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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Richard W. Joseph
Based on 29 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Richard Joseph wrote the following 29 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2
1 Guideline NCCN Guidelines Insights: Melanoma, Version 3.2016. 2016

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Algazi, Alain / Andtbacka, Robert / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / DiMaio, Dominick / Fields, Ryan C / Fleming, Martin D / Gastman, Brian / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Johnson, Douglas / Joseph, Richard W / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Materin, Miguel A / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ott, Patrick / Gupta, Aparna Priyanath / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April K / Skitzki, Joseph / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Torres-Roca, Javier F / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Engh, Anita. ·From Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine; The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute; University of Colorado Cancer Center; Aim at Melanoma; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital; Fox Chase Cancer Center; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; Duke Cancer Institute; Roswell Park Cancer Institute; Stanford Cancer Institute; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; Moffitt Cancer Center; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; and National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #27496110.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma have been significantly revised over the past few years in response to emerging data on a number of novel agents and treatment regimens. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the data and rationale supporting extensive changes to the recommendations for systemic therapy in patients with metastatic or unresectable melanoma.

2 Guideline Melanoma, Version 2.2016, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. 2016

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Algazi, Alain / Andtbacka, Robert / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / DiMaio, Dominick / Ernstoff, Marc / Fields, Ryan C / Fleming, Martin D / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Joseph, Richard W / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Materin, Miguel A / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April K / Skitzki, Joseph / Sosman, Jeff / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Torres-Roca, Javier F / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Engh, Anita. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #27059193.

ABSTRACT: This selection from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Melanoma focuses on adjuvant therapy and treatment of in-transit disease, because substantial changes were made to the recommendations for the 2016 update. Depending on the stage of the disease, options for adjuvant therapy now include biochemotherapy and high-dose ipilimumab. Treatment options for in-transit disease now include intralesional injection with talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC), a new immunotherapy. These additions prompted re-assessment of the data supporting older recommended treatment options for adjuvant therapy and in-transit disease, resulting in extensive revisions to the supporting discussion sections.

3 Review Patient-derived tumor xenograft models for melanoma drug discovery. 2016

Harris, Antoneicka L / Joseph, Richard W / Copland, John A. ·a Center for Clinical and Translational Sciences , Mayo Clinic College of Medicine , Rochester , MN , USA. · b Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine , Mayo Clinic , Jacksonville , FL , USA. · c Department of Cancer Biology , Mayo Clinic Florida , Jacksonville , FL , USA. ·Expert Opin Drug Discov · Pubmed #27454070.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Cutaneous metastatic melanoma (MM) is an aggressive form of skin cancer, with treatment providing cures to a minority of patients. The multiple risk factors that contribute to MM development suggest that cutaneous melanomas embody a repertoire of altered genetic events requiring studies to better understand its biology in order to develop novel therapies. AREAS COVERED: Patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDTX) mouse models are noted to be superior for novel drug discovery and tumor biology studies due to their ability to maintain tumor heterogeneity and their use as real-time individualized patient models. In this review, the authors highlight the utility of PDTX models in advancing treatment options for patients with MM by creating invaluable preclinical models that exhibit patient-relevant treatment outcomes. EXPERT OPINION: There is a strong necessity to reassess current approaches in which preclinical experiments are designed and executed in order to minimize unwarranted clinical trials. With rigorously performed preclinical studies, PDTX models have the capability to effectively confirm or deny drug effective outcomes. The ability to do this, however, will demand better aids to guide experimental design, the redefining of preclinical efficacy, and the understanding that these models should be viewed as complementary to other drug prediction and efficacy tools.

4 Review Efficacy of immunotherapy for metastatic mucosal melanoma. 2016

Shreders, Amanda / Joseph, Richard W. ·Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA. ·Immunotherapy · Pubmed #27381682.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Review Steroid hormone influence on melanomagenesis. 2015

Mitkov, Mario / Joseph, Richard / Copland, John. ·Mayo Clinic Department of Dermatology, Jacksonville, FL, USA; Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE, USA. Electronic address: mitkov.mario@mayo.edu. · Mayo Clinic Department of Oncology, Jacksonville, FL, USA. · Mayo Clinic Department of Cancer Biology, Jacksonville, FL, USA. ·Mol Cell Endocrinol · Pubmed #26415591.

ABSTRACT: Disparities in the prognosis and incidence of melanoma between male and female patients have led clinicians to explore the influence of steroid hormones on the development and progression of this malignancy. A better understanding of the disparities of melanoma behavior between sexes and ages could lead to improved prevention and treatment options. There are multiple themes in the literature that unify the physiologic functions of estrogen and androgen receptors; herein we discuss and map their pathways. Overall, it is important to understand that the differences in melanoma behavior between the sexes are multifactorial and likely involve interactions between the immune system, endocrine system, and environment, namely UV-radiation. Melanoma deserves a spot among hormone-sensitive tumors, and if tamoxifen is re-introduced for future therapy, tissue ratios of estrogen receptors should be obtained beforehand to assess their therapeutic predictive value. Because androgens, estrogens, and their receptors are involved in signaling of commonly mutated melanoma pathways, potential synergistic properties of the recently developed molecular kinase inhibitors that target those pathways may exist.

6 Review Vemurafenib: an evidence-based review of its clinical utility in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. 2014

Swaika, Abhisek / Crozier, Jennifer A / Joseph, Richard W. ·Department of Hematology and Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA. ·Drug Des Devel Ther · Pubmed #24966667.

ABSTRACT: The discovery of BRAF mutations in the majority of patients with metastatic melanoma combined with the identification of highly selective BRAF inhibitors have revolutionized the treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma. The first highly specific BRAF inhibitor, vemurafenib, began clinical testing in 2008 and moved towards a rapid approval in 2011. Vemurafenib induced responses in ~50% of patients with metastatic BRAF-mutant melanoma and demonstrated improved overall survival in a randomized Phase III trial. Furthermore, vemurafenib is well-tolerated with a low toxicity profile and rapid onset of action. Finally, vemurafenib is active even in patients with widely metastatic disease. Despite the success of vemurafenib in treating patients with BRAF-mutant metastatic melanoma, most, if not all, patients ultimately develop resistance resulting in disease progression at a median time of ~6 months. Multiple mechanisms of resistance have been described and rationale strategies are underway to combat resistance. This review highlights the development, clinical utility, resistance mechanisms, and future use of vemurafenib both in melanoma and other malignancies. We consulted PubMed, Scopus, MEDLINE, ASCO annual symposium abstracts, and http://clinicaltrials.gov/ for the purpose of this review.

7 Review Therapy for metastatic melanoma: the past, present, and future. 2012

Finn, Laura / Markovic, Svetomir N / Joseph, Richard W. ·Division of Hematology and Oncology, Mayo Clinic Florida, 4500 San Pablo Road, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA. ·BMC Med · Pubmed #22385436.

ABSTRACT: Metastatic melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer with a median overall survival of less than one year. Advancements in our understanding of how melanoma evades the immune system as well as the recognition that melanoma is a molecularly heterogeneous disease have led to major improvements in the treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma. In 2011, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved two novel therapies for advanced melanoma: a BRAF inhibitor, vemurafenib, and an immune stimulatory agent, ipilimumab. The success of these agents has injected excitement and hope into patients and clinicians and, while these therapies have their limitations, they will likely provide excellent building blocks for the next generation of therapies. In this review we will discuss the advantages and limitations of the two new approved agents, current clinical trials designed to overcome these limitations, and future clinical trials that we feel hold the most promise.

8 Clinical Trial Efficacy and Safety of Pembrolizumab in Patients Enrolled in KEYNOTE-030 in the United States: An Expanded Access Program. 2017

Gangadhar, Tara C / Hwu, Wen-Jen / Postow, Michael A / Hamid, Omid / Daud, Adil / Dronca, Roxana / Joseph, Richard / O'Day, Steven J / Hodi, F S / Pavlick, Anna C / Kluger, Harriet / Oxborough, Romina P / Yang, Aiming / Gazdoiu, Mihaela / Kush, Debra A / Ebbinghaus, Scot / Salama, April K S. ·*Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA †The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX ‡Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center §Weill Cornell Medical College §§NYU Clinical Cancer Center, New York, NY ∥The Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Los Angeles ¶Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco ††The John Wayne Cancer Institute, Providence Saint John's Health Center, Santa Monica, CA #Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN **Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL ‡‡Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA ∥∥Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT ¶¶Clinigen, Weybridge, UK ##Merck & Co. Inc., Kenilworth, NJ ***Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC. ·J Immunother · Pubmed #29028788.

ABSTRACT: KEYNOTE-030 (ClinicalTrials.gov ID, NCT02083484) was a global expanded access program that allowed access to pembrolizumab, an antiprogrammed death 1 antibody, for patients with advanced melanoma before its regulatory approval. Patients with unresectable stage III/IV melanoma that progressed after standard-of-care therapy, including ipilimumab and, if BRAF mutant, a BRAF inhibitor, were eligible to receive pembrolizumab 2 mg/kg every 3 weeks. Response was assessed by immune-related response criteria by investigator review. Adverse events (AEs) were graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. In the United States, 979 patients enrolled between April and September 2014. Of the 947 evaluable patients, 621 (65.6%) remained on treatment and transitioned to receive commercial pembrolizumab following approval by the Food and Drug Administration, whereas 326 (34.4%) discontinued, most commonly for disease progression (39.6%) or death (26.4%). Objective response rate was 14.5% (95% confidence interval, 12.2%-16.8%) in the treated population (n=947) and 22.1% (95% confidence interval, 18.8%-25.5%) in patients who had ≥1 response assessment reported (n=619). Twelve patients achieved complete response. One hundred eighty-one (19.1%) patients experienced ≥1 treatment-related AE, most commonly general disorders (8.0%), skin/subcutaneous tissue disorders (7.3%), and gastrointestinal disorders (6.4%); 29 (3.1%) patients experienced ≥1 grade 3/4 treatment-related AE. Immune-mediated AEs were also reported. There were no treatment-related deaths. The safety and efficacy observed in this expanded access program were consistent with those previously reported for similar populations and support the use of pembrolizumab for patients with advanced melanoma.

9 Clinical Trial Ipilimumab alone or in combination with nivolumab after progression on anti-PD-1 therapy in advanced melanoma. 2017

Zimmer, Lisa / Apuri, Susmitha / Eroglu, Zeynep / Kottschade, Lisa A / Forschner, Andrea / Gutzmer, Ralf / Schlaak, Max / Heinzerling, Lucie / Krackhardt, Angela M / Loquai, Carmen / Markovic, Svetomir N / Joseph, Richard W / Markey, Kelly / Utikal, Jochen S / Weishaupt, Carsten / Goldinger, Simone M / Sondak, Vernon K / Zager, Jonathan S / Schadendorf, Dirk / Khushalani, Nikhil I. ·Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, University Duisburg-Essen, Germany & German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: lisa.zimmer@uk-essen.de. · Hematology/Oncology Fellowship Program, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute/University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA. · Department of Cutaneous Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA. · Department of Oncology, Hematology and Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Tübingen, Germany. · Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Skin Cancer Center Hannover, Hannover Medical School, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Cologne, Skin Cancer Center, Center for Integrated Oncology (CIO) Köln Bonn, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Germany. · III. Medical Department, Technische Universität München (TUM) Munich, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Mainz, Germany. · Skin Cancer Unit, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany; Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Ruprecht-Karl University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Münster, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, University Duisburg-Essen, Germany & German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg, Germany. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #28214657.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The anti-programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) inhibitors pembrolizumab and nivolumab alone or in combination with ipilimumab have shown improved objective response rates and progression-free survival compared to ipilimumab only in advanced melanoma patients. Anti-PD-1 therapy demonstrated nearly equal clinical efficacy in patients who had progressed after ipilimumab or were treatment-naïve. However, only limited evidence exists regarding the efficacy of ipilimumab alone or in combination with nivolumab after treatment failure to anti-PD-therapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A multicenter retrospective study in advanced melanoma patients who were treated with nivolumab (1 or 3 mg/kg) and ipilimumab (1 mg or 3 mg/kg) or ipilimumab (3 mg/kg) alone after treatment failure to anti-PD-1 therapy was performed. Patient, tumour, pre- and post-treatment characteristics were analysed. RESULTS: In total, 47 patients were treated with ipilimumab (ipi-group) and 37 patients with ipilimumab and nivolumab (combination-group) after treatment failure to anti-PD-1 therapy. Overall response rates for the ipi- and the combination-group were 16% and 21%, respectively. Disease control rate was 42% for the ipi-group and 33% for the combination-group. One-year overall survival rates for the ipi- and the combination-group were 54% and 55%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Ipilimumab should be considered as a viable treatment option for patients with failure to prior anti-PD-1 therapy, including those with progressive disease as best response to prior anti-PD-1. In contrast, the combination of ipilimumab and nivolumab appears significantly less effective in this setting compared to treatment-naïve patients.

10 Clinical Trial Programmed Death-Ligand 1 Expression and Response to the Anti-Programmed Death 1 Antibody Pembrolizumab in Melanoma. 2016

Daud, Adil I / Wolchok, Jedd D / Robert, Caroline / Hwu, Wen-Jen / Weber, Jeffrey S / Ribas, Antoni / Hodi, F Stephen / Joshua, Anthony M / Kefford, Richard / Hersey, Peter / Joseph, Richard / Gangadhar, Tara C / Dronca, Roxana / Patnaik, Amita / Zarour, Hassane / Roach, Charlotte / Toland, Grant / Lunceford, Jared K / Li, Xiaoyun Nicole / Emancipator, Kenneth / Dolled-Filhart, Marisa / Kang, S Peter / Ebbinghaus, Scot / Hamid, Omid. ·Adil I. Daud, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco · Antoni Ribas, University of California, Los Angeles · Omid Hamid, The Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Los Angeles · Charlotte Roach and Grant Toland, Dako North America, Carpinteria, CA · Jedd D. Wolchok, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY · Wen-Jen Hwu, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston · Amita Patnaik, South Texas Accelerated Research Therapeutics, San Antonio, TX · Jeffrey S. Weber, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa · Richard Joseph, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL · F. Stephen Hodi, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA · Tara C. Gangadhar, Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia · Hassane Zarour, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA · Roxana Dronca, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN · Jared K. Lunceford, Xiaoyun Nicole Li, Kenneth Emancipator, Marisa Dolled-Filhart, S. Peter Kang, and Scot Ebbinghaus, Merck & Co, Kenilworth, NJ · Caroline Robert, Gustave Roussy and Paris-Sud University, Villejuif, France · Anthony M. Joshua, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada · Richard Kefford, Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead Hospital and Melanoma Institute Australia · Richard Kefford, Macquarie University · and Richard Kefford and Peter Hersey, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #27863197.

ABSTRACT: Purpose Expression of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) is a potential predictive marker for response and outcome after treatment with anti-programmed death 1 (PD-1). This study explored the relationship between anti-PD-1 activity and PD-L1 expression in patients with advanced melanoma who were treated with pembrolizumab in the phase Ib KEYNOTE-001 study (clinical trial information: NCT01295827). Patients and Methods Six hundred fifty-five patients received pembrolizumab10 mg/kg once every 2 weeks or once every 3 weeks, or 2 mg/kg once every 3 weeks. Tumor response was assessed every 12 weeks per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) v1.1 by independent central review. Primary outcome was objective response rate. Secondary outcomes included progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Membranous PD-L1 expression in tumor and tumor-associated immune cells was assessed by a clinical trial immunohistochemistry assay (22C3 antibody) and scored on a unique melanoma (MEL) scale of 0 to 5 by one of three pathologists who were blinded to clinical outcome; a score ≥ 2 (membranous staining in ≥ 1% of cells) was considered positive. Results Of 451 patients with evaluable PD-L1 expression, 344 (76%) had PD-L1-positive tumors. Demographic and staging variables were equally distributed among PD-L1-positive and -negative patients. An association between higher MEL score and higher response rate and longer PFS (hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.71 to 0.82) and OS (hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.69 to 0.83) was observed ( P < .001 for each). Objective response rate was 8%, 12%, 22%, 43%, 57%, and 53% for MEL 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. Conclusion PD-L1 expression in pretreatment tumor biopsy samples was correlated with response rate, PFS, and OS; however, patients with PD-L1-negative tumors may also achieve durable responses.

11 Clinical Trial Association of Pembrolizumab With Tumor Response and Survival Among Patients With Advanced Melanoma. 2016

Ribas, Antoni / Hamid, Omid / Daud, Adil / Hodi, F Stephen / Wolchok, Jedd D / Kefford, Richard / Joshua, Anthony M / Patnaik, Amita / Hwu, Wen-Jen / Weber, Jeffrey S / Gangadhar, Tara C / Hersey, Peter / Dronca, Roxana / Joseph, Richard W / Zarour, Hassane / Chmielowski, Bartosz / Lawrence, Donald P / Algazi, Alain / Rizvi, Naiyer A / Hoffner, Brianna / Mateus, Christine / Gergich, Kevin / Lindia, Jill A / Giannotti, Maxine / Li, Xiaoyun Nicole / Ebbinghaus, Scot / Kang, S Peter / Robert, Caroline. ·Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles. · Department of Hematology/Oncology, The Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Los Angeles, California. · Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Department of Medical Oncology, Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead Hospital and Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, Australia7Department of Clinical Medicine, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Clinical Research, South Texas Accelerated Research Therapeutics, San Antonio. · Department of Melanoma, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston. · Department of Cutaneous Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida. · Division of Hematology and Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Department of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Division of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Department of Hematology/Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida. · Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Department of Hematology/Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. · Department of Medical Oncology, Gustave-Roussy Cancer Campus and Paris Sud University, Villejuif Paris-Sud, France. · Department of Clinical Oncology, Merck & Co, Inc, Kenilworth, New Jersey. · BARDS, Merck & Co, Inc, Kenilworth, New Jersey. ·JAMA · Pubmed #27092830.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: The programmed death 1 (PD-1) pathway limits immune responses to melanoma and can be blocked with the humanized anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody pembrolizumab. OBJECTIVE: To characterize the association of pembrolizumab with tumor response and overall survival among patients with advanced melanoma. DESIGN, SETTINGS, AND PARTICIPANTS: Open-label, multicohort, phase 1b clinical trials (enrollment, December 2011-September 2013). Median duration of follow-up was 21 months. The study was performed in academic medical centers in Australia, Canada, France, and the United States. Eligible patients were aged 18 years and older and had advanced or metastatic melanoma. Data were pooled from 655 enrolled patients (135 from a nonrandomized cohort [n = 87 ipilimumab naive; n = 48 ipilimumab treated] and 520 from randomized cohorts [n = 226 ipilimumab naive; n = 294 ipilimumab treated]). Cutoff dates were April 18, 2014, for safety analyses and October 18, 2014, for efficacy analyses. EXPOSURES: Pembrolizumab 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks, 10 mg/kg every 3 weeks, or 2 mg/kg every 3 weeks continued until disease progression, intolerable toxicity, or investigator decision. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The primary end point was confirmed objective response rate (best overall response of complete response or partial response) in patients with measurable disease at baseline per independent central review. Secondary end points included toxicity, duration of response, progression-free survival, and overall survival. RESULTS: Among the 655 patients (median [range] age, 61 [18-94] years; 405 [62%] men), 581 had measurable disease at baseline. An objective response was reported in 194 of 581 patients (33% [95% CI, 30%-37%]) and in 60 of 133 treatment-naive patients (45% [95% CI, 36% to 54%]). Overall, 74% (152/205) of responses were ongoing at the time of data cutoff; 44% (90/205) of patients had response duration for at least 1 year and 79% (162/205) had response duration for at least 6 months. Twelve-month progression-free survival rates were 35% (95% CI, 31%-39%) in the total population and 52% (95% CI, 43%-60%) among treatment-naive patients. Median overall survival in the total population was 23 months (95% CI, 20-29) with a 12-month survival rate of 66% (95% CI, 62%-69%) and a 24-month survival rate of 49% (95% CI, 44%-53%). In treatment-naive patients, median overall survival was 31 months (95% CI, 24 to not reached) with a 12-month survival rate of 73% (95% CI, 65%-79%) and a 24-month survival rate of 60% (95% CI, 51%-68%). Ninety-two of 655 patients (14%) experienced at least 1 treatment-related grade 3 or 4 adverse event (AE) and 27 of 655 (4%) patients discontinued treatment because of a treatment-related AE. Treatment-related serious AEs were reported in 59 patients (9%). There were no drug-related deaths. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Among patients with advanced melanoma, pembrolizumab administration was associated with an overall objective response rate of 33%, 12-month progression-free survival rate of 35%, and median overall survival of 23 months; grade 3 or 4 treatment-related AEs occurred in 14%. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01295827.

12 Clinical Trial Evaluation of Immune-Related Response Criteria and RECIST v1.1 in Patients With Advanced Melanoma Treated With Pembrolizumab. 2016

Hodi, F Stephen / Hwu, Wen-Jen / Kefford, Richard / Weber, Jeffrey S / Daud, Adil / Hamid, Omid / Patnaik, Amita / Ribas, Antoni / Robert, Caroline / Gangadhar, Tara C / Joshua, Anthony M / Hersey, Peter / Dronca, Roxana / Joseph, Richard / Hille, Darcy / Xue, Dahai / Li, Xiaoyun Nicole / Kang, S Peter / Ebbinghaus, Scot / Perrone, Andrea / Wolchok, Jedd D. ·F. Stephen Hodi, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA · Wen-Jen Hwu, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston · Amita Patnaik, South Texas Accelerated Research Therapeutics, San Antonio, TX · Richard Kefford, Westmead Hospital, Melanoma Institute Australia, and Macquarie University · Peter Hersey, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia · Jeffrey S. Weber, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa · Richard Joseph, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL · Adil Daud, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco · Omid Hamid, The Angeles Clinic and Research Institute · Antoni Ribas, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA · Caroline Robert, Gustave-Roussy and Paris-Sud University, Villejuif-Paris-Sud, France · Tara C. Gangadhar, Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA · Anthony M. Joshua, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada · Roxana Dronca, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN · Darcy Hille, Dahai Xue, Xiaoyun Nicole Li, S. Peter Kang, Scot Ebbinghaus, and Andrea Perrone, Merck, Kenilworth, NJ · and Jedd D. Wolchok, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #26951310.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: We evaluated atypical response patterns and the relationship between overall survival and best overall response measured per immune-related response criteria (irRC) and Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, version 1.1 (RECIST v1.1) in patients with advanced melanoma treated with pembrolizumab in the phase Ib KEYNOTE-001 study (clinical trial information: NCT01295827). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients received pembrolizumab 2 or 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks or every 3 weeks. Atypical responses were identified by using centrally assessed irRC data in patients with ≥ 28 weeks of imaging. Pseudoprogression was defined as ≥ 25% increase in tumor burden at week 12 (early) or any assessment after week 12 (delayed) that was not confirmed as progressive disease at next assessment. Response was assessed centrally per irRC and RECIST v1.1. RESULTS: Of the 655 patients with melanoma enrolled, 327 had ≥ 28 weeks of imaging follow-up. Twenty-four (7%) of these 327 patients had atypical responses (15 [5%] with early pseudoprogression and nine [3%] with delayed pseudoprogression). Of the 592 patients who survived ≥ 12 weeks, 84 (14%) experienced progressive disease per RECIST v1.1 but nonprogressive disease per irRC. Two-year overall survival rates were 77.6% in patients with nonprogressive disease per both criteria (n = 331), 37.5% in patients with progressive disease per RECIST v1.1 but nonprogressive disease per irRC (n = 84), and 17.3% in patients with progressive disease per both criteria (n = 177). CONCLUSION: Atypical responses were observed in patients with melanoma treated with pembrolizumab. Based on survival analysis, conventional RECIST might underestimate the benefit of pembrolizumab in approximately 15% of patients; modified criteria that permit treatment beyond initial progression per RECIST v1.1 might prevent premature cessation of treatment.

13 Clinical Trial Pilot Trial of Selecting Molecularly Guided Therapy for Patients with Non-V600 BRAF-Mutant Metastatic Melanoma: Experience of the SU2C/MRA Melanoma Dream Team. 2015

LoRusso, Patricia M / Boerner, Scott A / Pilat, Mary Jo / Forman, Karen M / Zuccaro, Clarice Y / Kiefer, Jeffrey A / Liang, Winnie S / Hunsberger, Sally / Redman, Bruce G / Markovic, Svetomir N / Sekulic, Aleksandar / Bryce, Alan H / Joseph, Richard W / Cowey, C Lance / Fecher, Leslie Anne / Sosman, Jeffrey Alan / Chapman, Paul B / Schwartz, Gary K / Craig, David W / Carpten, John D / Trent, Jeffrey M. ·Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut. Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan. patricia.lorusso@yale.edu. · Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut. Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan. · Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan. · Translational Genomics Research Institute, Phoenix, Arizona. · Biometrics Research Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland. · University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center (UMCCC), Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, Arizona. · Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida. · Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center/Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas. · Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee. · Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Columbia University, New York, New York. ·Mol Cancer Ther · Pubmed #26063764.

ABSTRACT: Targeted therapies and immunotherapies have led to significant improvements in the treatment of advanced cancers, including metastatic melanoma. However, new strategies are desperately needed to overcome therapeutic resistance to these agents, as well as to identify effective treatment approaches for cancer patients that fall outside major targetable mutational subtypes (e.g., non-V600 BRAF melanoma). One such strategy is to extend the paradigm of individually tailored, molecularly targeted therapy into a broader spectrum of melanoma patients, particularly those bearing tumors without commonly recognized therapeutic targets, as well as having failed or were ineligible for immunotherapy. In this nontreatment pilot study, next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies were utilized, including whole genome and whole transcriptome sequencing, to identify molecular aberrations in patients with non-V600 BRAF metastatic melanoma. This information was then rationally matched to an appropriate clinical treatment from a defined pharmacopeia. Five patients with advanced non-V600 BRAF metastatic melanoma were enrolled. We demonstrated successful performance of the following during a clinically relevant time period: patient tumor biopsy, quality DNA/RNA extraction, DNA/RNA-based sequencing for gene expression analysis, analysis utilizing a series of data integration methodologies, report generation, and tumor board review with formulated treatment plan. Streamlining measures were conducted based on the experiences of enrolling, collecting specimens, and analyzing the molecular signatures of patients. We demonstrated the feasibility of using NGS to identify molecular aberrations and generate an individualized treatment plan in this patient population. A randomized treatment study utilizing lessons learned from the conduct of this pilot study is currently underway.

14 Clinical Trial Anti-programmed-death-receptor-1 treatment with pembrolizumab in ipilimumab-refractory advanced melanoma: a randomised dose-comparison cohort of a phase 1 trial. 2014

Robert, Caroline / Ribas, Antoni / Wolchok, Jedd D / Hodi, F Stephen / Hamid, Omid / Kefford, Richard / Weber, Jeffrey S / Joshua, Anthony M / Hwu, Wen-Jen / Gangadhar, Tara C / Patnaik, Amita / Dronca, Roxana / Zarour, Hassane / Joseph, Richard W / Boasberg, Peter / Chmielowski, Bartosz / Mateus, Christine / Postow, Michael A / Gergich, Kevin / Elassaiss-Schaap, Jeroen / Li, Xiaoyun Nicole / Iannone, Robert / Ebbinghaus, Scot W / Kang, S Peter / Daud, Adil. ·Gustave Roussy and INSERM U981, Paris-Sud, France. Electronic address: caroline.robert@gustaveroussy.fr. · University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA. · Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead Hospital and Melanoma Institute Australia, Westmead, NSW, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA. · Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada. · University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · South Texas Accelerated Research Therapeutics, San Antonio, TX, USA. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL, USA. · Gustave Roussy and INSERM U981, Paris-Sud, France. · Merck, Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA. · University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. ·Lancet · Pubmed #25034862.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The anti-programmed-death-receptor-1 (PD-1) antibody pembrolizumab has shown potent antitumour activity at different doses and schedules in patients with melanoma. We compared the efficacy and safety of pembrolizumab at doses of 2 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg every 3 weeks in patients with ipilimumab-refractory advanced melanoma. METHODS: In an open-label, international, multicentre expansion cohort of a phase 1 trial, patients (aged ≥18 years) with advanced melanoma whose disease had progressed after at least two ipilimumab doses were randomly assigned with a computer-generated allocation schedule (1:1 final ratio) to intravenous pembrolizumab at 2 mg/kg every 3 weeks or 10 mg/kg every 3 weeks until disease progression, intolerable toxicity, or consent withdrawal. Primary endpoint was overall response rate (ORR) assessed with the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST, version 1.1) by independent central review. Analysis was done on the full-analysis set (all treated patients with measurable disease at baseline). This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01295827. FINDINGS: 173 patients received pembrolizumab 2 mg/kg (n=89) or 10 mg/kg (n=84). Median follow-up duration was 8 months. ORR was 26% at both doses--21 of 81 patients in the 2 mg/kg group and 20 of 76 in the 10 mg/kg group (difference 0%, 95% CI -14 to 13; p=0·96). Treatment was well tolerated, with similar safety profiles in the 2 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg groups and no drug-related deaths. The most common drug-related adverse events of any grade in the 2 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg groups were fatigue (29 [33%] vs 31 [37%]), pruritus (23 [26%] vs 16 [19%]), and rash (16 [18%] vs 15 [18%]). Grade 3 fatigue, reported in five (3%) patients in the 2 mg/kg pembrolizumab group, was the only drug-related grade 3 to 4 adverse event reported in more than one patient. INTERPRETATION: The results suggest that pembrolizumab at a dose of 2 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg every 3 weeks might be an effective treatment in patients for whom there are few effective treatment options. FUNDING: Merck Sharp and Dohme.

15 Clinical Trial Safety and tumor responses with lambrolizumab (anti-PD-1) in melanoma. 2013

Hamid, Omid / Robert, Caroline / Daud, Adil / Hodi, F Stephen / Hwu, Wen-Jen / Kefford, Richard / Wolchok, Jedd D / Hersey, Peter / Joseph, Richard W / Weber, Jeffrey S / Dronca, Roxana / Gangadhar, Tara C / Patnaik, Amita / Zarour, Hassane / Joshua, Anthony M / Gergich, Kevin / Elassaiss-Schaap, Jeroen / Algazi, Alain / Mateus, Christine / Boasberg, Peter / Tumeh, Paul C / Chmielowski, Bartosz / Ebbinghaus, Scot W / Li, Xiaoyun Nicole / Kang, S Peter / Ribas, Antoni. ·Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA. ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #23724846.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The programmed death 1 (PD-1) receptor is a negative regulator of T-cell effector mechanisms that limits immune responses against cancer. We tested the anti-PD-1 antibody lambrolizumab (previously known as MK-3475) in patients with advanced melanoma. METHODS: We administered lambrolizumab intravenously at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram of body weight every 2 or 3 weeks or 2 mg per kilogram every 3 weeks in patients with advanced melanoma, both those who had received prior treatment with the immune checkpoint inhibitor ipilimumab and those who had not. Tumor responses were assessed every 12 weeks. RESULTS: A total of 135 patients with advanced melanoma were treated. Common adverse events attributed to treatment were fatigue, rash, pruritus, and diarrhea; most of the adverse events were low grade. The confirmed response rate across all dose cohorts, evaluated by central radiologic review according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST), version 1.1, was 38% (95% confidence interval [CI], 25 to 44), with the highest confirmed response rate observed in the cohort that received 10 mg per kilogram every 2 weeks (52%; 95% CI, 38 to 66). The response rate did not differ significantly between patients who had received prior ipilimumab treatment and those who had not (confirmed response rate, 38% [95% CI, 23 to 55] and 37% [95% CI, 26 to 49], respectively). Responses were durable in the majority of patients (median follow-up, 11 months among patients who had a response); 81% of the patients who had a response (42 of 52) were still receiving treatment at the time of analysis in March 2013. The overall median progression-free survival among the 135 patients was longer than 7 months. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with advanced melanoma, including those who had had disease progression while they had been receiving ipilimumab, treatment with lambrolizumab resulted in a high rate of sustained tumor regression, with mainly grade 1 or 2 toxic effects. (Funded by Merck Sharp and Dohme; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01295827.).

16 Clinical Trial A randomized phase II study of cilengitide (EMD 121974) in patients with metastatic melanoma. 2012

Kim, Kevin B / Prieto, Victor / Joseph, Richard W / Diwan, Abdul H / Gallick, Gary E / Papadopoulos, Nicholas E / Bedikian, Agop Y / Camacho, Luis H / Hwu, Patrick / Ng, Chaan S / Wei, Wei / Johnson, Marcella M / Wittemer, Sabine M / Vardeleon, Anna / Reckeweg, Aaron / Colevas, A Dimitrios. ·Department of Melanoma Medical Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, The University of Texas, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. kkim@mdanderson.org ·Melanoma Res · Pubmed #22668797.

ABSTRACT: Cilengitide (EMD 121974) is a selective inhibitor of integrins αvβ3 and αvβ5. The αvβ3 promotes the proliferation of tumor-associated endothelial cells and potentially the survival of melanoma cells. We conducted a randomized phase II trial in patients with metastatic melanoma to evaluate the clinical efficacy of cilengitide. Patients with stage IV or unresectable stage III melanoma who were either chemonaive or who had previously received one systemic therapy were enrolled. Patients were randomly assigned to either 500 or 2000 mg of cilengitide administered intravenously twice weekly. The primary aim of this study was to determine the progression-free survival rate at 8 weeks. Tumor samples and blood samples were collected for pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic studies. Twenty-nine patients were enrolled, of whom 26 were treated (14 at 500 mg and 12 at 2000 mg). Among those treated, only three were progression free at 8 weeks: two in the 500 mg arm and one in the 2000 mg arm. One patient in the 2000 mg arm showed a prolonged partial response after an initial 28% enlargement of her target lesions. The treatment was well tolerated without clinically significant adverse events. The sole responder and one of two patients with stable disease had no αvβ3 expression at baseline. Overall, αvβ3 expression was decreased by day 8 of the treatment (P=0.05). Cilengitide was well tolerated by patients in both the treatment arms but had minimal clinical efficacy as a single-agent therapy for metastatic melanoma, and the efficacy was not related to baseline αvβ3 expression.

17 Clinical Trial Impact of clinical and pathologic features on tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte expansion from surgically excised melanoma metastases for adoptive T-cell therapy. 2011

Joseph, Richard W / Peddareddigari, Vijay R / Liu, Ping / Miller, Priscilla W / Overwijk, Willem W / Bekele, Nebiyou B / Ross, Merrick I / Lee, Jeffrey E / Gershenwald, Jeffrey E / Lucci, Anthony / Prieto, Victor G / McMannis, John D / Papadopoulos, Nicholas / Kim, Kevin / Homsi, Jade / Bedikian, Agop / Hwu, Wen-Jen / Hwu, Patrick / Radvanyi, Laszlo G. ·Department of Melanoma Medical Oncology, The University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ·Clin Cancer Res · Pubmed #21632855.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Clinical trials on adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT) using expanded tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) have shown response rates of over 50% in refractory melanoma. However, little is known how clinical and pathologic features impact TIL outgrowth isolated from metastatic melanoma tumors. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We analyzed the impact of clinical and pathologic features on initial TIL outgrowth in 226 consecutive patients undergoing tumor resection. Successful initial TIL outgrowth was defined as ≥40 million viable lymphocytes harvested from all tumor fragments in a 5-week culture. To normalize for the different size of resected tumors and thus available tumor fragments, we divided the number of expanded TIL by the starting number of tumor fragments (TIL/fragment). RESULTS: Overall, initial TIL outgrowth was successful in 62% of patients, with patients ≤30 years of age (94%; P = 0.01) and female patients (71% vs. 57% for males; P = 0.04) having the highest rate of success. Systemic therapy 30 days before tumor harvest negatively impacted initial TIL outgrowth compared to patients who never received systemic therapy (47% vs. 71%, P = 0.02). Biochemotherapy within 0 to 60 days of tumor harvest negatively impacted the initial TIL outgrowth with a success rate of only 16% (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Parameters such as age, sex, and the type and timing of prior systemic therapy significantly affect the success rate of the initial TIL outgrowth from tumor fragments for ACT; these parameters may be helpful in selecting patients for melanoma ACT.

18 Article High response rate to PD-1 blockade in desmoplastic melanomas. 2018

Eroglu, Zeynep / Zaretsky, Jesse M / Hu-Lieskovan, Siwen / Kim, Dae Won / Algazi, Alain / Johnson, Douglas B / Liniker, Elizabeth / Ben Kong, ? / Munhoz, Rodrigo / Rapisuwon, Suthee / Gherardini, Pier Federico / Chmielowski, Bartosz / Wang, Xiaoyan / Shintaku, I Peter / Wei, Cody / Sosman, Jeffrey A / Joseph, Richard W / Postow, Michael A / Carlino, Matteo S / Hwu, Wen-Jen / Scolyer, Richard A / Messina, Jane / Cochran, Alistair J / Long, Georgina V / Ribas, Antoni. ·University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Moffitt Cancer Center and University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA. · The University of Texas-MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York, USA. · Georgetown Lombardi Cancer Center, Washington DC, USA. · Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, San Francisco, California, USA. · Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida, USA. · The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·Nature · Pubmed #29320474.

ABSTRACT: Desmoplastic melanoma is a rare subtype of melanoma characterized by dense fibrous stroma, resistance to chemotherapy and a lack of actionable driver mutations, and is highly associated with ultraviolet light-induced DNA damage. We analysed sixty patients with advanced desmoplastic melanoma who had been treated with antibodies to block programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) or PD-1 ligand (PD-L1). Objective tumour responses were observed in forty-two of the sixty patients (70%; 95% confidence interval 57-81%), including nineteen patients (32%) with a complete response. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a high mutational load and frequent NF1 mutations (fourteen out of seventeen cases) in these tumours. Immunohistochemistry analysis from nineteen desmoplastic melanomas and thirteen non-desmoplastic melanomas revealed a higher percentage of PD-L1-positive cells in the tumour parenchyma in desmoplastic melanomas (P = 0.04); these cells were highly associated with increased CD8 density and PD-L1 expression in the tumour invasive margin. Therefore, patients with advanced desmoplastic melanoma derive substantial clinical benefit from PD-1 or PD-L1 immune checkpoint blockade therapy, even though desmoplastic melanoma is defined by its dense desmoplastic fibrous stroma. The benefit is likely to result from the high mutational burden and a frequent pre-existing adaptive immune response limited by PD-L1 expression.

19 Article Clinical Features of Acquired Resistance to Anti-PD-1 Therapy in Advanced Melanoma. 2017

Wang, Daniel Y / Eroglu, Zeynep / Ozgun, Alpaslan / Leger, Paul D / Zhao, Shilin / Ye, Fei / Luke, Jason J / Joseph, Richard W / Haq, Rizwan / Ott, Patrick A / Hodi, F Stephen / Sosman, Jeffrey A / Johnson, Douglas B / Buchbinder, Elizabeth I. ·Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · Department of Cutaneous Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida. · Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. · Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, Florida. · Melanoma Disease Center, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Medicine, Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. douglas.b.johnson@vanderbilt.edu elizabeth_buchbinder@dfci.harvard.edu. · Melanoma Disease Center, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. douglas.b.johnson@vanderbilt.edu elizabeth_buchbinder@dfci.harvard.edu. ·Cancer Immunol Res · Pubmed #28396509.

ABSTRACT: Anti-PD-1 therapy has improved clinical outcomes in advanced melanoma, but most patients experience intrinsic resistance. Responding patients can develop acquired resistance to anti-PD-1. We retrospectively reviewed 488 patients treated with anti-PD-1 from three academic centers and identified 36 patients with acquired resistance, defined as disease progression following objective response. The incidence, timing, disease sites, post-progression survival (PPS), and outcomes were evaluated descriptively. The acquired resistance cohort consisted of 67% with more than 1 feature of poor prognosis (stage M1c, elevated LDH, or brain metastasis), and 67% had previously received ipilimumab. Partial and complete responses were achieved in 89% (

20 Article Prolonged Benefit from Ipilimumab Correlates with Improved Outcomes from Subsequent Pembrolizumab. 2016

Shreders, Amanda / Joseph, Richard / Peng, Chengwei / Ye, Fei / Zhao, Shilin / Puzanov, Igor / Sosman, Jeffrey A / Johnson, Douglas B. ·Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida. Shreders.Amanda@mayo.edu. · Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida. · Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee. · Department of Quantitative Sciences, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee. ·Cancer Immunol Res · Pubmed #27197063.

ABSTRACT: Patients with metastatic melanoma whose disease progresses on ipilimumab can clearly derive benefit from subsequent anti-programmed death-1 (PD-1). However, patients experience heterogeneous outcomes with ipilimumab, including rapid or delayed progression, and it is unclear whether patterns of ipilimumab progression influence subsequent clinical responses to anti-PD-1. We retrospectively reviewed data from 116 patients with metastatic melanoma who progressed on ipilimumab and were subsequently treated with pembrolizumab. The study objectives were to determine whether progression-free survival (PFS) with ipilimumab was associated with PFS, objective response rate (ORR), and clinical benefit rate (CBR; ORR + stable disease) with pembrolizumab. Patients with PFS ≥90 days after treatment with ipilimumab generally had superior outcomes with subsequent pembrolizumab treatment compared with patients with PFS <90 days (ORR, 49% vs. 35%, P = 0.12; CBR, 66% vs. 46%, P = 0.03). Patients with prolonged ipilimumab benefit (PFS ≥ 180 days) had excellent outcomes with pembrolizumab compared with rapid progressors (PFS < 45 days; ORR, 55% vs. 25%; CBR, 80% vs. 25%; median PFS, 249 vs. 50 days). Using logistic regression models, PFS with ipilimumab was independently correlated with response to pembrolizumab (odds ratio, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.02-1.51). This study shows that prolonged PFS with ipilimumab predicts excellent outcomes with subsequent pembrolizumab treatment, offering valuable prognostic information for clinicians. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(7); 569-73. ©2016 AACR.

21 Article Treatment of in-transit and metastatic melanoma in two patients treated with ipilimumab and topical imiquimod. 2016

Joseph, Richard W / Cappel, Mark / Tzou, Katherine / Bagaria, Sanjay / Gilstrap, Cheryl / Swaika, Abhisek / Jambusaria-Pahlajani, Anokhi. ·aDivision of Medical Oncology Departments of bDermatology cRadiation Oncology dGeneral Surgery, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, Florida, USA. ·Melanoma Res · Pubmed #27138458.

ABSTRACT: Checkpoint blockade inhibitors have revolutionized the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Despite the success of these agents in improving the overall survival of patients with metastatic melanoma, not all patients achieve clinical benefit, leaving room for improvement. The presence of cutaneous metastases in patients with metastatic melanoma provides the unique opportunity to treat the cutaneous lesions with a local modality while simultaneously treating systemic disease with systemic therapy. Herein, we describe the treatment of two patients with both in-transit and metastatic melanoma with the combination of the topical toll-like receptor 7 agonist imiquimod with systemic ipilimumab. Both patients appeared to have progressed and developed new cutaneous and systemic metastases while on single agent ipilimumab only to respond when started on topical imiquimod. Both patients tolerated the combination of imiquimod and ipilimumab without serious adverse events, and both patients had excellent clinical responses. These cases provide a proof of principle of the possibility of the combination of toll-like receptor 7 agonists with immune checkpoint blockade inhibitors.

22 Article Lichenoid dermatitis in three patients with metastatic melanoma treated with anti-PD-1 therapy. 2015

Joseph, Richard W / Cappel, Mark / Goedjen, Brent / Gordon, Matthew / Kirsch, Brandon / Gilstrap, Cheryl / Bagaria, Sanjay / Jambusaria-Pahlajani, Anokhi. ·Division of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida. joseph.richard@mayo.edu. · Department of Dermatology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida. · Division of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida. · Department of General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida. ·Cancer Immunol Res · Pubmed #25287118.

ABSTRACT: Therapies that activate the immune system through blocking the binding of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) present on tumors and PD-1 (programmed death 1) present on activated immune cells are revolutionizing the care for patients with cancer. These therapies work by inhibiting negative regulators of the immune system, thereby decreasing a tumor's ability to evade the immune system. The side effects of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapies are generally mild and as expected are related to autoimmune reactions. Two of the most common side effects of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 therapies are rash and pruritus occurring in approximately 20% of patients. Although the rash is generally recognized to be immune mediated, the exact mechanisms of the rash remain unclear. Herein, we report three cases of lichenoid dermatitis in three patients treated with MK-3475 (anti-PD-1) that were characterized with marked T-cell infiltrates with few PD-1-positive cells. The rashes in all three patients were relatively mild, allowing treatment to continue despite the rashes.

23 Article c-MET expression in primary and liver metastases in uveal melanoma. 2014

Gardner, Faithlore P / Serie, Daniel J / Salomao, Diva R / Wu, Kevin J / Markovic, Svetomir N / Pulido, Jose S / Joseph, Richard W. ·aDivision of Hematology/Oncology bDepartment of Biomedical Informatics and Biostatics cDepartment of Pathology, Mayo Clinic Florida, Jacksonville, Florida dDepartment of Pathology eDepartment of Medical Oncology fDepartment of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic Rochester, Rochester, MN, USA. ·Melanoma Res · Pubmed #25211165.

ABSTRACT: There is a pressing need for effective therapies to treat uveal melanoma. Agents that inhibit the c-MET pathway have shown promise in multiple malignancies that overexpress c-MET. Herein, we assess c-MET expression in both primary uveal melanoma and liver metastases of uveal melanoma and evaluate the association of c-MET expression with clinical and pathologic variables. We have retrospectively identified tumor samples from primary and liver metastases of uveal melanoma from 1 January 1990 to 1 January 2012. We utilized immunohistochemistry to assess c-MET expression, and two pathologists quantified c-MET expression using an H-score (product of the intensity of staining and percentage of positive cells). The Mann-Whitney U-test, Pearson's correlation, and Cox model were used as appropriate. Thirty-nine of 40 (98%) primary tumors and nine of 10 (90%) metastatic liver lesions expressed c-MET (H-score range 0-300). There was a strong association between the percentage of positive cells and the intensity of c-MET expression (P=0.007). We found no association between c-MET H-score and clinicopathologic variables such as age, sex, or stage. c-MET expression was significantly higher in metastatic compared with primary tumors (median H-score 190 vs. 30, P=0.022). c-MET is expressed in the vast majority of primary and liver metastases of uveal melanomas; however, c-MET expression did not associate with pathologic features in our cohort. Metastatic lesions have higher expression of c-MET expression than primary tumors. Clinical trials involving c-MET inhibitors deserve further study in patients with uveal melanoma in both the adjuvant and metastatic setting.

24 Article Severe cutaneous and neurologic toxicity in melanoma patients during vemurafenib administration following anti-PD-1 therapy. 2013

Johnson, Douglas B / Wallender, Erika K / Cohen, Daniel N / Likhari, Sunaina S / Zwerner, Jeffrey P / Powers, Jennifer G / Shinn, Lisa / Kelley, Mark C / Joseph, Richard W / Sosman, Jeffrey A. ·Vanderbilt University Medical Center. · Mayo Clinic Jacksonville. ·Cancer Immunol Res · Pubmed #24490176.

ABSTRACT: Immune checkpoint inhibitors such as ipilimumab and targeted BRAF inhibitors have dramatically altered the landscape of melanoma therapeutics over the past few years. Agents targeting the programmed cell death-1/ligand (PD-1/PD-L1) axis are now being developed and appear to be highly active clinically with favorable toxicity profiles. We report two patients with BRAF V600E mutant melanoma who were treated with anti-PD-1 agents as first-line therapy without significant toxicity, followed by vemurafenib at disease progression. Both patients developed severe hypersensitivity drug eruptions with multi-organ injury early in their BRAF inhibitor treatment course. One patient subsequently developed acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP) and the other developed anaphylaxis upon low-dose vemurafenib rechallenge. Further investigation of the immune response during combination or sequences of melanoma therapeutics is warranted. Furthermore, clinicians should maintain a high index of suspicion for these toxicities when vemurafenib is administered following an anti-PD-1 agent.

25 Article Ultrathin primary is a marker for worse prognosis in lymph node-positive cutaneous melanoma. 2013

Bagaria, Sanjay P / Ray, Partha S / Joseph, Richard W / Heckman, Michael G / Rawal, Bhupendra / Gray, Richard J / Pockaj, Barbara / Wasif, Nabil. ·Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic Florida, 4500 San Pablo Road, Jacksonville, FL 32224, USA. bagaria.sanjay@mayo.edu ·Cancer · Pubmed #23408288.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Lymph lymph node metastasis from melanoma ≤0.50 mm (ultrathin) is an infrequent event. However, because many newly diagnosed melanomas are ultrathin, a significant proportion of patients who present with lymph node disease have an ultrathin melanoma. The authors hypothesized that ultrathin melanomas that present with lymph node metastasis represent biologically aggressive lesions with a worse prognosis. METHODS: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry data were queried to identify patients with cutaneous melanoma who presented with lymph node metastasis diagnosed between 1998 and 2008. Hazard ratios (HRs) from Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to compare disease-specific survival (DSS) between various tumor depths. RESULTS: In total, 6134 patients with lymph node-positive melanoma were identified and stratified according to tumor depth, including 588 (10%) with a tumor depth ≤0.50 mm, 519 (8%) with a tumor depth from 0.51 to 1.00 mm, 1669 (27%) with a tumor depth from 1.01 to 2.00 mm, 1871 (31%) with a tumor depth from 2.01 to 4.00 mm, and 1487 (24%) with a tumor depth >4.00 mm; and the respective 5-year DSS rates were 63%, 76%, 75%, 60%, and 43%. Multivariable analysis confirmed a similar trend in HRs for DSS: The HR was 1.00 for a tumor depth ≤0.50 mm (reference category) and 0.64 (P < .001), 0.65 (P < .001), 0.95 (P = .57), and 1.42 (P < .001) for tumor depths of 0.51 to 1.00 mm, 1.01 to 2.00 mm, 2.01 to 4.00 mm, and >4.00 mm, respectively. This association of tumor depth with DSS persisted for N1 and N2 disease but not for N3 disease. CONCLUSIONS: Ultrathin melanoma (≤0.50 mm) was identified as a marker of poor prognosis in the setting of lymph node metastasis. These results may improve recommendations for adjuvant therapy, surveillance protocols, and risk stratification for clinical trials.

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