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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Bernard Guillot
Based on 22 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, B. Guillot wrote the following 22 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline [Treatment of patients with inoperable stage III or stage IV melanoma. Société française de dermatologie]. 2018

Guillot, B / Charles, J / Jeudy, G / Cupissol, D / Dupuy, A / Dutriaux, C / Gangloff, D / Magne, N / Mirabel, X / M'Sadek, A / Pracht, M / Sichel, C / Do Outeiro, G. ·Département de dermatologie, hôpital Saint-Éloi, CHU de Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier, France. Electronic address: b-guillot@chu-montpellier.fr. · CHU de Grenoble, 38700 Grenoble, France. · CHU de Dijon, 21000 Dijon, France. · Institut du Cancer de Montpellier, 34298 Montpellier, France. · CHU de Rennes, 35000 Rennes, France. · CHU de Bordeaux, 33000 Bordeaux, France. · Institut universitaire du cancer de Toulouse, 31100 Toulouse, France. · Institut de cancérologie de la Loire, 42270 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez, France. · Centre Oscar-Lambret, 59000 Lille, France. · Centre Eugène-Marquis, 35000 Rennes, France. · 13470 Carnoux en Provence, France. · Institut national du cancer de Boulogne-Billancourt, 92100 Boulogne-Billancourt, France. ·Ann Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #29703640.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Guideline French updated recommendations in Stage I to III melanoma treatment and management. 2017

Guillot, B / Dalac, S / Denis, M G / Dupuy, A / Emile, J F / De La Fouchardiere, A / Hindie, E / Jouary, T / Lassau, N / Mirabel, X / Piperno Neumann, S / De Raucourt, S / Vanwijck, R. ·Dermatology Department, CHU Montpellier. · Dermatology Department, CHU Dijon. · Laboratory of Biochemistry, CHU Nantes. · Dermatology Department, CHU Rennes. · Laboratory of Pathology, AP-HP Ambroise Paré Hospital, Boulogne, France. · Laboratory of Pathology, Centre Léon Bérard Lyon. · Department of Nuclear medicine, CHU Bordeaux. · Dermatology Department, CH Pau. · Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave Roussy Villejuif. · Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret Lille. · Institut Curie, Paris, France. · 1 Avenue du 6 Juin, 1945, 14000 Caen, France. · Louvain Catholic University, Brussels, Belgium. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28120528.

ABSTRACT: As knowledge continues to develop, regular updates are necessary concerning recommendations for practice. The recommendations for the management of melanoma stages I to III were drawn up in 2005. At the request of the Société Française de Dermatologie, they have now been updated using the methodology for recommendations proposed by the Haute Autorité de Santé in France. In practice, the principal recommendations are as follows: for staging, it is recommended that the 7th edition of AJCC be used. The maximum excision margins have been reduced to 2 cm. Regarding adjuvant therapy, the place of interferon has been reduced and no validated emerging medication has yet been identified. Radiotherapy may be considered for patients in Stage III at high risk of relapse. The sentinel lymph node technique remains an option. Initial examination includes routine ultrasound as of Stage II, with other examinations being optional in stages IIC and III. A shorter strict follow-up period (3 years) is recommended for patients, but with greater emphasis on imaging.

3 Guideline [Update to the recommendations for management of melanoma stages I to III]. 2016

Guillot, B / Dalac, S / Denis, M G / Dupuy, A / Emile, J-F / De La Fouchardière, A / Hindie, E / Jouary, T / Lassau, N / Mirabel, X / Piperno Neumann, S / De Raucourt, S / Vanwijck, R. ·Département de dermatologie, hôpital Saint-Éloi, CHU de Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier cedex 5, France. Electronic address: b-guillot@chu-montpellier.fr. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital du Bocage sud, CHU de Dijon, BP 1542, 21079 Dijon cedex, France. · Laboratoire de biochimie, institut de biologie, 9, quai Moncousu, 44093 Nantes cedex, France. · Service de dermatologie, CHU de Rennes, Rennes, France. · Service d'anatomie pathologique, CHU Ambroise-Paré-Boulogne, 92104 Boulogne cedex, France. · Centre anticancéreux Léon-Bérard, 28, rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon, France. · Service de médecine nucléire Sud et Pellegrin, CHU de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. · Service de médecine, centre hospitalier de Pau, 64000 Pau, France. · Service d'imagerie médicale, institut Gustave-Roussy, 94800 Villejuif, France. · Centre Oscar-Lambret, 3, rue Fréderic-Combemale, 59000 Lille, France. · Institut Curie, 26, rue d'Ulm, 75005 Paris, France. · 1, avenue du 6-Juin, 14000 Caen, France. · Université catholique de Louvain, 10, avenue Hippocrate, 1200 Bruxelles, Belgique. ·Ann Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #27527567.

ABSTRACT: As knowledge continues to develop, regular updates are necessary concerning recommendations for practice. The recommendations for the management of melanoma stages I to III were drawn up in 2005. At the request of the Société Française de Dermatologie, they have now been updated using the methodology for recommendations proposed by the Haute Autorité de Santé. In practice, the principal recommendations are as follows: for staging, it is recommended that the 7th edition of AJCC be used. The maximum excision margins have been reduced to 2cm. Regarding adjuvant therapy, the place of interferon has been reduced and no validated emerging medication has yet been identified. Radiotherapy may be considered for patients in stage III at high risk of relapse. The sentinel lymph node technique remains an option. Initial examination includes routine ultrasound as of stage II, with other examinations being optional in stages IIC and III. A shorter strict follow-up period (3years) is recommended for patients, but with greater emphasis on imaging.

4 Guideline [Guidelines for stage I to III melanoma]. 2016

Guillot, Bernard / Dalac, Sophie / Denis, Marc / Dupuy, Alain / Emile, Jean François / De La Fouchardiere, Arnaud / Hindie, Elif / Jouary, Thomas / Lassau, Nathalie / Mirabel, Xavier / Piperno Neumann, Sophie / De Raucourt, Sixtine / Vanwijck, Romain. ·Département de dermatologie, hôpital Saint-Eloi, CHU de Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier cedex 5, France. Electronic address: b-guillot@chu-montpellier.fr. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital du Bocage sud, CHU de Dijon, BP 1542, 21079 Dijon cedex, France. · Laboratoire de biochimie, institut de biologie, 9, quai Moncousu, 44093 Nantes cedex, France. · Service de dermatologie, CHU de Rennes, Rennes, France. · Service d'anatomie pathologique, CHU Ambroise-Paré Boulogne, 92104 Boulogne cedex, France. · Centre anticancéreux Léon-Bérard, 28, rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon, France. · Service de médecine nucléire sud et pellegrin, CHU de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. · Service de médecine, CH de Pau, 64000 Pau, France. · Service d'imagerie médicale, institut Gustave-Roussy, 94800 Villejuif, France. · Centre Oscar-Lambret, 3, rue Fréderic-Combemale, 59000 Lille, France. · Institut Curie, 26, rue d'Ulm, 75005 Paris, France. · Sixtine, 1, avenue du 6 juin, 14000 Caen, France. · Université catholique de Louvain, avenue Hippocrate, 10 B-1200 Bruxelles, Belgique. ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #27456259.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Review [Innovative therapies for metastatic melanoma in elderly patients]. 2015

Du-Thanh, A / Lesage, C / Ferreira, E / Dereure, O / Guillot, B. ·Département de dermatologie, hôpital Saint-Eloi, CHU de Montpellier, université de Montpellier, 80, avenue Augustin-Fliche, 34295 Montpellier, France. Electronic address: a-du_thanh@chu-montpellier.fr. · Département de dermatologie, hôpital Saint-Eloi, CHU de Montpellier, université de Montpellier, 80, avenue Augustin-Fliche, 34295 Montpellier, France. · Unité d'oncogériatrie, centre Antonin-Balmes, 39, avenue Charles-Flahaut, 34295 Montpellier, France. ·Ann Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #25986740.

ABSTRACT: The mortality rate for malignant melanoma is higher in elderly patients aged 75 years or more, with over 25% of melanomas being diagnosed in this population. This poorer prognosis might perhaps be improved by emerging targeted therapies and immunotherapy, although these agents must be prescribed with care in this rather fragile population. The purpose of our review of the literature concerning phase-2 and -3 published trials of these innovative molecules was to examine their optimal use in elderly patients presenting metastatic malignant melanoma. Most of the trials examined included elderly patients and some were analyzed by age sub-groups. In conclusion, elderly patients with ECOG 0/1 status can be given ipilimumab or vemurafenib as first-line therapy depending on tumoral BRaf mutation status. The benefit of combined targeted therapies does not seem to apply consistently in elderly patients and their use must be discussed. Further specific data must be collected in elderly patients concerning anti-PD1 molecules. For more fragile patients, risk scales or scores should enable more accurate use of innovative therapies in metastatic melanoma. Moreover, physicians must be aware of the common drug interactions with targeted therapies, since elderly patients are often taking several concomitant drugs.

6 Review [Systemic treatment of melanoma brain metastases]. 2015

Le Rhun, É / Mateus, C / Mortier, L / Dhermain, F / Guillot, B / Grob, J-J / Lebbe, C / Thomas, M / Jouary, T / Leccia, M-T / Robert, C. ·Neuro-oncologie, département de neurochirurgie, hôpital Roger-Salengro, CHRU, rue Émile-Laine, 59037 Lille cedex, France; Oncologie médicale, centre Oscar-Lambret, 3, rue Frédéric-Combemale, BP 307, 59020 Lille cedex, France; Inserm U1192, laboratoire Prism, université Lille 1, bâtiment SN3 1(er) étage, 59655 Villeneuve-d'Ascq cedex, France; Groupe de réflexion sur la prise en charge des métastases cérébrales (GRPCMaC), 13273 Marseille cedex 09, France. Electronic address: emilie.lerhun@chru-lille.fr. · Département de dermatologie, institut de cancérologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue Édouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif cedex, France. · Département de dermatologie, centre hospitalier régional et universitaire de Lille, 2, avenue Oscar-Lambret, 59037 Lille cedex, France. · Groupe de réflexion sur la prise en charge des métastases cérébrales (GRPCMaC), 13273 Marseille cedex 09, France; Département de radiothérapie, institut de cancérologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue Édouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif cedex, France; Réunion de concertation pluridisciplinaire de neuro-oncologie, institut de cancérologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue Édouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif cedex, France. · Département de dermatologie, centre hospitalier universitaire, 80, avenue Augustin-Fliche, 34295 Montpellier cedex 5, France; Université Montpellier 1, 5, boulevard Henri-IV, CS 19044, 34967 Montpellier cedex 2, France. · Département de dermatologie, centre hospitalo-universitaire, AP-HM, 264, rue Saint-Pierre, 13385 Marseille cedex 05, France. · Département de dermatologie, hôpital Saint-Louis, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, 1, avenue Claude-Vellefaux, 75010 Paris, France. · Service de dermatologie, pôle d'oncologie-radiothérapie, de dermatologie et des soins palliatifs, groupe hospitalier Saint-André, centre hospitalier universitaire de Bordeaux, 1, rue Jean-Burguet, 33075 Bordeaux, France. · Clinique de dermatologie, d'allergologie et de photobiologie, centre hospitalier Albert-Michallon, boulevard de la Chantourne, BP 217, 38043 Grenoble cedex 9, France; Inserm U832, institut A.-Bonniot, 38043 Grenoble cedex 09, France. ·Cancer Radiother · Pubmed #25656856.

ABSTRACT: Melanomas have a high rate of brain metastases. Both the functional prognosis and the overall survival are poor in these patients. Until now, surgery and radiotherapy represented the two main modalities of treatment. Nevertheless, due to the improvement in the management of the extracerebral melanoma, the systemic treatment may be an option in patients with brain metastases. Immunotherapy with anti-CTLA4 (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4) - ipilimumab - or BRAF (serine/threonine-protein kinase B-raf) inhibitors - vemurafenib, dabrafenib - has shown efficacy in the management of brain metastases in a- or pauci-symptomatic patients. Studies are ongoing with anti-PD1 (programmed cell death 1) and combinations of targeted therapies associating anti-RAF (raf proto-oncogene, serine/threonine kinase) and anti-MEK (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase).

7 Review [Malignant epithelial and melanocytic skin tumors]. 2012

Guillot, Bernard / Du-Thanh, Aurélie. ·Département de dermatologie, CHU de Montpellier, hôpital Saint-Eloi, 34295 Montpellier Cedex 5, France. b-guillot@chu-montpellier.fr ·Rev Prat · Pubmed #22408878.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Review Serum proteomic profiling reveals potential biomarkers for cutaneous malignant melanoma. 2011

Solassol, Jérôme / Du-Thanh, Aurélie / Maudelonde, Thierry / Guillot, Bernard. ·Laboratoire de Biologie Cellulaire et Hormonale, Hôpital Arnaud de Villeneuve, CHU Montpellier, France. jerome.solassol@univ-montp1.fr ·Int J Biol Markers · Pubmed #21607923.

ABSTRACT: Cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) is the most serious type of skin cancer because of its tendency to metastasize. The prognosis and therapeutic management of patients are primarily based on clinical criteria (number of cancerous lymph nodes and/or the presence of distant metastases) and histopathological criteria (tumor depth, presence of ulceration and mitotic index). Although these factors are informative in advanced stages of the disease, they are less important in the early stages. In recent years, a number of attempts have been made to identify new serological prognostic biomarkers, especially for early forms of CMM. The recent development of proteomic techniques may offer new perspectives in this field. This article details the considerations of each of the proteomic techniques used today and describes the results of the most recent clinical studies conducted to identify new potential prognostic serum biomarkers for CMM. However, independent and large validation studies are needed before such markers can be used in everyday clinical practice.

9 Review [Circulating prognosis markers in melanoma: proteomic profiling and clinical studies]. 2011

Solassol, Jérôme / Guillot, Bernard / Maudelonde, Thierry. ·CHU de Montpellier, Hôpital Arnaud-de-Villeneuve, Laboratoire de biologie cellulaire et hormonale, Montpellier. jerome.solassol@univ-montp1.fr ·Ann Biol Clin (Paris) · Pubmed #21464007.

ABSTRACT: Cutaneous melanoma is the most dangerous skin cancer because of its ability to metastasize. Several clinical factors (number of invaded lymph nodes and/or presence of distant metastases) and histopathology (depth of tumor and presence of ulceration) are available to the clinician for determining prognosis and suggesting appropriate therapeutic management. However, these factors are often insufficient, especially in early forms of melanoma. Much research has focused on the identification of effective prognostic markers in serum. The only serum marker, which has been incorporated into the current AJCC classification for clinical use is lactate dehydrogenase dosage, a historical marker, restricted to the prognosis of metastatic disease. The recent development of technologies for proteome analysis offers new perspectives in this field. This review summarizes the specific considerations for each of the proteomic techniques used to date and presents the results of recent clinical investigations conducted to identify prognostic biomarkers in the serum of melanoma patients.

10 Clinical Trial MAGE-A3 immunotherapeutic as adjuvant therapy for patients with resected, MAGE-A3-positive, stage III melanoma (DERMA): a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial. 2018

Dreno, Brigitte / Thompson, John F / Smithers, Bernard Mark / Santinami, Mario / Jouary, Thomas / Gutzmer, Ralf / Levchenko, Evgeny / Rutkowski, Piotr / Grob, Jean-Jacques / Korovin, Sergii / Drucis, Kamil / Grange, Florent / Machet, Laurent / Hersey, Peter / Krajsova, Ivana / Testori, Alessandro / Conry, Robert / Guillot, Bernard / Kruit, Wim H J / Demidov, Lev / Thompson, John A / Bondarenko, Igor / Jaroszek, Jaroslaw / Puig, Susana / Cinat, Gabriela / Hauschild, Axel / Goeman, Jelle J / van Houwelingen, Hans C / Ulloa-Montoya, Fernando / Callegaro, Andrea / Dizier, Benjamin / Spiessens, Bart / Debois, Muriel / Brichard, Vincent G / Louahed, Jamila / Therasse, Patrick / Debruyne, Channa / Kirkwood, John M. ·Department of Dermatooncology, Hotel Dieu Nantes University Hospital, Nantes, France. · Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Queensland Melanoma Project, Discipline of Surgery, The University of Queensland, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, QLD, Australia. · Melanoma Sarcoma Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Service d'Oncologie Médicale, Hôpital François Mitterrand, Pau, France. · Skin Cancer Center Hannover, Department of Dermatology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany. · Petrov Research Institute of Oncology, St Petersburg, Russia. · Department of Soft Tissue, Bone Sarcoma, and Melanoma, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Institute, Oncology Center, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Dermatology and Skin Cancers, La Timone APHM Hospital, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille, France. · Department of Skin and Soft Tissue Tumours, National Cancer Institute, Kiev, Ukraine. · Swissmed Centrum Zdrowia, Gdansk, Poland; Department of Surgical Oncology, Gdansk Medical University, Gdansk, Poland. · Dermatology Department, Hôpital Robert Debré, Université de Reims Champagne-Ardenne, Reims, France. · Department of Dermatology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Tours, France; UFR de Médecine, Université François-Rabelais, Tours, France. · Melanoma Immunology and Oncology Group, Centenary Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Dermato-oncology Department, General University Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic. · Columbus Clinic Center, Milan, Italy. · Division of Hematology & Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USA. · Département de Dermatologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Hôpital Saint-Éloi, Montpellier, France. · Department of Medical Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer institute, Rotterdam, Netherlands. · Cancer Research Center, Moscow, Russia. · Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · Department of Oncology and Medical Radiology, Dnipropetrovsk State Medical Academy, Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine. · Centrum Medyczne Bieńkowski, Klinika Chirurgii Plastycznej, Bydgoszcz, Poland; Department of Oncological Surgery, Oncology Center, Bydgoszcz, Poland. · Melanoma Unit, Dermatology Department, Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Barcelona, Spain. · Instituto de Oncología Ángel H Roffo, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina. · Department of Dermatology, Venereology, and Allergology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany. · Medical Statistics, Department of Biomedical Data Sciences, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands. · GlaxoSmithKline, Rixensart, Belgium. Electronic address: fernando.x.ulloa-montoya@GSK.com. · GlaxoSmithKline, Rixensart, Belgium. · GlaxoSmithKline, Rixensart, Belgium; Immunology Translational Medicine, UCB, Brussels, Belgium. · GlaxoSmithKline, Rixensart, Belgium; Biostatistics Department, Janssen Research & Development, Beerse, Belgium. · GlaxoSmithKline, Rixensart, Belgium; ViaNova Biosciences, Brussels, Belgium. · GlaxoSmithKline, Rixensart, Belgium; Laboratoires Servier, Paris, France. · GlaxoSmithKline, Rixensart, Belgium; University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · UPMC Hillman Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #29908991.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Despite newly approved treatments, metastatic melanoma remains a life-threatening condition. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the MAGE-A3 immunotherapeutic in patients with stage IIIB or IIIC melanoma in the adjuvant setting. METHODS: DERMA was a phase 3, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial done in 31 countries and 263 centres. Eligible patients were 18 years or older and had histologically proven, completely resected, stage IIIB or IIIC, MAGE-A3-positive cutaneous melanoma with macroscopic lymph node involvement and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score of 0 or 1. Randomisation and treatment allocation at the investigator sites were done centrally via the internet. We randomly assigned patients (2:1) to receive up to 13 intramuscular injections of recombinant MAGE-A3 with AS15 immunostimulant (MAGE-A3 immunotherapeutic; 300 μg MAGE-A3 antigen plus 420 μg CpG 7909 reconstituted in AS01B to a total volume of 0·5 mL), or placebo, over a 27-month period: five doses at 3-weekly intervals, followed by eight doses at 12-weekly intervals. The co-primary outcomes were disease-free survival in the overall population and in patients with a potentially predictive gene signature (GS-positive) identified previously and validated here via an adaptive signature design. The final analyses included all patients who had received at least one dose of study treatment; analyses for efficacy were in the as-randomised population and for safety were in the as-treated population. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00796445. FINDINGS: Between Dec 1, 2008, and Sept 19, 2011, 3914 patients were screened, 1391 randomly assigned, and 1345 started treatment (n=895 for MAGE-A3 and n=450 for placebo). At final analysis (data cutoff May 23, 2013), median follow-up was 28·0 months [IQR 23·3-35·5] in the MAGE-A3 group and 28·1 months [23·7-36·9] in the placebo group. Median disease-free survival was 11·0 months (95% CI 10·0-11·9) in the MAGE-A3 group and 11·2 months (8·6-14·1) in the placebo group (hazard ratio [HR] 1·01, 0·88-1·17, p=0·86). In the GS-positive population, median disease-free survival was 9·9 months (95% CI 5·7-17·6) in the MAGE-A3 group and 11·6 months (5·6-22·3) in the placebo group (HR 1·11, 0·83-1·49, p=0·48). Within the first 31 days of treatment, adverse events of grade 3 or worse were reported by 126 (14%) of 894 patients in the MAGE-A3 group and 56 (12%) of 450 patients in the placebo group, treatment-related adverse events of grade 3 or worse by 36 (4%) patients given MAGE-A3 vs six (1%) patients given placebo, and at least one serious adverse event by 14% of patients in both groups (129 patients given MAGE-A3 and 64 patients given placebo). The most common adverse events of grade 3 or worse were neoplasms (33 [4%] patients in the MAGE-A3 group vs 17 [4%] patients in the placebo group), general disorders and administration site conditions (25 [3%] for MAGE-A3 vs four [<1%] for placebo) and infections and infestations (17 [2%] for MAGE-A3 vs seven [2%] for placebo). No deaths were related to treatment. INTERPRETATION: An antigen-specific immunotherapeutic alone was not efficacious in this clinical setting. Based on these findings, development of the MAGE-A3 immunotherapeutic for use in melanoma has been stopped. FUNDING: GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals SA.

11 Clinical Trial STAT3 Mediates Nilotinib Response in KIT-Altered Melanoma: A Phase II Multicenter Trial of the French Skin Cancer Network. 2018

Delyon, Julie / Chevret, Sylvie / Jouary, Thomas / Dalac, Sophie / Dalle, Stephane / Guillot, Bernard / Arnault, Jean-Philippe / Avril, Marie-Françoise / Bedane, Christophe / Bens, Guido / Pham-Ledard, Anne / Mansard, Sandrine / Grange, Florent / Machet, Laurent / Meyer, Nicolas / Legoupil, Delphine / Saiag, Philippe / Idir, Zakia / Renault, Victor / Deleuze, Jean-François / Hindie, Elif / Battistella, Maxime / Dumaz, Nicolas / Mourah, Samia / Lebbe, Celeste / Anonymous631101. ·Service de Dermatologie, and CIC (Centre d'Investigations Cliniques), AP-HP, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France; INSERM, UMR-976, AP-HP, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France; Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. Electronic address: julie.delyon@aphp.fr. · Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; Service de Biostatistique et Information Médicale, AP-HP, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France. · Unité Onco-dermatologie, Hôpital François Mitterrand, Pau, France. · Service de Dermatologie, CHU Dijon Bourgogne, Dijon, France. · Cancer Research Center of Lyon, INSERM U1052, CNRS UMR5286, Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University, Institut de Cancérologie des Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France. · Montpellier University Hospital, Montpellier, France. · Service de Dermatologie, CHU Amiens-Picardie, Amiens, France. · Service de Dermatologie, AP-HP, Hôpital Cochin, Paris, France; Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France. · Unité d'oncologie thoracique et cutanée, Hopital Dupuytren, Limoges, France. · Service de Dermatologie, Centre hospitalier régional d'Orléans, Orléans, France. · Dermatology Department, CHU de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. · Dermatology Department, CHU de Clermont Ferrand, Clermont Ferrand, France. · Dermatology Department, Reims University Hospital, Reims, France. · Department of Dermatology, Centre Hospitalier Regional et Universitaire (CHRU) de Tours, Tours, France; Inserm U930, University Francois Rabelais de Tours, Tours, France. · Dermatologie, Institut Universitaire du Cancer et CHU de Toulouse, Toulouse, France; Inserm UMR 1037, CRCT, Toulouse, France. · Dermatology Department, University Hospital of Brest, Brest, France. · Université de Versailles St-Quentin, EA 4340, Boulogne-Billancourt, France; Service de Dermatologie Générale et Oncologique, AP-HP, Hôpital Ambroise Paré, Boulogne-Billancourt, France. · AP-HP, Département de la Recherche Clinique et du Développement, AP-HP, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France. · Laboratory for Bioinformatics, CEPH-Fondation Jean Dausset, Paris, France. · Centre National de Génotypage, CEA, Evry, France; CEPH-Fondation Jean Dausset, Paris, France. · Service de Médecine Nucléaire, CHU de Bordeaux, LabEx TRAIL, Université de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. · Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; INSERM, UMR_S1165, Paris, France; Pathology department, Hopital Saint-Louis, AP-HP, Paris, France. · INSERM, UMR-976, AP-HP, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France. · INSERM, UMR-976, AP-HP, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France; Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; Laboratoire de Pharmacologie Biologique, AP-HP, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France. · Service de Dermatologie, and CIC (Centre d'Investigations Cliniques), AP-HP, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France; INSERM, UMR-976, AP-HP, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris, France; Université Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #28843487.

ABSTRACT: Mutated oncogenic KIT is a therapeutic target in melanoma. We conducted a multicenter phase II trial on the KIT inhibitor nilotinib in patients with unresectable melanoma harboring KIT alteration. The primary endpoint was the response rate (complete response or partial response following Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria) at 6 months. Pharmacodynamic studies using KIT sequencing, qPCR array, and immunostaining of downstream KIT effectors were performed during treatment. Twenty-five patients were included and received 400 mg oral nilotinib twice daily. At 6 months, nilotinib induced tumor response in four patients. The best overall response rate was 20% and the disease control rate was 56%, limited to patients harboring exon 11 or 13 mutations. Four patients exhibited durable response, including three persisting (3.6 and 2.8 years for two patients with stage IIIC and 2.5 years for one with IVM1b melanoma). A reduction in signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 phosphorylation and its effectors (BCL-2, MCL-1) in tumors during follow-up was significantly associated with clinical response. In the KIT-mutated melanoma cell line M230, nilotinib reduced STAT3 signaling and STAT inhibitors were as efficient as KIT inhibitors in reducing cell proliferation. Our study evidences a significant association between STAT3 inhibition and response to nilotinib, and provides a rationale for future research assessing STAT inhibitors in KIT-mutated melanoma.

12 Clinical Trial Adjuvant therapy with pegylated interferon alfa-2b (36 months) versus low-dose interferon alfa-2b (18 months) in melanoma patients without macrometastatic nodes: an open-label, randomised, phase 3 European Association for Dermato-Oncology (EADO) study. 2013

Grob, Jean Jacques / Jouary, Thomas / Dréno, Brigitte / Asselineau, Julien / Gutzmer, Ralf / Hauschild, Axel / Leccia, Marie Thérèse / Landthaler, Michael / Garbe, Claus / Sassolas, Bruno / Herbst, Rudolf A / Guillot, Bernard / Chene, Genevieve / Pehamberger, Hubert. ·Aix-Marseille University, CRO2, Service de Dermatologie, Hopital de Timone, 264 Rue St Pierre, 13885 Marseille CEDEX 05, Marseille, France. jean-jacques.grob@ap-hm.fr ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #22975216.

ABSTRACT: AIM: Both low-dose interferon (IFN) alfa-2b and pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN) alfa-2b have been shown to be superior to observation in the adjuvant treatment of melanoma without macrometastatic nodes, but have never been directly compared. Peg-IFN facilitates prolongation of treatment, which could provide additional benefit. This multicentre, open-label, randomised, phase 3 trial compared standard low-dose interferon IFN and prolonged treatment with Peg-IFN. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with resected melanoma ≥1.5mm thick and without clinically detectable node metastases were randomised 1:1 to treatment with IFN 3 MU subcutaneously (SC) three times weekly for 18 months or Peg-IFN 100 μg SC once weekly for 36 months. Sentinel lymph node dissection (SLND) was optional. The primary endpoint was disease-free survival (DFS). Secondary endpoints included distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), overall survival (OS) and adverse events (AEs) grade 3-4. RESULTS: Of 898 patients enrolled, 896 (443 Peg-IFN, 453 IFN) were eligible for evaluation (median follow-up 4.7 years). SLND was performed in 68.2% of patients. There were no statistical differences between the two arms for the primary outcome of DFS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.91, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.73-1.15) or the secondary outcomes of DMFS (HR 1.02, 95% CI 0.80-1.32) and OS (HR 1.09, 95% CI 0.82-1.45). Peg-IFN was associated with higher rates of grade 3-4 AEs (47.3% versus 25.2%; p<0.0001) and discontinuations (54.3% versus 30.4%) compared with IFN. CONCLUSION: This trial did not show superiority for adjuvant Peg-IFN over conventional low-dose IFN in melanoma patients without clinically detectable nodes. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00221702.

13 Clinical Trial Large randomized study of thymosin alpha 1, interferon alfa, or both in combination with dacarbazine in patients with metastatic melanoma. 2010

Maio, Michele / Mackiewicz, Andrzej / Testori, Alessandro / Trefzer, Uwe / Ferraresi, Virginia / Jassem, Jacek / Garbe, Claus / Lesimple, Thierry / Guillot, Bernard / Gascon, Pere / Gilde, Katalin / Camerini, Roberto / Cognetti, Francesco / Anonymous590652. ·Division of Medical Oncology and Immunotherapy, Department of Oncology, University Hospital of Siena, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Siena, Italy. mmaio@cro.it ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #20194853.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Thymosin alpha 1 (Talpha1) is an immunomodulatory polypeptide that enhances effector T-cell responses. In this large randomized study, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of combining Talpha1 with dacarbazine (DTIC) and interferon alfa (IFN-alpha) in patients with metastatic melanoma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Four hundred eighty-eight patients were randomly assigned to five treatment groups: DTIC+IFN-alpha+Talpha1 (1.6 mg); DTIC+IFN-alpha+Talpha1 (3.2 mg); DTIC+IFN-alpha+Talpha1 (6.4 mg); DTIC+Talpha1 (3.2 mg); DTIC+IFN-alpha (control group). The primary end point was best overall response at study end (12 months). Secondary end points included duration of response, overall survival (OS), and progression-free survival (PFS). Patients were observed for up to 24 months. RESULTS: Ten and 12 tumor responses were observed in the DTIC+IFN-alpha+Talpha1 (3.2 mg) and DTIC+Talpha1 (3.2 mg) groups, respectively, versus four in the control group, which was sufficient to reject the null hypothesis that P(0) < or = .05 (expected response rate of standard therapy) in these two arms. Duration of response ranged from 1.9 to 23.2 months in patients given Talpha1 and from 4.4 to 8.4 months in the control group. Median OS was 9.4 months in patients given Talpha1 versus 6.6 months in the control group (hazard ratio = 0.80; 9% CI, 0.63 to 1.02; P = .08). An increase in PFS was observed in patients given Talpha1 versus the control group (hazard ratio = 0.80; 95% CI, 0.63 to 1.01; P = .06). Addition of Talpha1 to DTIC and IFN-alpha did not lead to any additional toxicity. CONCLUSION: These results suggest Talpha1 has activity in patients with metastatic melanoma and provide rationale for further clinical evaluation of this agent.

14 Clinical Trial Temozolomide and cisplatin combination in naive patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma: results of a phase II multicenter trial. 2010

Wierzbicka-Hainaut, Ewa / Sassolas, Bruno / Mourey, Laurent / Guillot, Bernard / Bedane, Christophe / Guillet, Gerard / Tourani, Jean Marc. ·Departments of Dermatology, CHU de Poitiers, Institut Claudius Rigaud, Toulouse, France. e.wierzbicka@chu-poitiers.fr ·Melanoma Res · Pubmed #20075758.

ABSTRACT: Temozolomide (TMZ) is a second-generation alkylating agent that has recently shown some efficacy in stage IV melanoma. The purpose of this study was to test the efficacy and safety of combination therapy with TMZ and cisplatin (CDDP) in patients with metastatic melanoma. Chemo-naive patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma were included in a phase II study of combined therapy with TMZ (200 mg/m/day), days 1-5, and CDDP (75 mg/m/day) on day 1. The treatment was given every 28 days, for up to six cycles. The primary endpoint was the overall response rate and the secondary endpoints were progression-free survival, probability of survival, and tolerance. Thirty patients were enrolled into this study. Median age was 59 years. A total of 126 cycles were administered. Grade 3 and 4 hematological toxicity was observed in 14 patients (46.6%) and clinical toxicity in seven patients (23.3%). No complete response was observed among the 30 included patients. Five patients (16.7%) achieved a partial response. An additional six patients (20%) showed disease stabilization and 17 patients (56.6%) revealed progressive disease. Median survival and median response duration were 8 and 7.2 months, respectively. One- and 2-year survivals were 36.7 and 13.3%. One- and 2-year progression-free survivals were 13.3 and 3.3%. Our results suggest that concurrent adjunction of CDDP to TMZ regimen increases toxicity according to this schedule and does not improve the outcome of stage IV melanoma. The objective response rate is close to response rates observed with single-agent chemotherapy.

15 Clinical Trial Temozolomide associated with PEG-interferon in patients with metastatic melanoma: a multicenter prospective phase I/II study. 2008

Guillot, Bernard / Khamari, Amir / Cupissol, Didier / Delaunay, Michele / Bedane, Christophe / Dreno, Brigitte / Picot, Marie Christine / Dereure, Olivier. ·Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Saint-Eloi, University of Montpellier I, Montpellier, France. b-guillot@chu-montpellier.fr ·Melanoma Res · Pubmed #18337651.

ABSTRACT: Metastatic melanoma treatment remains disappointing, and a combined approach by chemotherapy and immunotherapy might increase the response rates through a synergistic action. Accordingly, a clinical trial using oral temozolomide (TMZ) and subcutaneous PEG-interferon alpha-2b (PEG) in patients with metastatic melanoma was designed to determine the maximal tolerated dosage of both drugs and the antitumoral response. A multicenter, prospective, phase I/II study was conducted in 31 metastatic melanoma patients, without cerebral metastasis. Dose escalation was performed according to the modified continual reassessment method scale and resulted in four cohorts of patients: TMZ 150 mg/m2 5 days/week each 4 weeks and PEG 0.5 microg/kg/week - TMZ 150 mg/m2 5 days/week and PEG 1.0 microg/kg/week - TMZ 200 mg/m2 5 days/week and PEG 0.5 microg/kg/week - TMZ 200 mg/m2 5 days/week and PEG 1.0 microg/kg/week. Patients received a maximum of six cycles. Thirty-three patients were enrolled in this study: one in the first dose level, one in the second one, 18 in the third one and 11 in the fourth one. At level 4, four of 11 patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity and four nondose-limiting toxicity; toxicity was mainly hematologic (grade IV thrombocytopenia). An objective response was observed in five patients (two complete response and three partial response) receiving level 3 or 4 of treatment. The disease remained stable in three patients, and six of 31 patients were alive 24 months after enrollment. The association of oral TMZ with subcutaneous PEG in metastatic melanoma displayed an unacceptable hematological toxicity with the dosages of 200 mg/m2 5 days/week and 1 microg/week, respectively. At a lower level, this treatment was effective and deserves further investigations to define its indications in metastatic melanoma patients.

16 Article A family with two cases of melanocytic tumors and fragile X syndrome. 2017

Lesage, Candice / Coupier, Isabelle / Guillot, Bernard. ·aDepartment of Dermatology, Hôpital Saint-Eloi bDepartment of Oncogenetics, Hôpital Arnaud de Villeuneuve, CHU Montpellier, France. ·Melanoma Res · Pubmed #29036014.

ABSTRACT: Fragile X syndrome (FXS), a leading cause of inherited intellectual disability, most commonly results from an expansion of the CGG trinucleotide repeat in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene to more than 200 copies (full mutation). The FXS phenotype differs by sex and is associated with intellectual and cognitive impairment, characteristic physical features, epilepsy, and/or behavioral challenges including autism spectrum disorder. In this patient population, tumors involving blood cells, digestive organs, the central nervous system, and testes have been described, but melanocytic tumors have not been reported. Here, we describe two maternal cousins with FXS, one of whom has melanoma and the other has atypical nevus syndrome. We discuss possible mechanisms leading to this unusual or possibly coincidental association and the difficulties in the optimal treatment of FXS patients.

17 Article Ipilimumab in melanoma patients with brain metastasis: a retro-spective multicentre evaluation of thirty-eight patients. 2014

Konstantinou, Maria-Polina / Dutriaux, Caroline / Gaudy-Marqueste, Caroline / Mortier, Laurent / Bedane, Christophe / Girard, Céline / Thellier, Sophie / Jouary, Thomas / Grob, Jean-Jacques / Richard, Marie-Aleth / Templier, Caroline / Sakji, Lilia / Guillot, Bernard / Paul, Carle / Meyer, Nicolas. ·Department of Dermatology, Toulouse III University and Larrey Hospital, 31059 Toulouse Cedex 9, France. ·Acta Derm Venereol · Pubmed #23824275.

ABSTRACT: Treatment with ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody that antagonizes cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), results in improved survival of patients with stage IIIc-IV melanoma. However, there is a lack of data on the efficacy of ipilimumab in patients with brain metastases. To evaluate the efficacy of ipilimumab for the treatment of brain metastasis in melanoma, a multicentre, retrospective analysis of 38 patients with brain metastases in melanoma, treated with ipilimumab in the context of the French Expanded Access Program, was performed. Three patients had a 3 partial response, 5 stable disease, 15 disease progression and 15 patients died during the induction phase due to disease progression. Median overall survival was 101 days (range 54-154). The brain metastases control rate was 16% (6/38). Ipilimumab may be effective in a few patients with central nervous system metastasis. However, patients with brain metastases and a low life expectancy may not benefit sufficiently from treatment with ipilimumab.

18 Article [New hope in metastatic melanoma treatment?]. 2012

Guillot, B. ·Département de dermatologie, hôpital Saint-Éloi, CHU de Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier cedex 5, France. b-guillot@chu-montpellier.fr ·Ann Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #23122388.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Article Risk factors in elderly people for lentigo maligna compared with other melanomas: a double case-control study. 2009

Gaudy-Marqueste, Caroline / Madjlessi, Nika / Guillot, Bernard / Avril, Marie-Françoise / Grob, Jean-Jacques. ·Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Sainte Marguerite, 270 Blvd de Sainte Marguerite, Marseille 13009, France. caroline.gaudy@mail.ap-hm.fr ·Arch Dermatol · Pubmed #19380663.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To assess lentigo maligna (LM) as an epidemiological entity separate from other melanomas (OMs) in elderly people. DESIGN: Double age- and sex-matched case-control study to compare the risk factors for LMs and OMs. SETTING: General community. Patients A total of 76 patients with LM were paired by age and sex with 76 patients with OMs and 152 controls. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The association of melanoma risk with the following potential risk factors: sun exposure history by 10-year periods, frequency of sunburns, phenotypic traits, density of freckles and sun sensitivity at age 20 years, counts of nevi larger than 2 mm in diameter on the face and forearm, skin aging features (as assessed using a photographic scale), and history of basal and/or squamous cell carcinomas. RESULTS: Risk of LMs and OMs were similarly associated with history of sunburns, light skin type, and freckling. Cumulative chronic outdoor and occupational sun exposures were not risk factors in any of the 2 groups of melanomas. Lentigo maligna differed from OMs by the absence of a detectable association with the number of nevi and a greater association with nonmelanoma skin cancers. CONCLUSIONS: Although chronically sun-exposed skin is a prerequisite for LM, risk of LM does not increase with the cumulative dose of sun exposure, but LM is associated with sunburn history, like all other types of melanomas. The main epidemiological characteristic of LM is the absence of an apparent relation with the genetic propensity to develop nevi. This epidemiological profile is in accordance with recent molecular findings and may also account for the histoclinical and evolutive characteristics of LM.

20 Article Highly sensitive detection of melanoma based on serum proteomic profiling. 2009

Caron, Julie / Mangé, Alain / Guillot, Bernard / Solassol, Jérôme. ·Department of Dermatology, CHU Montpellier, Hôpital Saint Eloi, Montpellier, France. ·J Cancer Res Clin Oncol · Pubmed #19288131.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: There is no available tumor marker that can detect primary melanoma. Proteomics analysis has been proposed as a novel tool that would lead to the discovery of potential new tumor markers. METHODS: We developed a serum proteomic fingerprinting approach coupled with a classification method to determine whether proteomic profiling could discriminate between melanoma and healthy volunteers. A total of 108 serum samples from 30 early-stage [American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage I or II] and 30 advanced-stage (AJCC stage III or IV) melanoma patients and 48 healthy volunteers were analyzed by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS) utilizing protein chip technology and artificial neural networks. RESULTS: In a first step, a multiprotein classifier was built using a training set of 30 pathologically confirmed melanoma and 24 healthy volunteer serum samples, resulting in good classification accuracy for correct diagnosis and stage classification assignment. Subsequently, our multiprotein classifier was tested in an independent validation set of 30 melanoma and 24 non-cancer serum samples patients, maintained in a good diagnostic accuracy of 98.1% (sensitivity 96.7%, specificity 100%), and 100% stage I/II classification assignment. CONCLUSIONS: Although results remain to be confirmed in larger collective patient cohorts, we could demonstrate the usefulness of proteomic profiling as a sensitive and specific assay to detect melanoma, including non-metastatic melanoma, from the serum.

21 Minor First report of ipilimumab-induced Grover disease. 2014

Munoz, J / Guillot, B / Girard, C / Dereure, O / Du-Thanh, A. ·Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Montpellier, University Montpellier 1, 80 rue Augustin Fliche, F-34295, Montpellier Cedex 5, France. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #24749658.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Minor Hepatic transarterial chemoembolization (HACE) with cisplatin in liver metastases from cutaneous melanoma: a prospective study of three patients. 2013

Devaux, S / Du Thanh, A / Gallix, B / Girard, C / Dereure, O / Guillot, B. · ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #22691056.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --