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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Clara N. Curiel-Lewandrowski
Based on 24 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, C. Curiel-Lewandrowski wrote the following 24 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Guidelines of care for the management of primary cutaneous melanoma. 2019

Swetter, Susan M / Tsao, Hensin / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Elder, David E / Gershenwald, Jeffrey E / Guild, Valerie / Grant-Kels, Jane M / Halpern, Allan C / Johnson, Timothy M / Sober, Arthur J / Thompson, John A / Wisco, Oliver J / Wyatt, Samantha / Hu, Shasa / Lamina, Toyin. ·Department of Dermatology, Stanford University Medical Center and Cancer Institute, Stanford, California; Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. Electronic address: sswetter@stanford.edu. · Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Division of Dermatology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona; University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, Arizona. · Department of Dermatology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Department of Pathology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas; Department of Cancer Biology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · AIM at Melanoma Foundation, Plano, Texas. · Department of Dermatology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut; Department of Pathology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut; Department of Pediatrics, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut. · Department of Dermatology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Dermatology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon. · Decatur Dermatology, Decatur, Alabama. · Department of Dermatology, University of Miami Health System, Miami, Florida. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30392755.

ABSTRACT: The incidence of primary cutaneous melanoma continues to increase each year. Melanoma accounts for the majority of skin cancer-related deaths, but treatment is usually curative following early detection of disease. In this American Academy of Dermatology clinical practice guideline, updated treatment recommendations are provided for patients with primary cutaneous melanoma (American Joint Committee on Cancer stages 0-IIC and pathologic stage III by virtue of a positive sentinel lymph node biopsy). Biopsy techniques for a lesion that is clinically suggestive of melanoma are reviewed, as are recommendations for the histopathologic interpretation of cutaneous melanoma. The use of laboratory, molecular, and imaging tests is examined in the initial work-up of patients with newly diagnosed melanoma and for follow-up of asymptomatic patients. With regard to treatment of primary cutaneous melanoma, recommendations for surgical margins and the concepts of staged excision (including Mohs micrographic surgery) and nonsurgical treatments for melanoma in situ, lentigo maligna type (including topical imiquimod and radiation therapy), are updated. The role of sentinel lymph node biopsy as a staging technique for cutaneous melanoma is described, with recommendations for its use in clinical practice. Finally, current data regarding pregnancy and melanoma, genetic testing for familial melanoma, and management of dermatologic toxicities related to novel targeted agents and immunotherapies for patients with advanced disease are summarized.

2 Review Addressing the knowledge gap in clinical recommendations for management and complete excision of clinically atypical nevi/dysplastic nevi: Pigmented Lesion Subcommittee consensus statement. 2015

Kim, Caroline C / Swetter, Susan M / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Grichnik, James M / Grossman, Douglas / Halpern, Allan C / Kirkwood, John M / Leachman, Sancy A / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Ming, Michael E / Nelson, Kelly C / Veledar, Emir / Venna, Suraj S / Chen, Suephy C. ·Pigmented Lesion Clinic and Cutaneous Oncology Program, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Pigmented Lesion and Melanoma Program, Department of Dermatology, Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, California3Dermatology Service, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Pigmented Lesion Clinic and Multidisciplinary Cutaneous Oncology Program, Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson. · Melanoma Program, Department of Dermatology, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida. · Pigmented Lesion Clinic, Departments of Dermatology and Oncological Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · Pigmented Lesion Clinic, Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Melanoma Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine, Dermatology and Translational Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology Program, Department of Dermatology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland. · Pigmented Lesion Clinic, Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Pigmented Lesion Clinic, Department of Dermatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. · Center for Research and Grants, Baptist Health South Florida, Miami. · Skin Oncology and Melanoma Center, Department of Medicine, MedStar Washington Cancer Institute and Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC. · Melanoma and Pigmented Lesion Clinic, Department of Dermatology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia15Division of Dermatology, Atlanta Veterans Administration Medical Center, Decatur, Georgia. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #25409291.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: The management of clinically atypical nevi/dysplastic nevi (CAN/DN) is controversial, with few data to guide the process. Management recommendations for DN with positive histologic margins were developed by the Delphi method to achieve consensus among members of the Pigmented Lesion Subcommittee (PLS) of the Melanoma Prevention Working Group (MPWG) after reviewing the current evidence. OBJECTIVES: To outline key issues related to the management of CAN/DN: (1) biopsies of CAN and how positive margins arise, (2) whether incompletely excised DN evolve into melanoma, (3) current data on the outcomes of DN with positive histologic margins, (4) consensus recommendations, and (5) a proposal for future studies, including a large-scale study to help guide the management of DN with positive margins. EVIDENCE REVIEW: The literature, including recent studies examining management and outcomes of DN with positive margins between 2009 to 2014, was reviewed. FINDINGS: A consensus statement by the PLS of the MPWG following review of the literature, group discussions, and a structured Delphi method consensus. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This consensus statement reviews the complexities of management of CAN/DN. A review of the literature and 2 rounds of a structured Delphi consensus resulted in the following recommendations: (1) mildly and moderately DN with clear margins do not need to be reexcised, (2) mildly DN biopsied with positive histologic margins without clinical residual pigmentation may be safely observed rather than reexcised, and (3) observation may be a reasonable option for management of moderately DN with positive histologic margins without clinically apparent residual pigmentation; however, more data are needed to make definitive recommendations in this clinical scenario.

3 Review Screening and prevention measures for melanoma: is there a survival advantage? 2012

Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Chen, Suephy C / Swetter, Susan M / Anonymous4170734. ·The University of Arizona Cancer Center, 1515 N. Campbell Ave, Box 245024, Tucson, AZ, 85724, USA. ccuriel@azcc.arizona.edu ·Curr Oncol Rep · Pubmed #22907282.

ABSTRACT: Controversy has emerged over the past decades regarding the value and impact of melanoma screening to detect early stage disease for improved prognosis. Those questioning the benefits of prevention efforts base their arguments on the absence of prospective, randomized studies demonstrating decreased melanoma mortality to justify the cost associated with screening and educational campaigns. For those in favor of melanoma screening, the lack of proven survival benefit is not a justification to abandon this approach, but rather a reflection of the lack of resources necessary to conduct a long-term trial. In 2009, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF)report did not recommend routine primary care screening for the general population given the absence of evidence. However, since the USPSTF report, a series of new studies are available, which support the potential benefit of screening and have the potential to significantly impact current policies regarding skin cancer screening, particularly for melanoma.

4 Review Survival is not the only valuable end point in melanoma screening. 2012

Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Kim, Caroline C / Swetter, Susan M / Chen, Suephy C / Halpern, Allan C / Kirkwood, John M / Leachman, Sancy A / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Ming, Michael E / Grichnik, James M / Anonymous1021005. ·Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #22336950.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Review Selection criteria for genetic assessment of patients with familial melanoma. 2009

Leachman, Sancy A / Carucci, John / Kohlmann, Wendy / Banks, Kimberly C / Asgari, Maryam M / Bergman, Wilma / Bianchi-Scarrà, Giovanna / Brentnall, Teresa / Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte / Bruno, William / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / de Snoo, Femke A / Debniak, Tadeusz / Demierre, Marie-France / Elder, David / Goldstein, Alisa M / Grant-Kels, Jane / Halpern, Allan C / Ingvar, Christian / Kefford, Richard F / Lang, Julie / MacKie, Rona M / Mann, Graham J / Mueller, Kurt / Newton-Bishop, Julia / Olsson, Håkan / Petersen, Gloria M / Puig, Susana / Rigel, Darrell / Swetter, Susan M / Tucker, Margaret A / Yakobson, Emanuel / Zitelli, John A / Tsao, Hensin. ·Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-5550, USA. sancy.leachman@hci.utah.edu ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #19751883.

ABSTRACT: Approximately 5% to 10% of melanoma may be hereditary in nature, and about 2% of melanoma can be specifically attributed to pathogenic germline mutations in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A). To appropriately identify the small proportion of patients who benefit most from referral to a genetics specialist for consideration of genetic testing for CDKN2A, we have reviewed available published studies of CDKN2A mutation analysis in cohorts with invasive, cutaneous melanoma and found variability in the rate of CDKN2A mutations based on geography, ethnicity, and the type of study and eligibility criteria used. Except in regions of high melanoma incidence, such as Australia, we found higher rates of CDKN2A positivity in individuals with 3 or more primary invasive melanomas and/or families with at least one invasive melanoma and two or more other diagnoses of invasive melanoma and/or pancreatic cancer among first- or second-degree relatives on the same side of the family. The work summarized in this review should help identify individuals who are appropriate candidates for referral for genetic consultation and possible testing.

6 Article Management strategies of academic pigmented lesion clinic directors in the United States. 2018

Nelson, Kelly C / Grossman, Douglas / Kim, Caroline C / Chen, Suephy C / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara N / Grichnik, James M / Kirkwood, John M / Leachman, Sancy A / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Swetter, Susan M / Venna, Suraj S / Ming, Michael E. ·Department of Dermatology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · Department of Dermatology, University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, Utah. · Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia; Division of Dermatology, Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, Georgia. · University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, Arizona. · Scully-Welsh Cancer Center, Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach, Florida. · University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Department of Dermatology, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, Oregon. · Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Skin Cancer Center, Hauppage, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Pigmented Lesion and Melanoma Program, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California; Cancer Institute, Stanford, California; Dermatology Service, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Inova Schar Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Fairfax, Virginia. · Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: michael.ming@uphs.upenn.edu. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #29307637.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Article Incidence of and Risk Factors for Skin Cancer in Organ Transplant Recipients in the United States. 2017

Garrett, Giorgia L / Blanc, Paul D / Boscardin, John / Lloyd, Amanda Abramson / Ahmed, Rehana L / Anthony, Tiffany / Bibee, Kristin / Breithaupt, Andrew / Cannon, Jennifer / Chen, Amy / Cheng, Joyce Y / Chiesa-Fuxench, Zelma / Colegio, Oscar R / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Del Guzzo, Christina A / Disse, Max / Dowd, Margaret / Eilers, Robert / Ortiz, Arisa Elena / Morris, Caroline / Golden, Spring K / Graves, Michael S / Griffin, John R / Hopkins, R Samuel / Huang, Conway C / Bae, Gordon Hyeonjin / Jambusaria, Anokhi / Jennings, Thomas A / Jiang, Shang I Brian / Karia, Pritesh S / Khetarpal, Shilpi / Kim, Changhyun / Klintmalm, Goran / Konicke, Kathryn / Koyfman, Shlomo A / Lam, Charlene / Lee, Peter / Leitenberger, Justin J / Loh, Tiffany / Lowenstein, Stefan / Madankumar, Reshmi / Moreau, Jacqueline F / Nijhawan, Rajiv I / Ochoa, Shari / Olasz, Edit B / Otchere, Elaine / Otley, Clark / Oulton, Jeremy / Patel, Parth H / Patel, Vishal Anil / Prabhu, Arpan V / Pugliano-Mauro, Melissa / Schmults, Chrysalyne D / Schram, Sarah / Shih, Allen F / Shin, Thuzar / Soon, Seaver / Soriano, Teresa / Srivastava, Divya / Stein, Jennifer A / Sternhell-Blackwell, Kara / Taylor, Stan / Vidimos, Allison / Wu, Peggy / Zajdel, Nicholas / Zelac, Daniel / Arron, Sarah T. ·University of California-San Francisco Medical Center, San Francisco. · Scripps Green Hospital, La Jolla, California. · University of Minnesota Medical Center, Minneapolis. · Baylor All Saints and Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · University of California-Los Angeles Medical Center, Los Angeles. · Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville. · Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut. · University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · University of Arizona Medical Center, Tucson. · New York Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center, New York. · University of California-San Diego Medical Center, San Diego. · Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St Louis, Missouri. · Oregon Health and Science University, Portland. · University of Alabama Hospital, Birmingham. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio. · Mayo Clinic Rochester, Rochester, Minnesota. · Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. · New York University Langone Medical Center, New York. · University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Parkland Memorial Hospital, Dallas. · Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #28097368.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Skin cancer is the most common malignancy occurring after organ transplantation. Although previous research has reported an increased risk of skin cancer in solid organ transplant recipients (OTRs), no study has estimated the posttransplant population-based incidence in the United States. Objective: To determine the incidence and evaluate the risk factors for posttransplant skin cancer, including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), melanoma (MM), and Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) in a cohort of US OTRs receiving a primary organ transplant in 2003 or 2008. Design, Setting, and Participants: This multicenter retrospective cohort study examined 10 649 adult recipients of a primary transplant performed at 26 centers across the United States in the Transplant Skin Cancer Network during 1 of 2 calendar years (either 2003 or 2008) identified through the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) database. Recipients of all organs except intestine were included, and the follow-up periods were 5 and 10 years. Main Outcomes and Measures: Incident skin cancer was determined through detailed medical record review. Data on predictors were obtained from the OPTN database. The incidence rates for posttransplant skin cancer overall and for SCC, MM, and MCC were calculated per 100 000 person-years. Potential risk factors for posttransplant skin cancer were tested using multivariate Cox regression analysis to yield adjusted hazard ratios (HR). Results: Overall, 10 649 organ transplant recipients (mean [SD] age, 51 [12] years; 3873 women [36%] and 6776 men [64%]) contributed 59 923 years of follow-up. The incidence rates for posttransplant skin cancer was 1437 per 100 000 person-years. Specific subtype rates for SCC, MM, and MCC were 812, 75, and 2 per 100 000 person-years, respectively. Statistically significant risk factors for posttransplant skin cancer included pretransplant skin cancer (HR, 4.69; 95% CI, 3.26-6.73), male sex (HR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.34-1.81), white race (HR, 9.04; 95% CI, 6.20-13.18), age at transplant 50 years or older (HR, 2.77; 95% CI, 2.20-3.48), and being transplanted in 2008 vs 2003 (HR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.22-1.94). Conclusions and Relevance: Posttransplant skin cancer is common, with elevated risk imparted by increased age, white race, male sex, and thoracic organ transplantation. A temporal cohort effect was present. Understanding the risk factors and trends in posttransplant skin cancer is fundamental to targeted screening and prevention in this population.

