents recommendations for loco-regional treatments of the pulmonary, bone, cutaneous, hepatic and digestive metastatic sites for patients with pauci-metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

4 Clinical Trial Malignancy and chronic leg ulcers: the value of systematic wound biopsies: a prospective, multicenter, cross-sectional study. 2012

Senet, Patricia / Combemale, Patrick / Debure, Clelia / Baudot, Nathalie / Machet, Laurent / Aout, Mounir / Vicaut, Eric / Lok, Catherine / Anonymous11910730. ·Department of Dermatology, Hopital Tenon, Assistance Publique–Hopitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Universite´ Paris X, Paris, France. patricia.senet@tnn.aphp.fr ·Arch Dermatol · Pubmed #22772403.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of skin cancers associated with chronic leg ulcers (CLUs) presumably of vascular origin and failing to heal (ie, increased wound area or depth) despite 3 months or more of appropriate treatment. DESIGN: Prospective cross-sectional study. SETTING: Ambulatory or hospitalized patients from 17 dermatology departments. PATIENTS: Between January 1, 2006, and May 31, 2008, a total of 144 patients consulted for CLUs, attributed to venous and/or peripheral arterial disease(s), increasing in wound size, that is, larger area and/or depth, despite appropriate standard treatment for at least 3 months. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: At inclusion, at least two 6-mm punch biopsies, 1 at the wound edge and 1 in the wound bed, in the most clinically suspicious areas, were systematically performed. The primary end point was the skin cancer frequency diagnosed in at least 1 wound biopsy specimen obtained at inclusion. RESULTS: The 144 patients included had 154 CLUs. The overall skin cancer frequency in the CLUs was 10.4%: 9 squamous cell and 5 basal cell carcinomas, 1 melanoma, and 1 leiomyosarcoma; 56.3% had persisted for at least 3 years. Univariate analyses retained older age, abnormal excessive granulation tissue at wound edges, high clinical suspicion of cancer, and number of biopsies, but not wound area or duration, as being significantly associated with skin cancer in 1 or more biopsy specimens. CONCLUSIONS: The combined primary ulcerated cancer or malignant transformation frequency was sufficiently high in CLUs referred to tertiary care centers to consider systematic biopsy of a wound refractory to 3 months or more of appropriate treatment.

5 Article Long-term efficacy and safety of sonidegib in patients with advanced basal cell carcinoma: 42-month analysis of the phase 2 randomised, double-blind BOLT study. 2019

Dummer, R / Guminksi, A / Gutzmer, R / Lear, J T / Lewis, K D / Chang, A L S / Combemale, P / Dirix, L / Kaatz, M / Kudchadkar, R / Loquai, C / Plummer, R / Schulze, H-J / Stratigos, A J / Trefzer, U / Squittieri, N / Migden, M R. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Zürich, Skin Cancer Center, University Hospital, Zürich, Switzerland. · Department of Medical Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia. · Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Mater Hospital, Sydney, Australia. · Skin Cancer Center Hannover, Department of Dermatology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. · Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, MAHSC, Manchester University and Salford Royal NHS Trust, Manchester, UK. · University of Colorado Cancer Center, Anschutz, Aurora, CO, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Redwood City, CA, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Lyon, France. · Centre de Référence des Neurofibromatoses, Créteil, France. · Saint-Augustinus Hospital, Antwerp, Belgium. · Department of Dermatology, SRH Waldklinikum Gera, Germany. · Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University Medical Center Mainz, Mainz, Germany. · Northern Centre for Cancer Care, The Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Department of Dermatology, Fachklinik Hornheide, Münster, Germany. · First Department of Dermatology-Venereology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens School of Medicine, Andreas Sygros Hospital for Skin and Venereal Diseases, Athens, Greece. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Charite, Berlin, Germany. · Sun Pharmaceutical Industries, Inc, Princeton, NJ, USA. · Departments of Dermatology and Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas-MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #31545507.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) exhibit aberrant activation of the hedgehog pathway. Sonidegib is a hedgehog pathway inhibitor approved for the treatment of locally advanced BCC (laBCC) and metastatic BCC (mBCC) based on primary results of the BOLT (Basal Cell Carcinoma Outcomes with LDE225 [sonidegib] Treatment) study. PURPOSE: This is the final 42-month analysis of the BOLT study evaluating sonidegib efficacy and safety. METHODS: Adults with no prior hedgehog pathway inhibitor therapy were randomised in a 1:2 ratio to sonidegib 200 mg or 800 mg once daily. Treatment continued for up to 42 months or until disease progression, unacceptable toxicity, death, study termination, or withdrawal of consent. Primary efficacy endpoint was objective response rate (ORR) by central review, assessed at baseline, weeks 5, 9, and 17, then subsequently every 8 or 12 weeks during years 1 or 2, respectively. Safety endpoints included adverse event monitoring and reporting. RESULTS: The study enrolled 230 patients, 79 and 151 in the 200 mg and 800 mg groups, respectively, of whom 8% and 3% remained on treatment by the 42-month cutoff, respectively. The ORR by central review (95% confidence interval [CI]) was 56·1 (43·3-68·3)% for laBCC and 7·7 (0·2-36·0)% for mBCC in the 200 mg group and 46·1 (37·2-55·1)% for laBCC and 17·4 (5·0-38·8)% for mBCC in the 800 mg group. No new safety concerns emerged. CONCLUSIONS: Sonidegib demonstrated sustained efficacy and a manageable safety profile. Final BOLT results support sonidegib as a viable treatment option for laBCC and mBCC.

6 Article Hospitalisation costs of metastatic melanoma in France; the MELISSA study (MELanoma In hoSpital coSts Assessment). 2017

Fernandes, Jérôme / Bregman, Bruno / Combemale, Patrick / Amaz, Camille / de Léotoing, Lucie / Vainchtock, Alexandre / Gaudin, Anne-Françoise. ·Medical Information Department, Groupe OC Santé, Montpellier, France. · Bristol-Myers Squibb, Health Economics & Public Health, Bristol-Myers Squibb, 3, rue Joseph Monier, 92500, Rueil-Malmaison, France. bruno.bregman@bms.com. · Skin Cancer Unit, Medical Oncology Department, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon, France. · Heva, Lyon, France. · Bristol-Myers Squibb, Health Economics & Public Health, Bristol-Myers Squibb, 3, rue Joseph Monier, 92500, Rueil-Malmaison, France. ·BMC Health Serv Res · Pubmed #28789648.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Management of metastatic melanoma is changing rapidly following the introduction of innovative effective therapies, with consequences for the allocation of healthcare resources. The objective of this study was to assess hospitalisation costs of metastatic melanoma in France from 2011 to 2013 from the perspective of the government payer. METHODS: The population studied corresponded to all adults with metastatic melanoma hospitalised in France between 1st January 2011 and 31st December 2013 who required chemotherapy, immunotherapy or radiotherapy due to tumour progression and unresectable Stage III or Stage IV melanoma. Metastatic melanoma was identified by ICD-10 codes documented in the hospital patient discharge records. For each patient, hospital stays were stratified into a pre- or post- progression health state using proxy variables for the RECIST criteria. All healthcare expenditure documented in the French national hospital claims system database and incurred between the index hospitalisation (or change of progression state) and the end of follow-up were analysed. For the principal analysis, valuation of healthcare resource consumption was performed using official national hospitalisation tariffs. Any expensive therapy administered during the stay was documented from a linked database of expensive drugs (FICHCOMP). RESULTS: Seventy-eight thousand seven hundred fifty hospital stays by 10,337 patients with metastatic melanoma were identified over the three-year study period. Annual per capita costs of hospitalisation were € 5046 in the pre-progression stage and € 19,006 in the post-progression stage. Hospitalisations attributed to adverse drug reactions to chemotherapy or immunotherapy were observed in 27% of patients. Annual per capita costs of these hospitalisations related to adverse drug reactions were € 3762 in the pre-progression stage and € 5523 in the post-progression stage. CONCLUSIONS: Hospitalisation costs related to metastatic melanoma rise substantially as the disease progresses. Treatment strategies which slow down disease progression would be expected to reduce costs of hospitalisation for metastatic melanoma, although they may also entail significant acquisition costs. This will entail organisational changes of resource allocation for the treatment of metastatic melanoma in hospitals.

7 Article An unusual case of desmoplastic melanoma containing an osteoclast-like giant cell-rich nodule. 2015

Houang, Michelle / Castillo, Christine / La Marca, Sophie / Combemale, Patrick / Wang, Qing / Paindavoine, Sandrine / Pissaloux, Daniel / de la Fouchardiere, Arnaud. · ·Am J Dermatopathol · Pubmed #24999544.

ABSTRACT: The authors describe a case of a 5 cm mixed desmoplastic melanoma occurring on the cheek of an 88-year-old white woman. The epidermis showed the features of lentigo maligna. Within the dermis, there was a mixed desmoplastic melanoma with 2 components. The first component consisted of infiltrative malignant spindled cells with prominent stromal fibrosis and had the typical appearance of desmoplastic melanoma. The second component was within the deep half of the tumor and consisted of a densely cellular nodule composed of spindled melanocytes admixed with many osteoclast-like giant cells. There was a peripheral neurotropism and tumor invaded bone. The Breslow thickness was 14 mm. On followup, a sacral metastasis was discovered, which had a similar morphology to the deep cellular nodule. Immunohistochemistry of spindled cells both inside and outside the nodule showed S100 positivity with the absence of other melanocytic markers (HMB-45, Melan-A). Smooth muscle actin and p63 were focally positive. The osteoclast-like giant cells expressed CD68 and MiTF. Array comparative genomic hybridization of the typical desmoplastic melanoma region had a flat profile, whereas the cellular osteoclast-like giant cell–rich region displayed important cytogenetic anomalies, some of which have been previously described in melanomas. The main array comparative genomic hybridization findings were confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization using specific probes. The differences in morphology and molecular cytogenetics between the 2 areas suggest that these might represent the progression or emergence of a more aggressive clone within the tumor. Subsequent metastatic spread to the bone may be a result of accumulated cytogenetic abnormalities.

8 Minor Metastatic melanoma of the ovary and circulating S100B. 2013

Boespflug, Amélie / Combemale, Patrick / de la Fouchardiere, Arnaud / Neidhardt, Eve Marie. ·Medical resident. ·Eur J Dermatol · Pubmed #24125939.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --