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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Tae Min Kim
Based on 4 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, T-M Kim wrote the following 4 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial Adjuvant Nivolumab versus Ipilimumab in Resected Stage III or IV Melanoma. 2017

Weber, Jeffrey / Mandala, Mario / Del Vecchio, Michele / Gogas, Helen J / Arance, Ana M / Cowey, C Lance / Dalle, Stéphane / Schenker, Michael / Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna / Marquez-Rodas, Ivan / Grob, Jean-Jacques / Butler, Marcus O / Middleton, Mark R / Maio, Michele / Atkinson, Victoria / Queirolo, Paola / Gonzalez, Rene / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Smylie, Michael / Meyer, Nicolas / Mortier, Laurent / Atkins, Michael B / Long, Georgina V / Bhatia, Shailender / Lebbé, Celeste / Rutkowski, Piotr / Yokota, Kenji / Yamazaki, Naoya / Kim, Tae M / de Pril, Veerle / Sabater, Javier / Qureshi, Anila / Larkin, James / Ascierto, Paolo A / Anonymous7111184. ·From New York University Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York (J.W.) · Papa Giovanni XXIII Cancer Center Hospital, Bergamo (M. Mandala), Medical Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Milan (M.D.V.), Oncology Institute of Veneto Istituti di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, Padua (V.C.-S.), Center for Immuno-Oncology, University Hospital of Siena, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Siena (M. Maio), Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa (P.Q.), and Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Pascale, Naples (P.A.A.) - all in Italy · National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens (H.J.G.) · Hospital Clinic de Barcelona, Barcelona (A.M.A.), and General University Hospital Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (I.M.-R.) - both in Spain · Texas Oncology-Baylor Cancer Center, Dallas (C.L.C.) · Hospices Civils de Lyon, Pierre Bénite (S.D.), Aix-Marseille University, Hospital de la Timone, Marseille (J.-J.G.), Institut Universitaire du Cancer de Toulouse and Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU), Toulouse (N.M.), Université Lille, INSERM Unité 1189, CHU Lille, Lille (L.M.), and Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Dermatology and Centres d'Investigation Clinique, INSERM Unité 976, Hôpital Saint Louis, Université Paris Diderot, Paris (C.L.) - all in France · Oncology Center Sf. Nectarie, Craiova, Romania (M. Schenker) · Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (M.O.B.), and Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (M. Smylie) - both in Canada · the Department of Oncology, University of Oxford, Oxford (M.R.M.), and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (J.L.) - both in the United Kingdom · Gallipoli Medical Research Foundation and University of Queensland, Queensland, VIC (V.A.), and Melanoma Institute Australia, University of Sydney, and Royal North Shore and Mater Hospitals, Sydney (G.V.L.) - all in Australia · University of Colorado, Denver (R.G.) · Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta (R.R.K.) · Georgetown-Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Washington DC (M.B.A.) · University of Washington, Seattle (S.B.) · Maria Sklodowska-Curie Institute-Oncology Center, Warsaw, Poland (P.R.) · Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (K.Y.), and the National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (N.Y.) - both in Japan · Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea (T.M.K.) · and Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ (V.P, J.S., A.Q.). ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #28891423.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Nivolumab and ipilimumab are immune checkpoint inhibitors that have been approved for the treatment of advanced melanoma. In the United States, ipilimumab has also been approved as adjuvant therapy for melanoma on the basis of recurrence-free and overall survival rates that were higher than those with placebo in a phase 3 trial. We wanted to determine the efficacy of nivolumab versus ipilimumab for adjuvant therapy in patients with resected advanced melanoma. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, phase 3 trial, we randomly assigned 906 patients (≥15 years of age) who were undergoing complete resection of stage IIIB, IIIC, or IV melanoma to receive an intravenous infusion of either nivolumab at a dose of 3 mg per kilogram of body weight every 2 weeks (453 patients) or ipilimumab at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram every 3 weeks for four doses and then every 12 weeks (453 patients). The patients were treated for a period of up to 1 year or until disease recurrence, a report of unacceptable toxic effects, or withdrawal of consent. The primary end point was recurrence-free survival in the intention-to-treat population. RESULTS: At a minimum follow-up of 18 months, the 12-month rate of recurrence-free survival was 70.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 66.1 to 74.5) in the nivolumab group and 60.8% (95% CI, 56.0 to 65.2) in the ipilimumab group (hazard ratio for disease recurrence or death, 0.65; 97.56% CI, 0.51 to 0.83; P<0.001). Treatment-related grade 3 or 4 adverse events were reported in 14.4% of the patients in the nivolumab group and in 45.9% of those in the ipilimumab group; treatment was discontinued because of any adverse event in 9.7% and 42.6% of the patients, respectively. Two deaths (0.4%) related to toxic effects were reported in the ipilimumab group more than 100 days after treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients undergoing resection of stage IIIB, IIIC, or IV melanoma, adjuvant therapy with nivolumab resulted in significantly longer recurrence-free survival and a lower rate of grade 3 or 4 adverse events than adjuvant therapy with ipilimumab. (Funded by Bristol-Myers Squibb and Ono Pharmaceutical; CheckMate 238 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02388906 ; Eudra-CT number, 2014-002351-26 .).

2 Clinical Trial Phase II Trial of Nilotinib in Patients With Metastatic Malignant Melanoma Harboring KIT Gene Aberration: A Multicenter Trial of Korean Cancer Study Group (UN10-06). 2015

Lee, Su Jin / Kim, Tae Min / Kim, Yu Jung / Jang, Kee-Taek / Lee, Hyo Jin / Lee, Soon Nam / Ahn, Mi Sun / Hwang, In Gyu / Lee, Suee / Lee, Moon-Hee / Lee, Jeeyun. ·Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam, Republic of Korea. · Department of Pathology and Translational Genomics, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, Republic of Korea. · Division of Hemato-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Hematology-Oncology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, Republic of Korea. · Department of Internal Medicine, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Internal Medicine, Dong-A University Hospital, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan, Republic of Korea. · Department of Hemato-Oncology, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon, Republic of Korea. · Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea jyunlee@skku.edu. ·Oncologist · Pubmed #26424760.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: KIT has been suggested to be a potential therapeutic target for malignant melanoma. We evaluated the antitumor activity and safety of the KIT inhibitor nilotinib in metastatic melanoma patients harboring KIT gene mutations or amplifications. METHODS: We conducted a phase II multicenter trial of nilotinib in metastatic malignant melanoma with KIT mutations or amplifications. Patients received 400 mg oral nilotinib twice daily. The primary endpoint was response rate, and if seven or more responders were observed from the cumulative 36 patients, nilotinib would be considered worthy of further testing in this study population. RESULTS: Between October 2009 and June 2013, 176 patients underwent molecular screening for KIT gene aberrations, and 42 patients harboring KIT gene mutations and/or amplification were enrolled in the study. Overall, 25 (59.5%), 15 (35.7%), and 2 (4.8%) patients had KIT mutations, KIT amplifications, and both KIT mutations and amplification, respectively. Of the 42 enrolled patients, 1 patient achieved complete response, 6 patients achieved partial response, and 17 patients achieved stable disease, resulting in an overall response rate of 16.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 5.4%-28.0%) and a disease control rate of 57.1% (95% CI: 42.1%-72.1%). The median duration of response was 34 weeks (range: 5-55 weeks). Of the 7 responders, 6 patients had KIT mutations (exon 11: 5 patients; exon 17: 1 patient), and 1 patient had KIT amplification only. CONCLUSION: Although this study did not meet its primary endpoint of response rate, nilotinib showed durable response in a subset of metastatic melanoma patients with specific KIT mutations. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: KIT aberration can be detected in a subset of metastatic melanoma patients. This phase II trial showed that nilotinib demonstrates durable response in a subset of patients with KIT mutations. The safety profile was very tolerable. This study suggests that a KIT inhibitor may benefit a small subset of metastatic melanoma patients with KIT mutations.

3 Article Oncogenic BRAF fusions in mucosal melanomas activate the MAPK pathway and are sensitive to MEK/PI3K inhibition or MEK/CDK4/6 inhibition. 2017

Kim, H S / Jung, M / Kang, H N / Kim, H / Park, C-W / Kim, S-M / Shin, S J / Kim, S H / Kim, S G / Kim, E K / Yun, M R / Zheng, Z / Chung, K Y / Greenbowe, J / Ali, S M / Kim, T-M / Cho, B C. ·Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Pharmacology, Brain Korea 21 PLUS Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · JEUK Institute for Cancer Research, JEUK Co., Ltd., Gumi-City, Kyungbuk, Korea. · Department of Pathology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Anatomic Pathology Reference Lab, Seegene Medical Foundation, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Dermatology, Yanbian University Hospital, Yanji City, China. · Department of Dermatology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Foundation Medicine Inc., Cambridge, MA, USA. · Department of Medical Informatics, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. ·Oncogene · Pubmed #28092667.

ABSTRACT: Despite remarkable progress in cutaneous melanoma genomic profiling, the mutational landscape of primary mucosal melanomas (PMM) remains unclear. Forty-six PMMs underwent targeted exome sequencing of 111 cancer-associated genes. Seventy-six somatic nonsynonymous mutations in 42 genes were observed, and recurrent mutations were noted on eight genes, including TP53 (13%), NRAS (13%), SNX31 (9%), NF1 (9%), KIT (7%) and APC (7%). Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK; 37%), cell cycle (20%) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-mTOR (15%) pathways were frequently mutated. We biologically characterized a novel ZNF767-BRAF fusion found in a vemurafenib-refractory respiratory tract PMM, from which cell line harboring ZNF767-BRAF fusion were established for further molecular analyses. In an independent data set, NFIC-BRAF fusion was identified in an oral PMM case and TMEM178B-BRAF fusion and DGKI-BRAF fusion were identified in two malignant melanomas with a low mutational burden (number of mutation per megabase, 0.8 and 4, respectively). Subsequent analyses revealed that the ZNF767-BRAF fusion protein promotes RAF dimerization and activation of the MAPK pathway. We next tested the in vitro and in vivo efficacy of vemurafenib, trametinib, BKM120 or LEE011 alone and in combination. Trametinib effectively inhibited tumor cell growth in vitro, but the combination of trametinib and BKM120 or LEE011 yielded more than additive anti-tumor effects both in vitro and in vivo in a melanoma cells harboring the BRAF fusion. In conclusion, BRAF fusions define a new molecular subset of PMM that can be targeted therapeutically by the combination of a MEK inhibitor with PI3K or cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 inhibitors.

4 Article Ipilimumab Real-World Efficacy and Safety in Korean Melanoma Patients from the Korean Named-Patient Program Cohort. 2017

Jung, Minkyu / Lee, Jeeyun / Kim, Tae Min / Lee, Dae Ho / Kang, Jin Hyung / Oh, Sung Young / Lee, Soo Jung / Shin, Sang Joon. ·Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Internal Medicine, Dong-A University Hospital, Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan, Korea. · Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu, Korea. ·Cancer Res Treat · Pubmed #27121719.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Ipilimumab improves survival in advanced melanoma patients. However, the efficacy and safety of ipilimumab has not been evaluated in Asian melanoma patients with a high frequency of mucosal and acral melanoma subtypes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Advanced melanoma patients treated with 3 mg/kg ipilimumab in a Korean multicenter named-patient program (NPP) were evaluated between September 2014 and July 2015. Baseline characteristics and blood parameters including neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) were assessed, and outcome and adverse events were evaluated according to subtypes. RESULTS: A total of 104 advanced melanoma patients were treated. The primary sites were acral (31.7%), mucosal (26%), cutaneous (26%), uveal (9.6%), and unknown (6.7%). Sixty-eight patients (65.4%) experienced adverse events, and the most common toxicity was skin rash (22.1%), 10 patients (9.6%) experienced adverse events of grade 3 or higher. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 2.73 months (95% confidence interval, 2.67 to 2.85), and there was no difference in PFS according to subtypes. Poor performance status, liver metastasis, and NLR (≥ 5) were independent poor prognostic factors by multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: In the Korean NPP cohort, ipilimumab showed similar efficacy and tolerability compared to Western patients, regardless of subtypes. All subtypes should benefit from ipilimumab with consideration of performance status, liver metastasis, and NLR.