8 Article Lack of harms from community-based melanoma screening by primary care providers. 2016

Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Swetter, Susan M. ·Division of Dermatology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona. ccuriel@e-mail.arizona.edu. · Department of Dermatology, Stanford University, Stanford, California. · Dermatology Service, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. ·Cancer · Pubmed #27392136.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Article The state of melanoma: challenges and opportunities. 2016

Merlino, Glenn / Herlyn, Meenhard / Fisher, David E / Bastian, Boris C / Flaherty, Keith T / Davies, Michael A / Wargo, Jennifer A / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Weber, Michael J / Leachman, Sancy A / Soengas, Maria S / McMahon, Martin / Harbour, J William / Swetter, Susan M / Aplin, Andrew E / Atkins, Michael B / Bosenberg, Marcus W / Dummer, Reinhard / Gershenwald, Jeffrey E / Halpern, Allan C / Herlyn, Dorothee / Karakousis, Giorgos C / Kirkwood, John M / Krauthammer, Michael / Lo, Roger S / Long, Georgina V / McArthur, Grant / Ribas, Antoni / Schuchter, Lynn / Sosman, Jeffrey A / Smalley, Keiran S / Steeg, Patricia / Thomas, Nancy E / Tsao, Hensin / Tueting, Thomas / Weeraratna, Ashani / Xu, George / Lomax, Randy / Martin, Alison / Silverstein, Steve / Turnham, Tim / Ronai, Ze'ev A. ·Laboratory of Cancer Biology and Genetics, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Melanoma Research Center, The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Cutaneous Biology Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, USA. · Departments of Dermatology and Pathology, Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Developmental Therapeutics, Cancer Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, USA. · Department of Genomic Medicine and Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Departments of Medicine and Dermatology, University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ, USA. · Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cancer Biology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Knight Cancer Institute Melanoma and Skin Cancer Program, Oregon Health Science University, Portland, OR, USA. · Molecular Oncology Program, Melanoma Laboratory, CNIO, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Dermatology, Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT, USA. · Bascom Palmer Eye Institute and Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Stanford University Medical Center and Cancer Institute/VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA. · Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA. · Department of Dermatology and Dermatopathology, Cancer Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of Zurich, Zürich, Switzerland. · Dermatology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Melanoma and Skin Cancer Program, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · Department of Pathology, Cancer Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology and Dermatology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Melanoma Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Department of Cancer Medicine, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Vic., Australia. · Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical School, Nashville, TN, USA. · Department of Tumor Biology, The Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA. · Women Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Melanoma Program, Department of Dermatology, Lineberger Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. · Melanoma and Pigmented Lesion Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany. · Melanoma Research Foundation, Washington, DC, USA. · Tumor Initiation and Maintenance Program, Cancer Center, Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, La Jolla, CA, USA. ·Pigment Cell Melanoma Res · Pubmed #27087480.

ABSTRACT: The Melanoma Research Foundation (MRF) has charted a comprehensive assessment of the current state of melanoma research and care. Intensive discussions among members of the MRF Scientific Advisory Council and Breakthrough Consortium, a group that included clinicians and scientists, focused on four thematic areas - diagnosis/early detection, prevention, tumor cell dormancy (including metastasis), and therapy (response and resistance). These discussions extended over the course of 2015 and culminated at the Society of Melanoma Research 2015 International Congress in November. Each of the four groups has outlined their thoughts as per the current status, challenges, and opportunities in the four respective areas. The current state and immediate and long-term needs of the melanoma field, from basic research to clinical management, are presented in the following report.

10 Article Teledermoscopy in High-risk Melanoma Patients: A Comparative Study of Face-to-face and Teledermatology Visits. 2016

Arzberger, Edith / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Blum, Andreas / Chubisov, Dmitry / Oakley, Amanda / Rademaker, Marius / Soyer, Hans / Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer. ·Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. edith.arzberger@medunigraz.at. ·Acta Derm Venereol · Pubmed #26776245.

ABSTRACT: Teledermoscopy is considered a reliable tool for the evaluation of pigmented skin lesions. We compared the management decision in face-to-face visits vs. teledermatology in a high-risk melanoma cohort using total-body photography, macroscopic and dermoscopic images of single lesions. Patients were assessed both face-to face and by 4 remote teledermatologists. Lesions identified as suspicious for skin cancer by face-to-face evaluation underwent surgical excision. The teledermatologists recommended "self-monitoring", "short-term monitoring", or "excision". A 4-year monitoring was completed in a cohort of participating subjects. The general agreement, calculated by prevalence and bias-adjusted κ (PABAK), showed almost perfect agreement (PABAK 0.9-0.982). A total of 23 lesions were excised; all teledermatologists identified the 9 melanomas. The greatest discrepancy was detected in "short-term monitoring". During 4-year monitoring one melanoma was excised that had been considered benign. In conclusion, melanoma identification by experts in pigmented lesions appears to be equivalent between face-to-face and teledermatological consultation.

11 Article Psychological Stress and Immunological Modulations in Early-stage Melanoma Patients. 2015

Richtig, Erika / Trapp, Eva Maria / Avian, Alexander / Brezinsek, Hans Peter / Trapp, Michael / Egger, Josef Wilhelm / Kapfhammer, Hans Peter / Rohrer, Peter Michael / Berghold, Andrea / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Demel, Ulrike. ·Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Austria Auenbruggerplatz 8 , AT-8036 Graz, Austria. erika.richtig@medunigraz.at. ·Acta Derm Venereol · Pubmed #25587794.

ABSTRACT: Mental stress may have a negative impact on the immune state of cancer patients, in whom immunologic surveillance is essential for survival. This study investigated the immunological response of 19 patients with early-stage melanoma and a matched control group undergoing the Determination Stress Test before surgery. Cytokine and chemokine levels and lymphocyte subpopulations were measured at baseline and post-stress test time-points. Following the stress test lower levels of interleukin (IL)-6 were observed in the melanoma group compared with healthy volunteers (p = 0.044). IL-10 increased significantly in the control group 30 min after the stress test (p = 0.002) in comparison with the melanoma group (p = 0.407). CCL5/Rantes decreased significantly in the melanoma group, whereas CD16/CD56+ natural killer cells increased in both groups, with a sharp decrease below baseline after stress in the melanoma group (p = 0.001). This pilot study shows an altered immunological response to stressors in melanoma patients.

12 Article Effects of total-body digital photography on cancer worry in patients with atypical mole syndrome. 2015

Moye, Molly S / King, Sallyann M C / Rice, Zakiya P / DeLong, Laura K / Seidler, Anne M / Veledar, Emir / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Chen, Suephy C. ·Department of Dermatology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia2currently with the Department of Dermatology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City. · Department of Dermatology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia3currently with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia. · Department of Dermatology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. · Department of Dermatology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia4currently with Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, California. · Department of Dermatology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia5Center for Research and Grants, Baptist Health South Florida, Coral Gables. · Skin Cancer Institute/Arizona Cancer Center, Division of Dermatology, University of Arizona, Tucson. · Department of Dermatology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia7Division of Dermatology, Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, Georgia. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #25389923.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: Cancer worry about developing melanoma in at-risk patients may affect one's quality of life and adherence to screening. Little is known about melanoma-related worry in patients with atypical mole syndrome (AMS). OBJECTIVES: To quantify levels and elucidate predictors of worry related to developing melanoma in patients with AMS and to determine whether total-body digital photography (TBDP) in pigmented lesion clinics (PLCs) reduces worry. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: In this pretest-posttest study, patients with AMS from PLCs at 2 academic medical centers were recruited from June 1, 2005, through October 31, 2008, to answer questions about cancer worry before and after undergoing TBDP. Questionnaires used included the new melanoma and recurrent melanoma Revised Impact of Event Scale (RIES), the Melanoma Worry Scale (MWS), the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and the Life Orientation Test. INTERVENTIONS: All patients underwent TBDP. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Changes in the MWS and new melanoma RIES scores. RESULTS: A total of 138 patients completed baseline questionnaires; 108 patients (78.3%) completed questionnaires after TBDP. Baseline levels of worry were low and reduced further after TBDP. In patients with a personal history of melanoma, worry was reduced on all scales. In patients without a personal history of melanoma, only the new melanoma RIES score was significantly decreased. Predictors of baseline MWS scores include female sex, personal history of melanoma, and higher Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, adjusted for demographics, family history of melanoma, and Life Orientation Test scores. Adjusted predictors of the baseline new melanoma RIES score were similar but also included lower educational level and did not include sex. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Patients with AMS have low levels of melanoma-related worry, which is similar to data from other populations at high risk of cancers. We found that TBDP is a clinically useful tool that can be used in PLCs to help decrease worry about developing melanoma in at-risk patients.

13 Article Understanding visual search patterns of dermatologists assessing pigmented skin lesions before and after online training. 2014

Krupinski, Elizabeth A / Chao, Joseph / Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer / Morrison, Lynne / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara. ·Department of Medical Imaging, University of Arizona Tucson, 1609 N Warren Bldg 211 Rm 112, Tucson, AZ, 85724, USA, krupinski@radiology.arizona.edu. ·J Digit Imaging · Pubmed #24939005.

ABSTRACT: The goal of this investigation was to explore the feasibility of characterizing the visual search characteristics of dermatologists evaluating images corresponding to single pigmented skin lesions (PSLs) (close-ups and dermoscopy) as a venue to improve training programs for dermoscopy. Two Board-certified dermatologists and two dermatology residents participated in a phased study. In phase I, they viewed a series of 20 PSL cases ranging from benign nevi to melanoma. The close-up and dermoscopy images of the PSL were evaluated sequentially and rated individually as benign or malignant, while eye position was recorded. Subsequently, the participating subjects completed an online dermoscopy training module that included a pre- and post-test assessing their dermoscopy skills (phase 2). Three months later, the subjects repeated their assessment on the 20 PSLs presented during phase I of the study. Significant differences in viewing time and eye-position parameters were observed as a function of level of expertise. Dermatologists overall have more efficient search than residents generating fewer fixations with shorter dwells. Fixations and dwells associated with decisions changing from benign to malignant or vice versa from photo to dermatoscopic viewing were longer than any other decision, indicating increased visual processing for those decisions. These differences in visual search may have implications for developing tools to teach dermatologists and residents about how to better utilize dermoscopy in clinical practice.

14 Article Clinical performance of the Nevisense system in cutaneous melanoma detection: an international, multicentre, prospective and blinded clinical trial on efficacy and safety. 2014

Malvehy, J / Hauschild, A / Curiel-Lewandrowski, C / Mohr, P / Hofmann-Wellenhof, R / Motley, R / Berking, C / Grossman, D / Paoli, J / Loquai, C / Olah, J / Reinhold, U / Wenger, H / Dirschka, T / Davis, S / Henderson, C / Rabinovitz, H / Welzel, J / Schadendorf, D / Birgersson, U. ·Department of Dermatology, Hospital Clinic, IDIBAPS, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #24841846.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Even though progress has been made, the detection of melanoma still poses a challenge. In light of this situation, the Nevisense electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) system (SciBase AB, Stockholm, Sweden) was designed and shown to have the potential to be used as an adjunct diagnostic tool for melanoma detection. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and safety of the Nevisense system in the distinction of benign lesions of the skin from melanoma with electrical impedance spectroscopy. METHODS: This multicentre, prospective, and blinded clinical study was conducted at five American and 17 European investigational sites. All eligible skin lesions in the study were examined with the EIS-based Nevisense system, photographed, removed by excisional biopsy and subjected to histopathological evaluation. A postprocedure clinical follow-up was conducted at 7 ± 3 days from the initial measurement. A total of 1951 patients with 2416 lesions were enrolled into the study; 1943 lesions were eligible and evaluable for the primary efficacy end point, including 265 melanomas - 112 in situ and 153 invasive melanomas with a median Breslow thickness of 0·57 mm [48 basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) and seven squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs)]. RESULTS: The observed sensitivity of Nevisense was 96·6% (256 of 265 melanomas) with an exact one-sided 95% lower confidence bound estimated at 94·2% and an observed specificity of 34·4%, and an exact two-sided 95% confidence bound estimated at 32·0-36·9%. The positive and negative predictive values of Nevisense were 21·1% and 98·2%, respectively. The observed sensitivity for nonmelanoma skin cancer was 100% (55 of 48 BCCs and seven SCCs) with an exact two-sided 95% confidence bound estimated at 93·5-100·0%. CONCLUSIONS: Nevisense is an accurate and safe device to support clinicians in the detection of cutaneous melanoma.

15 Article Pediatric melanoma: analysis of an international registry. 2013

Averbook, Bruce J / Lee, Sandra J / Delman, Keith A / Gow, Kenneth W / Zager, Jonathan S / Sondak, Vernon K / Messina, Jane L / Sabel, Michael S / Pittelkow, Mark R / Ecker, Phillip M / Markovic, Svetomir N / Swetter, Susan M / Leachman, Sancy A / Testori, Alessandro / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Go, Ronald S / Jukic, Drazen M / Kirkwood, John M. ·Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio; Department of Surgery, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. ·Cancer · Pubmed #24022819.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The management of pediatric melanoma (PM) has largely been extrapolated from adult data. However, the behavior of PM appears to differ from its adult counterparts. Therefore, an international PM registry was created and analyzed. METHODS: Twelve institutions contributed deidentified clinicopathologic and outcome data for patients diagnosed with PM from 1953 through 2008. RESULTS: Overall survival (OS) data were reported for 365 patients with invasive PM who had adequate follow-up data. The mean age of the patients was 16 years (range 1 year-21 years). The 10-year OS rate, 80.6%, tended to vary by patient age: 100% for those aged birth to 10 years, 69.7% for those aged > 10 years to 15 years, and 79.5% for those aged > 15 years to 20 years (P = .147). Patients with melanomas measuring ≤ 1 mm had a favorable prognosis (10-year OS rate of 97%), whereas survival was lower but similar for patients with melanomas measuring > 1 mm to 2 mm, > 2 mm to 4 mm, and > 4 mm (70%, 78%, and 80%, respectively; P = .0077). Ulceration and lymph node metastasis were found to be correlated with worse survival (P = .022 and P = .017, respectively). The 10-year OS rate was 94.1% for patients with American Joint Committee on Cancer stage I disease, 79.6% for those with stage II disease, and 77.1% for patients with stage III disease (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Tumor thickness, ulceration, lymph node status, and stage were found to be significant predictors of survival in patients with PM, similar to adult melanoma. There is a trend toward increased survival in children aged ≤ 10 years versus adolescents aged > 10 years. Further analyses are needed to probe for potential biological and behavioral differences in pediatric versus adult melanoma.

16 Article A novel therapeutic combination approach for treating multiple vemurafenib-induced keratoacanthomas: systemic acitretin and intralesional fluorouracil. 2013

LaPresto, Lindsay / Cranmer, Lee / Morrison, Lynne / Erickson, Christof P / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara. ·College of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #23552479.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Article Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of sulindac in individuals at risk for melanoma: evaluation of potential chemopreventive activity. 2012

Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Swetter, Susan M / Einspahr, Janine G / Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh / Nagle, Ray / Sagerman, Paul / Tangrea, Joseph / Parnes, Howard / Alberts, David S / Chow, Hsiao-Hui. ·College of Medicine, Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85724-5024, USA. ccuriel@azcc.arizona.edu ·Cancer · Pubmed #22605570.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Reduced melanoma risk has been reported with regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, the ability of NSAIDs to reach melanocytes in vivo and modulate key biomarkers in preneoplastic lesions such as atypical nevi has not been evaluated. METHODS: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of sulindac was conducted in individuals with atypical nevi (AN) to determine bioavailability of sulindac and metabolites in nevi and effect on apoptosis and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) expression in AN. Fifty subjects with AN ≥ 4 mm in size and 1 benign nevus (BN) were randomized to sulindac (150 mg twice a day) or placebo for 8 weeks. Two AN were randomized for baseline excision, and 2 AN and BN were excised after intervention. RESULTS: Postintervention sulindac, sulindac sulfone, and sulindac sulfide concentrations were 0.31 ± 0.36, 1.56 ± 1.35, and 2.25 ± 2.24 μg/mL in plasma, and 0.51 ± 1.05, 1.38 ± 2.86, and 0.12 ± 0.12 μg/g in BN, respectively. Sulindac intervention did not significantly change VEGFA expression but did increase expression of the apoptotic marker cleaved caspase-3 in AN (increase of 3 ± 33 in sulindac vs decrease of 25 ± 45 in the placebo arm, P = .0056), although significance was attenuated (P = .1103) after adjusting for baseline expression. CONCLUSIONS: Eight weeks of sulindac intervention resulted in high concentrations of sulindac sulfone, a proapoptotic metabolite, in BN but did not effectively modulate VEGFA and cleaved caspase-3 expression. Study limitations included limited exposure time to sulindac and the need to optimize a panel of biomarkers for NSAID intervention studies.

18 Article Erythematous annular plaques on the trunk. 2012

LaPresto, Lindsay / Cranmer, Lee / Erickson, Christof P / Morrison, Lynne / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara. ·University of Arizona, Tucson, USA. ·Arch Dermatol · Pubmed #22508881.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Article Long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs decreases the risk of cutaneous melanoma: results of a United States case-control study. 2011

Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Nijsten, Tamar / Gomez, Maria L / Hollestein, Loes M / Atkins, Michael B / Stern, Robert S. ·Department of Dermatology, BIDMC, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ccuriel@azcc.arizona.edu ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #21390049.

ABSTRACT: Experimental and observational studies continue to demonstrate conflicting results regarding the role of several commonly used drugs as melanoma chemopreventive agents. This case-control study was designed to assess the associations between cutaneous melanoma (CM) and exposure to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and statins in current users. A total of 400 CM and 600 eligible age- and gender-matched community-based controls were prospectively recruited and interviewed. We assessed participants' demographic characteristics, CM risk factors, and current and previous use of medications. Multivariable conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between NSAIDs and/or aspirin (ASA), statin exposure, and CM risk. Half of the subjects were men (mean age 60 years). After adjusting for confounders, use of any type of NSAIDs for more than 5 years significantly reduced the risk of melanoma development compared with the low-exposure group (adjusted OR=0.57; 95% CI=0.43-0.77). Subgroup analyses showed that the observed risk reduction was primarily driven by continuous ASA use (>5 years adjusted OR=0.51, 95% CI=0.35-0.75). No significant protective effect was observed with statin exposure (OR=0.97, 95% CI=0.73-1.29). Long-term use of NSAIDs, especially ASA, is associated with a significantly decreased risk of CM development. Clinical intervention studies are warranted to further investigate the potential role of ASA and other NSAIDs as chemopreventive agents for CM.

20 Article Utilization and rationale for the implementation of total body (digital) photography as an adjunct screening measure for melanoma. 2010

Rice, Zakiya P / Weiss, Francesca J / DeLong, Laura K / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Chen, Suephy C. ·Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Emory University, 101 Woodruff Circle, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. ·Melanoma Res · Pubmed #20729763.

ABSTRACT: The primary objective of our study was to update the prevalence of total body photography (TBP) utilization and the rationale for its implementation as an adjunctive screening measure by academic dermatologists across the USA, and investigate the emergence of total body digital photography (TBDP). Our secondary objective was to further examine how TBP/TBDP is being incorporated into the dermatology screening examination in academic pigmented lesion clinics. A questionnaire was mailed to 113 dermatology departments across the USA. About 43% (49/113) of surveyed departments responded. TBP was used by 67% (33/49) of the respondents. Of these respondents, 33% (11/33) used TBDP alone, 33% (11/33) used TBDP in combination with nondigitally based TBP, and 33% (11/33) used nondigital TBP with print photos. The three most frequently cited reasons for the use of full-body baseline photographs were that they reduced patient anxiety, led to fewer biopsies, and helped to find melanoma early in the curable stage. Respondents who did not use full body baseline photographs cited logistical constraints as the number one reason, followed by perceived lack of utility. In conclusion, our study shows that there is a significant number of academic dermatologists using TBP/TBDP. However, this study also shows that there are conflicting beliefs among academic dermatologists concerning the efficacy of TBP/TBDP. At this point with a documented growing trend in utilization of TBP, more studies are needed to evaluate the efficacy of this screening adjunct to diagnose melanoma early and positively impact survival because of early diagnosis.

21 Article Melanoma high-risk families' perceived health care provider risk communication. 2009

Loescher, Lois J / Crist, Janice D / Cranmer, Lee / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Warneke, James A. ·University of Arizona College of Nursing Tucson, AZ, USA. oescher@nursing.arizona.edu ·J Cancer Educ · Pubmed #19838889.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Families with a melanoma history are at risk of melanoma. Melanoma survival improves when people are aware of their risk and ways to modify it. We explored at-risk families' perceived risk communication from healthcare providers. METHODS: Qualitative description. RESULTS: Participants perceived: (1) few provider discussions of melanoma risk or risk-modifying behaviors; (2) a desire to trust information from providers; (3) the healthcare system constrains communication; and (4) concerns about provider competence and caring regarding worrisome lesions. CONCLUSIONS: Providers should provide clear, comprehensive, accurate, and consistent messages about melanoma to persons at high risk; messages also convey competence and caring.

22 Article Primary cutaneous melanomas seen as inflamed pigmented lesions in patients undergoing adjuvant interferon treatment: a possible diagnostic clue for physicians. 2009

Hu, Stephanie / Kim, Caroline C / Jessup, Chad / Phung, Thuy L / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara. ·Department of Dermatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02215, USA. ·Arch Dermatol · Pubmed #19451501.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In addition to a complete skin examination every few months, adjuvant interferon treatment is often recommended for patients with high-risk melanomas. Therefore, dermatologists play an important role in detecting multiple primary melanomas and may be required to attempt to identify the primary melanoma in patients with metastatic disease. OBSERVATIONS: We describe 3 patients with a diagnosis of melanoma who were diagnosed as having a new primary cutaneous melanoma within weeks of initiating interferon treatment. All 3 melanomas were inflamed clinically, prompting excisional biopsy. Histopathologic analysis of the melanomas revealed thin (<1.0 mm Breslow thickness) invasive tumors, as well as the presence of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and/or regression. CONCLUSIONS: Inflamed melanocytic lesions in patients undergoing interferon treatment should be further evaluated to investigate the possibility of primary cutaneous melanomas. This observation may enable earlier detection and treatment of melanomas in patients with multiple tumors or metastatic melanoma with an unknown primary site.

23 Minor Lack of P-glycoprotein expression in melanoma brain metastases of different melanoma types. 2016

Richtig, Erika / Asslaber, Martin / Partl, Richard / Avian, Alexander / Berghold, Andrea / Kapp, Karin / Preusser, Matthias / Becker, Juergen C / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara. · ·Clin Neuropathol · Pubmed #26636558.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

24 Minor Multiple primary cutaneous melanomas in Li-Fraumeni syndrome. 2011

Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Speetzen, Larisa Sotinsky / Cranmer, Lee / Warneke, James A / Loescher, Lois J. · ·Arch Dermatol · Pubmed #21339461.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --