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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Allan C. Halpern
Based on 57 articles published since 2009
(Why 57 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, A. Halpern wrote the following 57 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3
1 Guideline Guidelines of care for the management of primary cutaneous melanoma. 2019

Swetter, Susan M / Tsao, Hensin / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Elder, David E / Gershenwald, Jeffrey E / Guild, Valerie / Grant-Kels, Jane M / Halpern, Allan C / Johnson, Timothy M / Sober, Arthur J / Thompson, John A / Wisco, Oliver J / Wyatt, Samantha / Hu, Shasa / Lamina, Toyin. ·Department of Dermatology, Stanford University Medical Center and Cancer Institute, Stanford, California; Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. Electronic address: sswetter@stanford.edu. · Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Division of Dermatology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona; University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, Arizona. · Department of Dermatology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Department of Pathology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas; Department of Cancer Biology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · AIM at Melanoma Foundation, Plano, Texas. · Department of Dermatology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut; Department of Pathology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut; Department of Pediatrics, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut. · Department of Dermatology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Dermatology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon. · Decatur Dermatology, Decatur, Alabama. · Department of Dermatology, University of Miami Health System, Miami, Florida. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30392755.

ABSTRACT: The incidence of primary cutaneous melanoma continues to increase each year. Melanoma accounts for the majority of skin cancer-related deaths, but treatment is usually curative following early detection of disease. In this American Academy of Dermatology clinical practice guideline, updated treatment recommendations are provided for patients with primary cutaneous melanoma (American Joint Committee on Cancer stages 0-IIC and pathologic stage III by virtue of a positive sentinel lymph node biopsy). Biopsy techniques for a lesion that is clinically suggestive of melanoma are reviewed, as are recommendations for the histopathologic interpretation of cutaneous melanoma. The use of laboratory, molecular, and imaging tests is examined in the initial work-up of patients with newly diagnosed melanoma and for follow-up of asymptomatic patients. With regard to treatment of primary cutaneous melanoma, recommendations for surgical margins and the concepts of staged excision (including Mohs micrographic surgery) and nonsurgical treatments for melanoma in situ, lentigo maligna type (including topical imiquimod and radiation therapy), are updated. The role of sentinel lymph node biopsy as a staging technique for cutaneous melanoma is described, with recommendations for its use in clinical practice. Finally, current data regarding pregnancy and melanoma, genetic testing for familial melanoma, and management of dermatologic toxicities related to novel targeted agents and immunotherapies for patients with advanced disease are summarized.

2 Guideline Melanoma, Version 2.2016, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. 2016

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Algazi, Alain / Andtbacka, Robert / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / DiMaio, Dominick / Ernstoff, Marc / Fields, Ryan C / Fleming, Martin D / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Joseph, Richard W / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Materin, Miguel A / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April K / Skitzki, Joseph / Sosman, Jeff / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Torres-Roca, Javier F / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Engh, Anita. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #27059193.

ABSTRACT: This selection from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Melanoma focuses on adjuvant therapy and treatment of in-transit disease, because substantial changes were made to the recommendations for the 2016 update. Depending on the stage of the disease, options for adjuvant therapy now include biochemotherapy and high-dose ipilimumab. Treatment options for in-transit disease now include intralesional injection with talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC), a new immunotherapy. These additions prompted re-assessment of the data supporting older recommended treatment options for adjuvant therapy and in-transit disease, resulting in extensive revisions to the supporting discussion sections.

3 Guideline Melanoma, version 4.2014. 2014

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / Daud, Adil / Dimaio, Dominick / Fleming, Martin D / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole R / Ho, Maria / Anonymous5170793. ·From 1Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; 2Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; 3Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; 4University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; 5The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; 6UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; 7UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; 8Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center; 9St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; 10University of Colorado Cancer Center; 11Aim at Melanoma; 12Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; 13Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; 14Roswell Park Cancer Institute; 15Moffitt Cancer Center; 16The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; 17Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; 18Fox Chase Cancer Center; 19The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; 20Duke Cancer Institute; 21Stanford Cancer Institute; 22Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; 23City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; 24University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; and 25National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #24812131.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma provide multidisciplinary recommendations for the management of patients with melanoma. These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight notable recent updates. Dabrafenib and trametinib, either as monotherapy (category 1) or combination therapy, have been added as systemic options for patients with unresectable metastatic melanoma harboring BRAF V600 mutations. Controversy continues regarding the value of adjuvant radiation for patients at high risk of nodal relapse. This is reflected in the category 2B designation to consider adjuvant radiation following lymphadenectomy for stage III melanoma with clinically positive nodes or recurrent disease.

4 Guideline Melanoma, version 2.2013: featured updates to the NCCN guidelines. 2013

Coit, Daniel G / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daud, Adil / Dimaio, Dominick / Fleming, Martin D / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Lind, Anne / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Pruitt, Scott K / Ross, Merrick I / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Thompson, John A / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Ho, Maria / Anonymous4310755. ·Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #23584343.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma provide multidisciplinary recommendations on the clinical management of patients with melanoma. This NCCN Guidelines Insights report highlights notable recent updates. Foremost of these is the exciting addition of the novel agents ipilimumab and vemurafenib for treatment of advanced melanoma. The NCCN panel also included imatinib as a treatment for KIT-mutated tumors and pegylated interferon alfa-2b as an option for adjuvant therapy. Also important are revisions to the initial stratification of early-stage lesions based on the risk of sentinel lymph node metastases, and revised recommendations on the use of sentinel lymph node biopsy for low-risk groups. Finally, the NCCN panel reached clinical consensus on clarifying the role of imaging in the workup of patients with melanoma.

5 Guideline Melanoma. 2012

Coit, Daniel G / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daud, Adil / Dilawari, Raza A / Dimaio, Dominick / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Lind, Anne / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Pruitt, Scott K / Ross, Merrick I / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Thompson, John A / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / Anonymous590720. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #22393197.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Guideline Guidelines of care for the management of primary cutaneous melanoma. American Academy of Dermatology. 2011

Bichakjian, Christopher K / Halpern, Allan C / Johnson, Timothy M / Foote Hood, Antoinette / Grichnik, James M / Swetter, Susan M / Tsao, Hensin / Barbosa, Victoria Holloway / Chuang, Tsu-Yi / Duvic, Madeleine / Ho, Vincent C / Sober, Arthur J / Beutner, Karl R / Bhushan, Reva / Smith Begolka, Wendy / Anonymous6410703. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan Health System and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #21868127.

ABSTRACT: The incidence of primary cutaneous melanoma has been increasing dramatically for several decades. Melanoma accounts for the majority of skin cancer-related deaths, but treatment is nearly always curative with early detection of disease. In this update of the guidelines of care, we will discuss the treatment of patients with primary cutaneous melanoma. We will discuss biopsy techniques of a lesion clinically suspicious for melanoma and offer recommendations for the histopathologic interpretation of cutaneous melanoma. We will offer recommendations for the use of laboratory and imaging tests in the initial workup of patients with newly diagnosed melanoma and for follow-up of asymptomatic patients. With regard to treatment of primary cutaneous melanoma, we will provide recommendations for surgical margins and briefly discuss nonsurgical treatments. Finally, we will discuss the value and limitations of sentinel lymph node biopsy and offer recommendations for its use in patients with primary cutaneous melanoma.

7 Guideline Melanoma. 2009

Coit, Daniel G / Andtbacka, Robert / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Dilawari, Raza A / Dimaio, Dominick / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed / Lange, Julie R / Lind, Anne / Martin, Lainie / Martini, Mary C / Pruitt, Scott K / Ross, Merrick I / Sener, Stephen F / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Thompson, John A / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / Weber, Jeffrey / Wong, Michael K / Anonymous5080627. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #19401060.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Melanoma surveillance in "high-risk" individuals. 2014

Halpern, Allan C / Marchetti, Michael A / Marghoob, Ashfaq A. ·Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #24965763.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial The ever-evolving landscape for detection of early melanoma: challenges and promises. 2013

Geller, Alan C / Halpern, Allan C. ·Department of Society, Human Development, and Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Electronic address: ageller@hsph.harvard.edu. · Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #23399817.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Review Melanoma. 2015

Schadendorf, Dirk / Fisher, David E / Garbe, Claus / Gershenwald, Jeffrey E / Grob, Jean-Jacques / Halpern, Allan / Herlyn, Meenhard / Marchetti, Michael A / McArthur, Grant / Ribas, Antoni / Roesch, Alexander / Hauschild, Axel. ·Department of Dermatology, University Duisburg-Essen, University Hospital Essen, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45147 Essen, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany. · Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Dermatology and Skin Cancers, APHM Timone Hospital Aix-Marseille University, Marseille, France. · Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Melanoma Research Center, Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. · Division of Cancer Medicine and Research, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Departments of Medicine, Surgery, and Medical and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein (UKSH), Kiel, Germany. ·Nat Rev Dis Primers · Pubmed #27188223.

ABSTRACT: Melanoma is a common cancer in the Western world with an increasing incidence. Sun exposure is still considered to be the major risk factor for melanoma. The prognosis of patients with malignant (advanced-stage) melanoma differs widely between countries, but public campaigns advocating early detection have led to significant reductions in mortality rates. As well as sun exposure, distinct genetic alterations have been identified as associated with melanoma. For example, families with melanoma who have germline mutations in CDKN2A are well known, whereas the vast majority of sporadic melanomas have mutations in the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, which is the pathway with the highest oncogenic and therapeutic relevance for this disease. BRAF and NRAS mutations are typically found in cutaneous melanomas, whereas KIT mutations are predominantly observed in mucosal and acral melanomas. GNAQ and GNA11 mutations prevail in uveal melanomas. Additionally, the PI3K-AKT-PTEN pathway and the immune checkpoint pathways are important. The finding that programmed cell death protein 1 ligand 1 (PDL1) and PDL2 are expressed by melanoma cells, T cells, B cells and natural killer cells led to the recent development of programmed cell death protein 1 (PD1)-specific antibodies (for example, nivolumab and pembrolizumab). Alongside other new drugs - namely, BRAF inhibitors (vemurafenib and dabrafenib) and MEK inhibitors (trametinib and cobimetinib) - these agents are very promising and have been shown to significantly improve prognosis for patients with advanced-stage metastatic disease. Early signs are apparent that these new treatment modalities are also improving long-term clinical benefit and the quality of life of patients. This Primer summarizes the current understanding of melanoma, from mechanistic insights to clinical progress. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/vX2N9s.

11 Review Addressing the knowledge gap in clinical recommendations for management and complete excision of clinically atypical nevi/dysplastic nevi: Pigmented Lesion Subcommittee consensus statement. 2015

Kim, Caroline C / Swetter, Susan M / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Grichnik, James M / Grossman, Douglas / Halpern, Allan C / Kirkwood, John M / Leachman, Sancy A / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Ming, Michael E / Nelson, Kelly C / Veledar, Emir / Venna, Suraj S / Chen, Suephy C. ·Pigmented Lesion Clinic and Cutaneous Oncology Program, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Pigmented Lesion and Melanoma Program, Department of Dermatology, Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, California3Dermatology Service, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Pigmented Lesion Clinic and Multidisciplinary Cutaneous Oncology Program, Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson. · Melanoma Program, Department of Dermatology, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida. · Pigmented Lesion Clinic, Departments of Dermatology and Oncological Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · Pigmented Lesion Clinic, Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Melanoma Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine, Dermatology and Translational Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology Program, Department of Dermatology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland. · Pigmented Lesion Clinic, Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Pigmented Lesion Clinic, Department of Dermatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. · Center for Research and Grants, Baptist Health South Florida, Miami. · Skin Oncology and Melanoma Center, Department of Medicine, MedStar Washington Cancer Institute and Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC. · Melanoma and Pigmented Lesion Clinic, Department of Dermatology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia15Division of Dermatology, Atlanta Veterans Administration Medical Center, Decatur, Georgia. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #25409291.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: The management of clinically atypical nevi/dysplastic nevi (CAN/DN) is controversial, with few data to guide the process. Management recommendations for DN with positive histologic margins were developed by the Delphi method to achieve consensus among members of the Pigmented Lesion Subcommittee (PLS) of the Melanoma Prevention Working Group (MPWG) after reviewing the current evidence. OBJECTIVES: To outline key issues related to the management of CAN/DN: (1) biopsies of CAN and how positive margins arise, (2) whether incompletely excised DN evolve into melanoma, (3) current data on the outcomes of DN with positive histologic margins, (4) consensus recommendations, and (5) a proposal for future studies, including a large-scale study to help guide the management of DN with positive margins. EVIDENCE REVIEW: The literature, including recent studies examining management and outcomes of DN with positive margins between 2009 to 2014, was reviewed. FINDINGS: A consensus statement by the PLS of the MPWG following review of the literature, group discussions, and a structured Delphi method consensus. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This consensus statement reviews the complexities of management of CAN/DN. A review of the literature and 2 rounds of a structured Delphi consensus resulted in the following recommendations: (1) mildly and moderately DN with clear margins do not need to be reexcised, (2) mildly DN biopsied with positive histologic margins without clinical residual pigmentation may be safely observed rather than reexcised, and (3) observation may be a reasonable option for management of moderately DN with positive histologic margins without clinically apparent residual pigmentation; however, more data are needed to make definitive recommendations in this clinical scenario.

12 Review A clinico-dermoscopic approach for skin cancer screening: recommendations involving a survey of the International Dermoscopy Society. 2013

Argenziano, Giuseppe / Giacomel, Jason / Zalaudek, Iris / Blum, Andreas / Braun, Ralph P / Cabo, Horacio / Halpern, Allan / Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer / Malvehy, Josep / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Menzies, Scott / Moscarella, Elvira / Pellacani, Giovanni / Puig, Susana / Rabinovitz, Harold / Saida, Toshiaki / Seidenari, Stefania / Soyer, H Peter / Stolz, Wilhelm / Thomas, Luc / Kittler, Harald. ·Dermatology and Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova IRCCS, Viale Risorgimento 80, Reggio Emilia 42100, Italy. Electronic address: g.argenziano@gmail.com. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #24075542.

ABSTRACT: Dermoscopy is useful for skin cancer screening, but a detailed approach is required that integrates this tool into a rational clinical work flow. To investigate clinician perceptions and behavior in approaching patients with skin tumors, a survey was launched by electronic mail through the International Dermoscopy Society. After 4 months, the responses were analyzed and significant findings calculated. Considering the current approach of study participants in examining patients for skin cancer, an up-to-date system of triage is presented in this review, which aims to promote an improved diagnostic accuracy and more timely management of skin malignancy.

13 Review A cautionary note on melanoma screening in the Hispanic/Latino population. 2013

Jaimes, Natalia / Oliveria, Susan / Halpern, Allan. ·Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10022, USA. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #23715239.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Review Microinvasive melanoma: cutaneous pharmacotherapeutic approaches. 2013

Quigley, Elizabeth A / Halpern, Allan C. ·Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 136 Mountain View Blvd, Basking Ridge, NJ, USA. Quigleye@mskcc.org ·Am J Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #23479385.

ABSTRACT: Surgical excision is the treatment of choice for primary melanomas and radiation therapy is the accepted alternative for the subset of lesions not amenable to surgery. With the recent rise in melanoma incidence, especially in the elderly, there are a growing number of cases that are neither amenable to surgery nor radiation therapy. In this article, we review pharmacotherapeutic approaches to microinvasive melanoma (invasive radial growth phase melanoma) that might be considered in such circumstances. There are no approved drugs for the treatment of primary melanoma and randomized controlled trials with 5 or more years of follow-up have not been performed. The limited studies and numerous case series in the literature on pharmacologic treatment of primary melanoma have focused on topical therapies. Accordingly, we provide a review of the potential pharmacotherapeutic agents in the treatment of microinvasive melanoma by extrapolating from the available limited literature on the use of fluorouracil, azelaic acid, retinoic acid derivatives, interferon (IFN)-α, imiquimod, and other agents for melanoma in situ, invasive melanoma, and epidermotropic melanoma metastases. Our review indicates that topical fluorouracil and tretinoin are not effective as single agents. The efficacy of azelaic acid, tazarotene, cidofovir, and intralesional IFN-α, interleukin-2, and IFN-β is undefined. Imiquimod is the most studied and promising agent; however, optimal dosage, therapeutic regimen, and survival rates are unknown. In the face of a growing demand for non-surgical treatments, formal clinical trials are needed to ascertain the role of pharmacotherapeutic agents in the treatment of microinvasive melanoma.

15 Review Survival is not the only valuable end point in melanoma screening. 2012

Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Kim, Caroline C / Swetter, Susan M / Chen, Suephy C / Halpern, Allan C / Kirkwood, John M / Leachman, Sancy A / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Ming, Michael E / Grichnik, James M / Anonymous1021005. ·Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #22336950.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Review Skin cancer education for primary care physicians: a systematic review of published evaluated interventions. 2011

Goulart, Jacqueline M / Quigley, Elizabeth A / Dusza, Stephen / Jewell, Sarah T / Alexander, Gwen / Asgari, Maryam M / Eide, Melody J / Fletcher, Suzanne W / Geller, Alan C / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Weinstock, Martin A / Halpern, Allan C / Anonymous3480691. ·Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 07920, USA. ·J Gen Intern Med · Pubmed #21472502.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Early detection of melanoma may provide an opportunity to positively impact melanoma mortality. Numerous skin cancer educational interventions have been developed for primary care physicians (PCPs) to improve diagnostic accuracy. Standardized training is also a prerequisite for formal testing of melanoma screening in the primary care setting. OBJECTIVE: We conducted a systematic review to determine the extent of evaluated interventions designed to educate PCPs about skin cancer, including melanoma. DESIGN: Relevant studies in the English language were identified through systemic searches performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS, and Cochrane through December 2010. Supplementary information was obtained from corresponding authors of the included studies when necessary. APPROACH: Studies eligible for inclusion formally evaluated skin cancer education interventions and were designed primarily for PCPs. Excluded studies lacked a specified training intervention, used decision-making software, focused solely on risk factor identification, or did not directly educate or assess participants. Twenty studies met the selection criteria. Data were extracted according to intervention content and delivery format, and study outcomes. KEY RESULTS: All interventions included instructions about skin cancer diagnosis, but otherwise varied in content. Curricula utilized six distinct educational techniques, usually incorporating more than one. Intervention duration varied from 12 min to over 6 h. Eight of the 20 studies were randomized trials. Most studies (18/20, 90%) found a significant improvement in at least one of the following five outcome categories: knowledge, competence, confidence, diagnostic performance, or systems outcomes. Competence was most commonly measured; no study evaluated all categories. Variability in study design, interventions, and outcome measures prevented correlation of outcomes with intervention characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the development of many isolated educational interventions, few have been tested rigorously or evaluated under sufficient standardized conditions to allow for quantitative comparison. Improved and rigorously tested skin cancer educational interventions for PCPs with outcome measures focusing on changes in performance are needed.

17 Review Defining the patient at high risk for melanoma. 2010

Psaty, Estee L / Scope, Alon / Halpern, Allan C / Marghoob, Ashfaq A. ·Dermatology Service Department of Medicine Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center New York, NY 11788, USA. ·Int J Dermatol · Pubmed #20465687.

ABSTRACT: In this practical review, we aim to help clinicians identify patients who are at significant risk of developing malignant melanoma. Universal screening is challenging, thus it is important to effectively single out patients who have a high risk of developing the disease. We provide a summary of pertinent questions to review when taking the patient's history, point out the phenotypic features to note during skin examination, and suggest risk stratification as a means to plan initial and long-term surveillance strategy. We mention personal and family history of melanoma as prime risk factors for melanoma, yet the review also focuses on the patient who has no history of melanoma, either in himself or his family, and the proper ways to evaluate his likelihood of developing the disease.

18 Review Selection criteria for genetic assessment of patients with familial melanoma. 2009

Leachman, Sancy A / Carucci, John / Kohlmann, Wendy / Banks, Kimberly C / Asgari, Maryam M / Bergman, Wilma / Bianchi-Scarrà, Giovanna / Brentnall, Teresa / Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte / Bruno, William / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / de Snoo, Femke A / Debniak, Tadeusz / Demierre, Marie-France / Elder, David / Goldstein, Alisa M / Grant-Kels, Jane / Halpern, Allan C / Ingvar, Christian / Kefford, Richard F / Lang, Julie / MacKie, Rona M / Mann, Graham J / Mueller, Kurt / Newton-Bishop, Julia / Olsson, Håkan / Petersen, Gloria M / Puig, Susana / Rigel, Darrell / Swetter, Susan M / Tucker, Margaret A / Yakobson, Emanuel / Zitelli, John A / Tsao, Hensin. ·Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-5550, USA. sancy.leachman@hci.utah.edu ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #19751883.

ABSTRACT: Approximately 5% to 10% of melanoma may be hereditary in nature, and about 2% of melanoma can be specifically attributed to pathogenic germline mutations in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A). To appropriately identify the small proportion of patients who benefit most from referral to a genetics specialist for consideration of genetic testing for CDKN2A, we have reviewed available published studies of CDKN2A mutation analysis in cohorts with invasive, cutaneous melanoma and found variability in the rate of CDKN2A mutations based on geography, ethnicity, and the type of study and eligibility criteria used. Except in regions of high melanoma incidence, such as Australia, we found higher rates of CDKN2A positivity in individuals with 3 or more primary invasive melanomas and/or families with at least one invasive melanoma and two or more other diagnoses of invasive melanoma and/or pancreatic cancer among first- or second-degree relatives on the same side of the family. The work summarized in this review should help identify individuals who are appropriate candidates for referral for genetic consultation and possible testing.

19 Review Melanoma early detection. 2009

Terushkin, Vitaly / Halpern, Allan C. ·Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 160 East 53rd Street, New York, NY 10022, USA. ·Hematol Oncol Clin North Am · Pubmed #19464598.

ABSTRACT: Recognizing early forms of melanoma may have significant impact on decreasing mortality from this malignancy. As a result, multiple efforts have focused on developing new and improving current early detection strategies. These include educating patients about the importance of performing skin self-examination, increasing rates of complete skin examinations by physicians in the context of routine care, initiating mass screening campaigns, creating specialized skin cancer clinics, and developing better diagnostic tools through advances in technology. In this article, the current state of these efforts is reviewed.

20 Review The most common challenges in melanoma diagnosis and how to avoid them. 2009

Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Changchien, Lily / DeFazio, Jennifer / Dessio, Whitney C / Malvehy, Josep / Zalaudek, Iris / Halpern, Allan C / Scope, Alon. ·Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10022, USA. marghooa@mskcc.org ·Australas J Dermatol · Pubmed #19178485.

ABSTRACT: Due to its particularly lethal nature and tendency to affect relatively young individuals, the timely diagnosis of melanoma remains of paramount importance for clinicians and their patients. Unfortunately, melanomas can mimic benign lesions that are overwhelmingly more common in the population than are melanomas, and misdiagnosis or delay in diagnosis of melanoma can occur. Misdiagnosis of melanoma serves as one of the most common causes for malpractice litigation brought against medical practitioners. In this review we describe seven clinical scenarios that represent challenges in melanoma diagnosis and discuss potential strategies for avoiding the errors that commonly give rise to those scenarios.

21 Clinical Trial Sunbeds and sunlamps: who used them and their risk for melanoma. 2011

Fears, Thomas R / Sagebiel, Richard W / Halpern, Allan / Elder, David E / Holly, Elizabeth A / Guerry, Dupont / Tucker, Margaret A. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. ·Pigment Cell Melanoma Res · Pubmed #21362155.

ABSTRACT: Sunbed/sunlamp use was recently classified as carcinogenic. This report considers characteristics of those who use sunbeds/sunlamps and the effect of sunbed/sunlamp use on their risk for melanoma within a large case-control study carried out in 1991-1992. Females were more likely than males to have used sunbeds/sunlamps. Use by females increased strongly and significantly with younger ages and with the perceived ability to tan. For females, the individual risk for melanoma increased with typical session time and frequency of sessions. Use before age 20, current use and years of use were not significant. The use patterns of occasional and frequent users were very different. We estimate that typical 5-min sessions would increase the risk for melanoma by 19% for frequent users (10+ sessions) and by 3% for occasional users (1-9 sessions). Body sites that are not generally exposed to sunlight were more common sites of primary melanomas for frequent sunbed/sunlamp users. For males, measures of sunbed/sunlamp use were not significantly associated with melanoma risk.

22 Article Accuracy of tele-consultation on management decisions of lesions suspect for melanoma using reflectance confocal microscopy as a stand-alone diagnostic tool. 2019

Scope, A / Dusza, S W / Pellacani, G / Gill, M / Gonzalez, S / Marchetti, M A / Rabinovitz, H S / Marghoob, A A / Alessi-Fox, C / Halpern, A C. ·Medical Screening Institute, Sheba Medical Center and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy. · SkinMedical Research and Diagnostics, Dobbs Ferry, NY, USA. · SUNY Downstate, Brooklyn, NY, USA. · Department of Medicine and Medical Specialties, University de Alcalà, Madrid, Spain. · Skin and Cancer Associates, Plantation, FL, USA. · Caliber Imaging and Diagnostics, Rochester, NY, USA. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #30242916.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Diagnostic accuracy of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) as a stand-alone diagnostic tool for suspect skin lesions has not been extensively studied. OBJECTIVE: Primary aim was to measure experts' accuracy in RCM-based management decisions. Secondary aim was to identify melanoma-specific RCM features. METHODS: The study enrolled patients ≥18 years that underwent biopsy of skin lesions clinically suspected to be melanoma. One hundred lesions imaged by RCM were randomly selected from 439 lesions prospectively collected at four pigmented lesion clinics. The study data set included 23 melanomas, three basal cell and two squamous cell carcinomas, 11 indeterminate melanocytic lesions and 61 benign lesions including 50 nevi. Three expert RCM evaluators were blinded to clinical or dermoscopic images, and to the final histopathological diagnosis. Evaluators independently issued a binary RCM-based management decision, 'biopsy' vs. 'observation'; these decisions were scored against histopathological diagnosis, with 'biopsy' as the correct management decision for malignant and indeterminate lesions. A subset analysis of 23 melanomas and 50 nevi with unequivocal histopathological diagnosis was performed to identify melanoma-specific RCM features. RESULTS: Sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were 74%, 67% and 70% for reader 1, 46%, 84% and 69% for reader 2, and 72%, 46% and 56% for reader 3, respectively. The overall kappa for management decisions was 0.34. Readers had unanimous agreement on management for 50 of the 100 lesions. Non-specific architecture, non-visible papillae, streaming of nuclei, coarse collagen fibres and abnormal vasculature showed a significant association with melanoma in the evaluation of at least two readers. CONCLUSIONS: Reflectance confocal microscopy tele-consultation of especially challenging lesions, based on image review without benefit of clinical or dermoscopy images, may be associated with limited diagnostic accuracy and interobserver agreement. Architectural and stromal criteria may emerge as potentially useful and reproducible criteria for melanoma diagnosis.

23 Article The first 30 years of the American Academy of Dermatology skin cancer screening program: 1985-2014. 2018

Okhovat, Jean-Phillip / Beaulieu, Derek / Tsao, Hensin / Halpern, Allan C / Michaud, Dominique S / Shaykevich, Shimon / Geller, Alan C. ·Department of Dermatology, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Stanford, California; Department of Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Tufts University School of Medicine, Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. · Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Dermatology Service of the Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Department of Public Health & Community Medicine, Tufts Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of General Internal Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: ageller@hsph.harvard.edu. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30057360.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The incidence of melanoma is rising faster than that of any other preventable cancer in the United States. The American Academy of Dermatology has sponsored free skin cancer education and screenings conducted by volunteer dermatologists in the United States since 1985. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to assess the American Academy of Dermatology's national skin cancer screening program from 1986 to 2014 by analyzing the risk factor profile, access to dermatologic services, and examination results. METHODS: We conducted several detailed statistical analyses of the screening population. RESULTS: From 1986 to 2014, records were available for 2,046,531 screenings, 1,963,141 (96%) of which were subjected to detailed analysis. Men comprised 38% of all participants. The number of annual screenings reached approximately 100,000 in 1990 and remained relatively stable thereafter. From 1991 to 2014 (data for 1995, 1996 and 2000 were unavailable), clinical diagnoses were rendered for 20,628 melanomas, 156,087 dysplastic nevi, 32,893 squamous cell carcinomas, and 129,848 basal cell carcinomas. Only 21% of screenees had a regular dermatologist. Those with a clinical diagnosis of skin cancer were more likely than the general screening population to be uninsured. LIMITATIONS: Inability to verify clinical diagnoses histopathologically. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that the SPOTme program has detected thousands of skin cancers that may have gone undetected or experienced a delay in detection.

24 Article Results of the 2016 International Skin Imaging Collaboration International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging challenge: Comparison of the accuracy of computer algorithms to dermatologists for the diagnosis of melanoma from dermoscopic images. 2018

Marchetti, Michael A / Codella, Noel C F / Dusza, Stephen W / Gutman, David A / Helba, Brian / Kalloo, Aadi / Mishra, Nabin / Carrera, Cristina / Celebi, M Emre / DeFazio, Jennifer L / Jaimes, Natalia / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Quigley, Elizabeth / Scope, Alon / Yélamos, Oriol / Halpern, Allan C / Anonymous5761037. ·Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · IBM Research Division, Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York. · Departments of Neurology, Psychiatry, and Biomedical Informatics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. · Kitware Inc, Clifton Park, New York. · Stoecker & Associates, Rolla, Missouri. · Melanoma Unit, Department of Dermatology, Hospital Clinic, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, CIBER de Enfermedades Raras, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Computer Science, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, Arkansas. · Dermatology Service, Aurora Centro Especializado en Cáncer de Piel, Medellín, Colombia; Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida. · Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York; Department of Dermatology, Sheba Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. Electronic address: halperna@mskcc.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #28969863.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Computer vision may aid in melanoma detection. OBJECTIVE: We sought to compare melanoma diagnostic accuracy of computer algorithms to dermatologists using dermoscopic images. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study using 100 randomly selected dermoscopic images (50 melanomas, 44 nevi, and 6 lentigines) from an international computer vision melanoma challenge dataset (n = 379), along with individual algorithm results from 25 teams. We used 5 methods (nonlearned and machine learning) to combine individual automated predictions into "fusion" algorithms. In a companion study, 8 dermatologists classified the lesions in the 100 images as either benign or malignant. RESULTS: The average sensitivity and specificity of dermatologists in classification was 82% and 59%. At 82% sensitivity, dermatologist specificity was similar to the top challenge algorithm (59% vs. 62%, P = .68) but lower than the best-performing fusion algorithm (59% vs. 76%, P = .02). Receiver operating characteristic area of the top fusion algorithm was greater than the mean receiver operating characteristic area of dermatologists (0.86 vs. 0.71, P = .001). LIMITATIONS: The dataset lacked the full spectrum of skin lesions encountered in clinical practice, particularly banal lesions. Readers and algorithms were not provided clinical data (eg, age or lesion history/symptoms). Results obtained using our study design cannot be extrapolated to clinical practice. CONCLUSION: Deep learning computer vision systems classified melanoma dermoscopy images with accuracy that exceeded some but not all dermatologists.

25 Article Factors in Early Adolescence Associated With a Mole-Prone Phenotype in Late Adolescence. 2017

Xu, Haoming / Marchetti, Michael A / Dusza, Stephen W / Chung, Esther / Fonseca, Maira / Scope, Alon / Geller, Alan C / Bishop, Marilyn / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Halpern, Allan C. ·Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Sheba Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts. · School Health Services, Framingham Public Schools, Framingham, Massachusetts. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #28593303.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Nevi are important phenotypic risk factors for melanoma in adults. Few studies have examined the constitutional and behavioral factors associated with a mole-prone phenotype in adolescents. Objective: To identify host, behavioral, and dermoscopic factors in early adolescence (age, 14 years) that are associated with a mole-prone phenotype in late adolescence (age, 17 years). Design, Setting, and Participants: A prospective observational cohort study from the Study of Nevi in Children was conducted from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2014, with a 2- to 3-year follow-up. A total of 569 students from the school system in Framingham, Massachusetts, were enrolled in the 8th or 9th grade (baseline; mean [SD] age, 14.4 [0.7] years). The overall retention rate was 73.3%, and 417 students were reassessed in the 11th grade. Main Outcome and Measures: Mole-prone phenotype in the 11th grade, defined as total nevus count of the back and 1 randomly selected leg in the top decile of the cohort or having any nevi greater than 5 mm in diameter. Results: Of the 417 students assessed at follow-up in the 11th grade (166 females and 251 males; mean [SD] age, 17.0 [0.4] years), 111 participants (26.6%) demonstrated a mole-prone phenotype: 69 students (62.2%) with 1 nevus greater than 5 mm in diameter, 23 students (20.7%) with total nevus count in the top decile, and 19 students (17.1%) with both characteristics. On multivariate analysis, baseline total nevus count (adjusted odds ratio, 9.08; 95% CI, 4.0-23.7; P < .001) and increased variability of nevus dermoscopic pattern (adjusted odds ratio, 4.24; 95% CI, 1.36-13.25; P = .01) were associated with a mole-prone phenotype. Conclusions and Relevance: This study found clinically recognizable factors associated with a mole-prone phenotype that may facilitate the identification of individuals at risk for melanoma. These findings could have implications for primary prevention strategies and help target at-risk adolescents for higher-intensity counseling about sun protection and skin self-examination.

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