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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Scot W. Ebbinghaus
Based on 13 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Scot Ebbinghaus wrote the following 13 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial Outcomes by line of therapy and programmed death ligand 1 expression in patients with advanced melanoma treated with pembrolizumab or ipilimumab in KEYNOTE-006: A randomised clinical trial. 2018

Carlino, Matteo S / Long, Georgina V / Schadendorf, Dirk / Robert, Caroline / Ribas, Antoni / Richtig, Erika / Nyakas, Marta / Caglevic, Christian / Tarhini, Ahmed / Blank, Christian / Hoeller, Christoph / Bar-Sela, Gil / Barrow, Catherine / Wolter, Pascal / Zhou, Honghong / Emancipator, Kenneth / Jensen, Erin H / Ebbinghaus, Scot / Ibrahim, Nageatte / Daud, Adil. ·Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Blacktown Hospital, Blacktown, NSW, Australia; Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia; School of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: Matteo.carlino@sydney.edu.au. · Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Department of Medical Oncology and Translational Research, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Mater Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: georgina.long@sydney.edu.au. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany; German Cancer Consortium, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: Dirk.Schadendorf@uk-essen.de. · Department of Oncology, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; Paris-Sud University, Orsay, France. Electronic address: Caroline.Robert@igr.fr. · Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA. Electronic address: aribas@mednet.ucla.edu. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. Electronic address: erika.richtig@medunigraz.at. · Department of Clinical Cancer Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: marnya@ous-hf.no. · Unit of Investigational Cancer Drugs, Instituto Oncologico Fundación Arturo López Pérez, Santiago, Chile. Electronic address: oncodemia@yahoo.com. · Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. Electronic address: tarhiniaa@upmc.edu. · Division of Immunology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Electronic address: c.blank@nki.nl. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: christoph.hoeller@meduniwien.ac.at. · Division of Oncology, Rambam Health Care Campus, Haifa, Israel. Electronic address: g_barsela@rambam.health.gov.il. · Wellington Blood and Cancer Centre, Wellington Hospital, Wellington, New Zealand. Electronic address: Catherine.Barrow@ccdhb.org.nz. · Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: pascalwolter@hotmail.com. · Department of BARDS, Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ, USA. Electronic address: honghongz@gmail.com. · Companion Diagnostics, Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ, USA. Electronic address: kenneth.emancipator@merck.com. · LDS - Medical Communications, Merck & Co., Inc., North Wales, PA, USA. Electronic address: erin_jensen2@merck.com. · Department of Clinical Oncology, Merck & Co., Inc., North Wales, PA, USA. Electronic address: scot_ebbinghaus@merck.com. · Department of Clinical Oncology, Merck & Co., Inc., North Wales, PA, USA. Electronic address: nageatte.ibrahim@merck.com. · University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. Electronic address: adaud@medicine.ucsf.edu. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #30096704.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Predictive biomarkers of patients likely to benefit from anti-programmed death 1 inhibitor therapy have clinical relevance. We examined whether line of therapy or tumour programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression affects the efficacy and safety of pembrolizumab, compared with ipilimumab, in advanced melanoma. METHODS: Of 834 patients enrolled in the randomised, open-label phase III KEYNOTE-006 study, 833 were included in this analysis. Patients were randomly assigned 1:1:1 to receive pembrolizumab 10 mg/kg every 2 or 3 weeks (for 24 months) or ipilimumab 3 mg/kg every 3 weeks (for four doses) until disease progression/intolerable toxicity. This analysis evaluated progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS) and objective response rate (ORR). Data cut-off: 03 November 2016. RESULTS: Of the patients, 60.3% were male, 65.9% were treatment naive and 80.6% had PD-L1-positive tumours (median follow-up was 33.9 months). Twenty-four-month survival rates were higher with pembrolizumab than with ipilimumab in treatment-naive (PFS 31.0% versus 14.6%; OS 58.0% versus 44.7%) and previously treated patients (PFS 25.7% versus 11.3%; OS 49.2% versus 37.9%). Twenty-four-month survival rates were higher with pembrolizumab than with ipilimumab in patients with PD-L1-positive tumours (PFS 33.2% versus 13.1%; OS 58.4% versus 45.0%) and similar in PD-L1-negative tumours (PFS 14.9% versus NR [no data at 24 months for a PFS estimate]; OS 43.6% versus 31.8%). Safety of pembrolizumab by subgroup was consistent with previous reports. CONCLUSIONS: Findings support pembrolizumab monotherapy as standard of care in patients with advanced melanoma, regardless of first- or second-line therapy or PD-L1 status. CLINICALTRIALS. GOV IDENTIFIER: NCT01866319.

2 Clinical Trial Efficacy and Safety of Pembrolizumab in Patients Enrolled in KEYNOTE-030 in the United States: An Expanded Access Program. 2017

Gangadhar, Tara C / Hwu, Wen-Jen / Postow, Michael A / Hamid, Omid / Daud, Adil / Dronca, Roxana / Joseph, Richard / O'Day, Steven J / Hodi, F S / Pavlick, Anna C / Kluger, Harriet / Oxborough, Romina P / Yang, Aiming / Gazdoiu, Mihaela / Kush, Debra A / Ebbinghaus, Scot / Salama, April K S. ·*Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA †The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX ‡Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center §Weill Cornell Medical College §§NYU Clinical Cancer Center, New York, NY ∥The Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Los Angeles ¶Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco ††The John Wayne Cancer Institute, Providence Saint John's Health Center, Santa Monica, CA #Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN **Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL ‡‡Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA ∥∥Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT ¶¶Clinigen, Weybridge, UK ##Merck & Co. Inc., Kenilworth, NJ ***Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC. ·J Immunother · Pubmed #29028788.

ABSTRACT: KEYNOTE-030 (ClinicalTrials.gov ID, NCT02083484) was a global expanded access program that allowed access to pembrolizumab, an antiprogrammed death 1 antibody, for patients with advanced melanoma before its regulatory approval. Patients with unresectable stage III/IV melanoma that progressed after standard-of-care therapy, including ipilimumab and, if BRAF mutant, a BRAF inhibitor, were eligible to receive pembrolizumab 2 mg/kg every 3 weeks. Response was assessed by immune-related response criteria by investigator review. Adverse events (AEs) were graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. In the United States, 979 patients enrolled between April and September 2014. Of the 947 evaluable patients, 621 (65.6%) remained on treatment and transitioned to receive commercial pembrolizumab following approval by the Food and Drug Administration, whereas 326 (34.4%) discontinued, most commonly for disease progression (39.6%) or death (26.4%). Objective response rate was 14.5% (95% confidence interval, 12.2%-16.8%) in the treated population (n=947) and 22.1% (95% confidence interval, 18.8%-25.5%) in patients who had ≥1 response assessment reported (n=619). Twelve patients achieved complete response. One hundred eighty-one (19.1%) patients experienced ≥1 treatment-related AE, most commonly general disorders (8.0%), skin/subcutaneous tissue disorders (7.3%), and gastrointestinal disorders (6.4%); 29 (3.1%) patients experienced ≥1 grade 3/4 treatment-related AE. Immune-mediated AEs were also reported. There were no treatment-related deaths. The safety and efficacy observed in this expanded access program were consistent with those previously reported for similar populations and support the use of pembrolizumab for patients with advanced melanoma.

3 Clinical Trial Final analysis of a randomised trial comparing pembrolizumab versus investigator-choice chemotherapy for ipilimumab-refractory advanced melanoma. 2017

Hamid, Omid / Puzanov, Igor / Dummer, Reinhard / Schachter, Jacob / Daud, Adil / Schadendorf, Dirk / Blank, Christian / Cranmer, Lee D / Robert, Caroline / Pavlick, Anna C / Gonzalez, Rene / Hodi, F Stephen / Ascierto, Paolo A / Salama, April K S / Margolin, Kim A / Gangadhar, Tara C / Wei, Ziwen / Ebbinghaus, Scot / Ibrahim, Nageatte / Ribas, Antoni. ·The Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA. Electronic address: ohamid@theangelesclinic.org. · Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN, USA. · University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland. · Ella Lemelbaum Institute of Melanoma, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel. · University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. · University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany. · Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ, USA. · Gustave Roussy and Paris-Sud University, Villejuif, France. · New York University Cancer Institute, New York, NY, USA. · University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA. · Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA. · Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione G. Pascale, Napoli, Italy. · Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC, USA. · City of Hope, Duarte, CA, USA. · Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ, USA. · University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #28961465.

ABSTRACT: AIM: To evaluate the protocol-specified final analysis of overall survival (OS) in the KEYNOTE-002 study (NCT01704287) of pembrolizumab versus chemotherapy in patients with ipilimumab-refractory, advanced melanoma. METHODS: In this randomised, phase II study, eligible patients had advanced melanoma with documented progression after two or more ipilimumab doses, previous BRAF or MEK inhibitor or both, if BRAF RESULTS: A total of 180 patients were randomised to pembrolizumab 2 mg/kg, 181 to pembrolizumab 10 mg/kg and 179 to chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 28 months (range 24.1-35.5), 368 patients died and 98 (55%) crossed over to pembrolizumab. Pembrolizumab 2 mg/kg (hazard ratio [HR] 0.86, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.67-1.10, p = 0.117) and 10 mg/kg (0.74, 0.57-0.96, p = 0.011) resulted in a non-statistically significant improvement in OS versus chemotherapy; median OS was 13.4 (95% CI 11.0-16.4) and 14.7 (95% CI 11.3-19.5), respectively, versus 11.0 months (95% CI 8.9-13.8), with limited improvement after censoring for crossover. Two-year survival rates were 36% and 38%, versus 30%. Progression-free survival, objective response rate and duration of response improved with pembrolizumab versus chemotherapy, regardless of dose. Grade III-V treatment-related adverse events occurred in 24 (13.5%), 30 (16.8%) and 45 (26.3%) patients, respectively. CONCLUSION: Improvement in OS with pembrolizumab was not statistically significant at either dose versus chemotherapy.

4 Clinical Trial Pembrolizumab versus ipilimumab for advanced melanoma: final overall survival results of a multicentre, randomised, open-label phase 3 study (KEYNOTE-006). 2017

Schachter, Jacob / Ribas, Antoni / Long, Georgina V / Arance, Ana / Grob, Jean-Jacques / Mortier, Laurent / Daud, Adil / Carlino, Matteo S / McNeil, Catriona / Lotem, Michal / Larkin, James / Lorigan, Paul / Neyns, Bart / Blank, Christian / Petrella, Teresa M / Hamid, Omid / Zhou, Honghong / Ebbinghaus, Scot / Ibrahim, Nageatte / Robert, Caroline. ·Division of Oncology, Ella Lemelbaum Institute for Melanoma, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel. Electronic address: jacob.schachter@sheba.health.gov.il. · Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology and Translational Research, Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Mater Hospital and Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital Clinic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Dermatology and Skin Cancer, Aix Marseille University, Hôpital de la Timone, Marseille, France. · Department of Dermatology, Université Lille, INSERM U1189, CHU Lille, F-59000, France. · Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Westmead and Blacktown Hospitals, Melanoma Institute Australia, and The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Medical Oncology, Chris O'Brien Lifehouse, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, and Melanoma Institute Australia, Camperdown, Australia. · Department of Melanoma and Cancer Immunotherapy, Sharett Institute of Oncology, Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel. · Department of Medical Oncology, Royal Marsden Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Medical Oncology University of Manchester and the Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. · Department of Medical Oncology, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Medical Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology/Hematology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Department of Hematology/Oncology, The Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Department of BARDS, Merck & Co, Kenilworth, NJ, USA. · Department of Clinical Oncology, Merck & Co, Kenilworth, NJ, USA. · Department of Oncology, Gustave Roussy and Paris-Sud University, Villejuif, France. ·Lancet · Pubmed #28822576.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Interim analyses of the phase 3 KEYNOTE-006 study showed superior overall and progression-free survival of pembrolizumab versus ipilimumab in patients with advanced melanoma. We present the final protocol-specified survival analysis. METHODS: In this multicentre, open-label, randomised, phase 3 trial, we recruited patients from 87 academic institutions, hospitals, and cancer centres in 16 countries (Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Chile, Colombia, France, Germany, Israel, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Spain, Sweden, UK, and USA). We randomly assigned participants (1:1:1) to one of two dose regimens of pembrolizumab, or one regimen of ipilimumab, using a centralised, computer-generated allocation schedule. Treatment assignments used blocked randomisation within strata. Eligible patients were at least 18 years old, with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0 or 1, at least one measurable lesion per Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors version 1.1 (RECIST v1.1), unresectable stage III or IV melanoma (excluding ocular melanoma), and up to one previous systemic therapy (excluding anti-CTLA-4, PD-1, or PD-L1 agents). Secondary eligibility criteria are described later. Patients were excluded if they had active brain metastases or active autoimmune disease requiring systemic steroids. The primary outcome was overall survival (defined as the time from randomisation to death from any cause). Response was assessed per RECIST v1.1 by independent central review at week 12, then every 6 weeks up to week 48, and then every 12 weeks thereafter. Survival was assessed every 12 weeks, and final analysis occurred after all patients were followed up for at least 21 months. Primary analysis was done on the intention-to-treat population (all randomly assigned patients) and safety analyses were done in the treated population (all randomly assigned patients who received at least one dose of study treatment). Data cutoff date for this analysis was Dec 3, 2015. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01866319. FINDINGS: Between Sept 18, 2013, and March 3, 2014, 834 patients with advanced melanoma were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive intravenous pembrolizumab every 2 weeks (n=279), intravenous pembrolizumab every 3 weeks (n=277), or intravenous ipilimumab every 3 weeks (ipilimumab for four doses; n=278). One patient in the pembrolizumab 2 week group and 22 patients in the ipilimumab group withdrew consent and did not receive treatment. A total of 811 patients received at least one dose of study treatment. Median follow-up was 22·9 months; 383 patients died. Median overall survival was not reached in either pembrolizumab group and was 16·0 months with ipilimumab (hazard ratio [HR] 0·68, 95% CI 0·53-0·87 for pembrolizumab every 2 weeks vs ipilimumab; p=0·0009 and 0·68, 0·53-0·86 for pembrolizumab every 3 weeks vs ipilimumab; p=0·0008). 24-month overall survival rate was 55% in the 2-week group, 55% in the 3-week group, and 43% in the ipilimumab group. INTERPRETATION: Substantiating the results of the interim analyses of KEYNOTE-006, pembrolizumab continued to provide superior overall survival versus ipilimumab, with no difference between pembrolizumab dosing schedules. These conclusions further support the use of pembrolizumab as a standard of care for advanced melanoma. FUNDING: Merck & Co.

5 Clinical Trial Standard-dose pembrolizumab in combination with reduced-dose ipilimumab for patients with advanced melanoma (KEYNOTE-029): an open-label, phase 1b trial. 2017

Long, Georgina V / Atkinson, Victoria / Cebon, Jonathan S / Jameson, Michael B / Fitzharris, Bernie M / McNeil, Catriona M / Hill, Andrew G / Ribas, Antoni / Atkins, Michael B / Thompson, John A / Hwu, Wen-Jen / Hodi, F Stephen / Menzies, Alexander M / Guminski, Alexander D / Kefford, Richard / Kong, Benjamin Y / Tamjid, Babak / Srivastava, Archana / Lomax, Anna J / Islam, Mohammed / Shu, Xinxin / Ebbinghaus, Scot / Ibrahim, Nageatte / Carlino, Matteo S. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, University of Sydney, Mater Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: georgina.long@sydney.edu.au. · Gallipoli Medical Research Foundation, Greenslopes Private Hospital, Greenslopes, QLD, Australia; University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute, Austin Health, School of Cancer Medicine, LaTrobe University, Heidelberg, VIC, Australia. · Regional Cancer Centre, Waikato Hospital, Hamilton, New Zealand. · Canterbury District Health Board, Christchurch Hospital, Christchurch, New Zealand. · Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Melanoma Institute Australia, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Chris O'Brien Lifehouse, Camperdown, NSW, Australia. · Tasman Oncology Research, Southport Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. · Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Georgetown-Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Washington, DC, USA. · Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA. · Melanoma Institute Australia, University of Sydney, Mater Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Westmead Hospital, Melanoma Institute Australia, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW, Australia; Melanoma Institute Australia, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Blacktown Hospital, Blacktown, NSW, Australia. · Merck & Co, Kenilworth, NJ, USA. ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #28729151.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Reduced-dose nivolumab in combination with standard-dose ipilimumab improves objective response and progression-free survival compared with standard-dose ipilimumab alone, but increases toxicity. We assessed the safety and anti-tumour activity of standard-dose pembrolizumab in combination with reduced-dose ipilimumab. METHODS: In this open-label, phase 1b trial, we recruited patients from 12 medical centres in Australia, New Zealand, and the USA. Eligible patients were aged at least 18 years, had advanced melanoma, had an Eastern Coooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 or 1, had measurable disease according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) version 1.1, had adequate organ function, had resolution of toxic effects of the most recent previous chemotherapy to grade 1 or less, had no active autoimmune disease requiring systemic steroids or immunosuppressive agents, had no active non-infectious pneumonitis, had no uncontrolled thyroid dysfunction or diabetes, had no active brain metastases, and had not received previous immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy. Patients received intravenous pembrolizumab 2 mg/kg plus intravenous ipilimumab 1 mg/kg every 3 weeks for four doses, followed by intravenous pembrolizumab 2 mg/kg every 3 weeks for up to 2 years or disease progression, intolerable toxicity, withdrawal of consent, or investigator decision. The primary endpoint was safety and tolerability. The proportion of patients achieving an objective response assessed per RECIST version 1.1 by independent central review and overall survival were secondary endpoints. We also assessed progression-free survival. The primary endpoint was assessed in all patients who received at least one dose of combination therapy. Activity was assessed in all enrolled patients. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02089685. Enrolment into this cohort is closed, but patients are still being monitored for safety and anti-tumour activity. FINDINGS: Between Jan 13, 2015, and Sept 17, 2015, we enrolled and treated 153 patients. As of the Oct 17, 2016, cutoff date, median follow-up was 17·0 months (IQR 14·8-18·8). 110 (72%) of 153 patients received all four pembrolizumab plus ipilimumab doses; 64 (42%) remained on pembrolizumab monotherapy. 110 grade 3-4 treatment-related adverse events occurred in 69 (45%) patients. No treatment-related deaths occurred. Treatment-related adverse events led to discontinuation of pembrolizumab and ipilimumab in 22 (14%) patients, including 17 (11%) who discontinued both treatments for the same event and five (3%) who discontinued ipilimumab for one event and later discontinued pembrolizumab for another. 12 (8%) patients discontinued ipilimumab only and 14 (9%) discontinued pembrolizumab only because of treatment-related adverse events. 158 immune-mediated adverse events of any grade occurred in 92 (60%) patients, and 50 immune-mediated adverse events of grade 3-4 occurred in 42 (27%) patients; the most common immune-mediated adverse events were hypothyroidism (25 [16%]) and hyperthyroidism (17 [11%]). 93 (61% [95% CI 53-69]) patients achieved an objective response. Estimated 1 year progression-free survival was 69% (95% CI 60-75), and estimated 1 year overall survival was 89% (95% CI 83-93). INTERPRETATION: Standard-dose pembrolizumab given in combination with four doses of reduced-dose ipilimumab followed by standard-dose pembrolizumab has a manageable toxicity profile and provides robust anti-tumour activity in patients with advanced melanoma. These data suggest that standard-dose pembrolizumab plus reduced-dose ipilimumab might be a tolerable, efficacious treatment option for patients with advanced melanoma. A randomised phase 2 trial of alternative dosing strategies of this combination is underway. FUNDING: Merck & Co, Inc.

6 Clinical Trial Programmed Death-Ligand 1 Expression and Response to the Anti-Programmed Death 1 Antibody Pembrolizumab in Melanoma. 2016

Daud, Adil I / Wolchok, Jedd D / Robert, Caroline / Hwu, Wen-Jen / Weber, Jeffrey S / Ribas, Antoni / Hodi, F Stephen / Joshua, Anthony M / Kefford, Richard / Hersey, Peter / Joseph, Richard / Gangadhar, Tara C / Dronca, Roxana / Patnaik, Amita / Zarour, Hassane / Roach, Charlotte / Toland, Grant / Lunceford, Jared K / Li, Xiaoyun Nicole / Emancipator, Kenneth / Dolled-Filhart, Marisa / Kang, S Peter / Ebbinghaus, Scot / Hamid, Omid. ·Adil I. Daud, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco · Antoni Ribas, University of California, Los Angeles · Omid Hamid, The Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Los Angeles · Charlotte Roach and Grant Toland, Dako North America, Carpinteria, CA · Jedd D. Wolchok, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY · Wen-Jen Hwu, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston · Amita Patnaik, South Texas Accelerated Research Therapeutics, San Antonio, TX · Jeffrey S. Weber, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa · Richard Joseph, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL · F. Stephen Hodi, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA · Tara C. Gangadhar, Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia · Hassane Zarour, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA · Roxana Dronca, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN · Jared K. Lunceford, Xiaoyun Nicole Li, Kenneth Emancipator, Marisa Dolled-Filhart, S. Peter Kang, and Scot Ebbinghaus, Merck & Co, Kenilworth, NJ · Caroline Robert, Gustave Roussy and Paris-Sud University, Villejuif, France · Anthony M. Joshua, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada · Richard Kefford, Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead Hospital and Melanoma Institute Australia · Richard Kefford, Macquarie University · and Richard Kefford and Peter Hersey, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #27863197.

ABSTRACT: Purpose Expression of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) is a potential predictive marker for response and outcome after treatment with anti-programmed death 1 (PD-1). This study explored the relationship between anti-PD-1 activity and PD-L1 expression in patients with advanced melanoma who were treated with pembrolizumab in the phase Ib KEYNOTE-001 study (clinical trial information: NCT01295827). Patients and Methods Six hundred fifty-five patients received pembrolizumab10 mg/kg once every 2 weeks or once every 3 weeks, or 2 mg/kg once every 3 weeks. Tumor response was assessed every 12 weeks per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) v1.1 by independent central review. Primary outcome was objective response rate. Secondary outcomes included progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Membranous PD-L1 expression in tumor and tumor-associated immune cells was assessed by a clinical trial immunohistochemistry assay (22C3 antibody) and scored on a unique melanoma (MEL) scale of 0 to 5 by one of three pathologists who were blinded to clinical outcome; a score ≥ 2 (membranous staining in ≥ 1% of cells) was considered positive. Results Of 451 patients with evaluable PD-L1 expression, 344 (76%) had PD-L1-positive tumors. Demographic and staging variables were equally distributed among PD-L1-positive and -negative patients. An association between higher MEL score and higher response rate and longer PFS (hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.71 to 0.82) and OS (hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.69 to 0.83) was observed ( P < .001 for each). Objective response rate was 8%, 12%, 22%, 43%, 57%, and 53% for MEL 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. Conclusion PD-L1 expression in pretreatment tumor biopsy samples was correlated with response rate, PFS, and OS; however, patients with PD-L1-negative tumors may also achieve durable responses.

7 Clinical Trial Health-related quality of life in the randomised KEYNOTE-002 study of pembrolizumab versus chemotherapy in patients with ipilimumab-refractory melanoma. 2016

Schadendorf, Dirk / Dummer, Reinhard / Hauschild, Axel / Robert, Caroline / Hamid, Omid / Daud, Adil / van den Eertwegh, Alfons / Cranmer, Lee / O'Day, Steven / Puzanov, Igor / Schachter, Jacob / Blank, Christian / Salama, April / Loquai, Carmen / Mehnert, Janice M / Hille, Darcy / Ebbinghaus, Scot / Kang, S Peter / Zhou, Wei / Ribas, Antoni. ·University Hospital Essen, Hufelandstrasse 55, D-45147 Essen, Germany. Electronic address: dirk.schadendorf@uk-essen.de. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Zurich, Gloriastrasse 31, 8091 Zurich, Switzerland. Electronic address: Reinhard.Dummer@usz.ch. · Department of Dermatology, Venereology, and Allergology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel Campus, Arnold-Heller Strasse 3, 24105 Kiel, Germany. Electronic address: ahauschild@dermatology.uni-kiel.de. · Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus and Paris-Sud University, 114 Rue Edouard Vaillant, 94800 Villejuif, France. Electronic address: Caroline.Robert@gustaveroussyr.fr. · The Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, 2001 Santa Monica Blvd, Ste 560W, Santa Monica, CA 90404, USA. Electronic address: ohamid@theangelesclinic.org. · University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine, 1600 Divisadero St, NZ Bldg A, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA. Electronic address: Adil.Daud@ucsf.edu. · Department of Medical Oncology, VU University Medical Center Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1118, 1081 HZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: vandeneertwegh@VUMC.nl. · Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of Arizona Cancer Center at UMC North, 3838 N. Campbell Ave, Tucson, AZ 85724, USA. Electronic address: lcranmer@uacc.arizona.edu. · The Los Angeles Skin Cancer Institute, The Beverly Hills Cancer Center, 8900 Wilshire Blvd, Beverly Hills, CA 90211, USA. Electronic address: stevenjoday@gmail.com. · Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, 2220 Pierce Ave, 777 Preston Research Building, Nashville, TN 37232, USA. Electronic address: igor.puzanov@vanderbilt.edu. · Department of Oncology, Ella Institute for Melanoma, Sheba Medical Center, Derech Sheba 2, Tel-Hashomer, Ramat-Gan, Israel. Electronic address: Jacob.Schachter@sheba.health.gov.il. · Department of Medical Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: c.blank@nki.nl. · Division of Medical Oncology, Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3198, 20 Duke Medicine Circle, Durham, NC 27710, USA. Electronic address: april.salama@duke.edu. · Skin Clinic, Universitätsmedizin Mainz, Langenbeckstrasse 1, 55131 Mainz, Germany. Electronic address: carmen.loquai@unimedizin-mainz.de. · Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany Street, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA. Electronic address: mehnerja@cinj.rutgers.edu. · Merck & Co., Inc., 2000 Galloping Hill Road, Kenilworth, NJ 07033, USA. Electronic address: darcy_hille@merck.com. · Merck & Co., Inc., 2000 Galloping Hill Road, Kenilworth, NJ 07033, USA. Electronic address: scot_ebbinghaus@merck.com. · Merck & Co., Inc., 2000 Galloping Hill Road, Kenilworth, NJ 07033, USA. Electronic address: s.peter.kang@merck.com. · Merck & Co., Inc., 2000 Galloping Hill Road, Kenilworth, NJ 07033, USA. Electronic address: wei.zhou2@merck.com. · Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center (JCCC) at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), 10833 Le Conte Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA. Electronic address: aribas@mednet.ucla.edu. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #27596353.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In KEYNOTE-002, pembrolizumab significantly prolonged progression-free survival and was associated with a better safety profile compared with chemotherapy in patients with advanced melanoma that progressed after ipilimumab. We present health-related quality of life (HRQoL) outcomes from KEYNOTE-002. METHODS: Patients were randomly assigned 1:1:1 to pembrolizumab 2 or 10 mg/kg every 3 weeks (Q3W) or investigator-choice chemotherapy. HRQoL was assessed using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality-of-Life Questionnaire-Core 30 instrument. A constrained longitudinal data analysis model was implemented to assess between-arm differences in HRQoL scores. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01704287. RESULTS: Of the 540 patients enrolled, 520 were included in the HRQoL analysis. Baseline global health status (GHS) was similar across treatment arms. Compliance rates at week 12 were 76.6% (n = 108), 82.3% (n = 121), and 86.4% (n = 133) for the control, pembrolizumab 2 mg/kg Q3W, and pembrolizumab 10 mg/kg Q3W arms, respectively. From baseline to week 12, GHS/HRQoL scores were maintained to a higher degree in the pembrolizumab arms compared with the chemotherapy arm (decrease of -2.6 for each pembrolizumab arm versus -9.1 for chemotherapy; P = 0.01 for each pembrolizumab arm versus chemotherapy). Fewer patients treated with pembrolizumab experienced deterioration in GHS at week 12 (31.8% for pembrolizumab 2 mg/kg, 26.6% for 10 mg/kg, and 38.3% for chemotherapy), with similar trends observed for the individual functioning and symptoms scales. CONCLUSIONS: HRQoL was better maintained with pembrolizumab than with chemotherapy in KEYNOTE-002, supporting the use of pembrolizumab in patients with ipilimumab-refractory melanoma.

8 Clinical Trial Association of Pembrolizumab With Tumor Response and Survival Among Patients With Advanced Melanoma. 2016

Ribas, Antoni / Hamid, Omid / Daud, Adil / Hodi, F Stephen / Wolchok, Jedd D / Kefford, Richard / Joshua, Anthony M / Patnaik, Amita / Hwu, Wen-Jen / Weber, Jeffrey S / Gangadhar, Tara C / Hersey, Peter / Dronca, Roxana / Joseph, Richard W / Zarour, Hassane / Chmielowski, Bartosz / Lawrence, Donald P / Algazi, Alain / Rizvi, Naiyer A / Hoffner, Brianna / Mateus, Christine / Gergich, Kevin / Lindia, Jill A / Giannotti, Maxine / Li, Xiaoyun Nicole / Ebbinghaus, Scot / Kang, S Peter / Robert, Caroline. ·Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles. · Department of Hematology/Oncology, The Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Department of Medical Oncology, Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead Hospital and Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, Australia7Department of Clinical Medicine, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Clinical Research, South Texas Accelerated Research Therapeutics, San Antonio. · Department of Melanoma, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston. · Department of Cutaneous Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida. · Division of Hematology and Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Department of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Division of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Department of Hematology/Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida. · Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Department of Hematology/Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. · Department of Medical Oncology, Gustave-Roussy Cancer Campus and Paris Sud University, Villejuif Paris-Sud, France. · Department of Clinical Oncology, Merck & Co, Inc, Kenilworth, New Jersey. · BARDS, Merck & Co, Inc, Kenilworth, New Jersey. ·JAMA · Pubmed #27092830.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: The programmed death 1 (PD-1) pathway limits immune responses to melanoma and can be blocked with the humanized anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody pembrolizumab. OBJECTIVE: To characterize the association of pembrolizumab with tumor response and overall survival among patients with advanced melanoma. DESIGN, SETTINGS, AND PARTICIPANTS: Open-label, multicohort, phase 1b clinical trials (enrollment, December 2011-September 2013). Median duration of follow-up was 21 months. The study was performed in academic medical centers in Australia, Canada, France, and the United States. Eligible patients were aged 18 years and older and had advanced or metastatic melanoma. Data were pooled from 655 enrolled patients (135 from a nonrandomized cohort [n = 87 ipilimumab naive; n = 48 ipilimumab treated] and 520 from randomized cohorts [n = 226 ipilimumab naive; n = 294 ipilimumab treated]). Cutoff dates were April 18, 2014, for safety analyses and October 18, 2014, for efficacy analyses. EXPOSURES: Pembrolizumab 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks, 10 mg/kg every 3 weeks, or 2 mg/kg every 3 weeks continued until disease progression, intolerable toxicity, or investigator decision. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The primary end point was confirmed objective response rate (best overall response of complete response or partial response) in patients with measurable disease at baseline per independent central review. Secondary end points included toxicity, duration of response, progression-free survival, and overall survival. RESULTS: Among the 655 patients (median [range] age, 61 [18-94] years; 405 [62%] men), 581 had measurable disease at baseline. An objective response was reported in 194 of 581 patients (33% [95% CI, 30%-37%]) and in 60 of 133 treatment-naive patients (45% [95% CI, 36% to 54%]). Overall, 74% (152/205) of responses were ongoing at the time of data cutoff; 44% (90/205) of patients had response duration for at least 1 year and 79% (162/205) had response duration for at least 6 months. Twelve-month progression-free survival rates were 35% (95% CI, 31%-39%) in the total population and 52% (95% CI, 43%-60%) among treatment-naive patients. Median overall survival in the total population was 23 months (95% CI, 20-29) with a 12-month survival rate of 66% (95% CI, 62%-69%) and a 24-month survival rate of 49% (95% CI, 44%-53%). In treatment-naive patients, median overall survival was 31 months (95% CI, 24 to not reached) with a 12-month survival rate of 73% (95% CI, 65%-79%) and a 24-month survival rate of 60% (95% CI, 51%-68%). Ninety-two of 655 patients (14%) experienced at least 1 treatment-related grade 3 or 4 adverse event (AE) and 27 of 655 (4%) patients discontinued treatment because of a treatment-related AE. Treatment-related serious AEs were reported in 59 patients (9%). There were no drug-related deaths. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Among patients with advanced melanoma, pembrolizumab administration was associated with an overall objective response rate of 33%, 12-month progression-free survival rate of 35%, and median overall survival of 23 months; grade 3 or 4 treatment-related AEs occurred in 14%. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01295827.

9 Clinical Trial Evaluation of Immune-Related Response Criteria and RECIST v1.1 in Patients With Advanced Melanoma Treated With Pembrolizumab. 2016

Hodi, F Stephen / Hwu, Wen-Jen / Kefford, Richard / Weber, Jeffrey S / Daud, Adil / Hamid, Omid / Patnaik, Amita / Ribas, Antoni / Robert, Caroline / Gangadhar, Tara C / Joshua, Anthony M / Hersey, Peter / Dronca, Roxana / Joseph, Richard / Hille, Darcy / Xue, Dahai / Li, Xiaoyun Nicole / Kang, S Peter / Ebbinghaus, Scot / Perrone, Andrea / Wolchok, Jedd D. ·F. Stephen Hodi, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA · Wen-Jen Hwu, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston · Amita Patnaik, South Texas Accelerated Research Therapeutics, San Antonio, TX · Richard Kefford, Westmead Hospital, Melanoma Institute Australia, and Macquarie University · Peter Hersey, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia · Jeffrey S. Weber, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa · Richard Joseph, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL · Adil Daud, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco · Omid Hamid, The Angeles Clinic and Research Institute · Antoni Ribas, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA · Caroline Robert, Gustave-Roussy and Paris-Sud University, Villejuif-Paris-Sud, France · Tara C. Gangadhar, Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA · Anthony M. Joshua, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada · Roxana Dronca, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN · Darcy Hille, Dahai Xue, Xiaoyun Nicole Li, S. Peter Kang, Scot Ebbinghaus, and Andrea Perrone, Merck, Kenilworth, NJ · and Jedd D. Wolchok, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #26951310.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: We evaluated atypical response patterns and the relationship between overall survival and best overall response measured per immune-related response criteria (irRC) and Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, version 1.1 (RECIST v1.1) in patients with advanced melanoma treated with pembrolizumab in the phase Ib KEYNOTE-001 study (clinical trial information: NCT01295827). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients received pembrolizumab 2 or 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks or every 3 weeks. Atypical responses were identified by using centrally assessed irRC data in patients with ≥ 28 weeks of imaging. Pseudoprogression was defined as ≥ 25% increase in tumor burden at week 12 (early) or any assessment after week 12 (delayed) that was not confirmed as progressive disease at next assessment. Response was assessed centrally per irRC and RECIST v1.1. RESULTS: Of the 655 patients with melanoma enrolled, 327 had ≥ 28 weeks of imaging follow-up. Twenty-four (7%) of these 327 patients had atypical responses (15 [5%] with early pseudoprogression and nine [3%] with delayed pseudoprogression). Of the 592 patients who survived ≥ 12 weeks, 84 (14%) experienced progressive disease per RECIST v1.1 but nonprogressive disease per irRC. Two-year overall survival rates were 77.6% in patients with nonprogressive disease per both criteria (n = 331), 37.5% in patients with progressive disease per RECIST v1.1 but nonprogressive disease per irRC (n = 84), and 17.3% in patients with progressive disease per both criteria (n = 177). CONCLUSION: Atypical responses were observed in patients with melanoma treated with pembrolizumab. Based on survival analysis, conventional RECIST might underestimate the benefit of pembrolizumab in approximately 15% of patients; modified criteria that permit treatment beyond initial progression per RECIST v1.1 might prevent premature cessation of treatment.

10 Clinical Trial Pembrolizumab versus investigator-choice chemotherapy for ipilimumab-refractory melanoma (KEYNOTE-002): a randomised, controlled, phase 2 trial. 2015

Ribas, Antoni / Puzanov, Igor / Dummer, Reinhard / Schadendorf, Dirk / Hamid, Omid / Robert, Caroline / Hodi, F Stephen / Schachter, Jacob / Pavlick, Anna C / Lewis, Karl D / Cranmer, Lee D / Blank, Christian U / O'Day, Steven J / Ascierto, Paolo A / Salama, April K S / Margolin, Kim A / Loquai, Carmen / Eigentler, Thomas K / Gangadhar, Tara C / Carlino, Matteo S / Agarwala, Sanjiv S / Moschos, Stergios J / Sosman, Jeffrey A / Goldinger, Simone M / Shapira-Frommer, Ronnie / Gonzalez, Rene / Kirkwood, John M / Wolchok, Jedd D / Eggermont, Alexander / Li, Xiaoyun Nicole / Zhou, Wei / Zernhelt, Adriane M / Lis, Joy / Ebbinghaus, Scot / Kang, S Peter / Daud, Adil. ·University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA. Electronic address: aribas@mednet.ucla.edu. · Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN, USA. · University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland. · University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany. · The Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Gustave Roussy and Paris-Sud University, Villejuif, France. · Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA. · Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel. · New York University Cancer Institute, New York, NY, USA. · University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA. · University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ, USA. · Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands. · Beverly Hills Cancer Center, Beverly Hills, CA, USA. · Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione G. Pascale, Napoli, Italy. · Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC, USA. · Seattle Cancer Care Alliance/University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · University Medical Center, Mainz, Germany. · Universitätsklinikum Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany. · Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead and Blacktown Hospitals, and Melanoma Institute Australia, Westmead, NSW, Australia. · St Luke's Cancer Center, Bethlehem, PA, USA; Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Merck & Co, Kenilworth, NJ, USA. · University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #26115796.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patients with melanoma that progresses on ipilimumab and, if BRAF(V600) mutant-positive, a BRAF or MEK inhibitor or both, have few treatment options. We assessed the efficacy and safety of two pembrolizumab doses versus investigator-choice chemotherapy in patients with ipilimumab-refractory melanoma. METHODS: We carried out a randomised phase 2 trial of patients aged 18 years or older from 73 hospitals, clinics, and academic medical centres in 12 countries who had confirmed progressive disease within 24 weeks after two or more ipilimumab doses and, if BRAF(V600) mutant-positive, previous treatment with a BRAF or MEK inhibitor or both. Patients had to have resolution of all ipilimumab-related adverse events to grade 0-1 and prednisone 10 mg/day or less for at least 2 weeks, an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0 or 1, and at least one measurable lesion to be eligible. Using a centralised interactive voice response system, we randomly assigned (1:1:1) patients in a block size of six to receive intravenous pembrolizumab 2 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg every 3 weeks or investigator-choice chemotherapy (paclitaxel plus carboplatin, paclitaxel, carboplatin, dacarbazine, or oral temozolomide). Randomisation was stratified by ECOG performance status, lactate dehydrogenase concentration, and BRAF(V600) mutation status. Individual treatment assignment between pembrolizumab and chemotherapy was open label, but investigators and patients were masked to assignment of the dose of pembrolizumab. We present the primary endpoint at the prespecified second interim analysis of progression-free survival in the intention-to-treat population. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01704287. The study is closed to enrolment but continues to follow up and treat patients. FINDINGS: Between Nov 30, 2012, and Nov 13, 2013, we enrolled 540 patients: 180 patients were randomly assigned to receive pembrolizumab 2 mg/kg, 181 to receive pembrolizumab 10 mg/kg, and 179 to receive chemotherapy. Based on 410 progression-free survival events, progression-free survival was improved in patients assigned to pembrolizumab 2 mg/kg (HR 0·57, 95% CI 0·45-0·73; p<0·0001) and those assigned to pembrolizumab 10 mg/kg (0·50, 0·39-0·64; p<0·0001) compared with those assigned to chemotherapy. 6-month progression-free survival was 34% (95% CI 27-41) in the pembrolizumab 2 mg/kg group, 38% (31-45) in the 10 mg/kg group, and 16% (10-22) in the chemotherapy group. Treatment-related grade 3-4 adverse events occurred in 20 (11%) patients in the pembrolizumab 2 mg/kg group, 25 (14%) in the pembrolizumab 10 mg/kg group, and 45 (26%) in the chemotherapy group. The most common treatment-related grade 3-4 adverse event in the pembrolizumab groups was fatigue (two [1%] of 178 patients in the 2 mg/kg group and one [<1%] of 179 patients in the 10 mg/kg group, compared with eight [5%] of 171 in the chemotherapy group). Other treatment-related grade 3-4 adverse events include generalised oedema and myalgia (each in two [1%] patients) in those given pembrolizumab 2 mg/kg; hypopituitarism, colitis, diarrhoea, decreased appetite, hyponatremia, and pneumonitis (each in two [1%]) in those given pembrolizumab 10 mg/kg; and anaemia (nine [5%]), fatigue (eight [5%]), neutropenia (six [4%]), and leucopenia (six [4%]) in those assigned to chemotherapy. INTERPRETATION: These findings establish pembrolizumab as a new standard of care for the treatment of ipilimumab-refractory melanoma. FUNDING: Merck Sharp & Dohme.

11 Clinical Trial Pembrolizumab versus Ipilimumab in Advanced Melanoma. 2015

Robert, Caroline / Schachter, Jacob / Long, Georgina V / Arance, Ana / Grob, Jean Jacques / Mortier, Laurent / Daud, Adil / Carlino, Matteo S / McNeil, Catriona / Lotem, Michal / Larkin, James / Lorigan, Paul / Neyns, Bart / Blank, Christian U / Hamid, Omid / Mateus, Christine / Shapira-Frommer, Ronnie / Kosh, Michele / Zhou, Honghong / Ibrahim, Nageatte / Ebbinghaus, Scot / Ribas, Antoni / Anonymous4340827. ·The authors' affiliations are listed in the Appendix. ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #25891173.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The immune checkpoint inhibitor ipilimumab is the standard-of-care treatment for patients with advanced melanoma. Pembrolizumab inhibits the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) immune checkpoint and has antitumor activity in patients with advanced melanoma. METHODS: In this randomized, controlled, phase 3 study, we assigned 834 patients with advanced melanoma in a 1:1:1 ratio to receive pembrolizumab (at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram of body weight) every 2 weeks or every 3 weeks or four doses of ipilimumab (at 3 mg per kilogram) every 3 weeks. Primary end points were progression-free and overall survival. RESULTS: The estimated 6-month progression-free-survival rates were 47.3% for pembrolizumab every 2 weeks, 46.4% for pembrolizumab every 3 weeks, and 26.5% for ipilimumab (hazard ratio for disease progression, 0.58; P<0.001 for both pembrolizumab regimens versus ipilimumab; 95% confidence intervals [CIs], 0.46 to 0.72 and 0.47 to 0.72, respectively). Estimated 12-month survival rates were 74.1%, 68.4%, and 58.2%, respectively (hazard ratio for death for pembrolizumab every 2 weeks, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.47 to 0.83; P=0.0005; hazard ratio for pembrolizumab every 3 weeks, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.52 to 0.90; P=0.0036). The response rate was improved with pembrolizumab administered every 2 weeks (33.7%) and every 3 weeks (32.9%), as compared with ipilimumab (11.9%) (P<0.001 for both comparisons). Responses were ongoing in 89.4%, 96.7%, and 87.9% of patients, respectively, after a median follow-up of 7.9 months. Efficacy was similar in the two pembrolizumab groups. Rates of treatment-related adverse events of grade 3 to 5 severity were lower in the pembrolizumab groups (13.3% and 10.1%) than in the ipilimumab group (19.9%). CONCLUSIONS: The anti-PD-1 antibody pembrolizumab prolonged progression-free survival and overall survival and had less high-grade toxicity than did ipilimumab in patients with advanced melanoma. (Funded by Merck Sharp & Dohme; KEYNOTE-006 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01866319.).

12 Clinical Trial Anti-programmed-death-receptor-1 treatment with pembrolizumab in ipilimumab-refractory advanced melanoma: a randomised dose-comparison cohort of a phase 1 trial. 2014

Robert, Caroline / Ribas, Antoni / Wolchok, Jedd D / Hodi, F Stephen / Hamid, Omid / Kefford, Richard / Weber, Jeffrey S / Joshua, Anthony M / Hwu, Wen-Jen / Gangadhar, Tara C / Patnaik, Amita / Dronca, Roxana / Zarour, Hassane / Joseph, Richard W / Boasberg, Peter / Chmielowski, Bartosz / Mateus, Christine / Postow, Michael A / Gergich, Kevin / Elassaiss-Schaap, Jeroen / Li, Xiaoyun Nicole / Iannone, Robert / Ebbinghaus, Scot W / Kang, S Peter / Daud, Adil. ·Gustave Roussy and INSERM U981, Paris-Sud, France. Electronic address: caroline.robert@gustaveroussy.fr. · University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA. · Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead Hospital and Melanoma Institute Australia, Westmead, NSW, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA. · Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada. · University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · South Texas Accelerated Research Therapeutics, San Antonio, TX, USA. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA. · Gustave Roussy and INSERM U981, Paris-Sud, France. · Merck, Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA. · University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. ·Lancet · Pubmed #25034862.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The anti-programmed-death-receptor-1 (PD-1) antibody pembrolizumab has shown potent antitumour activity at different doses and schedules in patients with melanoma. We compared the efficacy and safety of pembrolizumab at doses of 2 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg every 3 weeks in patients with ipilimumab-refractory advanced melanoma. METHODS: In an open-label, international, multicentre expansion cohort of a phase 1 trial, patients (aged ≥18 years) with advanced melanoma whose disease had progressed after at least two ipilimumab doses were randomly assigned with a computer-generated allocation schedule (1:1 final ratio) to intravenous pembrolizumab at 2 mg/kg every 3 weeks or 10 mg/kg every 3 weeks until disease progression, intolerable toxicity, or consent withdrawal. Primary endpoint was overall response rate (ORR) assessed with the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST, version 1.1) by independent central review. Analysis was done on the full-analysis set (all treated patients with measurable disease at baseline). This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01295827. FINDINGS: 173 patients received pembrolizumab 2 mg/kg (n=89) or 10 mg/kg (n=84). Median follow-up duration was 8 months. ORR was 26% at both doses--21 of 81 patients in the 2 mg/kg group and 20 of 76 in the 10 mg/kg group (difference 0%, 95% CI -14 to 13; p=0·96). Treatment was well tolerated, with similar safety profiles in the 2 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg groups and no drug-related deaths. The most common drug-related adverse events of any grade in the 2 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg groups were fatigue (29 [33%] vs 31 [37%]), pruritus (23 [26%] vs 16 [19%]), and rash (16 [18%] vs 15 [18%]). Grade 3 fatigue, reported in five (3%) patients in the 2 mg/kg pembrolizumab group, was the only drug-related grade 3 to 4 adverse event reported in more than one patient. INTERPRETATION: The results suggest that pembrolizumab at a dose of 2 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg every 3 weeks might be an effective treatment in patients for whom there are few effective treatment options. FUNDING: Merck Sharp and Dohme.

13 Clinical Trial Safety and tumor responses with lambrolizumab (anti-PD-1) in melanoma. 2013

Hamid, Omid / Robert, Caroline / Daud, Adil / Hodi, F Stephen / Hwu, Wen-Jen / Kefford, Richard / Wolchok, Jedd D / Hersey, Peter / Joseph, Richard W / Weber, Jeffrey S / Dronca, Roxana / Gangadhar, Tara C / Patnaik, Amita / Zarour, Hassane / Joshua, Anthony M / Gergich, Kevin / Elassaiss-Schaap, Jeroen / Algazi, Alain / Mateus, Christine / Boasberg, Peter / Tumeh, Paul C / Chmielowski, Bartosz / Ebbinghaus, Scot W / Li, Xiaoyun Nicole / Kang, S Peter / Ribas, Antoni. ·Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA. ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #23724846.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The programmed death 1 (PD-1) receptor is a negative regulator of T-cell effector mechanisms that limits immune responses against cancer. We tested the anti-PD-1 antibody lambrolizumab (previously known as MK-3475) in patients with advanced melanoma. METHODS: We administered lambrolizumab intravenously at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram of body weight every 2 or 3 weeks or 2 mg per kilogram every 3 weeks in patients with advanced melanoma, both those who had received prior treatment with the immune checkpoint inhibitor ipilimumab and those who had not. Tumor responses were assessed every 12 weeks. RESULTS: A total of 135 patients with advanced melanoma were treated. Common adverse events attributed to treatment were fatigue, rash, pruritus, and diarrhea; most of the adverse events were low grade. The confirmed response rate across all dose cohorts, evaluated by central radiologic review according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST), version 1.1, was 38% (95% confidence interval [CI], 25 to 44), with the highest confirmed response rate observed in the cohort that received 10 mg per kilogram every 2 weeks (52%; 95% CI, 38 to 66). The response rate did not differ significantly between patients who had received prior ipilimumab treatment and those who had not (confirmed response rate, 38% [95% CI, 23 to 55] and 37% [95% CI, 26 to 49], respectively). Responses were durable in the majority of patients (median follow-up, 11 months among patients who had a response); 81% of the patients who had a response (42 of 52) were still receiving treatment at the time of analysis in March 2013. The overall median progression-free survival among the 135 patients was longer than 7 months. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with advanced melanoma, including those who had had disease progression while they had been receiving ipilimumab, treatment with lambrolizumab resulted in a high rate of sustained tumor regression, with mainly grade 1 or 2 toxic effects. (Funded by Merck Sharp and Dohme; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01295827.).