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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Martin D. Fleming
Based on 7 articles published since 2009
(Why 7 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Martin D. Fleming wrote the following 7 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline NCCN Guidelines Insights: Melanoma, Version 3.2016. 2016

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Algazi, Alain / Andtbacka, Robert / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / DiMaio, Dominick / Fields, Ryan C / Fleming, Martin D / Gastman, Brian / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Johnson, Douglas / Joseph, Richard W / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Materin, Miguel A / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ott, Patrick / Gupta, Aparna Priyanath / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April K / Skitzki, Joseph / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Torres-Roca, Javier F / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Engh, Anita. ·From Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine; The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute; University of Colorado Cancer Center; Aim at Melanoma; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital; Fox Chase Cancer Center; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; Duke Cancer Institute; Roswell Park Cancer Institute; Stanford Cancer Institute; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; Moffitt Cancer Center; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; and National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #27496110.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma have been significantly revised over the past few years in response to emerging data on a number of novel agents and treatment regimens. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the data and rationale supporting extensive changes to the recommendations for systemic therapy in patients with metastatic or unresectable melanoma.

2 Guideline Melanoma, Version 2.2016, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. 2016

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Algazi, Alain / Andtbacka, Robert / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / DiMaio, Dominick / Ernstoff, Marc / Fields, Ryan C / Fleming, Martin D / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Joseph, Richard W / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Materin, Miguel A / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April K / Skitzki, Joseph / Sosman, Jeff / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Torres-Roca, Javier F / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Engh, Anita. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #27059193.

ABSTRACT: This selection from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Melanoma focuses on adjuvant therapy and treatment of in-transit disease, because substantial changes were made to the recommendations for the 2016 update. Depending on the stage of the disease, options for adjuvant therapy now include biochemotherapy and high-dose ipilimumab. Treatment options for in-transit disease now include intralesional injection with talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC), a new immunotherapy. These additions prompted re-assessment of the data supporting older recommended treatment options for adjuvant therapy and in-transit disease, resulting in extensive revisions to the supporting discussion sections.

3 Guideline Melanoma, version 4.2014. 2014

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / Daud, Adil / Dimaio, Dominick / Fleming, Martin D / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole R / Ho, Maria / Anonymous5170793. ·From 1Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; 2Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; 3Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; 4University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; 5The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; 6UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; 7UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; 8Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center; 9St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; 10University of Colorado Cancer Center; 11Aim at Melanoma; 12Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; 13Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; 14Roswell Park Cancer Institute; 15Moffitt Cancer Center; 16The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; 17Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; 18Fox Chase Cancer Center; 19The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; 20Duke Cancer Institute; 21Stanford Cancer Institute; 22Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; 23City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; 24University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; and 25National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #24812131.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma provide multidisciplinary recommendations for the management of patients with melanoma. These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight notable recent updates. Dabrafenib and trametinib, either as monotherapy (category 1) or combination therapy, have been added as systemic options for patients with unresectable metastatic melanoma harboring BRAF V600 mutations. Controversy continues regarding the value of adjuvant radiation for patients at high risk of nodal relapse. This is reflected in the category 2B designation to consider adjuvant radiation following lymphadenectomy for stage III melanoma with clinically positive nodes or recurrent disease.

4 Guideline Melanoma, version 2.2013: featured updates to the NCCN guidelines. 2013

Coit, Daniel G / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daud, Adil / Dimaio, Dominick / Fleming, Martin D / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Lind, Anne / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Pruitt, Scott K / Ross, Merrick I / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Thompson, John A / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Ho, Maria / Anonymous4310755. ·Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #23584343.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma provide multidisciplinary recommendations on the clinical management of patients with melanoma. This NCCN Guidelines Insights report highlights notable recent updates. Foremost of these is the exciting addition of the novel agents ipilimumab and vemurafenib for treatment of advanced melanoma. The NCCN panel also included imatinib as a treatment for KIT-mutated tumors and pegylated interferon alfa-2b as an option for adjuvant therapy. Also important are revisions to the initial stratification of early-stage lesions based on the risk of sentinel lymph node metastases, and revised recommendations on the use of sentinel lymph node biopsy for low-risk groups. Finally, the NCCN panel reached clinical consensus on clarifying the role of imaging in the workup of patients with melanoma.

5 Article Guidance of sentinel lymph node biopsy decisions in patients with T1-T2 melanoma using gene expression profiling. 2019

Vetto, John T / Hsueh, Eddy C / Gastman, Brian R / Dillon, Larry D / Monzon, Federico A / Cook, Robert W / Keller, Jennifer / Huang, Xin / Fleming, Andrew / Hewgley, Preston / Gerami, Pedram / Leachman, Sancy / Wayne, Jeffrey D / Berger, Adam C / Fleming, Martin D. ·Division of Surgical Oncology, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239, USA. · Department of Surgery, St Louis University, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. · Department of Plastic Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland, OH 44915, USA. · Larry D Dillon Surgical Oncology & General Surgery, Colorado Springs, CO 80907, USA. · Castle Biosciences, Inc., Friendswood, TX 77546, USA. · Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago IL 60611, USA. · Skin Cancer Institute, Northwestern University, Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. · Department of Pathology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago IL 60611, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR 97239, USA. · Department of Surgical Oncology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL 60611, USA. · Department of Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA 19017, USA. ·Future Oncol · Pubmed #30691297.

ABSTRACT: AIM: Can gene expression profiling be used to identify patients with T1-T2 melanoma at low risk for sentinel lymph node (SLN) positivity? PATIENTS & METHODS: Bioinformatics modeling determined a population in which a 31-gene expression profile test predicted <5% SLN positivity. Multicenter, prospectively-tested (n = 1421) and retrospective (n = 690) cohorts were used for validation and outcomes, respectively. RESULTS: Patients 55-64 years and ≥65 years with a class 1A (low-risk) profile had SLN positivity rates of 4.9% and 1.6%. Class 2B (high-risk) patients had SLN positivity rates of 30.8% and 11.9%. Melanoma-specific survival was 99.3% for patients ≥55 years with class 1A, T1-T2 tumors and 55.0% for class 2B, SLN-positive, T1-T2 tumors. CONCLUSION: The 31-gene expression profile test identifies patients who could potentially avoid SLN biopsy.

6 Article Performance of a prognostic 31-gene expression profile in an independent cohort of 523 cutaneous melanoma patients. 2018

Zager, Jonathan S / Gastman, Brian R / Leachman, Sancy / Gonzalez, Rene C / Fleming, Martin D / Ferris, Laura K / Ho, Jonhan / Miller, Alexander R / Cook, Robert W / Covington, Kyle R / Meldi-Plasseraud, Kristen / Middlebrook, Brooke / Kaminester, Lewis H / Greisinger, Anthony / Estrada, Sarah I / Pariser, David M / Cranmer, Lee D / Messina, Jane L / Vetto, John T / Wayne, Jeffrey D / Delman, Keith A / Lawson, David H / Gerami, Pedram. ·Department of Cutaneous Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, 10920 N. McKinley Drive room 4123, Tampa, FL, 33612, USA. · Department of Plastic Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, 3303 S.W. Bond Avenue, Portland, OR, 97239, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, 12801 E. 17th Avenue, Aurora, CO, 80045, USA. · Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 910 Madison, Suite 303, Memphis, TN, 38163, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 3601 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA, 15213, USA. · Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 3708 Fifth Avenue, Suite 500.94, Pittsburgh, PA, 15213, USA. · START Center for Cancer Care, 4383 Medical Drive, San Antonio, TX, 78229, USA. · Castle Biosciences, Inc., 820 S. Friendswood Drive, Suite 201, Friendswood, TX, 77546, USA. · Dermatology North Palm Beach, 840 U.S. Highway Number One, North Palm Beach, FL, 33408, USA. · Research & Development, Kelsey Research Foundation, 5615 Kirby Drive, Suite 660, Houston, TX, 77005, USA. · Affiliated Dermatology, 20401 North 73rd Street, Suite 230, Scottsdale, AZ, 85255, USA. · Pariser Dermatology Specialists, Virginia Clinical Research, Inc., 6160 Kempsville Circle, Suite 200A, Norfolk, VA, 23502, USA. · Eastern Virginia Medical School, P.O. Box 1980, Norfolk, VA, 23501-1980, USA. · Department of Sarcoma Medical Oncology, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, 825 Eastlake Avenue E, Seattle, WA, 98109, USA. · Department of Anatomic Pathology, Moffitt Cancer Center, 10920 N. McKinley Drive, Tampa, FL, 33612, USA. · Division of Surgical Oncology, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, 3303 S.W. Bond Avenue, Portland, OR, 97239, USA. · Department of Surgical Oncology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, 251 East Huron Street, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, 676 North St. Clair Street, Suite 1600, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA. · Skin Cancer Institute, Northwestern University, Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, 420 East Superior Street, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA. · Department of Surgery, Emory University Winship Cancer Institute, 1364 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA, 30322, USA. · Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Emory University Winship Cancer Institute, 550 Peachtree Street NE, Atlanta, GA, 30308, USA. · Skin Cancer Institute, Northwestern University, Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, 420 East Superior Street, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA. pgerami1@nm.org. · Departments of Dermatology and Pathology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, 676 North St. Clair Street, Arkes 1600, Chicago, IL, 60611, USA. pgerami1@nm.org. ·BMC Cancer · Pubmed #29402264.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The heterogeneous behavior of patients with melanoma makes prognostication challenging. To address this, a gene expression profile (GEP) test to predict metastatic risk was previously developed. This study evaluates the GEP's prognostic accuracy in an independent cohort of cutaneous melanoma patients. METHODS: This multi-center study analyzed primary melanoma tumors from 523 patients, using the GEP to classify patients as Class 1 (low risk) and Class 2 (high risk). Molecular classification was correlated to clinical outcome and assessed along with AJCC v7 staging criteria. Primary endpoints were recurrence-free (RFS) and distant metastasis-free (DMFS) survival. RESULTS: The 5-year RFS rates for Class 1 and Class 2 were 88% and 52%, respectively, and DMFS rates were 93% versus 60%, respectively (P < 0.001). The GEP was a significant predictor of RFS and DMFS in univariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR] = 5.4 and 6.6, respectively, P < 0.001 for each), along with Breslow thickness, ulceration, mitotic rate, and sentinel lymph node (SLN) status (P < 0.001 for each). GEP, tumor thickness and SLN status were significant predictors of RFS and DMFS in a multivariate model that also included ulceration and mitotic rate (RFS HR = 2.1, 1.2, and 2.5, respectively, P < 0.001 for each; and DMFS HR = 2.7, 1.3 and 3.0, respectively, P < 0.01 for each). CONCLUSIONS: The GEP test is an objective predictor of metastatic risk and provides additional independent prognostic information to traditional staging to help estimate an individual's risk for recurrence. The assay identified 70% of stage I and II patients who ultimately developed distant metastasis. Its role in consideration of patients for adjuvant therapy should be examined prospectively.

7 Article Neoadjuvant Talimogene Laherparepvec for the Treatment of Metastatic Melanoma. 2017

Stiles, Zachary E / Fleming, Martin D / Luce, Edward A / Deneve, Jeremiah L. · ·Am Surg · Pubmed #28738934.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --