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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Shasa Hu
Based on 11 articles published since 2010
(Why 11 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Shasa Hu wrote the following 11 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Guidelines of care for the management of primary cutaneous melanoma. 2019

Swetter, Susan M / Tsao, Hensin / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Elder, David E / Gershenwald, Jeffrey E / Guild, Valerie / Grant-Kels, Jane M / Halpern, Allan C / Johnson, Timothy M / Sober, Arthur J / Thompson, John A / Wisco, Oliver J / Wyatt, Samantha / Hu, Shasa / Lamina, Toyin. ·Department of Dermatology, Stanford University Medical Center and Cancer Institute, Stanford, California; Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. Electronic address: sswetter@stanford.edu. · Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Division of Dermatology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona; University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, Arizona. · Department of Dermatology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Department of Pathology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas; Department of Cancer Biology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · AIM at Melanoma Foundation, Plano, Texas. · Department of Dermatology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut; Department of Pathology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut; Department of Pediatrics, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut. · Department of Dermatology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Dermatology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon. · Decatur Dermatology, Decatur, Alabama. · Department of Dermatology, University of Miami Health System, Miami, Florida. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30392755.

ABSTRACT: The incidence of primary cutaneous melanoma continues to increase each year. Melanoma accounts for the majority of skin cancer-related deaths, but treatment is usually curative following early detection of disease. In this American Academy of Dermatology clinical practice guideline, updated treatment recommendations are provided for patients with primary cutaneous melanoma (American Joint Committee on Cancer stages 0-IIC and pathologic stage III by virtue of a positive sentinel lymph node biopsy). Biopsy techniques for a lesion that is clinically suggestive of melanoma are reviewed, as are recommendations for the histopathologic interpretation of cutaneous melanoma. The use of laboratory, molecular, and imaging tests is examined in the initial work-up of patients with newly diagnosed melanoma and for follow-up of asymptomatic patients. With regard to treatment of primary cutaneous melanoma, recommendations for surgical margins and the concepts of staged excision (including Mohs micrographic surgery) and nonsurgical treatments for melanoma in situ, lentigo maligna type (including topical imiquimod and radiation therapy), are updated. The role of sentinel lymph node biopsy as a staging technique for cutaneous melanoma is described, with recommendations for its use in clinical practice. Finally, current data regarding pregnancy and melanoma, genetic testing for familial melanoma, and management of dermatologic toxicities related to novel targeted agents and immunotherapies for patients with advanced disease are summarized.

2 Review Role, Extent, and Impact of Comorbidity on Prognosis and Survival in Advanced Metastatic Melanoma: A Review. 2019

Bebe, Frederick N / Hu, Shasa / Brown, Tony L / Tulp, Orien L. ·Dr. Bebe is with the Kentucky State University College of Agriculture and Food Science and Sustainable Systems in Frankfort, Kentucky. · Dr. Hu is with the Miller College of Medicine at the University of Miami in Miami, Florida. · Drs. Brown and Tulp are with the University of Science, Arts and Technology Monserrat in the British West Indies and the College of Medicine and Graduate School in Denver, Colorado. ·J Clin Aesthet Dermatol · Pubmed #30881572.

ABSTRACT: Increased incidence of comorbidity in advanced metastatic melanoma (AMM) is emerging as an important factor in patient prognosis, treatment, and survival. This paper reviews the impact of comorbidities on the prognosis and survival outcomes of patients diagnosed with AMM. Our search initially yielded limited results. We then broadened our search to include breast, colorectal, and prostate cancer and covered malignancies in which screening (like melanoma) is associated with the detection of early-stage disease. Most studies showed that a higher prevalence of comorbidity was associated with more advanced cancer stage. Both treatment and survival of patients were influenced by age and the extent of comorbidity. Racial differences in survival were greatest for patients with no comorbidities and less evident at higher levels of comorbidity. Comorbid conditions showed differential effects for prognosis, treatment, and survival. Limited Information in the literature demonstrates that more research is warranted with respect to comorbidities and AMM.

3 Article Consensus Recommendations for the Use of Non-Invasive Melanoma Detection Techniques Based on Results of an International DELPHI Process. 2019

Waldman, Reid A / Grant-Kels, Jane M / Curiel, Clara N / Curtis, Julia / Rodríguez, Salvador González / Hu, Shasa / Kerr, Philip / Marghoob, Ashfaq / Markowitz, Orit / Pellacani, Giovanni / Rabinovitz, Harold / Rao, Babar / Scope, Alon / Stein, Jennifer A / Swetter, Susan M. ·University of Connecticut Department of Dermatology, Farmington, CT 06032. · University of Connecticut Department of Dermatology, Farmington, CT 06032. Electronic address: grant@uchc.edu. · University of Arizona College of Medicine Department of Dermatology. · Department of Dermatology University of Utah School of Medicine. · Department of Medicine and Medical Specialties Alcalá University. · Department of Dermatology University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. · Department of Dermatology Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. · Department of Dermatology SUNY Downstate Medical Center. · Department of Dermatology University of Modena and Reggio Emilia. · Dermatology Associates. · Department of Dermatology Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. · The Kittner Skin Cancer Screening & Research Institute Sheba Medical Center and Sackler School of Medicine. · The Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology New York University School of Medicine. · Department of Dermatology Stanford University Medical Center. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #31563644.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Article Barriers to Enacting Childhood Sun Safety Behavior: Findings from Focus Group Interviews Among Hispanic Parents in Miami. 2019

Carcioppolo, Nick / Sanchez, Margaret / Ali, Khudejah / Nolan, Katherine / Hu, Shasa. ·Department of Communication Studies, University of Miami, 5100 Brunson Dr. 3013 Wolfson Communication Building, Coral Gables, FL, 33146, USA. carcioppolo.nick@gmail.com. · Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1475 NW 12th Ave., Miami, FL, 33136, USA. carcioppolo.nick@gmail.com. · Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1475 NW 12th Ave., Miami, FL, 33136, USA. · Department of Communication Studies, University of Miami, 5100 Brunson Dr. 3013 Wolfson Communication Building, Coral Gables, FL, 33146, USA. · Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1475 NW 12th Ave., Miami, FL, 33136, USA. ·J Immigr Minor Health · Pubmed #30141024.

ABSTRACT: Hispanics are generally diagnosed at more advanced stages of melanoma than non-Hispanic Whites, leading to lower survival rates. As skin cancer incidence is attributable to lifetime exposure to ultraviolet light, encouraging the performance of sun safety behaviors in childhood is an important strategy to address this divide. Problematically, we know little about the barriers to sun safety among Hispanic youth, especially among the Hispanics living in South Florida. To address this gap, we conducted focus groups among parents of Hispanic children aged 4-10 to understand the unique barriers to sun protection among this audience. Results revealed four categories of barriers: child-based barriers, external barriers, parental enactment barriers, and parental proper adherence barriers. These results are discussed in terms of their implications for future intervention research among this audience.

5 Article Rates of Dermoscopy Use for Melanoma Diagnosis in the Miami VA Medical Center. 2017

Chen, Lucy L / Wei, Erin X / Ma, Fangchao / Keri, Jonette / Hu, Shasa. ·Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida. · Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #28273283.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Article Google Search Trends and Skin Cancer: Evaluating the US Population's Interest in Skin Cancer and Its Association With Melanoma Outcomes. 2015

Bloom, Romi / Amber, Kyle T / Hu, Shasa / Kirsner, Robert. ·Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida. · Department of Internal Medicine, MacNeal Hospital, Berwyn, Illinois. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #26061357.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Article Predictors of neighborhood risk for late-stage melanoma: addressing disparities through spatial analysis and area-based measures. 2014

Hu, Shasa / Sherman, Recinda / Arheart, Kristopher / Kirsner, Robert S. ·Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA; Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA. Electronic address: shu@med.miami.edu. · Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA. · Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA; Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #24335896.

ABSTRACT: Minority populations have disproportionately more advanced stage melanoma and worse survival. To clarify the impact of race and ethnicity on late-stage melanoma diagnosis, we performed spatial analysis of geocoded melanoma cases diagnosed in Florida, 1999-2008, to identify geographic clusters of higher-than-expected incidence of late-stage melanoma and developed predictive models for melanoma cases in high-risk neighborhoods accounting for area-based poverty, race/ethnicity, patient insurance status, age, and gender. In the adjusted model, Hispanic ethnicity and census tract-level poverty are the strongest predictors for clustering of late-stage melanoma. Hispanic whites were 43% more likely to live in neighborhoods with excessive late-stage melanoma (P<0.001) compared with non-Hispanic whites (NHW). For every 1% increase in population living in poverty, there is a 2% increase in late-stage melanoma clustering (P<0.001). Census tract-level poverty predicted late-stage melanoma similarly among NHW and Hispanic whites. The impact of insurance coverage varied among populations; the most consistent trend was that Medicaid coverage is associated with higher odds for late-stage melanoma. The finding that Hispanics are most likely to reside in high-risk neighborhoods, independent of poverty and insurance status, underscores the importance of addressing, and overcoming community-level barriers to melanoma care.

8 Minor Recent dermatology visit is associated with thinner Breslow depth nodular melanomas. 2019

Wei, Erin X / Chen, Lucy / Ma, Fangchao / Keri, Jonette / Hu, Shasa. ·Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: xewei@bwh.harvard.edu. · Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida. · Illinois Department of Public Health, Springfield, Illinois. · Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida; Veterans Affairs Miami Health Care System, Miami, Florida. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30876534.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Minor Association of Google Search Volume Index Peaks for Skin Cancer With Skin Cancer Awareness Month--Reply. 2016

Amber, Kyle T / Bloom, Romi / Hu, Shasa. ·Department of Dermatology, University of California Irvine Health Center, Irvine. · Department of Dermatology & Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #26762258.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Minor Suboptimal skin cancer screening and delayed melanoma diagnosis in Hispanics: comment on "Cutaneous melanoma and other skin cancer screening among Hispanics in the United States". 2011

Hu, Shasa / Kirsner, Robert S. · ·Arch Dermatol · Pubmed #21690546.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Minor Geographic distribution of melanoma in Miami-Dade County, Florida: online first. 2011

Yin, Natalie / Parker, Dorothy F / Hu, Shasa / Kirsner, Robert S. · ·Arch Dermatol · Pubmed #21242347.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --