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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Marc Guillaume Denis
Based on 15 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, M. Denis wrote the following 15 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline French updated recommendations in Stage I to III melanoma treatment and management. 2017

Guillot, B / Dalac, S / Denis, M G / Dupuy, A / Emile, J F / De La Fouchardiere, A / Hindie, E / Jouary, T / Lassau, N / Mirabel, X / Piperno Neumann, S / De Raucourt, S / Vanwijck, R. ·Dermatology Department, CHU Montpellier. · Dermatology Department, CHU Dijon. · Laboratory of Biochemistry, CHU Nantes. · Dermatology Department, CHU Rennes. · Laboratory of Pathology, AP-HP Ambroise Paré Hospital, Boulogne, France. · Laboratory of Pathology, Centre Léon Bérard Lyon. · Department of Nuclear medicine, CHU Bordeaux. · Dermatology Department, CH Pau. · Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave Roussy Villejuif. · Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret Lille. · Institut Curie, Paris, France. · 1 Avenue du 6 Juin, 1945, 14000 Caen, France. · Louvain Catholic University, Brussels, Belgium. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28120528.

ABSTRACT: As knowledge continues to develop, regular updates are necessary concerning recommendations for practice. The recommendations for the management of melanoma stages I to III were drawn up in 2005. At the request of the Société Française de Dermatologie, they have now been updated using the methodology for recommendations proposed by the Haute Autorité de Santé in France. In practice, the principal recommendations are as follows: for staging, it is recommended that the 7th edition of AJCC be used. The maximum excision margins have been reduced to 2 cm. Regarding adjuvant therapy, the place of interferon has been reduced and no validated emerging medication has yet been identified. Radiotherapy may be considered for patients in Stage III at high risk of relapse. The sentinel lymph node technique remains an option. Initial examination includes routine ultrasound as of Stage II, with other examinations being optional in stages IIC and III. A shorter strict follow-up period (3 years) is recommended for patients, but with greater emphasis on imaging.

2 Guideline [Update to the recommendations for management of melanoma stages I to III]. 2016

Guillot, B / Dalac, S / Denis, M G / Dupuy, A / Emile, J-F / De La Fouchardière, A / Hindie, E / Jouary, T / Lassau, N / Mirabel, X / Piperno Neumann, S / De Raucourt, S / Vanwijck, R. ·Département de dermatologie, hôpital Saint-Éloi, CHU de Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier cedex 5, France. Electronic address: b-guillot@chu-montpellier.fr. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital du Bocage sud, CHU de Dijon, BP 1542, 21079 Dijon cedex, France. · Laboratoire de biochimie, institut de biologie, 9, quai Moncousu, 44093 Nantes cedex, France. · Service de dermatologie, CHU de Rennes, Rennes, France. · Service d'anatomie pathologique, CHU Ambroise-Paré-Boulogne, 92104 Boulogne cedex, France. · Centre anticancéreux Léon-Bérard, 28, rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon, France. · Service de médecine nucléire Sud et Pellegrin, CHU de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. · Service de médecine, centre hospitalier de Pau, 64000 Pau, France. · Service d'imagerie médicale, institut Gustave-Roussy, 94800 Villejuif, France. · Centre Oscar-Lambret, 3, rue Fréderic-Combemale, 59000 Lille, France. · Institut Curie, 26, rue d'Ulm, 75005 Paris, France. · 1, avenue du 6-Juin, 14000 Caen, France. · Université catholique de Louvain, 10, avenue Hippocrate, 1200 Bruxelles, Belgique. ·Ann Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #27527567.

ABSTRACT: As knowledge continues to develop, regular updates are necessary concerning recommendations for practice. The recommendations for the management of melanoma stages I to III were drawn up in 2005. At the request of the Société Française de Dermatologie, they have now been updated using the methodology for recommendations proposed by the Haute Autorité de Santé. In practice, the principal recommendations are as follows: for staging, it is recommended that the 7th edition of AJCC be used. The maximum excision margins have been reduced to 2cm. Regarding adjuvant therapy, the place of interferon has been reduced and no validated emerging medication has yet been identified. Radiotherapy may be considered for patients in stage III at high risk of relapse. The sentinel lymph node technique remains an option. Initial examination includes routine ultrasound as of stage II, with other examinations being optional in stages IIC and III. A shorter strict follow-up period (3years) is recommended for patients, but with greater emphasis on imaging.

3 Guideline [Guidelines for stage I to III melanoma]. 2016

Guillot, Bernard / Dalac, Sophie / Denis, Marc / Dupuy, Alain / Emile, Jean François / De La Fouchardiere, Arnaud / Hindie, Elif / Jouary, Thomas / Lassau, Nathalie / Mirabel, Xavier / Piperno Neumann, Sophie / De Raucourt, Sixtine / Vanwijck, Romain. ·Département de dermatologie, hôpital Saint-Eloi, CHU de Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier cedex 5, France. Electronic address: b-guillot@chu-montpellier.fr. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital du Bocage sud, CHU de Dijon, BP 1542, 21079 Dijon cedex, France. · Laboratoire de biochimie, institut de biologie, 9, quai Moncousu, 44093 Nantes cedex, France. · Service de dermatologie, CHU de Rennes, Rennes, France. · Service d'anatomie pathologique, CHU Ambroise-Paré Boulogne, 92104 Boulogne cedex, France. · Centre anticancéreux Léon-Bérard, 28, rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon, France. · Service de médecine nucléire sud et pellegrin, CHU de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. · Service de médecine, CH de Pau, 64000 Pau, France. · Service d'imagerie médicale, institut Gustave-Roussy, 94800 Villejuif, France. · Centre Oscar-Lambret, 3, rue Fréderic-Combemale, 59000 Lille, France. · Institut Curie, 26, rue d'Ulm, 75005 Paris, France. · Sixtine, 1, avenue du 6 juin, 14000 Caen, France. · Université catholique de Louvain, avenue Hippocrate, 10 B-1200 Bruxelles, Belgique. ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #27456259.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Review Circulating tumour DNA: analytical aspects and clinical applications for metastatic melanoma patients. 2017

Herbreteau, Guillaume / Vallée, Audrey / Knol, Anne-Chantal / Théoleyre, Sandrine / Quéreux, Gaëlle / Khammari, Amir / Dréno, Brigitte / Denis, Marc G. ·Laboratoire de biochimie, Plateforme de génétique moléculaire des cancers, CHU de Nantes, Nantes, France, Centre de recherche en cancérologie et immunologie, Inserm U 1232, Nantes, France. · Centre de recherche en cancérologie et immunologie, Inserm U 1232, Nantes, France. · Centre de recherche en cancérologie et immunologie, Inserm U 1232, Nantes, France, Service de dermatologie, CHU de Nantes, Nantes, France, Centre d'investigation clinique, Inserm CIC1413, CHU de Nantes, Nantes, France. ·Ann Biol Clin (Paris) · Pubmed #29192597.

ABSTRACT: The management of metastatic melanoma has evolved since the onset of treatments with BRAF inhibitors. In order to predict which patients are likely to respond to these treatments, the therapeutic strategy is now conditioned by the search for the activating mutations of the BRAF gene. Tumor genotyping is routinely performed from DNA extracted from tissue or cellular specimens from the primary tumor, metastases, or neoplastic effusions. Due to their invasiveness, these specimens are rarely repeated during the management. In addition, the analysis of the tumor material requires a pretreatment of the sample (formalin fixation, paraffin inclusion, preparation of tissue sections) and may take up to several weeks, making emergency treatment with BRAF inhibitors impossible. Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA), released by cancer cells in the blood stream, appears as an alternative to tissue sampling. The pre-analytical conditions are now well defined, and several technological approaches can be used to demonstrate the desired molecular alterations. ctDNA is less affected by tumor heterogeneity, can be collected in a minimally invasive manner and analyzed rapidly. Furthermore, ctDNA can be repeatedly analyzed during follow-up, which makes it possible to envisage its use as a specific tumor marker, in order to monitor the response to the treatment and to detect treatment failure.

5 Article PD-L1 expression by tumor cell lines: A predictive marker in melanoma. 2018

Knol, Anne C / Nguyen, Jean-Michel / Pandolfino, Marie-Christine / Denis, Marc G / Khammari, Amir / Dréno, Brigitte. ·Centre de recherche en Cancérologie et Immunologie Nantes-Angers [CRCINA], Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale [INSERM] INSERM1232, Université de Nantes, Université d'Angers, CHU Nantes, Nantes, France. · Saint Jacques University Hospital, Service d'évaluation médicale et économique [SEME] Pôle Hospitalo-Universitaire 11 [PHU11], CHU Nantes, Nantes, France. · Unité de Thérapie Cellulaire et Génique [UTCG], CHU Nantes, Nantes, France. · Laboratoire de Biochimie et Plateforme de Génétique des Cancers, CHU Nantes, Nantes, France. · Service de dermato-cancérologie, CHU Nantes, Nantes, France. ·Exp Dermatol · Pubmed #29505109.

ABSTRACT: Prognostic biomarkers for patients with melanoma after lymph node resection are of clinical relevance and could thus enable the identification of patients who therefore would most benefit from adjuvant treatment. The aim of this work was to determine, using an in vitro model, whether immune-related biomarkers, such as MHC-class I and II, melanoma-associated antigens, IDO1 and PD-L1, could also be relevant to predict the risk of relapse of patients with stage III melanoma after lymph node resection. We established tumor cell lines from metastatic lymph nodes of 50 patients with melanoma. The expression of investigated biomarkers was determined on untreated and IFN-γ treated melanoma cell lines using flow cytometry. Among the selected biomarkers, the IFN-γ-induced expression of PD-L1 and IDO1 was associated with an increased risk of relapse (P = .0001 and P = .013, respectively) and was also associated with death for IDO1 (P = .0005). In the future, this immunologic signature could permit the identification of patients at higher risk of relapse and justifying an adjuvant treatment using immunotherapy.

6 Article Efficient treatment of a metastatic melanoma patient with a combination of BRAF and MEK inhibitors based on circulating tumor DNA analysis: a case report. 2017

Quéreux, Gaelle / Herbreteau, Guillaume / Knol, Anne-Chantal / Vallée, Audrey / Khammari, Amir / Théoleyre, Sandrine / Saint-Jean, Mélanie / Dréno, Brigitte / Denis, Marc G. ·Department of Dermatology, INSERM CIC1413, Nantes University Hospital, Nantes, France. · CRCINA INSERM U1232, Nantes, France. · Immuno-Dermatology Laboratory, Nantes University Hospital, Nantes, France. · Department of Biochemistry, Nantes University Hospital, 9 quai Moncousu, 44093, Nantes Cedex 01, France. · CRCINA INSERM U1232, Nantes, France. marc.denis@chu-nantes.fr. · Department of Biochemistry, Nantes University Hospital, 9 quai Moncousu, 44093, Nantes Cedex 01, France. marc.denis@chu-nantes.fr. ·BMC Res Notes · Pubmed #28743309.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Fixed tissues are the standard samples used in routine practice for molecular testing. But sometimes tissues are lacking or difficult to obtain. In these cases, circulating tumor DNA released from tumor cells can be used as an alternative source of tumor DNA. CASE PRESENTATION: We present the case of a 63-year-old Caucasian woman with a metastatic melanoma and a very poor performance status. A plasma sample was tested and the BRAF p.V600E mutation was detected. Based on this result, a treatment combining a BRAF inhibitor and a MEK inhibitor was immediately started. This patient achieved a complete response. In addition, by repeating the plasma test, we could obtain a precise kinetic of release of mutated BRAF DNA in plasma. CONCLUSIONS: We report here for the first time the efficient treatment of a metastatic melanoma patient on the basis of circulating tumor DNA analysis. This urgent treatment provided a dramatic response in a patient with a very poor initial condition. The kinetic data most likely reflect treatment efficacy.

7 Article Clinical, Genetic and Innate Immunity Characteristics of Melanoma in Organ Transplant Recipients. 2017

Brocard, Anabelle / Knol, Anne-Chantal / Bossard, Céline / Denis, Marc Guillaume / Quéreux, Gaëlle / Saint-Jean, Mélanie / Peuvrel, Lucie / Khammari, Amir / Blancho, Gilles / Dantal, Jacques / Dréno, Brigitte. ·Department of Dermatology, Nantes University Hospital, INSERM, 892, FR-44000 Nantes, France. ·Acta Derm Venereol · Pubmed #27868139.

ABSTRACT: The aims of this study were to determine the clinical and histological characteristics of melanoma in transplant recipients, the mutation profile (BRAF, NRAS and c-KIT genes), and the immune tolerance of the tumour microenvironment by immunohistochemical study of the expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), PD1, PD-L1, CD8 and FoxP3. The study population comprised patients who had undergone a renal transplant in Nantes University Hospital who developed post-transplantation melanoma. Twenty cases of melanoma out of 4,663 transplant recipients were studied. The results differed from the usual data with respect to melanoma site: 40% were located on the face and were of the malignant lentigo type. The mutation profile was concordant with that of the immunocompetent population. IDO was expressed in all the sections tested, while CD8, FoxP3, PD1 and PD-L1 were poorly expressed. This reflected a highly immunodepressed tumour environment, raising the question of the inductive role of IDO on tumour immune tolerance in patients presenting with long-term immunodepression.

8 Article Clinical significance of BRAF mutation status in circulating tumor DNA of metastatic melanoma patients at baseline. 2016

Knol, Anne C / Vallée, Audrey / Herbreteau, Guillaume / Nguyen, Jean-Michel / Varey, Emilie / Gaultier, Aurélie / Théoleyre, Sandrine / Saint-Jean, Mélanie / Peuvrel, Lucie / Brocard, Anabelle / Quéreux, Gaëlle / Khammari, Amir / Denis, Marc G / Dréno, Brigitte. ·CRCNA, , INSERM U892, CNRS 6299, Nantes Cedex 01, France. · Laboratoire de Biochimie et Plateforme de Génétique des Cancers, CHU Hôtel-Dieu, Nantes Cedex 01, France. · SEB-PIMESP, CHU Nantes, Nantes Cedex 01, France. · Unité de Cancéro-Dermatologie-CIC biothérapie INSERM 0503, CHU Hôtel-Dieu, Nantes Cedex 01, France. · CRCNA, , INSERM U892, CNRS 6299, Nantes Cedex 01, France. brigitte.dreno@wanadoo.fr. · Unité de Cancéro-Dermatologie-CIC biothérapie INSERM 0503, CHU Hôtel-Dieu, Nantes Cedex 01, France. brigitte.dreno@wanadoo.fr. ·Exp Dermatol · Pubmed #27194447.

ABSTRACT: Circulating tumor DNA is a promising non-invasive tool for cancer monitoring. The main objective of our work was to investigate the relationship between mutant BRAF DNA in plasma and clinical response. Thirty-eight stage IV patients with a V600 mutated BRAF melanoma were included prior to any treatment. DNA was extracted from plasma and mutant DNA was detected using the amplification-refractory mutation system method. Before the beginning of any treatment, the corresponding BRAF mutation was detected in 29 of the 38 tested plasma samples (76.3% positive per cent agreement). We observed a strong correlation between the presence of circulating mutated DNA and overall survival (OS; P=.02), and with the number of metastatic sites (P=.01). The presence of circulating mutated DNA was also strongly correlated with serum LDH activity (P<.01) and S100 protein concentration (P<.01). Finally, seven patients presented discordant BRAF status in different tumor sites. In all these patients, the test performed on ctDNA was positive, suggesting that ctDNA analysis might be less sensitive to tumor heterogeneity. Altogether, these results suggest that plasmatic mutant BRAF DNA is a prognostic factor of OS, correlated with tumor burden. In addition, it represents an interesting alternative source of DNA to detect BRAF mutations before treatment.

9 Article Detection of BRAF V600 mutations in melanoma: evaluation of concordance between the Cobas® 4800 BRAF V600 mutation test and the methods used in French National Cancer Institute (INCa) platforms in a real-life setting. 2015

Mourah, Samia / Denis, Marc G / Narducci, Fabienne Escande / Solassol, Jérôme / Merlin, Jean-Louis / Sabourin, Jean-Christophe / Scoazec, Jean-Yves / Ouafik, L'Houcine / Emile, Jean-François / Heller, Remy / Souvignet, Claude / Bergougnoux, Loïc / Merlio, Jean-Philippe. ·Department of Pharmacology-Genetics, AP-HP, Saint-Louis Hospital, Paris, France; INSERM UMRS 976 Paris, F-75010, France. · Department of Biochemistry, Nantes University Hospital, Nantes, France. · Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, Lille Regional University Hospital, Lille, France. · Department of Biology-Pathology, Montpellier University Hospital, Montpellier, France. · Department of Tumor Biology, Alexis Vautrin Center, Vandoeuvre les Nancy, France. · Department of Pathology-Cytopathology, Rouen University Hospital, Rouen, France. · Laboratory of Pathology and Cytopathology, Edouard Herriot Hospital, Lyon, France; Department of Biology and Pathology, Gustave Roussy Hospital, Villejuif, France. · Department of Cancer Biology, Marseille Nord University Hospital, Marseille, France. · Department of Pathology, Ambroise Paré Hospital, Boulogne-Billancourt, France. · Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, Colmar hospital, Colmar, France. · Roche, Boulogne-Billancourt, France. · Department of Tumor Biology, Bordeaux University Hospital, Bordeaux, France. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #25789737.

ABSTRACT: Vemurafenib is approved for the treatment of metastatic melanoma in patients with BRAF V600 mutation. In pivotal clinical trials, BRAF testing has always been done with the approved cobas 4800 BRAF test. In routine practice, several methods are available and are used according to the laboratories usual procedures. A national, multicenter, non-interventional study was conducted with prospective and consecutive collection of tumor samples. A parallel evaluation was performed in routine practice between the cobas 4800 BRAF V600 mutation test and home brew methods (HBMs) of 12 national laboratories, labelled and funded by the French National Cancer Institute (INCa). For 420 melanoma samples tested, the cobas method versus HBM showed a high concordance (93.3%; kappa = 0.86) in BRAF V600 genotyping with similar mutation rates (34.0% versus 35.7%, respectively). Overall, 97.4% and 98.6% of samples gave valid results using the cobas and HBM, respectively. Of the 185 samples strictly fulfilling the cobas guidelines, the concordance rate was even higher (95.7%; kappa = 0.91; 95%CI [0.85; 0.97]). Out of the 420 samples tested, 28 (6.7%) showed discordance between HBM and cobas. This prospective study shows a high concordance rate between the cobas 4800 BRAF V600 test and home brew methods in the routine detection of BRAF V600E mutations.

10 Article Comparative analysis of BRAF, NRAS and c-KIT mutation status between tumor tissues and autologous tumor cell-lines of stage III/IV melanoma. 2015

Knol, Anne-Chantal / Pandolfino, Marie-Christine / Vallée, Audrey / Nguyen, Frédérique / Lella, Virginie / Khammari, Amir / Denis, Marc / Puaux, Anne-Laure / Dréno, Brigitte. ·CRCNA, INSERM U892, CNRS 6299, Nantes Cedex 01, France. ·Exp Dermatol · Pubmed #25363723.

ABSTRACT: In the last decade, advances in molecular biology have provided evidence of the genotypic heterogeneity of melanoma. We analysed BRAF, NRAS and c-KIT alterations in tissue samples from 63 stage III/IV melanoma patients and autologous cell-lines, using either allele-specific or quantitative PCR. The expression of BRAF V600E protein was also investigated using an anti-BRAF antibody in the same tissue samples. 81% of FFPE samples and tumor cell-lines harboured a genetic alteration in either BRAF (54%) or NRAS (27%) oncogenes. There was a strong concordance (100%) between tissue samples and tumor cell-lines. The BRAF V600E mutant-specific antibody showed high sensitivity (96%) and specificity (100%) for detecting the presence of a BRAF V600E mutation. The correlation was of 98% between PCR and immunohistochemistry results for BRAF mutation. These results suggest that BRAF and NRAS mutation status of tumor cells is not affected by culture conditions.

11 Article Younger age at the time of first metastasis in BRAF-mutated compared to BRAF wild-type melanoma patients. 2014

Saint-Jean, Melanie / Quereux, Gaëlle / Nguyen, Jean-Michel / Peuvrel, Lucie / Brocard, Anabelle / Vallee, Audrey / Knol, Anne-Chantal / Khammari, Amir / Denis, Marc G / Dréno, Brigitte. ·Department of Dermato-Cancerology, University Hospital Hôtel-Dieu, Nantes, France. · PIMESP, Saint-Jacques Hospital, Nantes, France. · Department of Biochemistry, University Hospital Hôtel-Dieu, Nantes, France. · Inserm U892, CIC Biothérapie Inserm 0503, Nantes, France. ·Oncol Rep · Pubmed #24926836.

ABSTRACT: The relationship between BRAF mutations and the patient clinical profile is still under question. The objective of the present study was to correlate the BRAF mutation status in primary and metastatic melanomas with the clinicopathological profile, disease-free (DFS) and overall survival (OS). A total of 367 melanoma samples from 278 patients were screened for their BRAF status using a combination of allele-specific amplification and DNA sequencing. Two or three tissue samples from the same patient were available for 74 patients. The clinicopathological characteristics were tested for their association with the BRAF mutation using the Fisher's or Pearson's χ2 test. Log-rank tests and Cox models were used for survival analyses. BRAF mutation was found in 152 samples (41.4%). Ten of the 74 patients with several tissue samples (13.5%) had discordant BRAF mutation results. BRAF-mutated patients were significantly younger at the time of primary melanoma and first diagnosis of metastasis than BRAF wild-type patients but with no difference in DFS and OS. According to our results, a primary melanoma with BRAF mutation is not associated with a more aggressive illness.

12 Article Adoptive TIL transfer in the adjuvant setting for melanoma: long-term patient survival. 2014

Khammari, Amir / Knol, Anne-Chantal / Nguyen, Jean-Michel / Bossard, Céline / Denis, Marc-Guillaume / Pandolfino, Marie-Christine / Quéreux, Gaëlle / Bercegeay, Sylvain / Dréno, Brigitte. ·Skin Cancer Unit, CHU Hôtel-Dieu, 1 Place Alexis Ricordeau, 44093 Nantes, France ; CRCNA, INSERM U892, CNRS 6299, 9 Quai Moncousu, 44093 Nantes, France. · CRCNA, INSERM U892, CNRS 6299, 9 Quai Moncousu, 44093 Nantes, France. · CRCNA, INSERM U892, CNRS 6299, 9 Quai Moncousu, 44093 Nantes, France ; PIMESP-SEB, Hôpital St Jacques, 85 rue St Jacques, 44093 Nantes, France. · Service d'Anatomie et Cytologie Pathologiques, CHU Hôtel-Dieu, 30 boulevard Jean Monnet, 44093 Nantes, France. · Plateforme de Génétique des Cancers, CHU Hôtel-Dieu, 1 Place Alexis Ricordeau, 44000 Nantes, France. · CRCNA, INSERM U892, CNRS 6299, 9 Quai Moncousu, 44093 Nantes, France ; Unité de Thérapie Cellulaire et Génique (UTCG), CHU Hôtel-Dieu, 9 Quai Moncousu, 44093 Nantes, France. · Unité de Thérapie Cellulaire et Génique (UTCG), CHU Hôtel-Dieu, 9 Quai Moncousu, 44093 Nantes, France. · Skin Cancer Unit, CHU Hôtel-Dieu, 1 Place Alexis Ricordeau, 44093 Nantes, France ; CRCNA, INSERM U892, CNRS 6299, 9 Quai Moncousu, 44093 Nantes, France ; Unité de Thérapie Cellulaire et Génique (UTCG), CHU Hôtel-Dieu, 9 Quai Moncousu, 44093 Nantes, France. ·J Immunol Res · Pubmed #24741578.

ABSTRACT: Two first analyses of our clinical trial on TIL as adjuvant therapy for melanoma were published in 2002 and 2007. We present here an update of the clinical results after a 17-year median followup. In this trial, disease-free patients were randomly assigned to receive either TIL/IL-2 or IL-2. The relapse-free survival (RFS) was the primary objective. Eighty-eight patients were enrolled. A new analysis performed in May 2013 did not show significant changes in RFS or OS duration. However, our first finding on the association between the number of invaded lymph nodes and TIL effectiveness was strengthened. The Cox model adjusted on this interaction showed for the first time a significant treatment effect when considering the overall population, both on the RFS and OS. Patients treated with TIL had a longer RFS (P = 0.023) or OS (P = 0.020). This study being with a very long followup (17 years), confirmed the association between TIL effectiveness and the number of invaded lymph nodes, indicating that a low tumor burden could be a crucial factor enhancing the curative effect of TIL in possible microscopic residual disease. Moreover, we confirmed that a prolonged survival was associated with the presence of specific TIL and a decrease in Foxp3 expression.

13 Minor BRAF mutations might be more common than supposed in vulvar melanomas. 2018

Wylomanski, Sophie / Denis, Marc G / Théoleyre, Sandrine / Bouquin, Réjane / Vallée, Audrey / Knol, Anne-Chantal / Saint-Jean, Mélanie / Peuvrel, Lucie / Dréno, Brigitte / Quéreux, Gaëlle. ·Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nantes University Hospital, Nantes, France. · INSERM U 1232, Nantes, France. · Department of Biochemistry, Nantes University Hospital, Nantes, France. · Immuno-Dermatology Laboratory, Nantes University Hospital, Nantes, France. · Department of Dermatology, Nantes University Hospital, Nantes, France. · INSERM CIC 1413, Clinical Investigation Center, Nantes University Hospital, Nantes, France. ·Exp Dermatol · Pubmed #29178146.

ABSTRACT: Data on BRAF, NRAS and KIT mutations are scarce in patients with vulvo-vaginal melanomas and are associated with important therapeutic issues. We investigated their prevalence in a cohort of patients with female lower genital tract melanomas between 2003 and 2017. Of the 22 patients, 5 (22.7%) harboured a BRAF mutation, which was much higher than the rate of 5% reported in the literature. One patient, who was tested negative on the primary melanoma, had a NRAS mutation in a cutaneous metastasis. Our data provide a rationale for prospective and repeated mutations testing in female lower genital tract melanomas.

14 Minor Efficient Detection of BRAF Mutation in Plasma of Patients after Long-term Storage of Blood in Cell-Free DNA Blood Collection Tubes. 2015

Denis, Marc G / Knol, Anne-Chantal / Théoleyre, Sandrine / Vallée, Audrey / Dréno, Brigitte. ·Department of Biochemistry Nantes University Hospital Nantes, France marc.denis@chu-nantes.fr. · Cancer Research Center Nantes-Angers INSERM U892, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique 6299 Nantes, France. · Department of Biochemistry Nantes University Hospital Nantes, France. · Cancer Research Center Nantes-Angers INSERM U892, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique 6299 Nantes, France Unité de Cancéro-Dermatologie Centre d'Investigation Clinique Biothérapie, INSERM 0503, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Hôtel-Dieu Nantes, France. ·Clin Chem · Pubmed #25896990.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Minor Is a single BRAF wild-type test sufficient to exclude melanoma patients from vemurafenib therapy? 2014

Saint-Jean, Mélanie / Quéreux, Gaëlle / Nguyen, Jean-Michel / Peuvrel, Lucie / Brocard, Anabelle / Vallée, Audrey / Knol, Anne-Chantal / Khammari, Amir / Denis, Marc G / Dréno, Brigitte. ·Department of Dermato-Cancerology, University Hospital Hôtel-Dieu, Nantes, France; Inserm U892, CIC Biothérapie Inserm 0503, Nantes, France. · PIMESP, Saint-Jacques Hospital, Nantes, France. · Department of Biochemistry, University Hospital Hôtel-Dieu, Nantes, France. · Inserm U892, CIC Biothérapie Inserm 0503, Nantes, France; Immuno-Dermatology Laboratory, University Hospital Hôtel-Dieu, Nantes, France. · Department of Dermato-Cancerology, University Hospital Hôtel-Dieu, Nantes, France; Inserm U892, CIC Biothérapie Inserm 0503, Nantes, France; Immuno-Dermatology Laboratory, University Hospital Hôtel-Dieu, Nantes, France. Electronic address: brigitte.dreno@wanadoo.fr. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #24025553.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --