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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Mark Gorman
Based on 5 articles published since 2009
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Mark Gorman wrote the following 5 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy and Management of Regional Lymph Nodes in Melanoma: American Society of Clinical Oncology and Society of Surgical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update. 2018

Wong, Sandra L / Faries, Mark B / Kennedy, Erin B / Agarwala, Sanjiv S / Akhurst, Timothy J / Ariyan, Charlotte / Balch, Charles M / Berman, Barry S / Cochran, Alistair / Delman, Keith A / Gorman, Mark / Kirkwood, John M / Moncrieff, Marc D / Zager, Jonathan S / Lyman, Gary H. ·Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH, USA. · The Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Santa Monica, CA, USA. · American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA, USA. guidelines@asco.org. · St Luke's Cancer Center, Easton, PA, USA. · Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Broward Health, Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA. · Los Angeles Center for Health Services, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. · , Silver Spring, MD, USA. · University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norwich, UK. · H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA. · Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #29236202.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To update the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)-Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO) guideline for sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy in melanoma. METHODS: An ASCO-SSO panel was formed, and a systematic review of the literature was conducted regarding SLN biopsy and completion lymph node dissection (CLND) after a positive sentinel node in patients with melanoma. RESULTS: Nine new observational studies, two systematic reviews and an updated randomized controlled trial (RCT) of SLN biopsy, as well as two randomized controlled trials of CLND after positive SLN biopsy, were included. RECOMMENDATIONS: Routine SLN biopsy is not recommended for patients with thin melanomas that are T1a (non-ulcerated lesions < 0.8 mm in Breslow thickness). SLN biopsy may be considered for thin melanomas that are T1b (0.8 to 1.0 mm Breslow thickness or <0.8 mm Breslow thickness with ulceration) after a thorough discussion with the patient of the potential benefits and risk of harms associated with the procedure. SLN biopsy is recommended for patients with intermediate-thickness melanomas (T2 or T3; Breslow thickness of >1.0 to 4.0 mm). SLN biopsy may be recommended for patients with thick melanomas (T4; > 4.0 mm in Breslow thickness), after a discussion of the potential benefits and risks of harm. In the case of a positive SLN biopsy, CLND or careful observation are options for patients with low-risk micrometastatic disease, with due consideration of clinicopathological factors. For higher risk patients, careful observation may be considered only after a thorough discussion with patients about the potential risks and benefits of foregoing CLND. Important qualifying statements outlining relevant clinicopathological factors, and details of the reference patient populations are included within the guideline.

2 Guideline Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy and Management of Regional Lymph Nodes in Melanoma: American Society of Clinical Oncology and Society of Surgical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update. 2018

Wong, Sandra L / Faries, Mark B / Kennedy, Erin B / Agarwala, Sanjiv S / Akhurst, Timothy J / Ariyan, Charlotte / Balch, Charles M / Berman, Barry S / Cochran, Alistair / Delman, Keith A / Gorman, Mark / Kirkwood, John M / Moncrieff, Marc D / Zager, Jonathan S / Lyman, Gary H. ·Sandra L. Wong, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH · Mark B. Faries, The Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Santa Monica · Alistair Cochran, University of California, Los Angeles Center for Health Services, Los Angeles, CA · Erin B. Kennedy, American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA · Sanjiv S. Agarwala, St Luke's Cancer Center, Easton · John M. Kirkwood, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA · Timothy J. Akhurst, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Victoria, Australia · Charlotte Ariyan, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY · Charles M. Balch, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX · Barry S. Berman, Broward Health, Fort Lauderdale · Jonathan S. Zager, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL · Keith A. Delman, Emory University, Atlanta, GA · Mark Gorman, Silver Spring, MD · Marc D. Moncrieff, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norwich, United Kingdom · and Gary H. Lyman, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #29232171.

ABSTRACT: Purpose To update the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)-Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO) guideline for sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy in melanoma. Methods An ASCO-SSO panel was formed, and a systematic review of the literature was conducted regarding SLN biopsy and completion lymph node dissection (CLND) after a positive sentinel node in patients with melanoma. Results Nine new observational studies, two systematic reviews, and an updated randomized controlled trial of SLN biopsy, as well as two randomized controlled trials of CLND after positive SLN biopsy, were included. Recommendations Routine SLN biopsy is not recommended for patients with thin melanomas that are T1a (nonulcerated lesions < 0.8 mm in Breslow thickness). SLN biopsy may be considered for thin melanomas that are T1b (0.8 to 1.0 mm Breslow thickness or < 0.8 mm Breslow thickness with ulceration) after a thorough discussion with the patient of the potential benefits and risk of harms associated with the procedure. SLN biopsy is recommended for patients with intermediate-thickness melanomas (T2 or T3; Breslow thickness of > 1.0 to 4.0 mm). SLN biopsy may be recommended for patients with thick melanomas (T4; > 4.0 mm in Breslow thickness), after a discussion of the potential benefits and risks of harm. In the case of a positive SLN biopsy, CLND or careful observation are options for patients with low-risk micrometastatic disease, with due consideration of clinicopathological factors. For higher-risk patients, careful observation may be considered only after a thorough discussion with patients about the potential risks and benefits of foregoing CLND. Important qualifying statements outlining relevant clinicopathological factors and details of the reference patient populations are included within the guideline. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/melanoma-guidelines and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki .

3 Guideline Sentinel lymph node biopsy for melanoma: American Society of Clinical Oncology and Society of Surgical Oncology joint clinical practice guideline. 2012

Wong, Sandra L / Balch, Charles M / Hurley, Patricia / Agarwala, Sanjiv S / Akhurst, Timothy J / Cochran, Alistair / Cormier, Janice N / Gorman, Mark / Kim, Theodore Y / McMasters, Kelly M / Noyes, R Dirk / Schuchter, Lynn M / Valsecchi, Matias E / Weaver, Donald L / Lyman, Gary H / Anonymous1300731 / Anonymous1310731. ·University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #22778321.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO) sought to provide an evidence-based guideline on the use of lymphatic mapping and sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy in staging patients with newly diagnosed melanoma. METHODS: A comprehensive systematic review of the literature published from January 1990 through August 2011 was completed using MEDLINE and EMBASE. Abstracts from ASCO and SSO annual meetings were included in the evidence review. An Expert Panel was convened to review the evidence and develop guideline recommendations. RESULTS: Seventy-three studies met full eligibility criteria. The evidence review demonstrated that SLN biopsy is an acceptable method for lymph node staging of most patients with newly diagnosed melanoma. RECOMMENDATIONS: SLN biopsy is recommended for patients with intermediate-thickness melanomas (Breslow thickness, 1 to 4 mm) of any anatomic site; use of SLN biopsy in this population provides accurate staging. Although there are few studies focusing on patients with thick melanomas (T4; Breslow thickness, > 4 mm), SLN biopsy may be recommended for staging purposes and to facilitate regional disease control. There is insufficient evidence to support routine SLN biopsy for patients with thin melanomas (T1; Breslow thickness, < 1 mm), although it may be considered in selected patients with high-risk features when staging benefits outweigh risks of the procedure. Completion lymph node dissection (CLND) is recommended for all patients with a positive SLN biopsy and achieves good regional disease control. Whether CLND after a positive SLN biopsy improves survival is the subject of the ongoing Multicenter Selective Lymphadenectomy Trial II.

4 Guideline Sentinel lymph node biopsy for melanoma: American Society of Clinical Oncology and Society of Surgical Oncology joint clinical practice guideline. 2012

Wong, Sandra L / Balch, Charles M / Hurley, Patricia / Agarwala, Sanjiv S / Akhurst, Timothy J / Cochran, Alistair / Cormier, Janice N / Gorman, Mark / Kim, Theodore Y / McMasters, Kelly M / Noyes, R Dirk / Schuchter, Lynn M / Valsecchi, Matias E / Weaver, Donald L / Lyman, Gary H / Anonymous11110730 / Anonymous11120730. ·University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #22766987.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO) sought to provide an evidence-based guideline on the use of lymphatic mapping and sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy in staging patients with newly diagnosed melanoma. METHODS: A comprehensive systematic review of the literature published from January 1990 through August 2011 was completed using MEDLINE and EMBASE. Abstracts from ASCO and SSO annual meetings were included in the evidence review. An Expert Panel was convened to review the evidence and develop guideline recommendations. RESULTS: Seventy-three studies met full eligibility criteria. The evidence review demonstrated that SLN biopsy is an acceptable method for lymph node staging of most patients with newly diagnosed melanoma. RECOMMENDATIONS: SLN biopsy is recommended for patients with intermediate-thickness melanomas (Breslow thickness, 1-4 mm) of any anatomic site; use of SLN biopsy in this population provides accurate staging. Although there are few studies focusing on patients with thick melanomas (T4; Breslow thickness, >4 mm), SLN biopsy may be recommended for staging purposes and to facilitate regional disease control. There is insufficient evidence to support routine SLN biopsy for patients with thin melanomas (T1; Breslow thickness, <1 mm), although it may be considered in selected patients with high-risk features when staging benefits outweigh risks of the procedure. Completion lymph node dissection (CLND) is recommended for all patients with a positive SLN biopsy and achieves good regional disease control. Whether CLND after a positive SLN biopsy improves survival is the subject of the ongoing Multicenter Selective Lymphadenectomy Trial II.

5 Article A model for lentigo maligna recurrence using melanocyte count as a predictive marker based upon logistic regression analysis of a blinded retrospective review. 2014

Gorman, Mark / Khan, Muhammad A A / Johnson, Paul C D / Hart, Andrew / Mathew, Bipin. ·Canniesburn Plastic Surgery Unit, Glasgow, UK. Electronic address: drgorman@me.com. · Castle Hill Plastic Surgery Department, Hull, UK. · Robertson Centre for Biostatistics, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Canniesburn Plastic Surgery Unit, Glasgow, UK. · Hull Royal Infirmary Pathology Department, Hull, UK. ·J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg · Pubmed #24939827.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The pre-malignant skin lesion lentigo maligna (LM) presents a particular challenge. Pathologists demonstrate poor diagnostic concordance and often struggle to assess whether excision margins are truly negative. This can lead to equivocal histology reports and a lack of clear guidance with which surgeons may rationalise their surgical management plans. Based upon the biological principle that tumour burden increases the chance of recurrence, we propose a shift in diagnostic paradigm, using melanocyte count (MC) at an excision margin to predict LM recurrence. METHODS: This retrospective study reviewed all cases of LM from a regional UK melanoma centre (1996-2011), to include 167 excisions, from 99 patients. Pathology slides were assessed for MC (blinded) at the most affected margin. Seven secondary markers of neoplasia were additionally evaluated. Logistic regression analysis was used to model the relationship between MC and recurrence. RESULTS: MC is a strong predictor of LM recurrence (p < 0.0001). A regression curve predicts risk for individual MCs, which may also be divided into three risk strata; low (0-11% [MC 0-20]), intermediate (15-89% [MC 21-30]), and high risk (92-100% [MC ≥ 31]). MC misclassified 0.6% of cases in the low and high risk groups compared with 21% for pathologists, who were also equivocal for 18% of excisions. MC's inter-rater concordance was high (>0.9). The secondary factors were all independently associated with recurrence, but failed to improve predictive ability supplementary to MC. CONCLUSIONS: MC confidently predicts LM recurrence and is more accurate and reliable, whilst also reducing the uncertainty of current pathology assessment. Risk estimates for any given MC can be easily charted using the regression curve graph, where confidence interval and risk group boundaries demonstrate the degree of certainty associated with any given prediction. This change in approach is congruent with tumour behaviour. A recurrence 'tipping point' corresponds to the sharp risk increase across the intermediate group's narrow band of MC.