Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Laurence Lamant
Based on 21 articles published since 2009
(Why 21 articles?)
||||

Between 2009 and 2019, L. Lamant wrote the following 21 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline [Locoregional treatments of brain metastases for patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma: French national guidelines]. 2014

Lubrano, V / Derrey, S / Truc, G / Mirabel, X / Thariat, J / Cupissol, D / Sassolas, B / Combemale, P / Modiano, P / Bedane, C / Dygai-Cochet, I / Lamant, L / Mourrégot, A / Rougé Bugat, M-È / Siegrist, S / Tiffet, O / Mazeau-Woynar, V / Verdoni, L / Planchamp, F / Leccia, M-T / Anonymous610807. ·Service de neurochirurgie, hôpital de Rangueil, CHU de Toulouse, 1, avenue du Professeur-Jean-Poulhès, TSA 50032, 31059 Toulouse, France. · Département de neurochirurgie, hôpital Charles-Nicolle, 1, rue de Germont, 76000 Rouen, France. · Département de radiothérapie, centre Georges-François-Leclerc, 1, rue du Professeur-Marion, BP 77980, 21079 Dijon, France. · Département de radiothérapie-curiethérapie, centre Oscar-Lambret, 3, rue Frédéric-Combemale, BP 307, 59020 Lille, France. · Pôle de radiothérapie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue de Valombrose, 06189 Nice, France. · Service d'oncologie médicale, ICM, institut du cancer de Montpellier Val-d'Aurelle, 208, avenue des Apothicaires, parc Euromédecine, 34298 Montpellier, France. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital Cavale-Blanche, boulevard Tanguy-Prigent, 29609 Brest, France. · Unité onco-dermatologie, centre Léon Bérard, 28, rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon, France. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital Saint-Vincent-de-Paul, boulevard de Belfort, BP 387, 59020 Lille, France. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital Dupuytren, 2, avenue Martin-Luther-King, 87042 Limoges, France. · Service de médecine nucléaire, centre Georges-François-Leclerc, 1, rue du Professeur-Marion, BP 77980, 21079 Dijon, France. · Service d'anatomie pathologique, hôpital Purpan, place Baylac, 31059 Toulouse, France. · Service de chirurgie oncologique, ICM, institut du cancer de Montpellier Val-d'Aurelle, 208, avenue des Apothicaires, parc Euromédecine, 34298 Montpellier, France. · Cabinet médical, 59, rue de la Providence, 31500 Toulouse, France. · Cabinet médical, 3, rue Saint-Sigisbert, 57050 le Ban-Saint-Martin, France. · Service de chirurgie générale et thoracique, centre hospitalier universitaire, 42055 Saint-Étienne, France. · Direction des recommandations et de la qualité de l'expertise, Institut national du cancer, 52, avenue André-Morizet, 92513 Boulogne-Billancourt, France. · Direction des recommandations et de la qualité de l'expertise, Institut national du cancer, 52, avenue André-Morizet, 92513 Boulogne-Billancourt, France. Electronic address: recommandations@institutcancer.fr. · Clinique de dermatolo-vénéréologie, photobiologie et allergologie, pôle pluridisciplinaire de médecine, hôpital Michallon, 38043 Grenoble, France. ·Neurochirurgie · Pubmed #25241016.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The management of metastatic cutaneous melanoma is changing, marked by innovative therapies. However, their respective use and place in the therapeutic strategy continue to be debated by healthcare professionals. OBJECTIVE: The French national cancer institute has led a national clinical practice guideline project since 2008. It has carried out a review of these modalities of treatment and established recommendations. METHODS: The clinical practice guidelines development process is based on systematic literature review and critical appraisal by experts. The recommendations are thus based on the best available evidence and expert agreement. Prior to publication, the guidelines are reviewed by independent practitioners in cancer care delivery. RESULTS: This article presents the results of bibliographic search, the conclusions of the literature and the recommendations concerning locoregional treatments of brain metastases for patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

2 Guideline [Management of patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma: French national guidelines. French National Cancer Institute]. 2014

Leccia, M-T / Planchamp, F / Sassolas, B / Combemale, P / Modiano, P / Bedane, C / Cupissol, D / Derrey, S / Dygai-Cochet, I / Lamant, L / Lubrano, V / Mirabel, X / Mourrégot, A / Rougé Bugat, M-E / Siegrist, S / Thariat, J / Tiffet, O / Truc, G / Verdoni, L / Mazeau-Woynar, V. ·Pôle pluridisciplinaire de médecine, clinique de dermatolo-vénéréologie, photobiologie et allergologie, hôpital Michallon, 38043 Grenoble, France. · Direction des recommandations et de la qualité de l'expertise, Institut national du cancer, 52, avenue André-Morizet, 92513 Boulogne-Billancourt, France. Electronic address: recommandations@institutcancer.fr. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital Cavale Blanche, boulevard Tanguy-Prigent, 29609 Brest, France. · Unité onco-dermatologie, centre Léon-Bérard, 28, rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon, France. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital Saint-Vincent-de-Paul, boulevard de Belfort, BP 387, 59020 Lille, France. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital Dupuytren, 2, avenue Martin-Luther-King, 87042 Limoges, France. · Service d'oncologie médicale, ICM, institut du cancer de Montpellier Val-d'Aurelle, parc Euromédecine, 208, avenue des Apothicaires, 34298 Montpellier, France. · Département de neurochirurgie, hôpital Charles-Nicolle, 1, rue de Germont, 76000 Rouen, France. · Service de médecine nucléaire, centre Georges-François-Leclerc, 1, rue du Professeur-Marion, BP 77980, 21079 Dijon, France. · Service d'anatomie pathologique, hôpital Purpan, place Baylac, 31059 Toulouse, France. · Service de neurochirurgie, hôpital de Rangueil, 1, avenue du Professeur-Jean-Poulhès, TSA 50032, 31059 Toulouse, France. · Département de radiothérapie-curiethérapie, centre Oscar-Lambret, 3, rue Frédéric-Combemale, BP 307, 59020 Lille, France. · Service de chirurgie oncologique, ICM, institut du cancer de Montpellier Val-d'Aurelle, parc Euromédecine, 208, avenue des Apothicaires, 34298 Montpellier, France. · Cabinet médical, 59, rue de la Providence, 31500 Toulouse, France. · Cabinet médical, 3, rue Saint-Sigisbert, 57050 Le Ban-Saint-Martin, France. · Pôle de radiothérapie, centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue de Valombrose, 06189 Nice, France. · Service de chirurgie générale et thoracique, centre hospitalier universitaire de Saint-Étienne, 42055 Saint-Étienne, France. · Département de radiothérapie, centre Georges-François-Leclerc, 1, rue du Professeur-Marion, BP 77980, 21079 Dijon, France. · Direction des recommandations et de la qualité de l'expertise, Institut national du cancer, 52, avenue André-Morizet, 92513 Boulogne-Billancourt, France. ·Ann Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #24507205.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Recent years have seen the emergence of new molecules for the treatment of patients with metastatic cutaneous melanoma, with significant benefits in terms of survival and the opening of new therapeutic perspectives. In addition, many techniques are currently being developed for locoregional treatment of metastatic sites. Management of metastatic melanoma is thus fast-changing and is marked by innovative therapeutic approaches. However, the availability of these new treatments has prompted debate among healthcare professionals concerning their use and their place in therapeutic strategy. AIMS: Since 2008, the French National Cancer Institute (INCa) has been leading a project to define and diffuse national clinical practice guidelines. It has performed a review of these treatment methods, which it aims to circulate, and it is seeking to develop recommendations in order to allow nationwide implementation of innovative approaches while promoting good use thereof. METHODS: The clinical practice guidelines development process is based on systematic literature review and critical appraisal by experts within a multidisciplinary working group, with feedback from specialists in cancer care delivery. The recommendations are thus based on the best available evidence and expert agreement. Prior to publication, the guidelines are reviewed by independent practitioners in cancer care delivery. RESULTS: This article presents the national recommendations for first- and second-line systemic treatment and for locoregional treatment of metastatic sites in patients presenting metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

3 Guideline [Loco-regional treatments of the metastatic sites for patients with pauci-metastatic cutaneous melanoma (without brain metastasis): French national guidelines]. 2014

Sassolas, Bruno / Mourrégot, Anne / Thariat, Juliette / Tiffet, Olivier / Dygai-Cochet, Inna / Mirabel, Xavier / Truc, Gilles / Cupissol, Didier / Modiano, Philippe / Combemale, Patrick / Bedane, Christophe / Derrey, Stéphane / Lamant, Laurence / Lubrano, Vincent / Siegrist, Sophie / Rougé-Bugat, Marie-Ève / Mazeau-Woynar, Valérie / Verdoni, Laëtitia / Planchamp, François / Leccia, Marie-Thérèse. ·Hôpital Cavale Blanche, boulevard Tanguy-Prigent, 29609 Brest, France. · Institut du Cancer de Montpellier Val-d'Aurelle, parc Euromédecine, 208, avenue des Apothicaires, 34298 Montpellier, France. · Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 33, avenue de Valombrose, 06189 Nice, France. · Centre hospitalier universitaire de Saint-Étienne, 42055 Saint-Étienne, France. · Centre Georges-François-Leclerc, 1, rue du Professeur-Marion, BP 77980, 21079 Dijon, France. · Centre Oscar-Lambret, 3, rue Frédéric-Combemale, BP 307, 59020 Lille, France. · Hôpital Saint-Vincent-de-Paul, boulevard de Belfort, BP 387, 59020 Lille, France. · Centre Léon-Bérard, 28, rue Laënnec, 69008 Lyon, France. · Hôpital Dupuytren, 2, avenue Martin-Luther-King, 87042 Limoge, France. · Hôpital Charles-Nicolle, 1, rue de Germont, 76000 Rouen, France. · Hôpital Purpan, place Baylac, 31059 Toulouse, France. · Hôpital de Rangueil, 1, avenue du Professeur-Jean-Poulhès, TSA 50032, 31059 Toulouse, France. · Cabinet médical, 3, rue Saint-Sigisbert, 57050Le Ban-Saint-Martin, France. · Cabinet médical, 59, rue de la Providence, 31500 Toulouse, France. · Institut national du cancer, 52, avenue André-Morizet, 92513 Boulogne-Billancourt, France. · Hôpital Michallon, 38043 Grenoble, France. ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #24369290.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The last years are marked by the emergence of new molecules for the treatment of metastatic cutaneous melanoma with a significant benefit on the survival. Besides, some techniques are in development for the loco-regional treatment of the metastatic sites, bringing new therapeutic perspectives. However, their respective use and place in the therapeutic strategy are debated by healthcare professionals. OBJECTIVE: The French National Cancer Institute leads a national clinical practice guidelines project since 2008. It realized a review of these modalities of treatment and developed recommendations. METHODS: The clinical practice guidelines development process is based on systematic literature review and critical appraisal by a multidisciplinary expert workgroup. The recommendations are thus based on the best available evidence and expert agreement. Prior to publication, the guidelines are reviewed by independent practitioners in cancer care delivery. RESULTS: This article presents recommendations for loco-regional treatments of the pulmonary, bone, cutaneous, hepatic and digestive metastatic sites for patients with pauci-metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

4 Review Dermatologic complications of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint antibodies. 2016

Sibaud, Vincent / Meyer, Nicolas / Lamant, Laurence / Vigarios, Emmanuelle / Mazieres, Julien / Delord, Jean Pierre. ·aDepartment of Medical Oncology and Clinical Research bDepartment of Oncodermatology cDepartment of Pathology dDepartment of Oral Medicine, Institut Claudius Regaud, Institut Universitaire du Cancer, Toulouse Oncopole eDepartment of Oncopneumology, Hopital Larrey, Toulouse University, Toulouse, France. ·Curr Opin Oncol · Pubmed #27136138.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The therapeutic use of anti-PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies (nivolumab, pembrolizumab) is rapidly increasing. Given their mechanism of action that triggers T-cell activation, these immune checkpoint inhibitors induce specific adverse events that are mostly of immunologic origin. In this way, cutaneous toxicities represent the most frequent immune-related adverse events (irAEs). The purpose of this review is to summarize the most prevalent dermatologic complications induced by PD-1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint-blocking antibodies and to compare their dermatologic safety profile with anti-CTLA-4 ipilimumab. RECENT FINDINGS: More than 40% of melanoma patients treated with anti-PD-1 therapy are faced with dermatologic irAEs. However, these cutaneous complications usually remain self-limiting and readily manageable. Nonspecific macular papular rash and pruritus represent the most common manifestations. More characteristic lichenoid dermatitis or psoriasis may also develop. Vitiligo is also frequent in patients with melanoma but has not been reported in other types of solid cancers. Mucosal involvement may also occur, including xerostomia and lichenoid reactions. Although available data remain scarce, anti-PD-L1 antibodies present a similar dermatologic safety profile. SUMMARY: Dermatologic irAEs induced by PD-1 or PD-L1 blockade therapy rarely result in significant morbidity or permanent discontinuation of treatment. However, early recognition and appropriate management are crucial for restricting dose-limiting toxicities.

5 Review [Adverse skin reactions induced by BRAF inhibitors: a systematic review]. 2013

Sibaud, V / Lamant, L / Maisongrosse, V / Delord, J-P. ·Service de dermatologie, unité phases cliniques précoces, centre de lutte contre le cancer, institut Claudius-Regaud, 20-24, rue du Pont-Saint-Pierre, 31052 Toulouse, France. Electronic address: sibaud.vincent@claudiusregaud.fr. ·Ann Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #24034635.

ABSTRACT: Recent developments and therapeutic use of selective BRAF inhibitors (e.g. dabrafenib and vemurafenib) have significantly improved overall survival and disease-free survival of patients with BRAF V600 mutation-positive metastatic melanoma. Despite their survival benefits, small-molecule inhibitors of BRAF are associated with significant and sometimes severe treatment-related dermatological toxicity. The most common adverse skin reactions include photosensitivity, induced malignant lesions of the skin such as keratoacanthomas, squamous cell carcinoma and new primary melanomas, as well as keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation dysfunctions that can manifest as skin papillomas, hand-foot skin reaction, keratosis pilaris-like rash, acantholytic dyskeratosis and cysts of the milia type. In this article, we describe the clinical and histological features of the cutaneous manifestations induced by vemurafenib and dabrafenib on the basis of our clinical experience and a literature review. The crucial role of dermatologists in patient management is also highlighted.

6 Article Evaluation of eight melanocytic and neural crest-associated markers in a well-characterised series of 124 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumours (MPNST): useful to distinguish MPNST from melanoma? 2018

Gaspard, Margot / Lamant, Laurence / Tournier, Emilie / Valentin, Thibaud / Rochaix, Philippe / Terrier, Philippe / Ranchere-Vince, Dominique / Coindre, Jean-Michel / Filleron, Thomas / Le Guellec, Sophie. ·Department of Pathology, Institut Claudius Regaud, IUCT-Oncopole, Toulouse, France. · Department of Pathology, CHU, IUCT-Oncopole, Toulouse, France. · Department of Oncology, Institut Claudius Regaud, IUCT-Oncopole, Toulouse, France. · INSERM U1037, Cancer Research Center of Toulouse, Toulouse, France. · Department of Pathology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. · Department of Pathology, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon, France. · Department of Biopathology, Institut Bergonié, Bordeaux, France. · INSERM U916, Institut Bergonié, Bordeaux, France. · Department of Biostatistics, Institut Claudius Regaud, IUCT-Oncopole, Toulouse, France. ·Histopathology · Pubmed #30137667.

ABSTRACT: AIMS: The diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour (MPNST) may be challenging, especially in the sporadic setting. Owing to the lack of specific histological criteria, immunohistochemical and molecular diagnostic markers, several differential diagnoses must be considered, especially melanoma. Indeed, although S100 protein usually stains melanoma, other melanocytic markers are often negative, especially in spindle cell/desmoplastic types. This pattern of immunoreactivity resembles that of some nerve-derived tumours such as MPNST. Owing to their different clinical behaviours and therapeutic implications, accurate identification of these two different tumours is crucial. METHODS AND RESULTS: S100, SOX10, KBA62, MITF, HMB45, Melan-A, tyrosinase PNL2 and BRAF-V600E immunostaining was performed in a pathologically and genetically well-characterised cohort of primary MPNST (n = 124), including 66 (53%) NF1-associated tumours. Sox10 and KBA62 expression were found, respectively, in 102 (84%) and in 101 (83%) MPNST, whereas S100 was expressed in 64 cases (52%). We observed an increased loss of S100 with increasing histological grade (P = 0.0052). We found Melan-A expression in 14% (n = 17) of all MPNST, occurring in 82% (n = 14) of cases in an NF1 context. Six per cent (n = 8) of MPNST showed tyrosinase positivity, including seven (87%) NF1-associated. MITF expression was found in 10 (8%) MPNST. None expressed PNL2, HMB45 or BRAF-V600E. CONCLUSION: MPNST (in NF1 and a sporadic setting) can quite often be positive for Melan-A, tyrosinase and MITF. Pathologists should be cognisant of these exceptions to prevent confusion with melanoma.

7 Article Characterization and Outcomes of Disease Progression in 52 Patients Treated with BRAF-V600 + MEK Inhibitors for Advanced Melanoma. 2018

Lucas, Philippine / Boulinguez, Serge / Sibaud, Vincent / Mourey, Loïc / Lamant, Laurence / Paul, Carle / Meyer, Nicolas. · ·Dermatology · Pubmed #30110681.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Combined treatment with BRAF-V600 and MEK inhibitors has significantly improved progression-free and overall survival of patients with BRAF-mutated melanoma. Pattern of disease progression and outcomes in patients have not been fully characterized. METHODS: We conducted a single-center, retrospective, descriptive analysis of a cohort of 52 patients treated with BRAF-V600 + MEK inhibitors for advanced melanoma over a 12-month period. The aim of this study was to characterize disease progression, defined as metastatic pattern, disease kinetics, and response to subsequent therapies, in melanoma patients treated with BRAF-V600 + MEK inhibitors. RESULTS: Disease progression was observed in 31/52 (59.6%) patients treated with BRAF-V600 + MEK inhibitors. Relapse of melanoma involved the CNS for 22/31 (70.9%) patients with disease progression, including 18/31 (58%) patients who had exclusive intracranial metastases. Sixteen patients died from disease progression. Among the 31 patients who had disease progression, the median time until a relapse was 8 months, and the median survival time after disease progression was 2 months. CONCLUSION: Our study shows that, for patients treated with BRAF-V600 + MEK inhibitors who lose response, disease progression was aggressive and had poor outcomes. Most patients had CNS metastases and low rates of therapeutic response to any subsequent therapy.

8 Article Clinical, histological and molecular predictors of metastatic melanoma responses to anti-PD-1 immunotherapy. 2018

Dupuis, Frantz / Lamant, Laurence / Gerard, Emilie / Torossian, Nouritza / Chaltiel, Leonor / Filleron, Thomas / Beylot-Barry, Marie / Dutriaux, Caroline / Prey, Sorilla / Gros, Audrey / Jullie, Marie-Laure / Meyer, Nicolas / Vergier, Béatrice. ·Department of Pathology, Hôpital Haut-Lévêque (CHU de Bordeaux), 33604, Pessac, France. · Department of Pathology, Oncopole de Toulouse, 31100, Toulouse, France. · Université Paul-Sabatier, 31400, Toulouse, France. · Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Saint-André (CHU de Bordeaux), 33000, Bordeaux, France. · Department of Dermatology, Paul-Sabatier-Toulouse III University (CHU de Toulouse), 31059, Toulouse, France. · Department of Biostatistics, Oncopole de Toulouse, 31100, Toulouse, France. · INSERM U1053 Team 1 (université de Bordeaux), 33076, Bordeaux, France. · Department of Tumour Biology and Tumour Bank, Hôpital Haut-Lévêque (CHU de Bordeaux), 33604, Pessac, France. · Department of Pathology, Hôpital Haut-Lévêque (CHU de Bordeaux), 33604, Pessac, France. beatrice.vergier@chu-bordeaux.fr. · INSERM U1053 Team 1 (université de Bordeaux), 33076, Bordeaux, France. beatrice.vergier@chu-bordeaux.fr. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #29973670.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Prescribing anti-programmed death-1 (PD-1) immunotherapy for advanced melanoma is currently not restricted by any biomarker assessment. Determination of programmed death-ligand-1 (PD-L1)-expression status is technically challenging and is not mandatory, because negative tumours also achieve therapeutic responses. However, reproducible biomarkers predictive of a response to anti-PD-1 therapy could contribute to improving therapeutic decision-making. METHODS: This retrospective study on 70 metastatic melanoma patients was undertaken to evaluate the relationships between clinical, histological, immunohistochemical and/or molecular criteria, and the 6-month objective response rate. RESULTS: Better objective response rates were associated with metachronous metastases (P = 0.04), PD-L1 tumour- and/or immune-cell status (P = 0.01), CD163+ histiocytes at advancing edges (P = 0.009) of primary melanomas and NRAS mutation (P = 0.019). Moreover, CD163+ histiocytes at advancing edges (P = 0.04) were associated with longer progression-free survival (PFS), and metachronous metastases with longer overall survival (P = 0.02) and PFS (P = 0.049). CONCLUSIONS: Combining these reproducible biomarkers could help improve therapeutic decision-making for patients with progressive disease.

9 Article Loss of H3K27 trimethylation is not suitable for distinguishing malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor from melanoma: a study of 387 cases including mimicking lesions. 2017

Le Guellec, Sophie / Macagno, Nicolas / Velasco, Valérie / Lamant, Laurence / Lae, Marick / Filleron, Thomas / Malissen, Nausicaa / Cassagnau, Elisabeth / Terrier, Philippe / Chevreau, Christine / Ranchere-Vince, Dominique / Coindre, Jean-Michel. ·Department of Pathology, Institut Claudius Regaud, IUCT-Oncopole, Toulouse, France. · Department of Pathology, La Timone Hospital, Marseille, France. · Department of Biopathology, Institut Bergonié, Bordeaux, France. · Department of Pathology, CHU- IUCT-Oncopole, Toulouse, France. · Department of Pathology, Institut Curie, Paris, France. · Department of Biostatistics, Institut Claudius Regaud, IUCT-Oncopole, Toulouse, France. · INSERM, U1068, CRCM Marseille, Marseille, France. · Department of Pathology, Hôtel-Dieu, Nantes, France. · Department of Pathology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. · Department of Oncology, Institut Claudius Regaud, IUCT-Oncopole, Toulouse, France. · Department of Pathology, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon, France. · INSERM U916, Institut Bergonié, Bordeaux, France. · Université de Bordeaux, France. ·Mod Pathol · Pubmed #28752843.

ABSTRACT: The diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor remains challenging, especially in the sporadic setting. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is a rare malignancy, and owing to the lack of specific histological criteria, immunohistochemical and molecular diagnostic markers, several differential diagnoses must be considered, in particular melanoma. Recently, inactivation of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), induced by inactivating mutations in two of its critical constituents SUZ12 and EED, was reported in a large subset of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. Homozygous PRC2 inactivation induces complete loss of trimethylation at lysine 27 of histone 3 (H3K27me3). Recent studies suggest that complete loss of H3K27me3 is highly specific for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and may be a useful immunohistochemical diagnostic marker. Therefore, to determine the specificity of the complete loss of H3K27me3 expression in the context of the differential diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor from melanoma (its major potential mimic), we performed H3K27me3 immunohistochemistry in a pathologically and genetically well-characterized cohort of primary (neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), radiation-associated and sporadic context) malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (n=122) and in a cohort or primary (desmoplastic) and metastatic melanomas (n=265). In total, 88 (72%) malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, including 46 (71%) NF1-associated, 4 (100%) radiation-associated, and 38 (72%) sporadic tumors, showed complete loss of H3K27me3. We observed increased loss of H3K27me3 with increasing histological grade. Interestingly, we found complete loss of H3K27me3 in 37% (n=98) of all melanomas, including 25% (n=9) of primary desmoplastic melanomas. Moreover, partial loss ('mosaic' pattern) was observed in 23 (19%) of all malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors and in 136 (51%) of all melanomas. Complete loss of H3K27me3 detected by immunohistochemistry is not specific for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor and cannot be used safely when distinguishing malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor from melanoma.

10 Article Highly Concordant Results Between Immunohistochemistry and Molecular Testing of Mutated V600E BRAF in Primary and Metastatic Melanoma. 2016

Manfredi, Laure / Meyer, Nicolas / Tournier, Emilie / Grand, David / Uro-Coste, Emmanuelle / Rochaix, Philippe / Brousset, Pierre / Lamant, Laurence. ·Department of Pathology, Institut Universitaire du Cancer Toulouse Oncopole, 1, Avenue Irène Joliot-Curie, FR-31059 Toulouse, France. ·Acta Derm Venereol · Pubmed #26695089.

ABSTRACT: This study tested the sensitivity and specificity of VE1 antibody raised against BRAFV600E protein, on 189 melanoma samples, compared with molecular testing. In addition, the therapeutic response to BRAF inhibitors was analysed in 27 patients, according to staining intensity (scored from weak to strong) and pattern (homogeneous or heterogeneous). BRAFV600E status during melanoma progression was evaluated in a cohort of 54 patients with at least paired-samples. High sensitivity (98.6%) and specificity (97.7%) of VE1 were confirmed. During melanoma progression different samples showed concordant phenotypes. Heterogeneous VE1 staining was observed in 28.5% of cases, and progression-free survival was higher in patients with tumour samples displaying such staining. These findings suggest that only VE1-negative tumours would be genotyped to detect other BRAFV600 mutations, and that either primary melanoma or metastasis can be tested using immunohistochemistry, according to the material available.

11 Article Melanoma-expressed CD70 is involved in invasion and metastasis. 2016

Pich, Christine / Sarrabayrouse, Guillaume / Teiti, Iotefa / Mariamé, Bernard / Rochaix, Philippe / Lamant, Laurence / Favre, Gilles / Maisongrosse, Véronique / Tilkin-Mariamé, Anne-Françoise. ·Unité INSERM UMR 1037, CRCT, F-31037 Toulouse, France. · Université Paul Sabatier, F-31062 Toulouse, France. · ITAV, USR 3505, 1 Place Potier, F-31106 Toulouse, France. · Service d'anatomo-Pathologie, Institut Universitaire du Cancer - IUCT, F-31059 Toulouse, France. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #26671750.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: CD70 is a costimulatory molecule of the tumour necrosis factor family expressed in activated immune cells and some solid tumours. In lymphocytes CD70 triggers T cell-mediated cytotoxicity and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation. METHODS: We evaluated the expression of CD70 in biopsies and melanoma cell lines. Using melanoma cell lines positive or not for CD70, we analysed CD70 function on melanoma progression. RESULTS: We report CD70 expression in human melanoma cell lines and tumour cells from melanoma biopsies. This expression was observed in 95% of primary melanomas but only 37% of metastases. Both monomeric and trimeric forms of CD70 were detected in tumour cell membrane fractions, whereas cytoplasmic fractions contained almost exclusively monomeric CD70. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that CD70 expression inhibited melanoma cell migration, invasion and pulmonary metastasis implantation independently of the tumour immune microenvironment. Increasing the levels of the trimeric form of CD70 through monoclonal antibody binding led to an increase in CD70+ melanoma cell invasiveness through MAPK pathway activation, RhoE overexpression, ROCK1 and MYPT1 phosphorylation decrease, and stress fibres and focal adhesions disappearance. CONCLUSIONS: Our results describe a new non-immunological function of melanoma-expressed CD70, which involves melanoma invasiveness through MAPK pathway, RhoE and cytoskeletal modulation.

12 Article Identification of a Circulating MicroRNA Profile as a Biomarker of Metastatic Cutaneous Melanoma. 2016

Armand-Labit, Virginie / Meyer, Nicolas / Casanova, Anne / Bonnabau, Henri / Platzer, Valérie / Tournier, Emilie / Sansas, Benoît / Verdun, Stéphane / Thouvenot, Benoit / Hilselberger, Benoit / Doncescu, Andrei / Lamant, Laurence / Lacroix-Triki, Magali / Favre, Gilles / Pradines, Anne. ·Inserm, UMR 1037-CRCT, FR-31052 Toulouse, France. ·Acta Derm Venereol · Pubmed #26039581.

ABSTRACT: No specific biomarkers for prognostication or evaluation of tumour load in melanoma have been reported to our knowledge. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are strongly implicated in oncogenesis and tumour progression, and their circulating forms have been studied as potential biomarkers in oncology. The aim of this prospective study was to identify a melanoma-specific profile of plasma miRNAs. A screening phase, using RNA microarray, was conducted on plasma from 14 patients with metastatic melanoma and 5 healthy subjects. Selected miRNAs were analysed by RTqPCR in 2 independent training and validation cohorts including, respectively, 29 and 31 patients and 16 and 43 control subjects. A profile of 2 miRNAs (miR-1246 and miR-185) significantly associated with metastatic melanoma with a sensitivity of 90.5% and a specificity of 89.1% was identified. This plasma miRNA profile may become an accurate non-invasive biomarker for melanoma.

13 Article Acute skin reaction suggestive of pembrolizumab-induced radiosensitization. 2015

Sibaud, Vincent / David, Isabelle / Lamant, Laurence / Resseguier, Sarah / Radut, Roxana / Attal, Justine / Meyer, Nicolas / Delord, Jean-Pierre. ·Departments of aDermatology bRadiation Oncology cPathology dClinical Oncology, Institut Claudius Regaud, Institut Universitaire du Cancer, Toulouse Oncopole, Toulouse, France. ·Melanoma Res · Pubmed #26312439.

ABSTRACT: The combination of localized radiotherapy and immune checkpoint inhibitors represents a promising therapeutic strategy for various cancers, including metastatic melanoma. Radiation therapy may enhance tumor antigen presentation and cytokine release, which may optimize the systemic antitumor immune response induced by these immunotherapeutic antibodies, with a potential delayed abscopal effect. However, clinical experience of using immune checkpoint inhibitors with concurrent radiotherapy remains scarce. We report here for the first time a case suggestive of acute skin radiosensitization induced by pembrolizumab, with a suggestive time relationship between the completion of ionizing radiation, drug administration, and rapid onset of the skin reaction. This suggests that radiation therapy may also interact rapidly with anti-programmed-death 1 antibodies. Therefore, caution should be exercised when prescribing this combination therapy in advanced cancers.

14 Article The c-Jun/RHOB/AKT pathway confers resistance of BRAF-mutant melanoma cells to MAPK inhibitors. 2015

Delmas, Audrey / Cherier, Julia / Pohorecka, Magdalena / Medale-Giamarchi, Claire / Meyer, Nicolas / Casanova, Anne / Sordet, Olivier / Lamant, Laurence / Savina, Ariel / Pradines, Anne / Favre, Gilles. ·Inserm, UMR 1037-CRCT, Toulouse, France. · Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse, France. · Institut Claudius Regaud, Institut Universitaire du Cancer de Toulouse-Oncopole, Laboratory of Medical Biology and Oncogenetics, Toulouse, France. · Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Toulouse, Institut Universitaire du Cancer de Toulouse-Oncopole, Department of Dermatology, Toulouse, France. · Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire de Toulouse, Institut Universitaire du Cancer de Toulouse-Oncopole, Department of Pathology, Toulouse, France. · Scientific Partnerships, Roche SAS, Boulogne Billancourt, France. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #26098773.

ABSTRACT: The response of BRAF-mutant melanoma patients to BRAF inhibitors is dramatically impaired by secondary resistances and rapid relapse. So far, the molecular mechanisms driving these resistances are not completely understood. Here, we show that, in BRAF-mutant melanoma cells, inhibition of BRAF or its target MEK induces RHOB expression by a mechanism that depends on the transcription factor c-Jun. In those cells, RHOB deficiency causes hypersensitivity to BRAF and MEK inhibitors-induced apoptosis. Supporting these results, loss of RHOB expression in metastatic melanoma tissues is associated with an increased progression-free survival of BRAF-mutant patients treated with vemurafenib. Following BRAF inhibition, RHOB activates AKT whose inhibition causes hypersensitivity of BRAF-mutant melanoma cells to BRAF inhibitors. In mice, AKT inhibition synergizes with vemurafenib to block tumor growth of BRAF-mutant metastatic melanoma. Our findings reveal that BRAF inhibition activates a c-Jun/RHOB/AKT pathway that promotes tumor cell survival and further support a role of this pathway in the resistance of melanoma to vemurafenib. Our data also highlight the importance of using RHOB tumor levels as a biomarker to predict vemurafenib patient's response and to select those that would benefit of the combination with AKT inhibitors.

15 Article Breslow thickness, clark index and ulceration are associated with sentinel lymph node metastasis in melanoma patients: a cohort analysis of 612 patients. 2014

Munsch, Coline / Lauwers-Cances, Valérie / Lamant, Laurence / Gentil, Catherine / Rochaix, Philippe / Garrido, Ignacio / Lopez, Raphael / Chevreau, Christine / Paul, Carle / Meyer, Nicolas. ·Dermatology Department, Paul Sabatier-Toulouse III University and Larrey Hospital, Toulouse, France. ·Dermatology · Pubmed #25171688.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) is the most sensitive procedure for assessing nodal status in patients with primary melanoma. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the predictive ability of usual primary melanoma prognosis factors of detecting sentinel lymph node (SLN) metastasis in patients with melanoma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A cohort of 612 consecutive patients presenting with primary skin melanoma who underwent a SLNB was evaluated. Assessment of the determinants of SLN metastasis was based on general linear model analysis. The model performance was studied using the concordance statistic and the net reclassification index. The calibration was estimated using the Hosmer-Lemeshow test. RESULTS: The discrimination ability did not differ significantly between Breslow thickness (0.57), Clark index (0.61), ulceration (0.57) and histological subtype (0.55). Clark index, ulceration and Breslow thickness were all significant and independent determinants of SLN metastasis. The predictive ability of the final model was 0.657. CONCLUSION: Breslow thickness, Clark index and ulceration are independent predictors of a SLN metastasis.

16 Article High-frequency ultrasonography but not 930-nm optical coherence tomography reliably evaluates melanoma thickness in vivo: a prospective validation study. 2014

Meyer, N / Lauwers-Cances, V / Lourari, S / Laurent, J / Konstantinou, M-P / Lagarde, J-M / Krief, B / Batatia, H / Lamant, L / Paul, C. ·Université Paul Sabatier, Toulouse III, Toulouse, France; Department of Dermatology, Larrey Hospital, Toulouse, 30030, France; UMR1037-CRCT, Toulouse, France. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #24863700.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Early diagnosis and rapid surgical excision are essential for improving the prognosis of patients with melanoma. Reflectance confocal microscopy has been validated as a feasible procedure for in vivo diagnosis of melanoma but cannot be used to measure tumour thickness. However, ultrasonography and optical coherence tomography may allow melanoma thickness to be measured in vivo. OBJECTIVES: To validate the accuracy and reliability of high-frequency ultrasonography (HFUS) and optical coherence tomography for assessing melanoma thickness in vivo. METHODS: We conducted a prospective study on 131 patients with at least one equivocal melanocytic lesion. Each lesion underwent optical coherence tomography and HFUS assessment, followed by excision and pathological examination. Histopathology was considered to be the gold standard for assessing melanoma thickness. Repeatability, inter- and intrarater reproducibility and reliability were evaluated for each imaging procedure. RESULTS: Ultrasonography showed a good level of agreement with histology [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) 0.807; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.703-0.877] and excellent inter-rater reproducibility (G = 0.97), resulting in reliable in vivo assessment of melanoma thickness. The 930-nm optical coherence tomography showed a poor level of agreement with histopathology (ICC 0.0; 95% CI -0.2-0.2) and the inter-rater reproducibility was null (G = 0.00). CONCLUSIONS: HFUS is a reliable and reproducible noninvasive method for assessing melanoma thickness. Routine use of HFUS may allow single-step excision of equivocal melanocytic lesions, with surgical margins determined by in vivo assessment of tumour thickness.

17 Article CD10 expression by melanoma cells is associated with aggressive behavior in vitro and predicts rapid metastatic progression in humans. 2013

Thomas-Pfaab, Marianne / Annereau, Jean-Philippe / Munsch, Coline / Guilbaud, Nicolas / Garrido, Ignacio / Paul, Carle / Brousset, Pierre / Lamant, Laurence / Meyer, Nicolas. ·mariannethomas@ymail.com ·J Dermatol Sci · Pubmed #23219141.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: No biological or molecular marker of primary melanoma tumor cells has been shown to predict clinical outcome in melanoma. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether CD10, CD133, nestin and CD20 may evaluate the prognosis of melanoma. METHODS: The differential expression of these molecules was assessed in pairs of cell lines. We evaluated, by both immunohistochemical staining and RT-qPCR, their expression in a cohort of 32 patients (68 samples) with a history of metastatic melanoma, divided into two groups according to their clinical outcome profile. RESULTS: CD10 over expression in cancer cell lines was associated with more aggressive behavior in vitro. A CD10-positive staining was more frequent in patients in the "rapidly progressive" group than those in the "long survivor" group (23/35 versus 2/18, p<10(-4)). CD10 expression was associated with a lower median overall survival (1.15 year - IQR: [0.50-2.58] versus 4.27 - IQR: [1.66-6.33]; p=10(-4)). The Odds Ratio of displaying a "rapidly progressive" melanoma when tumor cells expressed CD10 was 15 (95% confidence interval: [3-78]). After adjusting for confounding factors, CD10 expression in melanoma tumor cells remained associated with an increased risk of death and more rapid disease progression (p=6×10(-4); HR=3.71). CONCLUSION: CD10 may predict clinical outcome in melanoma patients.

18 Article Melanoma chemotherapy leads to the selection of ABCB5-expressing cells. 2012

Chartrain, Marine / Riond, Joëlle / Stennevin, Aline / Vandenberghe, Isabelle / Gomes, Bruno / Lamant, Laurence / Meyer, Nicolas / Gairin, Jean Edouard / Guilbaud, Nicolas / Annereau, Jean Philippe. ·UMR 2587, CNRS-Pierre Fabre, Institut des Sciences et Technologies du Médicament de Toulouse (ISTMT), Toulouse, France. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #22675422.

ABSTRACT: Metastatic melanoma is the most aggressive skin cancer. Recently, phenotypically distinct subpopulations of tumor cells were identified. Among them, ABCB5-expressing cells were proposed to display an enhanced tumorigenicity with stem cell-like properties. In addition, ABCB5(+) cells are thought to participate to chemoresistance through a potential efflux function of ABCB5. Nevertheless, the fate of these cells upon drugs that are used in melanoma chemotherapy remains to be clarified. Here we explored the effect of anti-melanoma treatments on the ABCB5-expressing cells. Using a melanoma xenograft model (WM266-4), we observed in vivo that ABCB5-expressing cells are enriched after a temozolomide treatment that induces a significant tumor regression. These results were further confirmed in a preliminary study conducted on clinical samples from patients that received dacarbazine. In vitro, we showed that ABCB5-expressing cells selectively survive when exposed to dacarbazine, the reference treatment of metastatic melanoma, but also to vemurafenib, a new inhibitor of the mutated kinase V600E BRAF and other various chemotherapeutic drugs. Our results show that anti-melanoma chemotherapy might participate to the chemoresistance acquisition by selecting tumor cell subpopulations expressing ABCB5. This is of particular importance in understanding the relapses observed after anti-melanoma treatments and reinforces the interest of ABCB5 and ABCB5-expressing cells as potential therapeutic targets in melanoma.

19 Article Histological regression in primary melanoma: not a predictor of sentinel lymph node metastasis in a cohort of 397 patients. 2010

Socrier, Y / Lauwers-Cances, V / Lamant, L / Garrido, I / Lauwers, F / Lopez, R / Rochaix, P / Chevreau, C / Payoux, P / Viraben, R / Paul, C / Meyer, N. ·Paul Sabatier-Toulouse III University, Toulouse, France. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #20030641.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Regression has been proposed as a potential marker of dissemination in thin melanomas. Previous studies have shown conflicting results. OBJECTIVE: To determine if regression in melanoma is associated with an increased risk of sentinel lymph node (SLN) metastasis. METHODS: A cohort analysis was conducted. Data on all patients were collected on a standardized case report form during 10 years. A total of 397 consecutive patients with melanoma who underwent a SLN biopsy were analysed. All cases of melanoma and SLN biopsies were examined by the same two pathologists. Differences between melanomas with and without SLN metastasis were compared using Fisher's exact test or the two-sample t-test and the chi(2) test. Multivariable logistic regression was used to adjust for possible confounding factors. RESULTS: We analysed 397 patients (411 melanomas) who underwent a SLN biopsy. The median Breslow index was 1.8 mm (interquartile range 1.1-3). Regression was observed in 23% (n = 94). SLN metastases were observed in 26% (n = 106). The frequency of SLN metastasis was 16% in melanomas with regression and 29% without regression (P = 0.012). The adjusted odds ratio (OR) for regressive melanoma was 0.9 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.4-1.9; P = 0.777]. The risk of SLN metastasis was increased in melanoma cases with a Breslow index from 1.5 to < 2.0 mm (adjusted OR 3.1; 95% CI 1.4-7.1; P = 0.006) and >or= 2.0 mm (adjusted OR 3.5; 95% CI 1.7-7.4; P = 0.001) and ulceration of the melanoma (adjusted OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.1-3.2; P = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Regression is not an independent predictor of the risk of SLN metastasis in melanoma.

20 Minor Tumour lysis syndrome: an unexpected adverse event associated with ipilimumab. 2017

Masson Regnault, M / Ofaiche, J / Boulinguez, S / Tournier, E / Rochaix, P / Paul, C / Lamant, L / Meyer, N. ·Dermatology, Université Paul-Sabatier-Toulouse III and Institut Universitaire du Cancer de Toulouse, Toulouse, France. · Pathology, Université Paul-Sabatier-Toulouse III and Institut Universitaire du Cancer de Toulouse, Toulouse, France. · INSERM UMR 1037-CRCT, Toulouse, France. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #27256718.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Minor Oral squamous cell carcinoma and hyperkeratotic lesions with BRAF inhibitors. 2015

Vigarios, E / Lamant, L / Delord, J P / Fricain, J C / Chevreau, C / Barrés, B / Gomez-Roca, C / Boulanger, M / Sibaud, V. ·Oral Oncology Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Institut Universitaire du Cancer, Toulouse Oncopole, 1 av Irène Joliot-Curie, 31059, Toulouse CEDEX 9, France. · UFR Odontologie, 3 Chemin des Maraîchers, 31062, Toulouse CEDEX 9, France. · Pathology Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Institut Universitaire du Cancer, Toulouse Oncopole, 1 av Irène Joliot-Curie, 31059, Toulouse CEDEX 9, France. · Oncology Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Institut Universitaire du Cancer, Toulouse Oncopole, 1 av Irène Joliot-Curie, 31059, Toulouse CEDEX 9, France. · Oral Medicine Department, Pôle Odontologie et Santé Buccale, Hôpital Pellegrin, Place Amélie-Raba-Léon, 33076, Bordeaux CEDEX, France. · UFR Odontologie Bordeaux, 16-20 Cours de la Marne, 33076, Bordeaux CEDEX, France. · Dermatology Department, Institut Claudius Regaud, Institut Universitaire du Cancer, Toulouse Oncopole, 1 av Irène Joliot-Curie, 31059, Toulouse CEDEX 9, France. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #25495246.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --