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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Ryan C. Fields
Based on 9 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, R. C. Fields wrote the following 9 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline NCCN Guidelines Insights: Melanoma, Version 3.2016. 2016

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Algazi, Alain / Andtbacka, Robert / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / DiMaio, Dominick / Fields, Ryan C / Fleming, Martin D / Gastman, Brian / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Johnson, Douglas / Joseph, Richard W / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Materin, Miguel A / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ott, Patrick / Gupta, Aparna Priyanath / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April K / Skitzki, Joseph / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Torres-Roca, Javier F / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Engh, Anita. ·From Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine; The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute; University of Colorado Cancer Center; Aim at Melanoma; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital; Fox Chase Cancer Center; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; Duke Cancer Institute; Roswell Park Cancer Institute; Stanford Cancer Institute; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; Moffitt Cancer Center; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; and National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #27496110.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma have been significantly revised over the past few years in response to emerging data on a number of novel agents and treatment regimens. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the data and rationale supporting extensive changes to the recommendations for systemic therapy in patients with metastatic or unresectable melanoma.

2 Guideline Melanoma, Version 2.2016, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. 2016

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Algazi, Alain / Andtbacka, Robert / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / DiMaio, Dominick / Ernstoff, Marc / Fields, Ryan C / Fleming, Martin D / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Joseph, Richard W / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Materin, Miguel A / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April K / Skitzki, Joseph / Sosman, Jeff / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Torres-Roca, Javier F / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Engh, Anita. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #27059193.

ABSTRACT: This selection from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Melanoma focuses on adjuvant therapy and treatment of in-transit disease, because substantial changes were made to the recommendations for the 2016 update. Depending on the stage of the disease, options for adjuvant therapy now include biochemotherapy and high-dose ipilimumab. Treatment options for in-transit disease now include intralesional injection with talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC), a new immunotherapy. These additions prompted re-assessment of the data supporting older recommended treatment options for adjuvant therapy and in-transit disease, resulting in extensive revisions to the supporting discussion sections.

3 Review Evidence-based follow-up for the patient with melanoma. 2011

Fields, Ryan C / Coit, Daniel G. ·Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065, USA. ·Surg Oncol Clin N Am · Pubmed #21111966.

ABSTRACT: This article reviews the best evidence available to guide the follow-up of patients with melanoma, focusing on incidence of, and detection of, melanoma recurrence, frequency of follow-up visits, yield of, laboratory and radiographic tests, outcomes of patients with recurrent melanoma based on method of detection, detection of secondary melanomas, and stage-specific follow-up.

4 Article Noninvasive Determination of Melanoma Depth using a Handheld Photoacoustic Probe. 2017

Zhou, Yong / Tripathi, Shivani V / Rosman, Ilana / Ma, Jun / Hai, Pengfei / Linette, Gerald P / Council, M Laurin / Fields, Ryan C / Wang, Lihong V / Cornelius, Lynn A. ·Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Optical Imaging Laboratory, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. · Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. · Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri, USA; Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology and Immunology, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. · Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri, USA; Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. · Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri, USA; Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. · Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Optical Imaging Laboratory, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. Electronic address: lhwang@wustl.edu. · Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. Electronic address: cornelil@wustl.edu. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #28163070.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Article Clonal architectures and driver mutations in metastatic melanomas. 2014

Ding, Li / Kim, Minjung / Kanchi, Krishna L / Dees, Nathan D / Lu, Charles / Griffith, Malachi / Fenstermacher, David / Sung, Hyeran / Miller, Christopher A / Goetz, Brian / Wendl, Michael C / Griffith, Obi / Cornelius, Lynn A / Linette, Gerald P / McMichael, Joshua F / Sondak, Vernon K / Fields, Ryan C / Ley, Timothy J / Mulé, James J / Wilson, Richard K / Weber, Jeffrey S. ·The Genome Institute, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America; Department of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America; Department of Genetics, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America; Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America. · Donald A. Adam Comprehensive Melanoma Research Center, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida, United States of America. · The Genome Institute, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America. · The Genome Institute, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America; Department of Genetics, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America. · Department of Surgery, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America. · The Genome Institute, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America; Department of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America. · Department of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America; Department of Surgery, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America. · Department of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America; Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America. · Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America; Department of Surgery, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America. · The Genome Institute, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America; Department of Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America; Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America. · The Genome Institute, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America; Department of Genetics, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America; Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #25393105.

ABSTRACT: To reveal the clonal architecture of melanoma and associated driver mutations, whole genome sequencing (WGS) and targeted extension sequencing were used to characterize 124 melanoma cases. Significantly mutated gene analysis using 13 WGS cases and 15 additional paired extension cases identified known melanoma genes such as BRAF, NRAS, and CDKN2A, as well as a novel gene EPHA3, previously implicated in other cancer types. Extension studies using tumors from another 96 patients discovered a large number of truncation mutations in tumor suppressors (TP53 and RB1), protein phosphatases (e.g., PTEN, PTPRB, PTPRD, and PTPRT), as well as chromatin remodeling genes (e.g., ASXL3, MLL2, and ARID2). Deep sequencing of mutations revealed subclones in the majority of metastatic tumors from 13 WGS cases. Validated mutations from 12 out of 13 WGS patients exhibited a predominant UV signature characterized by a high frequency of C->T transitions occurring at the 3' base of dipyrimidine sequences while one patient (MEL9) with a hypermutator phenotype lacked this signature. Strikingly, a subclonal mutation signature analysis revealed that the founding clone in MEL9 exhibited UV signature but the secondary clone did not, suggesting different mutational mechanisms for two clonal populations from the same tumor. Further analysis of four metastases from different geographic locations in 2 melanoma cases revealed phylogenetic relationships and highlighted the genetic alterations responsible for differential drug resistance among metastatic tumors. Our study suggests that clonal evaluation is crucial for understanding tumor etiology and drug resistance in melanoma.

6 Article Malignant melanoma arising at the site of a previously excised giant congenital melanocytic nevus. 2014

Coughlin, Carrie C / Council, M Laurin / Gru, Alejandro A / Fields, Ryan C / Bayliss, Susan J. ·Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri. · Department of Pathology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri. · Department Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #24284966.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Article Racial differences in survival after surgical treatment for melanoma. 2011

Collins, Karen Kadela / Fields, Ryan C / Baptiste, Dadrie / Liu, Ying / Moley, Jeffrey / Jeffe, Donna B. ·Division of Health Behavior Research, Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA. kcollins@dom.wustl.edu ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #21479687.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Surgical-treatment outcomes for melanoma in African Americans are poorly characterized as a result of low incidence of melanoma among African Americans. We examined differences by race in overall and melanoma-specific survival, stratified by receipt of surgical treatment and by specific types of surgical treatment. METHODS: Data from the 1973-2004 public-use Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program (SEER) were analyzed by Cox proportional hazard models to compare the effects of surgical treatments on overall and melanoma-specific survival in blacks, whites, and other race, controlling for confounding demographic and tumor-related variables. RESULTS: Of 151,154 patients with first primary melanoma (148,883 whites, 789 blacks and 1,532 other race), 142,653 (94.4%) received surgical treatment. Among patients who received surgical treatment, 10-year melanoma-specific survival was lower in blacks (73%) than in whites (88%) and other race (85%); black patients were at significantly higher risk of overall and melanoma-specific mortality when compared with white (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.44-1.86, P < 0.0001 and HR = 1.50, 95% CI 1.25-1.79, P < 0.0001, respectively) and with other race (HR = 1.55, 95% CI 1.31-1.85, P < 0.0001 and HR = 1.49, 95% CI 1.16-1.91, P = 0.0017, respectively). Blacks who underwent biopsy, wide excision and surgery not otherwise specified were at higher risk of overall mortality compared with whites with the same treatment. CONCLUSION: Overall and melanoma-specific survival was lower in blacks undergoing surgical treatment for melanoma compared to both whites and other race. Reasons for these disparities remain poorly understood.

8 Minor Metastatic melanoma after solid organ transplantation: An interdisciplinary, institution-based review of management with systemic and targeted therapies. 2018

Tripathi, Shivani V / Morris, Caroline R / Alhamad, Tarek / Fields, Ryan C / Linette, Gerald P / Cornelius, Lynn A. ·Division of Dermatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri. · Renal Division, Department of Internal Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri; Transplant Epidemiology Research Collaboration, Institute of Public Health, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri. · Department of Surgery, Barnes Jewish Hospital and The Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri. · Division of Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri. · Division of Dermatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri. Electronic address: cornelil@wustl.edu. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #29241778.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Unspecified Extensive tumoral melanosis associated with ipilimumab-treated melanoma. 2016

Staser, K / Chen, D / Solus, J / Rosman, I S / Schaffer, A / Cornelius, L / Linette, G P / Fields, R C. ·Division of Dermatology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A. · Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A. · Division of Hematology and Oncology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A. · Department of Surgery, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #26877232.

ABSTRACT: Tumoral melanosis describes a pigmented lesion clinically similar to melanoma but on histology reveals dense aggregates of melanin-laden, benign macrophages without malignant cells. In the few reported cases so far, tumoral melanosis has arisen in the skin or lymph node of a patient with a regressed melanoma or an epithelioid tumour. As a marker of regressed primary melanoma, its discovery may prompt investigation and surveillance for undiagnosed local or metastatic disease. Here, we present a unique case of extensive tumoral melanosis arising during ipilimumab treatment of in-transit metastases from a previously excised melanoma.