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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Giovanni Ghigliotti
Based on 9 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, G. Ghigliotti wrote the following 9 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Spitz/Reed nevi: proposal of management recommendations by the Dermoscopy Study Group of the Italian Society of Dermatology (SIDeMaST). 2014

Broganelli, P / Titli, S / Lallas, A / Alaibac M Annetta, A / Battarra, V / Brunetti, B / Castagno, I / Cavicchini, S / Ferrari, A / Ghigliotti, G / Landi, C / Manganoni, A / Moscarella, E / Pellacani, G / Pizzichetta, M A / Rosina, P / Rubegni, P / Satta, R / Scalvenzi, M / Stanganelli, I / Stinco, G / Zalaudek, I / Zampieri, P / Argenziano, G / Anonymous1410806. ·Department of Oncology and Hematology, Section of Dermatology, City of Health and Science Hospital of Turin, Turin, Italy - paolobroganelli@inwind.it. ·G Ital Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #25213387.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Article Clinicopathological predictors of recurrence in nodular and superficial spreading cutaneous melanoma: a multivariate analysis of 214 cases. 2017

Pizzichetta, Maria A / Massi, Daniela / Mandalà, Mario / Queirolo, Paola / Stanganelli, Ignazio / De Giorgi, Vincenzo / Ghigliotti, Giovanni / Cavicchini, Stefano / Quaglino, Pietro / Corradin, Maria T / Rubegni, Pietro / Alaibac, Mauro / Astorino, Stefano / Ayala, Fabrizio / Magi, Serena / Mazzoni, Laura / Manganoni, Maria Ausilia / Talamini, Renato / Serraino, Diego / Palmieri, Giuseppe / Anonymous1471021. ·Division of Oncology B, CRO Aviano National Cancer Institute, Via Franco Gallini 2, 33081, Aviano, Italy. pizzichetta@cro.it. · Division of Pathological Anatomy, Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · Unit of Medical Oncology, Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Bergamo, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, National Institute for Cancer Research, IRCCS San Martino, Genoa, Italy. · Skin Cancer Unit, Istituto Tumori Romagna (IRST), Meldola, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Parma, Parma, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · Clinic of Dermatology, IRCCS San Martino-IST, Genoa, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Fondazione Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico IRCCS, Milan, Italy. · Dermatologic Clinic, Dept Medical Sciences, University of Torino, Turin, Italy. · Division of Dermatology, Pordenone Hospital, Pordenone, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Siena, Siena, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Padova, Padua, Italy. · Division of Dermatology, Celio Hospital, Rome, Italy. · National Cancer Institute, "Fondazione G. Pascale"-IRCCS, Naples, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, ASST degli Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia, Italy. · Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, CRO Aviano National Cancer Institute, Aviano, Italy. · Unit of Cancer Genetics, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry (ICB), National Research Council (CNR), Sassari, Italy. ·J Transl Med · Pubmed #29115977.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Nodular melanoma (NM) accounts for most thick melanomas and because of their frequent association with ulceration, fast growth rate and high mitotic rate, contribute substantially to melanoma-related mortality. In a multicentric series of 214 primary melanomas including 96 NM and 118 superficial spreading melanoma (SSM), histopathological features were examined with the aim to identify clinicopathological predictors of recurrence. METHODS: All consecutive cases of histopathologically diagnosed primary invasive SSM and NM during the period 2005-2010, were retrieved from the 12 participating Italian Melanoma Intergroup (IMI) centers. Each center provided clinico-pathological data such as gender, age at diagnosis, anatomical site, histopathological conventional parameters, date of excision and first melanoma recurrence. RESULTS: Results showed that NM subtype was significantly associated with Breslow thickness (BT) at multivariate analysis: [BT 1.01-2 mm (OR 7.22; 95% CI 2.73-19.05), BT 2.01-4 mm (OR 7.04; 95% CI 2.54-19.56), and BT > 4 mm (OR 51.78; 95% CI 5.65-474.86) (p < 0.0001)]. Furthermore, mitotic rate (MR) was significantly correlated with NM histotype: [(MR 3-5 mitoses/mm CONCLUSIONS: We found that NM subtype was significantly associated with higher BT and MR but it was not a prognostic factor since it did not significantly correlate with melanoma recurrence rate. Conversely, increased BT and MR as well as SNLB positivity were significantly associated with a higher risk of melanoma recurrence.

3 Article Parallel globules on the ridges caused by transepidermal elimination of melanocytic nests: A new dermoscopic pattern of acral melanoma. 2017

Ghigliotti, Giovanni / De Col, Elena / Rongioletti, Franco. ·I.R.C.C.S. A.O.U. San Martino-IST, Di.S.Sal, Section of Dermatology, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy. · I.R.C.C.S. A.O.U. San Martino-IST, Di.S.Sal, Section of Dermatology, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy. Electronic address: elenadecol@libero.it. · Department of Medical Sciences and Public Health, Dermatology Unit, University of Cagliari, Cagliari, Italy. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #28087014.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Article Multiple primary melanomas (MPMs) and criteria for genetic assessment: MultiMEL, a multicenter study of the Italian Melanoma Intergroup. 2016

Bruno, William / Pastorino, Lorenza / Ghiorzo, Paola / Andreotti, Virginia / Martinuzzi, Claudia / Menin, Chiara / Elefanti, Lisa / Stagni, Camilla / Vecchiato, Antonella / Rodolfo, Monica / Maurichi, Andrea / Manoukian, Siranoush / De Giorgi, Vincenzo / Savarese, Imma / Gensini, Francesca / Borgognoni, Lorenzo / Testori, Alessandro / Spadola, Giuseppe / Mandalà, Mario / Imberti, Gianlorenzo / Savoia, Paola / Astrua, Chiara / Ronco, Anna Maria / Farnetti, Alessandra / Tibiletti, Maria Grazia / Lombardo, Maurizio / Palmieri, Giuseppe / Ayala, Fabrizio / Ascierto, Paolo / Ghigliotti, Giovanni / Muggianu, Marisa / Spagnolo, Francesco / Picasso, Virginia / Tanda, Enrica Teresa / Queirolo, Paola / Bianchi-Scarrà, Giovanna. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Specialties and Surgical Science and Integrated Diagnostics, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy; Genetics of Rare Cancers, IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Genoa, Italy. · Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Specialties and Surgical Science and Integrated Diagnostics, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy; Genetics of Rare Cancers, IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Genoa, Italy. Electronic address: l.pastorino@unige.it. · Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Specialties and Surgical Science and Integrated Diagnostics, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy. · Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Specialties and Surgical Science and Integrated Diagnostics, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy; Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Specialties and Surgical Science and Integrated Diagnostics, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy. · Immunology and Molecular Oncology Unit, Veneto Institute of Oncology, Istituto Oncologico Veneto (IOV)-IRCCS, Padua, Italy. · Section of Oncology and Immunology, Department of Surgery, Oncology, and Gastroenterology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Melanoma and Soft Tissue Sarcoma Unit, Veneto Institute of Oncology, IOV-IRCCS, Padua, Italy. · Department of Experimental Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Melanoma and Sarcoma Surgery Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Medical Genetics Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · Unit of Medical Genetics, Department of Biomedical Experimental and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · Plastic Surgery Unit, Regional Melanoma Referral Center, Santa Maria Annunziata Hospital, Florence, Italy. · Division of Dermatoncological Surgery, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, Ospedale Papa Giovanni XXIII, Bergamo, Italy. · Department of Medical Sciences, Dermatology Section, University of Turin, Turin, Italy. · Dermatoncological Surgery Unit, Presidio Sanitario Gradenigo, Turin, Italy. · Anatomopathology Unit, Università dell'Insubria, Ospedale di Circolo, Varese, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, Ospedale di Circolo, Varese, Italy. · Cancer Genetics Unit, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, National Research Council, Sassari, Italy. · Department of Melanoma, National Cancer Institute Pascale Foundation, Naples, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Genoa, Italy. · Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Genoa, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS) Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria (AOU) San Martino-Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori (IST) Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, Genoa, Italy. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #26775776.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Multiple primary melanoma (MPM), in concert with a positive family history, is a predictor of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A) germline mutations. A rule regarding the presence of either 2 or 3 or more cancer events (melanoma and pancreatic cancer) in low or high melanoma incidence populations, respectively, has been established to select patients for genetic referral. OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine the CDKN2A/CDK4/microphthalmia-associated transcription factor mutation rate among Italian patients with MPM to appropriately direct genetic counseling regardless of family history. METHODS: In all, 587 patients with MPM and an equal number with single primary melanomas and control subjects were consecutively enrolled at the participating centers and tested for CDKN2A, CDK4, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor. RESULTS: CDKN2A germline mutations were found in 19% of patients with MPM versus 4.4% of patients with single primary melanoma. In familial MPM cases the mutation rate varied from 36.6% to 58.8%, whereas in sporadic MPM cases it varied from 8.2% to 17.6% in patients with 2 and 3 or more melanomas, respectively. The microphthalmia-associated transcription factor E318K mutation accounted for 3% of MPM cases altogether. LIMITATIONS: The study was hospital based, not population based. Rare novel susceptibility genes were not tested. CONCLUSION: Italian patients who developed 2 melanomas, even in situ, should be referred for genetic counseling even in the absence of family history.

5 Article Pigmented nodular melanoma: the predictive value of dermoscopic features using multivariate analysis. 2015

Pizzichetta, M A / Kittler, H / Stanganelli, I / Bono, R / Cavicchini, S / De Giorgi, V / Ghigliotti, G / Quaglino, P / Rubegni, P / Argenziano, G / Talamini, R / Anonymous1690828. ·Division of Medical Oncology - Preventive Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, National Cancer Institute, Via Franco Gallini, 2, 33081, Aviano, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Skin Cancer Unit, Istituto Tumori Romagna (IRST), Meldola, Italy. · Istituto Dermopatico Immacolata, IRCCS, Rome, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Fondazione Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico IRCCS, Milan, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · Clinic of Dermatology, IRCCS San Martino - Ist, Genoa, Italy. · Dermatologic Clinic, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Siena, Siena, Italy. · Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, National Cancer Institute, Via Franco Gallini, 2, 33081, Aviano, Italy. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #25916655.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Nodular melanoma (NM), representing 10-30% of all melanomas, plays a major role in global mortality related to melanoma. Nonetheless, the literature on dermoscopy of NM is scanty. OBJECTIVES: To assess odds ratios (ORs) to quantify dermoscopic features of pigmented NM vs. pigmented superficial spreading melanoma (SSM), and pigmented nodular nonmelanocytic and benign melanocytic lesions. METHODS: To assess the presence or absence of global patterns and dermoscopic criteria, digitized images of 457 pigmented skin lesions from patients with a histopathological diagnosis of NM (n = 75), SSM (n = 93), and nodular nonmelanocytic and benign melanocytic lesions (n = 289; namely, 39 basal cell carcinomas, 85 seborrhoeic keratoses, 81 blue naevi, and 84 compound/dermal naevi) were retrospectively collected and blindly evaluated by three observers. RESULTS: Multivariate analysis showed that ulceration (OR 4.07), homogeneous disorganized pattern (OR 10.76), and homogeneous blue pigmented structureless areas (OR 2.37) were significantly independent prognostic factors for NM vs. SSM. Multivariate analysis of dermoscopic features of NM vs. nonmelanocytic and benign melanocytic lesions showed that the positive correlating features leading to a significantly increased risk of NM were asymmetric pigmentation (OR 6.70), blue-black pigmented areas (OR 7.15), homogeneous disorganized pattern (OR 9.62), a combination of polymorphous vessels and milky-red globules/areas (OR 23.65), and polymorphous vessels combined with homogeneous red areas (OR 33.88). CONCLUSIONS: Dermoscopy may be helpful in improving the recognition of pigmented NM by revealing asymmetric pigmentation, blue-black pigmented areas, homogeneous disorganized pattern and abnormal vascular structures, including polymorphous vessels, milky-red globules/areas and homogeneous red areas.

6 Article Melanoma detection in Italian pigmented lesion clinics. 2014

Argenziano, G / Moscarella, E / Annetta, A / Battarra, V C / Brunetti, B / Buligan, C / Cantisani, C / Capizzi, R / Carbone, A / Carlino, A / Corsetti, V / Damiano, A / De Salvo, V / De Simone, P / Di Caterino, P / Fargnoli, M C / Ferrari, A / Fossati, B / Frascione, P / Ghigliotti, G / González Inchaurraga, M A / Guerriero, C / Landi, C / Mazzoni, L / Mirizzi, S / Palazzo, G / Pedretti, A / Peris, K / Piemonte, P / Rossi, A / Satta, R / Savoia, F / Scalvenzi, M / Stanganelli, I / Stinco, G / Zampieri, P / Zalaudek, I. ·Skin Cancer Unit Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova IRCCS Reggio Emilia, Italy - g.argenziano@gmail.com. ·G Ital Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #24819635.

ABSTRACT: AIM: Accuracy in melanoma detection is important to recognize early curable melanomas and to minimize the unnecessary excision of benign lesions. The aim of this paper was to evaluate melanoma screening accuracy of Italian pigmented lesion clinics in terms of number needed to excise (NNE), melanoma thickness, and number of melanomas diagnosed during patient follow-up. METHODS: Information on all skin tumors excised in 2011 were extracted from the databases of the participating centers. Information whether the lesion was excised at the baseline examination or during patient follow-up was recorded, as well as the overall number of patients examined in each center in 2011. RESULTS: After e-mail solicitation, 22 of 40 centers agreed to participate. A total of 8229 excised lesions were collected. The overall number of examined patients was 86.564, thus 9.5% of screened patients had a lesion removed. Of the excised lesions, 866 were diagnosed as melanoma (1% of examined patients) and 5311 (88.9%) were melanocytic nevi. Three NNE were calculated giving values of 7.9 excised lesions to find 1 melanoma, 7.1 melanocytic lesions to find 1 melanoma, and 3.7 lesions to find 1 skin malignancy. The median melanoma thickness was 0.6 mm, with only 15.1% of melanomas ≥ 1 mm of thickness. Melanomas detected over time were 96 (11.1%; mean thickness, 0.3 mm), with 15.6% of lesions excised after short-term follow-up and 84.4% after long-term follow-up. CONCLUSION: The NNE values comparable to those achieved in specialized clinical settings and the high number of early melanomas diagnosed at the baseline examination or during patient follow-up indicate a high level of accuracy in melanoma screening achieved by Italian pigmented lesion clinics.

7 Article Dermoscopic evaluation of nodular melanoma. 2013

Menzies, Scott W / Moloney, Fergal J / Byth, Karen / Avramidis, Michelle / Argenziano, Giuseppe / Zalaudek, Iris / Braun, Ralph P / Malvehy, Josep / Puig, Susana / Rabinovitz, Harold S / Oliviero, Margaret / Cabo, Horacio / Bono, Riccardo / Pizzichetta, Maria A / Claeson, Magdalena / Gaffney, Daniel C / Soyer, H Peter / Stanganelli, Ignazio / Scolyer, Richard A / Guitera, Pascale / Kelly, John / McCurdy, Olivia / Llambrich, Alex / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Zaballos, Pedro / Kirchesch, Herbert M / Piccolo, Domenico / Bowling, Jonathan / Thomas, Luc / Terstappen, Karin / Tanaka, Masaru / Pellacani, Giovanni / Pagnanelli, Gianluca / Ghigliotti, Giovanni / Ortega, Blanca Carlos / Crafter, Greg / Ortiz, Ana María Perusquía / Tromme, Isabelle / Karaarslan, Isil Kilinc / Ozdemir, Fezal / Tam, Anthony / Landi, Christian / Norton, Peter / Kaçar, Nida / Rudnicka, Lidia / Slowinska, Monika / Simionescu, Olga / Di Stefani, Alessandro / Coates, Elliot / Kreusch, Juergen. ·Sydney Melanoma Diagnostic Centre, Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW 2050, Australia. scott.menzies@sswahs.nsw.gov.au ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #23553375.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: Nodular melanoma (NM) is a rapidly progressing potentially lethal skin tumor for which early diagnosis is critical. OBJECTIVE: To determine the dermoscopy features of NM. DESIGN: Eighty-three cases of NM, 134 of invasive non-NM, 115 of nodular benign melanocytic tumors, and 135 of nodular nonmelanocytic tumors were scored for dermoscopy features using modified and previously described methods. Lesions were separated into amelanotic/hypomelanotic or pigmented to assess outcomes. SETTING: Predominantly hospital-based clinics from 5 continents. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Sensitivity, specificity, and odds ratios for features/models for the diagnosis of melanoma. RESULTS: Nodular melanoma occurred more frequently as amelanotic/hypomelanotic (37.3%) than did invasive non-NM (7.5%). Pigmented NM had a more frequent (compared with invasive non-NM; in descending order of odds ratio) symmetrical pigmentation pattern (5.8% vs 0.8%), large-diameter vessels, areas of homogeneous blue pigmentation, symmetrical shape, predominant peripheral vessels, blue-white veil, pink color, black color, and milky red/pink areas. Pigmented NM less frequently displayed an atypical broadened network, pigment network or pseudonetwork, multiple blue-gray dots, scarlike depigmentation, irregularly distributed and sized brown dots and globules, tan color, irregularly shaped depigmentation, and irregularly distributed and sized dots and globules of any color. The most important positive correlating features of pigmented NM vs nodular nonmelanoma were peripheral black dots/globules, multiple brown dots, irregular black dots/globules, blue-white veil, homogeneous blue pigmentation, 5 to 6 colors, and black color. A model to classify a lesion as melanocytic gave a high sensitivity (>98.0%) for both nodular pigmented and nonnodular pigmented melanoma but a lower sensitivity for amelanotic/hypomelanotic NM (84%). A method for diagnosing amelanotic/hypomelanotic malignant lesions (including basal cell carcinoma) gave a 93% sensitivity and 70% specificity for NM. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: When a progressively growing, symmetrically patterned melanocytic nodule is identified, NM needs to be excluded.

8 Article Dermoscopic evaluation of amelanotic and hypomelanotic melanoma. 2008

Menzies, Scott W / Kreusch, Juergen / Byth, Karen / Pizzichetta, Maria A / Marghoob, Ashfaq / Braun, Ralph / Malvehy, Josep / Puig, Susana / Argenziano, Giuseppe / Zalaudek, Iris / Rabinovitz, Harold S / Oliviero, Margaret / Cabo, Horacio / Ahlgrimm-Siess, Verena / Avramidis, Michelle / Guitera, Pascale / Soyer, H Peter / Ghigliotti, Giovanni / Tanaka, Masaru / Perusquia, Ana M / Pagnanelli, Gianluca / Bono, Riccardo / Thomas, Luc / Pellacani, Giovanni / Langford, David / Piccolo, Domenico / Terstappen, Karin / Stanganelli, Ignazio / Llambrich, Alex / Johr, Robert. ·Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney Melanoma Diagnostic Centre, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW 2050, Australia. scott.menzies@email.cs.nsw.gov.au ·Arch Dermatol · Pubmed #18794455.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine the predictive dermoscopic features of amelanotic and hypomelanotic melanoma. DESIGN: A total of 105 melanomas (median Breslow thickness, 0.76 mm), 170 benign melanocytic lesions, and 222 nonmelanocytic lesions lacking significant pigment (amelanotic, partially pigmented, and light colored) were imaged using glass-plate dermoscopy devices and scored for 99 dermoscopic features. Diagnostic models were derived from and tested on independent randomly selected lesions. SETTING: Predominantly hospital-based clinics from 5 continents. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Sensitivity, specificity, and odds ratios for individual features and models for the diagnosis of melanoma and malignancy. RESULTS: The most significant negative predictors of melanoma were having multiple (>3) milialike cysts (odds ratio, 0.09; 95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.64), comma vessels with a regular distribution (0.10; 0.01-0.70), comma vessels as the predominant vessel type (0.16; 0.05-0.52), symmetrical pigmentation pattern (0.18; 0.09-0.39), irregular blue-gray globules (0.20; 0.05-0.87), and multiple blue-gray globules (0.28; 0.10-0.81). The most significant positive predictors were having a blue-white veil (odds ratio,13; 95% confidence interval, 3.9-40.0), scarlike depigmentation (4.4; 2.4-8.0), multiple blue-gray dots (3.5; 1.9-6.4), irregularly shaped depigmentation (3.3; 2.0-5.3), irregular brown dots/globules (3.2; 1.8-5.6), 5 to 6 colors (3.2; 1.6-6.3), and predominant central vessels (3.1; 1.6-6.0). A simple model distinguishing melanomas from all nonmelanomas had a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity of 56% in the test set. A model distinguishing all malignant lesions from benign lesions had a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 37%. Conclusion Although the diagnostic accuracy of dermoscopy for melanoma lacking significant pigment is inferior to that of more pigmented lesions, features distinguishing the former from benign lesions can be visualized on dermoscopic evaluation.

9 Minor Dermoscopic diagnosis of amelanotic/hypomelanotic melanoma. 2017

Pizzichetta, M A / Kittler, H / Stanganelli, I / Ghigliotti, G / Corradin, M T / Rubegni, P / Cavicchini, S / De Giorgi, V / Bono, R / Alaibac, M / Astorino, S / Ayala, F / Quaglino, P / Pellacani, G / Argenziano, G / Guardoli, D / Specchio, F / Serraino, D / Talamini, R / Anonymous24890882. ·Division of Medical Oncology - Preventive Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, National Cancer Institute, Aviano, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Skin Cancer Unit, Istituto Tumori Romagna (IRST), Meldola, Department of Dermatology, University of Parma, Italy. · IRCCS San Martino - 1st Clinic of Dermatology, Genova, Italy. · Division of Dermatology, Pordenone Hospital, Pordenone, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Siena, Siena, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Fondazione Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico IRCCS, Milan, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · Istituto Dermopatico Immacolata, IRCCS, Rome, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Padova, Italy. · Division of Dermatology, Celio Hospital, Rome, Italy. · National Cancer Institute, 'Fondazione G. Pascale'-IRCCS, Naples, Italy. · Dermatologic Clinic, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Torino, Torino, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy. · Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, National Cancer Institute, Aviano, Italy. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #27681347.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --