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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Aimilios Lallas
Based on 83 articles published since 2010
(Why 83 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, A. Lallas wrote the following 83 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4
1 Guideline Spitz/Reed nevi: proposal of management recommendations by the Dermoscopy Study Group of the Italian Society of Dermatology (SIDeMaST). 2014

Broganelli, P / Titli, S / Lallas, A / Alaibac M Annetta, A / Battarra, V / Brunetti, B / Castagno, I / Cavicchini, S / Ferrari, A / Ghigliotti, G / Landi, C / Manganoni, A / Moscarella, E / Pellacani, G / Pizzichetta, M A / Rosina, P / Rubegni, P / Satta, R / Scalvenzi, M / Stanganelli, I / Stinco, G / Zalaudek, I / Zampieri, P / Argenziano, G / Anonymous1420806. ·Department of Oncology and Hematology, Section of Dermatology, City of Health and Science Hospital of Turin, Turin, Italy - paolobroganelli@inwind.it. ·G Ital Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #25213387.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Review Quality of life measurement in skin cancer patients: literature review and position paper of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology Task Forces on Quality of Life and Patient Oriented Outcomes, Melanoma and Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer. 2019

Chernyshov, P V / Lallas, A / Tomas-Aragones, L / Arenbergerova, M / Samimi, M / Manolache, L / Svensson, A / Marron, S E / Sampogna, F / Spillekom-vanKoulil, S / Bewley, A / Forsea, A M / Jemec, G B / Szepietowski, J C / Augustin, M / Finlay, A Y. ·Department of Dermatology and Venereology, National Medical University, Kiev, Ukraine. · First Department of Dermatology, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Department of Psychology, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza, Spain. · Department of Dermatovenereology, Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Dermatology Department, University of Tours, Tours, France. · Dermatology, Dali Medical, Bucharest, Romania. · Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Skane University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. · Department of Dermatology, Royo Villanova Hospital, Aragon Psychodermatology Research Group (GAI+PD), Zaragoza, Spain. · Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Istituto Dermopatico dell'Immacolata (IDI)-IRCCS FLMM, Rome, Italy. · Radboud Institute for Health Sciences, Department of Medical Psychology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. · Whipps Cross University Hospital, London, UK. · The Royal London Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Oncologic Dermatology and Allergology, Elias University Hospital, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania. · Department of Dermatology, Zealand University Hospital, Roskilde, Denmark. · Health Sciences Faculty, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Wrocław Medical University, Wrocław, Poland. · Institute for Health Services Research in Dermatology and Nursing (IVDP), University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Dermatology and Wound Healing, Division of Infection and Immunity, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #30963614.

ABSTRACT: The European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (EADV) Task Forces (TFs) on Quality of Life (QoL) and Patient Oriented Outcomes, Melanoma and Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer (NMSC) present a review of the literature and position statement on health-related (HR) QoL assessment in skin cancer patients. A literature search was carried out to identify publications since 1980 that included information about the impact of SC on QoL. Generic, dermatology-specific, cancer-specific, SC-specific, facial SC-specific, NMSC-specific, basal cell carcinoma-specific and melanoma-specific QoL questionnaires have been used to assess HRQoL in SC patients. HRQoL was assessed in the context of creation and validation of the HRQoL instruments, clinical trials, comparison of QoL in SC and other cancers, other diseases or controls, HRQoL assessment after treatment, comorbidities, behaviour modification, predictors of QoL and survival, supportive care needs, coping strategies and fear of cancer recurrence. The most widely used instruments for HRQoL assessment in SC patients are the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30), the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Melanoma (FACT-M), Skin Cancer Index (SCI), Short Form 36 Item Health Survey (SF-36) and the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). The TFs recommend the use of the cancer-specific EORTC QLQ-C30, especially in late stages of disease, and the melanoma-specific FACT-M and SC-specific SCI questionnaires. These instruments have been well validated and used in several studies. Other HRQoL instruments, also with good basic validation, are not currently recommended because the experience of their use is too limited. Dermatology-specific HRQoL instruments can be used to assess the impact of skin-related problems in SC. The TFs encourage further studies to validate HRQoL instruments for use in different stages of SC, in order to allow more detailed practical recommendations on HRQoL assessment in SC.

3 Review Dermoscopy of Spitz/Reed naevi and management. 2019

Papageorgiou, Chryssoula / Apalla, Zoe / Bobos, Mattheos / Gkentsidi, Theodosia / Kyrgidis, Athanassios / Lallas, Konstantinos / Manoli, Sofia-Magdalini / Moutsoudis, Andreas / Nikolaidou, Christina / Spyridis, Ioannis / Lallas, Aimilios. ·First Department of Dermatology, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. · State Clinic of Dermatology, Hospital for Skin and Venereal Diseases, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Microdiagnostics Pathology Laboratory, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Department of Histopathology, Hippokration General Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece. · First Department of Dermatology, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece - emlallas@gmail.com. ·G Ital Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #30762033.

ABSTRACT: Since their first description by Sophie Spitz, Spitz nevi have been a subject of controversy among clinicians for many decades, and remain a clinical conundrum until today as their etiology, morphology, biological behavior and natural evolution is still not totally clear. This is because their clinical, dermoscopic and histopathologic features sometimes overlap with those of melanoma, rendering the management of spitzoid lesions particularly difficult. In addition, cases of histopatologically equivocal lesions do exist and their classification might sometimes be very challenging. Among several terms that have been used to describe these morphologically "intermediate" lesions, atypical Spitz tumor (AST) is the most widely used. The aim of this review paper was to describe the dermoscopic patterns and structures seen in Spitz/Reed nevi, spitzoid melanoma and AST. Finally, this article provides an evidence-based update on the available options for the management of spitzoid lesions, before and after histopathologic diagnosis.

4 Review A meta-analysis of nevus-associated melanoma: Prevalence and practical implications. 2017

Pampena, Riccardo / Kyrgidis, Athanassios / Lallas, Aimilios / Moscarella, Elvira / Argenziano, Giuseppe / Longo, Caterina. ·Dermatology and Skin Cancer Unit, First Medical Department, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS), Reggio Emilia, Italy. · First Department of Dermatology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Dermatology Unit, University of Campania, Naples, Italy. · Dermatology and Skin Cancer Unit, First Medical Department, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS), Reggio Emilia, Italy; Dermatology Unit, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy. Electronic address: longo.caterina@gmail.com. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #28864306.

ABSTRACT: The reported prevalence of nevus-associated melanoma varies substantially. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the incidence and prevalence of this disease; we also performed subanalyses considering age, tumor thickness, and nevus-type classification. In 38 observational cohort and case-control studies, 29.1% of melanomas likely arose from a preexisting nevus and 70.9% de novo. Any given melanoma was 64% less likely to be nevus-associated than de novo (risk ratio 0.36, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.29-0.44; P < .001; I

5 Review Dermoscopy of Malignant Skin Tumours: What's New? 2017

Russo, Teresa / Piccolo, Vincenzo / Lallas, Aimilios / Giacomel, Jason / Moscarella, Elvira / Alfano, Roberto / Argenziano, Giuseppe. ·Dermatology Unit, University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Naples, Italy. ·Dermatology · Pubmed #28486238.

ABSTRACT: Dermoscopy represents a new and effective tool that assists dermatologists in improving the accuracy of clinical diagnosis in onco-dermatology. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the latest and important dermoscopic progress and observations in this ever-evolving field of dermatology.

6 Review MELTUMP: how to manage these lesions in the clinical routine. 2017

Piccolo, Vincenzo / Moscarella, Elvira / Lallas, Aimilios / Alfano, Roberto / Ferrara, Gerardo / Argenziano, Giuseppe. ·Dermatology Unit, L. Vanvitelli University, Naples, Italy - piccolo.vincenzo@gmail.com. · Dermatology Unit, L. Vanvitelli University, Naples, Italy. · Dermatology and Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale S. Maria Nuova Institute for Research and Care, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · First Department of Dermatology, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Department of Anesthesiology, Surgery and Emergency, L. Vanvitelli University, Naples, Italy. · Anatomic Pathology Unit, General Hospital of Macerata, Macerata, Italy. ·G Ital Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28195450.

ABSTRACT: Although most melanocytic lesions can be diagnosed by histopathologists as benign or malignant with high confidence, a subset of morphologically ambiguous lesions does exist and still represents a significant problem for pathologists. These lesions have been defined as MELTUMP, i.e. melanocytic tumors of uncertain malignant potential. MELTUMP could be considered as a large cauldron in which melanocytic lesions with equivocal morphologic features fall into, including most benign lesions and a minority of melanomas, unfortunately recognizable only a posteriori for their unfavorable outcome. As a consequence of the lack of uniformity in the biologic behavior of melanocytic lesions belonging to the heterogeneous subset of MELTUMP, confusion and lack of agreement in the management of these difficult lesions is increasingly growing up. As most MELTUMP have a favorable prognosis we recommend a conservative approach, avoiding over treatment for this group of lesions.

7 Review Melanoma: clinical and dermoscopic diagnosis. 2017

Brancaccio, Gabriella / Russo, Teresa / Lallas, Aimilios / Moscarella, Elvira / Agozzino, Marina / Argenziano, Giuseppe. ·Dermatology Unit, University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Naples, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Naples, Italy - russo.teresa87@gmail.com. · First Department of Dermatology, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. ·G Ital Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28121084.

ABSTRACT: Missing the diagnosis of a melanoma is the worst dermatologist nightmare, especially when melanomas have a non-alarming clinical appearance and imitate a completely benign lesion. The use of dermoscopy has provided an effective tool to facilitate the differential diagnosis and to increasingly allow an early diagnosis of melanoma. The aim of this article was to summarize the most recent and important clinical and dermoscopic pearls to recognize melanoma at the earliest stages of its development.

8 Review Update on dermoscopy of Spitz/Reed naevi and management guidelines by the International Dermoscopy Society. 2017

Lallas, A / Apalla, Z / Ioannides, D / Lazaridou, E / Kyrgidis, A / Broganelli, P / Alfano, R / Zalaudek, I / Argenziano, G / Anonymous3580894. ·First Department of Dermatology, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · City of Health and Science University, Turin, Italy. · Department of Anaesthesiology, Surgery and Emergency Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy. · Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Unit, Medical University of Graz, Austria. · Dermatology Unit, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #28118479.

ABSTRACT: Spitzoid lesions represent a challenging and controversial group of tumours, in terms of clinical recognition, biological behaviour and management strategies. Although Spitz naevi are considered benign tumours, their clinical and dermoscopic morphological overlap with spitzoid melanoma renders the management of spitzoid lesions particularly difficult. The controversy deepens because of the existence of tumours that cannot be safely histopathologically diagnosed as naevi or melanomas (atypical Spitz tumours). The dual objective of the present study was to provide an updated classification on dermoscopy of Spitz naevi, and management recommendations of spitzoid-looking lesions based on a consensus among experts in the field. After a detailed search of the literature for eligible studies, a data synthesis was performed from 15 studies on dermoscopy of Spitz naevi. Dermoscopically, Spitz naevi are typified by three main patterns: starburst pattern (51%), a pattern of regularly distributed dotted vessels (19%) and globular pattern with reticular depigmentation (17%). A consensus-based algorithm for the management of spitzoid lesions is proposed. According to it, dermoscopically asymmetric lesions with spitzoid features (both flat/raised and nodular) should be excised to rule out melanoma. Dermoscopically symmetric spitzoid nodules should also be excised or closely monitored, irrespective of age, to rule out atypical Spitz tumours. Dermoscopically symmetric, flat spitzoid lesions should be managed according to the age of the patient. Finally, the histopathological diagnosis of atypical Spitz tumour should warrant wide excision but not a sentinel lymph-node biopsy.

9 Review Contemporary and potential future molecular diagnosis of melanoma. 2016

Gandolfi, G / Dallaglio, K / Longo, C / Moscarella, E / Lallas, A / Alfano, R / Argenziano, G / Ciarrocchi, A. ·a Laboratory of Translational Research , Arcispedale S. Maria Nuova-IRCCS , Reggio Emilia , Italy. · b Skin Cancer Unit , Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova-IRCCS , Reggio Emilia , Italy. · c Surgery and Emergency Unit , Second University of Naples , Naples , Italy. · d Dermatology Unit , Second University of Naples , Naples , Italy. ·Expert Rev Mol Diagn · Pubmed #27348706.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The increasing incidence of cutaneous melanoma and the still limited effective treatments available for this disease represent a major health problem and a great challenge for research. The raise of the "omics" era and the development of new techniques to explore phenotypic heterogeneity are helping to decipher the mechanisms at the basis of melanoma heterogeneity. AREAS COVERED: We reviewed the most recent publications about the biology of cutaneous melanoma, to provide an overview of the most recent insights into the complexity of this tumor and their potential impact in the clinical settings. Expert commentary: Starting from the first attempts to provide a molecular classification of melanoma, it has been evident that this tumor represents a widely heterogeneous disease. This complexity and the multivariate nature of melanoma represent a major obstacle in developing the best management strategies for patients.

10 Review Dabrafenib: a new opportunity for the treatment of BRAF V600-positive melanoma. 2016

Banzi, Maria / De Blasio, Simona / Lallas, Aimilios / Longo, Caterina / Moscarella, Elvira / Alfano, Roberto / Argenziano, Giuseppe. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · First Department of Dermatology, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Department of Anesthesiology, Surgery and Emergency, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy. ·Onco Targets Ther · Pubmed #27226731.

ABSTRACT: Prior to 2011, the 1-year survival rates for patients suffering from advanced or metastatic melanoma was as low as 33%, with a median overall survival of about 9 months. Several chemotherapeutic regimens have been applied, either as monochemotherapy or as polychemotherapy, overall not resulting in an improvement of progression-free or overall survival. Novel insights into the epidemiology and biology of melanoma allowed the development of newer therapies. The discovery of mutations in BRAF, a part of the mitogen-activated protein kinase, allowed the development of two BRAF inhibitors, vemurafenib and dabrafenib, which significantly improved the outcome of metastatic melanoma treatment. This article reviews the mechanism of action, efficacy, and safety profile of dabrafenib. An in-depth knowledge of this medication will encourage clinicians to select the appropriate therapeutic strategy for each patient, as well as to prevent or adequately manage side effects, optimizing, thus, the drug's applicability.

11 Review Recent advances in dermoscopy. 2016

Russo, Teresa / Piccolo, Vincenzo / Lallas, Aimilios / Argenziano, Giuseppe. ·Dermatology Unit, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy. · First Department of Dermatology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. ·F1000Res · Pubmed #26949523.

ABSTRACT: The use of dermoscopy has offered a new morphological dimension of skin lesions and has provided an effective diagnostic tool to differentiate melanoma from other benign or malignant skin tumors but also to support the clinical diagnosis in general dermatology. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the most recent and important advances in the rising world of dermoscopy.

12 Review Dermoscopy of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer. 2015

Babino, G / Lallas, A / Longo, C / Moscarella, E / Alfano, R / Argenziano, G. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy - g.argenziano@gmail.com. ·G Ital Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #26184795.

ABSTRACT: Skin cancer is a major health problem because of its high incidence in white populations, as well as its related potential morbidity and mortality. Dermoscopy is a noninvasive tool that allows the identification of specific morphological features in different skin tumors, improving significantly the early diagnosis of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). This tool has also gained increased interest in the management of NMSC therapy and in the post-treatment follow-up. In this article, we provide a review of the dermoscopic patterns and criteria for the diagnosis of melanoma and NMSC described until now in the literature.

13 Review Sentinel lymph node biopsy followed by lymph node dissection for localised primary cutaneous melanoma. 2015

Kyrgidis, Athanassios / Tzellos, Thrasivoulos / Mocellin, Simone / Apalla, Zoe / Lallas, Aimilios / Pilati, Pierluigi / Stratigos, Alexander. ·Division of Evidence Based Dermatology, Dessau Medical Center, Dessau, Germany. ·Cochrane Database Syst Rev · Pubmed #25978975.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Melanoma is the leading cause of skin cancer-associated mortality. The vast majority of newly diagnosed melanomas are confined to the primary cutaneous site. Surgery represents the mainstay of melanoma treatment. Treatment strategies include wide excision of the primary tumour and sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) to assess the status of the regional nodal basin(s). SLNB has become an important component of initial melanoma management providing accurate disease staging. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects and safety of SLNB followed by completion lymph node dissection (CLND) for the treatment of localised primary cutaneous melanoma. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following databases up to February 2015: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library (2015, Issue 1), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), and LILACS ((Latin American and Caribbean Health Science Information database, from 1982). We also searched the following from inception: African Index Medicus, IndMED of India, Index Medicus for the South-East Asia Region, and six trials registers. We checked the reference lists of included and excluded studies for further references to relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We searched ISI Web of Science Conference Proceedings from inception to February 2015, and we scanned the abstracts of major dermatology and oncology conference proceedings up to 2015. SELECTION CRITERIA: Two review authors independently assessed all RCTs comparing SLNB followed by CLND for the treatment of primary localised cutaneous melanoma for inclusion. Primary outcome measures were overall survival and rate of treatment complications and side effects. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently extracted and analysed data on survival and recurrence, assessed risk of bias, and collected adverse effect information from included trials. MAIN RESULTS: We identified and included a single eligible trial comparing SLNB with observation and published in eight different reports (from 2005 to 2014) with 2001 participants. This did not report on our first primary outcome of overall survival. The study did report on the rate of treatment complications. Our secondary outcomes of disease-specific and disease-free survival, local recurrence and distant metastases were reported. There were 1347 participants in the intermediate-thickness melanoma group and 314 in the thick melanoma group.With regard to treatment complications, short-term surgical morbidity (30 days) in 1735 participants showed no difference between SLNB and observation (risk ratio [RR] 1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.9 to 1.37) for wide excision of the tumour site but favoured observation for complications related to the regional nodal basin (RR 14.36; 95% CI 6.74 to 30.59).The study did not report the actual 10-year melanoma-specific survival rate for all included participants. Instead, melanoma-specific survival rates for each group of participants: intermediate-thickness melanoma (defined as 1.2 to 3.5 mm) and thick melanomas (defined as 3.50 mm or more) was reported.In the intermediate-thickness melanoma group there was no statistically significant difference in disease-specific survival between study groups at 10 years (81.4 ± 1.5% versus 78.3 ± 2.0%, hazard ratio [HR] 0.84; 95% CI 0.65 to 1.09). In the thick melanoma group, again there was no statistically significant difference in disease-specific survival between study groups at 10 years (58.9.3 ± 4.1% versus 64.4 ± 4.6%, HR 1.12; 95% CI 0.77 to 1.64). Combining these groups there was some heterogeneity (I² = 34%) but the total HR was not statistically significant (HR 0.92; 95% CI 0.74 to 1.14). This study failed to show any difference for its stated primary outcome.The summary estimate for disease-free survival at 10 years favoured SLNB over observation in participants with intermediate-thickness and thick melanomas (HR 0.75; 95% CI 0.63 to 0.89).With regard to the rate of local and regional recurrence as the site of first recurrence, a benefit of SLNB uniformly existed in both groups of participants with intermediate-thickness and thick melanomas (RR 0.56; 95% CI 0.45 to 0.69). This is in contrast with a uniformly unfavourable effect of SLNB with regard to the rate of distant metastases as site of first recurrence, in both groups of participants with intermediate-thickness and thick melanomas (HR 1.33; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.72). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: We contacted the trial authors querying the lack of data on overall survival which was the primary outcome of their important study. They stated "there are numerous additional analyses that have yet to be reported for the trial". We expect that overall survival data will be available in a future update of this review.Disease-free survival and rate of local and regional recurrence favoured SLNB in both groups of participants with intermediate-thickness and thick melanomas but short-term surgical morbidity was higher in the SLNB group, especially with regard to complications in the nodal basin.The evidence for the outcomes of interest in this review is of low quality due to the risk of bias and imprecision of the estimated effects. Further research may have an important impact on our estimate of the effectiveness of SLNB in managing primary localised cutaneous melanoma. Currently this evidence is not sufficient to document a benefit of SLNB when compared to observation in individuals with primary localised cutaneous melanoma.

14 Review Reflectance confocal microscopy in the diagnosis of solitary pink skin tumours: review of diagnostic clues. 2015

Longo, C / Moscarella, E / Argenziano, G / Lallas, A / Raucci, M / Pellacani, G / Scope, A. ·Dermatology and Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale S. Maria Nuova, IRCCS, Viale Risorgimento 80, 42100, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Sheba Medical Center and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #25640416.

ABSTRACT: Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a noninvasive tool that can be helpful in the diagnosis of nonpigmented skin tumours. As RCM enables visualization of architectural and cytological structures at near-histological resolution, it can improve the diagnostic accuracy of dermoscopically equivocal solitary pink neoplasms. For management decisions, it is important to identify specific morphological clues that allow bedside classification of nonpigmented skin neoplasms into benign vs. malignant and melanocytic vs. nonmelanocytic. More specifically, the presence of a nested melanocytic proliferation at the dermoepidermal junction or dermis level permits the clinician to ascribe a given lesion as melanocytic; the identification of basaloid bright tumour islands is a key RCM feature for the diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma; and the presence of disarrayed epidermis along with small demarcated papillae is suggestive for the diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma. The present review offers a comprehensive description of the main RCM diagnostic clues for solitary pink neoplasms that direct clinicians to the correct diagnosis and that may serve as groundwork for future prospective studies.

15 Review No one should die of melanoma: a vision or impossible mission? 2014

Zalaudek, Iris / Moscarella, Elvira / Longo, Caterina / Lallas, Aimilios / Argenziano, Giuseppe / Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer. ·Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 8, 8036 Graz, Austria. · Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, IRCCS, Viale Risorgimento, 80, Reggio Emilia Reggio nell'Emilia, Italy. ·Melanoma Manag · Pubmed #30190809.

ABSTRACT: While the incidence of early-stage melanoma has dramatically increased over the past decades, the incidence and mortality rates of thick melanomas have remained relatively stable during the same period. A number of alternative theories have been postulated in order to explain these divergent trends between thin and thick melanomas, among which is the question of whether nodular melanoma may originate in the dermis. This concept has gained support from recent improvements in the understanding of the origin of melanocytes and the morphological and molecular diversity of melanoma. A dermal origin would plausibly explain why efforts at improving the early detection of melanoma largely fail, as it implies an initially intradermal growth that is hidden from our eyes until clinical signs and symptoms become only secondarily apparent. In light of this, at the current stage, the vision that no one should die of melanoma is an impossible mission.

16 Review The dermatoscopic universe of basal cell carcinoma. 2014

Lallas, Aimilios / Apalla, Zoe / Argenziano, Giuseppe / Longo, Caterina / Moscarella, Elvira / Specchio, Francesca / Raucci, Margaritha / Zalaudek, Iris. ·Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, Medical Department, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Austria. ·Dermatol Pract Concept · Pubmed #25126452.

ABSTRACT: Following the first descriptions of the dermatoscopic pattern of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) that go back to the very early years of dermatoscopy, the list of dermatoscopic criteria associated with BCC has been several times updated and renewed. Up to date, dermatoscopy has been shown to enhance BCC detection, by facilitating its discrimination from other skin tumors and inflammatory skin diseases. Furthermore, upcoming evidence suggests that the method is also useful for the management of the tumor, since it provides valuable information about the histopathologic subtype, the presence of clinically undetectable pigmentation, the expansion of the tumor beyond clinically visible margins and the response to non-ablative treatments. In the current article, we provide a summary of the traditional and latest knowledge on the value of dermatoscopy for the diagnosis and management of BCC.

17 Review Blue lesions. 2013

Longo, Caterina / Scope, Alon / Lallas, Aimilios / Zalaudek, Iris / Moscarella, Elvira / Gardini, Stefano / Argenziano, Giuseppe / Pellacani, Giovanni. ·Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova-IRCCS, Viale Risorgimento 80, Reggio Emilia 42100, Italy. Electronic address: longo.caterina@gmail.com. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #24075551.

ABSTRACT: Blue color is found in a wide range of malignant and benign melanocytic and nonmelanocytic lesions and in lesions that result from penetration of exogenous materials, such as radiation or amalgam tattoo or traumatic penetration of particles. Discriminating between different diagnostic entities that display blue color relies on careful patient examination and lesion assessment. Dermoscopically, the extent, distribution, and patterns created by blue color can help diagnose lesions with specificity and differentiate between benign and malignant entities. This article provides an overview of the main diagnoses whereby blue color can be found, providing simple management rules for these lesions.

18 Review Problematic lesions in the elderly. 2013

Zalaudek, Iris / Lallas, Aimilios / Longo, Caterina / Moscarella, Elvira / Tiodorovic-Zivkovic, Danica / Ricci, Cinzia / Albertini, Giuseppe / Argenziano, Giuseppe. ·Dermatology and Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico-IRCCS, Viale Risorgimento 80, Reggio Emilia 42100, Italy; Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Auenbruggerplatz 8, Graz 8036, Austria. Electronic address: iris.zalaudek@gmail.com. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #24075544.

ABSTRACT: As the population continues to age, clinicians and dermatologists are increasingly faced with geriatric patients presenting with a range of dermatologic manifestations, including benign and malignant skin tumors. Knowledge of epidemiologic and morphologic features, including dermoscopy of common and benign melanocytic and nonmelanocytic skin tumors, provides the basis for a better understanding and management of problematic skin tumors in this age group. This article provides an overview of common and problematic skin lesions in elderly patients and addresses epidemiologic, clinical, and dermoscopic clues that aid the differential diagnosis and management of challenging skin lesions.

19 Review Problematic lesions in children. 2013

Moscarella, Elvira / Piccolo, Vincenzo / Argenziano, Giuseppe / Lallas, Aimilios / Longo, Caterina / Castagnetti, Fabio / Pizzigoni, Stefania / Zalaudek, Iris. ·Skin Cancer Unit, First Medical Department, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, IRCCS, Viale Risorgimento, 80, Reggio Emilia 42100, Italy. Electronic address: elvira.moscarella@gmail.com. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #24075543.

ABSTRACT: Melanoma in childhood is rare, and appears more commonly either in association with a preexisting (congenital) nevus, or with spitzoid features than de novo. Thus, problematic melanocytic lesions in children are essentially represented by congenital nevi and Spitz nevi that can be regarded as melanoma precursors and melanoma simulators, respectively. As a consequence, clinical and dermoscopic features of melanoma in children differ from those in an adult population. Herein we describe common clinical and dermoscopic features of problematic lesions in children, focusing on congenital and Spitz/Reed nevi, and including other problematic lesions, such as atypical, blue, acral, and scalp nevi.

20 Article The presence of eccentric hyperpigmentation should raise the suspicion of melanoma. 2020

Borsari, S / Peccerillo, F / Pampena, R / Lai, M / Spadafora, M / Moscarella, E / Lallas, A / Pizzichetta, M A / Zalaudek, I / Del Regno, L / Peris, K / Pellacani, G / Longo, C. ·Centro Oncologico ad Alta Tecnologia Diagnostica, Azienda Unità Sanitaria Locale - IRCCS di Reggio Emilia, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy. · First Department of Dermatology, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Trieste, Trieste, Italy. · Division of Medical Oncology - Preventive Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Aviano, Italy. · Institute of Dermatology, Catholic University of Rome and Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli, Rome, Italy. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #32402129.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Melanocytic lesions with eccentric hyperpigmentation (EH), even though without other dermatoscopic features of melanoma, are often excised. OBJECTIVE: Aiming to understand if the EH in a pigmented lesion is an accurate criterion of malignancy, we evaluated the capability of two evaluators, with different expertise, to correctly diagnose a melanoma when analyzing a given lesion in toto versus a partial analysis, with only the EH or the non-hyperpigmented portion (non-EH) visible. METHODS: Dermatoscopic images of 240 lesions (107 melanomas and 133 nevi) typified by EH were selected. Facial, acral, mucosal lesions, as well as lesions showing clear-cut features of melanoma (except for atypical network) were excluded. Clinical and dermoscopic features (main pattern and numbers of colors) were described for all cases. Each image was split in two through a software so that only the EH or the non-EH was visible. Two blinded evaluators examined three sets of images, two with customized images and one with the non-modified ones: they were asked to give a dichotomous diagnosis (melanoma or nevus) for each image. RESULTS: Melanomas were significantly more frequently typified by color variegation (3 colors in 44.8% and 4 colors in 41.1% of cases) and atypical network (88.1% in the EH). No significant differences in diagnostic accuracy emerged between the two evaluators. Sensitivity improved in the evaluation of the whole lesions (mean sensitivity 89.7%) in comparison to the evaluation of EH or non-EH alone (72.7-62.6%). Specificity increased when evaluating the EH (54.1%). Positive predictive value (PPV) and likelihood ratio (LR+) of EH resulted 52.3% and 1.4, meaning that in one case out of two with EH is a melanoma. CONCLUSIONS: Lesions with EH are challenging, regardless of dermoscopic experience. The EH is a robust criterion for malignancy, since the evaluation of the whole lesion, through an intralesional comparative approach, increases sensitivity.

21 Article Dermatoscopic features of melanomas with a diameter up to 5mm (micromelanomas): a retrospective study. 2020

Megaris, A / Lallas, A / Bagolini, L Peruilh / Balais, G / Cuevas, R González / Lallas, K / Gkentsidi, T / Manoli, M S / Papageorgiou, C / Spyridis, I / Apalla, Z. ·City University of New York School of Medicine, New York, USA. Electronic address: aphmegaris@gmail.com. · First Department of Dermatology, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Dermatology Department, University of Chile. · Second Department of Dermatology, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #32289392.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Article Dermatoscopic predictors to discriminate between in situ and early invasive lentigo maligna melanoma: A retrospective observational study. 2020

Bagolini, Leonardo Peruilh / Apalla, Zoe / Cuevas, Ruben González / Lallas, Konstantinos / Papageorgiou, Chryssoula / Bobos, Mattheos / Manoli, Sofia Magdalini / Gkentsidi, Theodosia / Spyridis, Ioannis / Lazaridou, Elizabeth / Sotiriou, Elena / Vakirlis, Efstratios / Ioannides, Dimitrios / Lallas, Aimilios. ·Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile. Electronic address: leoperuilhbagolini@gmail.com. · State Clinic of Dermatology, Hippokration General Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile. · First Department of Dermatology, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Microdiagnostics Pathology Laboratory, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Second Department of Dermatology, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #32199898.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

23 Article Melanoma recognition by a deep learning convolutional neural network-Performance in different melanoma subtypes and localisations. 2020

Winkler, Julia K / Sies, Katharina / Fink, Christine / Toberer, Ferdinand / Enk, Alexander / Deinlein, Teresa / Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer / Thomas, Luc / Lallas, Aimilios / Blum, Andreas / Stolz, Wilhelm / Abassi, Mohamed S / Fuchs, Tobias / Rosenberger, Albert / Haenssle, Holger A. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Dermatology and Venerology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. · Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Dermatology, Lyon Sud University Hospital, Pierre Bénite, France. · First Department of Dermatology, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Public, Private and Teaching Practice, Konstanz, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Allergology and Environmental Medicine II, Hospital Thalkirchner Street, Munich, Germany. · Faculty of Computer Science and Mathematics, University of Passau, Passau, Germany. · Department of Research and Development, FotoFinder Systems GmbH, Bad Birnbach, Germany. · Institute of Genetic Epidemiology at the Center of Statistics, University of Goettingen, Goettingen, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: holger.haenssle@med.uni-heidelberg.de. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #31972395.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Deep learning convolutional neural networks (CNNs) show great potential for melanoma diagnosis. Melanoma thickness at diagnosis among others depends on melanoma localisation and subtype (e.g. advanced thickness in acrolentiginous or nodular melanomas). The question whether CNN may counterbalance physicians' diagnostic difficulties in these melanomas has not been addressed. We aimed to investigate the diagnostic performance of a CNN with approval for the European market across different melanoma localisations and subtypes. METHODS: The current market version of a CNN (Moleanalyzer-Pro®, FotoFinder Systems GmbH, Bad Birnbach, Germany) was used for classifications (malignant/benign) in six dermoscopic image sets. Each set included 30 melanomas and 100 benign lesions of related localisations and morphology (set-SSM: superficial spreading melanomas and macular nevi; set-LMM: lentigo maligna melanomas and facial solar lentigines/seborrhoeic keratoses/nevi; set-NM: nodular melanomas and papillomatous/dermal/blue nevi; set-Mucosa: mucosal melanomas and mucosal melanoses/macules/nevi; set-AM RESULTS: The CNN showed a high-level performance in set-SSM, set-NM and set-LMM (sensitivities >93.3%, specificities >65%, receiver operating characteristics-area under the curve [ROC-AUC] >0.926). In set-AM CONCLUSIONS: The CNN may help to partly counterbalance reduced human accuracies. However, physicians need to be aware of the CNN's limited diagnostic performance in mucosal and subungual lesions. Improvements may be expected from additional training images of mucosal and subungual sites.

24 Article European consensus-based interdisciplinary guideline for melanoma. Part 1: Diagnostics - Update 2019. 2020

Garbe, Claus / Amaral, Teresa / Peris, Ketty / Hauschild, Axel / Arenberger, Petr / Bastholt, Lars / Bataille, Veronique / Del Marmol, Veronique / Dréno, Brigitte / Fargnoli, Maria Concetta / Grob, Jean-Jacques / Höller, Christoph / Kaufmann, Roland / Lallas, Aimilios / Lebbé, Celeste / Malvehy, Josep / Middleton, Mark / Moreno-Ramirez, David / Pellacani, Giovanni / Saiag, Philippe / Stratigos, Alexander J / Vieira, Ricardo / Zalaudek, Iris / Eggermont, Alexander M M / Anonymous9471072. ·Center for Dermatooncology, Department of Dermatology, Eberhard Karls University, Tuebingen, Germany. Electronic address: claus.garbe@med.uni-tuebingen.de. · Center for Dermatooncology, Department of Dermatology, Eberhard Karls University, Tuebingen, Germany; Portuguese Air Force Health Care Direction, Lisbon, Portugal. · Institute of Dermatology, Università Cattolica, Rome, Italy; Fondazione Policlinico Universitario A. Gemelli - IRCCS, Rome, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein (UKSH), Campus Kiel, Kiel, Germany. · Department of Dermatovenerology, Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University of Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. · Twin Research and Genetic Epidemiology Unit, School of Basic & Medical Biosciences, King's College London, London, SE1 7EH, UK. · Department of Dermatology, Erasme Hospital, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. · Dermatology Department, CHU Nantes, CIC 1413, CRCINA, University Nantes, Nantes, France. · Department of Dermatology, University of L'Aquila, Italy. · University Department of Dermatology, Marseille, France. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Austria. · Department of Dermatology, Venerology and Allergology, Frankfurt University Hospital, Frankfurt, Germany. · First Department of Dermatology, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. · APHP Department of Dermatology, INSERM U976, University Paris 7 Diderot, Saint-Louis University Hospital, Paris, France. · Melanoma Unit, Department of Dermatology, Hospital Clinic, IDIBAPS, Barcelona, Spain. · NIHR Biomedical Research Center, University of Oxford, UK. · Medical-&-Surgical Dermatology Service, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla, Spain. · Dermatology Unit, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy. · University Department of Dermatology, Université de Versailles-Saint Quentin en Yvelines, APHP, Boulogne, France. · 1st Department of Dermatology, University of Athens School of Medicine, Andreas Sygros Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Centro Hospitalar Universitário de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal. · Dermatology Clinic, Maggiore Hospital, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy. · Princess Máxima Center, 3584 CS, Utrecht, the Netherlands. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #31928887.

ABSTRACT: Cutaneous melanoma (CM) is potentially the most dangerous form of skin tumor and causes 90% of skin cancer mortality. A unique collaboration of multidisciplinary experts from the European Dermatology Forum (EDF), the European Association of Dermato-Oncology (EADO), and the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) was formed to make recommendations on CM diagnosis and treatment, based on systematic literature reviews and the experts' experience. The diagnosis of melanoma can be made clinically and shall always be confirmed through dermatoscopy. If a melanoma is suspected, a histopathological examination is required. Sequential digital dermatoscopy and full-body photography can be used in risk persons to detect the development of melanomas at an earlier stage. Where available, confocal reflectance microscopy can improve clinical diagnosis in special cases. Melanoma shall be classified according to the 8th version of the AJCC classification. Thin melanomas up to 0.8 mm tumor thickness does not require further imaging diagnostics. From stage IB onwards, examinations with lymph node sonography are recommended, but no further imaging examinations. From stage IIC whole-body examinations with CT or PET-CT in combination with brain MRI are recommended. From stage III and higher, mutation testing is recommended, particularly for BRAF V600 mutation. It is important to provide a structured follow-up to detect relapses and secondary primary melanomas as early as possible. There is no evidence to support the frequency and extent of examinations. A stage-based follow-up scheme is proposed, which, according to the experience of the guideline group, covers the minimum requirements; further studies may be considered. This guideline is valid until the end of 2021.

25 Article Man against machine reloaded: performance of a market-approved convolutional neural network in classifying a broad spectrum of skin lesions in comparison with 96 dermatologists working under less artificial conditions. 2020

Haenssle, H A / Fink, C / Toberer, F / Winkler, J / Stolz, W / Deinlein, T / Hofmann-Wellenhof, R / Lallas, A / Emmert, S / Buhl, T / Zutt, M / Blum, A / Abassi, M S / Thomas, L / Tromme, I / Tschandl, P / Enk, A / Rosenberger, A / Anonymous721180. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: Holger.Haenssle@med.uni-heidelberg.de. · Department of Dermatology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Allergology and Environmental Medicine II, Munich, Germany. · Department of Dermatology and Venerology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. · First Department of Dermatology, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Department of Dermatology, University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, University of Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany. · Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Bremen, Germany. · Office Based Clinic of Dermatology, Konstanz, Germany. · Faculty of Computer Science and Mathematics, University of Passau, Passau, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Lyons Cancer Research Center, Lyon 1 University, Lyon, France. · Department of Dermatology, Université Catholique de Louvain, St Luc University Hospital, Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Genetic Epidemiology, University of Goettingen, Goettingen, Germany. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #31912788.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Convolutional neural networks (CNNs) efficiently differentiate skin lesions by image analysis. Studies comparing a market-approved CNN in a broad range of diagnoses to dermatologists working under less artificial conditions are lacking. MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred cases of pigmented/non-pigmented skin cancers and benign lesions were used for a two-level reader study in 96 dermatologists (level I: dermoscopy only; level II: clinical close-up images, dermoscopy, and textual information). Additionally, dermoscopic images were classified by a CNN approved for the European market as a medical device (Moleanalyzer Pro, FotoFinder Systems, Bad Birnbach, Germany). Primary endpoints were the sensitivity and specificity of the CNN's dichotomous classification in comparison with the dermatologists' management decisions. Secondary endpoints included the dermatologists' diagnostic decisions, their performance according to their level of experience, and the CNN's area under the curve (AUC) of receiver operating characteristics (ROC). RESULTS: The CNN revealed a sensitivity, specificity, and ROC AUC with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) of 95.0% (95% CI 83.5% to 98.6%), 76.7% (95% CI 64.6% to 85.6%), and 0.918 (95% CI 0.866-0.970), respectively. In level I, the dermatologists' management decisions showed a mean sensitivity and specificity of 89.0% (95% CI 87.4% to 90.6%) and 80.7% (95% CI 78.8% to 82.6%). With level II information, the sensitivity significantly improved to 94.1% (95% CI 93.1% to 95.1%; P < 0.001), while the specificity remained unchanged at 80.4% (95% CI 78.4% to 82.4%; P = 0.97). When fixing the CNN's specificity at the mean specificity of the dermatologists' management decision in level II (80.4%), the CNN's sensitivity was almost equal to that of human raters, at 95% (95% CI 83.5% to 98.6%) versus 94.1% (95% CI 93.1% to 95.1%); P = 0.1. In contrast, dermatologists were outperformed by the CNN in their level I management decisions and level I and II diagnostic decisions. More experienced dermatologists frequently surpassed the CNN's performance. CONCLUSIONS: Under less artificial conditions and in a broader spectrum of diagnoses, the CNN and most dermatologists performed on the same level. Dermatologists are trained to integrate information from a range of sources rendering comparative studies that are solely based on one single case image inadequate.

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