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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Julie R. Lange
Based on 15 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Julie Lange wrote the following 15 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline NCCN Guidelines Insights: Melanoma, Version 3.2016. 2016

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Algazi, Alain / Andtbacka, Robert / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / DiMaio, Dominick / Fields, Ryan C / Fleming, Martin D / Gastman, Brian / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Johnson, Douglas / Joseph, Richard W / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Materin, Miguel A / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ott, Patrick / Gupta, Aparna Priyanath / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April K / Skitzki, Joseph / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Torres-Roca, Javier F / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Engh, Anita. ·From Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine; The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute; University of Colorado Cancer Center; Aim at Melanoma; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital; Fox Chase Cancer Center; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; Duke Cancer Institute; Roswell Park Cancer Institute; Stanford Cancer Institute; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; Moffitt Cancer Center; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; and National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #27496110.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma have been significantly revised over the past few years in response to emerging data on a number of novel agents and treatment regimens. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the data and rationale supporting extensive changes to the recommendations for systemic therapy in patients with metastatic or unresectable melanoma.

2 Guideline Melanoma, Version 2.2016, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. 2016

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Algazi, Alain / Andtbacka, Robert / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / DiMaio, Dominick / Ernstoff, Marc / Fields, Ryan C / Fleming, Martin D / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Joseph, Richard W / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Materin, Miguel A / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April K / Skitzki, Joseph / Sosman, Jeff / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Torres-Roca, Javier F / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Engh, Anita. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #27059193.

ABSTRACT: This selection from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Melanoma focuses on adjuvant therapy and treatment of in-transit disease, because substantial changes were made to the recommendations for the 2016 update. Depending on the stage of the disease, options for adjuvant therapy now include biochemotherapy and high-dose ipilimumab. Treatment options for in-transit disease now include intralesional injection with talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC), a new immunotherapy. These additions prompted re-assessment of the data supporting older recommended treatment options for adjuvant therapy and in-transit disease, resulting in extensive revisions to the supporting discussion sections.

3 Guideline Melanoma, version 4.2014. 2014

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / Daud, Adil / Dimaio, Dominick / Fleming, Martin D / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole R / Ho, Maria / Anonymous5170793. ·From 1Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; 2Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; 3Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; 4University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; 5The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; 6UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; 7UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; 8Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center; 9St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; 10University of Colorado Cancer Center; 11Aim at Melanoma; 12Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; 13Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; 14Roswell Park Cancer Institute; 15Moffitt Cancer Center; 16The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; 17Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; 18Fox Chase Cancer Center; 19The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; 20Duke Cancer Institute; 21Stanford Cancer Institute; 22Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; 23City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; 24University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; and 25National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #24812131.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma provide multidisciplinary recommendations for the management of patients with melanoma. These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight notable recent updates. Dabrafenib and trametinib, either as monotherapy (category 1) or combination therapy, have been added as systemic options for patients with unresectable metastatic melanoma harboring BRAF V600 mutations. Controversy continues regarding the value of adjuvant radiation for patients at high risk of nodal relapse. This is reflected in the category 2B designation to consider adjuvant radiation following lymphadenectomy for stage III melanoma with clinically positive nodes or recurrent disease.

4 Guideline Melanoma, version 2.2013: featured updates to the NCCN guidelines. 2013

Coit, Daniel G / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daud, Adil / Dimaio, Dominick / Fleming, Martin D / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Lind, Anne / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Pruitt, Scott K / Ross, Merrick I / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Thompson, John A / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Ho, Maria / Anonymous4310755. ·Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #23584343.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma provide multidisciplinary recommendations on the clinical management of patients with melanoma. This NCCN Guidelines Insights report highlights notable recent updates. Foremost of these is the exciting addition of the novel agents ipilimumab and vemurafenib for treatment of advanced melanoma. The NCCN panel also included imatinib as a treatment for KIT-mutated tumors and pegylated interferon alfa-2b as an option for adjuvant therapy. Also important are revisions to the initial stratification of early-stage lesions based on the risk of sentinel lymph node metastases, and revised recommendations on the use of sentinel lymph node biopsy for low-risk groups. Finally, the NCCN panel reached clinical consensus on clarifying the role of imaging in the workup of patients with melanoma.

5 Guideline Melanoma. 2012

Coit, Daniel G / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daud, Adil / Dilawari, Raza A / Dimaio, Dominick / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Lind, Anne / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Pruitt, Scott K / Ross, Merrick I / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Thompson, John A / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / Anonymous590720. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #22393197.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Guideline Melanoma. 2009

Coit, Daniel G / Andtbacka, Robert / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Dilawari, Raza A / Dimaio, Dominick / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed / Lange, Julie R / Lind, Anne / Martin, Lainie / Martini, Mary C / Pruitt, Scott K / Ross, Merrick I / Sener, Stephen F / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Thompson, John A / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / Weber, Jeffrey / Wong, Michael K / Anonymous5080627. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #19401060.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Melanoma in the older patient: measuring frailty as an index of survival. 2011

Lange, Julie R / Kang, Sewon / Balch, Charles M. · ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #21879274.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Sorting through the heterogeneity of recurrent melanoma. 2008

Jacobs, Lisa K / Lange, Julie R / Balch, Charles M. · ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #18320286.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Review Epidemiology, risk factors, prevention, and early detection of melanoma. 2014

Azoury, Saïd C / Lange, Julie R. ·Department of Surgery, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Johns Hopkins Medicine, 600 North Wolfe Street, Blalock 610, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. · Department of Surgery, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Johns Hopkins Medicine, 600 North Wolfe Street, Blalock 610, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. Electronic address: jlange@jhmi.edu. ·Surg Clin North Am · Pubmed #25245960.

ABSTRACT: The incidence of melanoma has increased over the past several decades. Despite improved case mortality, overall deaths from melanoma have increased because of the large increase in incidence. Although we have a better understanding of the pathogenesis of melanoma and improved early diagnostic capabilities, the burden of disease and societal costs remain high. This article provides an update on the epidemiology of cutaneous melanoma worldwide and the common risk factors including heritable and modifiable risks, emphasizing the importance of education, early detection, and prevention in reducing the disease burden.

10 Review Surgical treatment of melanoma patients with early sentinel node involvement. 2012

Hardin, Rosemarie E / Lange, Julie R. ·Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. ·Curr Treat Options Oncol · Pubmed #22810837.

ABSTRACT: Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) is a standard staging procedure for many patients with clinically node negative, invasive melanoma, providing excellent prognostic information in appropriately selected patients. The broad acceptance of SLNB into clinical practice has resulted in substantial numbers of patients found to have microscopic nodal metastases. For patients with a positive sentinel node, a completion lymph node dissection (CLND) is the current standard of care. The majority of patients who undergo CLND are found to have histologically negative non-sentinel nodes, and yet are exposed to the potential morbidity of CLND, including infection, wound complications, and lymphedema. We do not yet know if there is a survival benefit from CLND that justifies its morbidity and we are currently unable to identify clinical and pathologic factors that may be associated with the likelihood of benefit from CLND. Controversy regarding the management of melanoma patients with a positive sentinel node highlights the need for continued investigation in melanoma biology, treatment, and outcomes. Patients with minimal tumor burden in their regional nodes would especially benefit from a better understanding of the appropriate management strategies. Ongoing clinical trials are aimed at determining whether CLND is superior to nodal observation and surveillance in patients with positive sentinel nodes, and at determining the outcome of patients with minimal disease in their sentinel node who forego CLND. These studies may help to resolve the uncertainties of the management in these patients. Until we have further information, CLND for melanoma patients with positive sentinel nodes remains the preferred, standard management strategy.

11 Review Epidemiology and treatment of melanoma in elderly patients. 2010

Tsai, Susan / Balch, Charles / Lange, Julie. ·Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. ·Nat Rev Clin Oncol · Pubmed #20142815.

ABSTRACT: The number of melanoma cases in the elderly (>65 years) will rise over the coming decades, making it an important public health problem. Elderly white men are the demographic group who are at highest risk of being diagnosed with melanoma and of dying from this cancer. Among patients with melanoma, older age is recognized as an independent poor prognostic factor, but it remains unclear whether this relationship is due to a change in the biology of the disease with increasing patient age, declining host defenses, or both. Most elderly patients can have surgery to control locoregional disease, but might not be candidates for intensive biologic therapies for advanced melanoma because of comorbidities and inability to tolerate the adverse side effects of these treatments. Early detection remains an important strategy for the management of melanoma. Further research is needed to determine why older melanoma patients have a worse prognosis than their younger counterparts, even when matched for all other clinical and pathological predictors of survival outcomes.

12 Article Comparison of the use and results of sentinel lymph node biopsy in children and young adults with melanoma. 2012

Mu, Euphemia / Lange, Julie R / Strouse, John J. ·Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. ·Cancer · Pubmed #22565612.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Data on sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy in children with melanoma are limited. In this study, the authors compared the factors associated with SLN biopsy use and metastases in pediatric and young adult patients with melanoma. METHODS: The 2008 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) databases were used to examine melanoma cases from 2003 to 2008. Data extracted include age, sex, race, stage, tumor thickness, ulceration, lymph node status, surgical treatment, and survival. Logistic regression models were used for adjusted analyses. RESULTS: In total, 717 children (age <20 years) and 1368 young adults (age 20-24 years) were identified who were diagnosed with melanoma. Factors that were associated with SLN biopsy use included tumor ulceration (odds ratio [OR], 2.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.4-4.3) and greater thickness (OR, 17; 95% CI, 12-24 for >1 mm vs ≤1 mm), but not younger age (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.94-1.8) in adjusted analyses. SLN metastasis was correlated with ulceration (OR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.6-5.8), increased thickness (OR, 6.8; 95% CI, 3.1-15 for 2.01-4.0 mm vs ≤1 mm), and for the interaction between age <20 years and thickness 1.01 to 2.00 mm (OR, 6.5; 95% CI, 1.7-25) in adjusted analyses. Children with nonulcerated melanomas that measured 1.01 to 2.00 mm in thickness were significantly more likely to have SLN metastases than young adults (24% vs 4%; P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Thickness and ulceration were strong predictors of both the use of SLN biopsy and positive SLN biopsy results in children and young adults with melanoma. Compared with young adults, children were more likely to have SLN metastases despite having similar rates of SLN biopsy use.

13 Article Health care system and socioeconomic factors associated with variance in use of sentinel lymph node biopsy for melanoma in the United States. 2009

Bilimoria, Karl Y / Balch, Charles M / Wayne, Jeffrey D / Chang, David C / Palis, Bryan E / Dy, Sydney M / Lange, Julie R. ·Cancer Programs, American College of Surgeons, Department of Surgery, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #19273706.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Guidelines recommend sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) for patients with clinical stage IB/II melanomas, but not clinical stage IA melanoma. This study examines factors associated with SLNB use for clinically node-negative melanoma. METHODS: Patients diagnosed with clinically node-negative invasive melanoma in 2004 and 2005 were identified from the National Cancer Data Base. Regression models were developed to assess the association of clinicopathologic (sex, age, race/ethnicity, comorbidities, T stage), socioeconomic (insurance status, educational level, income), and hospital (hospital type, geographic area) factors with SLNB use. RESULTS: A total of 16,598 patients were identified: 8,073 patients with clinical stage IA and 8,525 patients with clinical stage IB/II melanoma. For clinical stage IB/II melanoma, SLNB use was reported in 48.7% of patients. Patients with clinical stage IB/II melanoma were less likely to undergo SLNB if they were older than 75 years; had T1b tumors, no tumor ulceration, or head/neck or truncal lesions; were covered by Medicaid or Medicare; or lived in the Northeast, South, or West census regions. SLNB use was reported in 13.3% of patients with clinical stage IA melanoma and was more likely in patients who were younger than 56 years or lived in the Mountain or Pacific census regions. Patients treated at National Comprehensive Cancer Network-or National Cancer Institute-designated hospitals were most likely to undergo SLNB in adherence with national consensus guidelines. CONCLUSION: SLNB use was associated with clinicopathologic factors but also with health system factors, including type of insurance, geographic area, and hospital type. These findings have implications for provider education and health policy.

14 Article Sentinel lymph node biopsy in melanoma. 2008

Hueman, Matthew T / Lange, Julie R. ·Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. ·Curr Treat Options Oncol · Pubmed #18998214.

ABSTRACT: Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) for patients with newly diagnosed localized invasive melanoma provides excellent prognostic information and results in improved regional disease control. Prior to the common use of SLNB, regional nodal recurrence was the single most common site of melanoma recurrence, with symptomatic, bulky disease that could be disabling and difficult or impossible to control. With the widespread use of SLNB, regional recurrence of melanoma is much less frequent. Even without clear evidence of improvement in overall survival, the significant and reliable prognostic information and the improved regional control make sentinel node biopsy an important procedure that should be offered routinely to many patients with newly diagnosed melanoma.

15 Article Complete lymph node dissection for sentinel node-positive melanoma: assessment of practice patterns in the United States. 2008

Bilimoria, Karl Y / Balch, Charles M / Bentrem, David J / Talamonti, Mark S / Ko, Clifford Y / Lange, Julie R / Winchester, David P / Wayne, Jeffrey D. ·Cancer Programs, American College Surgeons, Chicago, IL, USA. k-bilimoria@northwestern.edu ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #18414952.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Currently, complete lymph node dissection (CLND) is recommended after identification of a metastatic lymph node by sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB). Guidelines suggest that CLND should be performed as a separate procedure, and a sufficient number of nodes should be examined. Our objective was to examine the utilization, timing, and adequacy of CLND for melanoma in the United States. METHODS: From the National Cancer Data Base, patients diagnosed with stage I to III melanoma during 2004-2005 were identified. Multiple logistic regression was used to assess factors associated with CLND utilization, timing (separate operation from SLNB), and adequacy (examination of > or = 10 nodes). RESULTS: Of the 44,548 patients identified, 47.5% were pathologic stage IA, 23.8% stage IB, 14.1% stage II, and 14.6% stage III. Of the 17% (2942 of 17,524) with nodal metastases on SLNB, only 50% underwent a CLND. Patients were significantly less likely to undergo a CLND after SLNB if > 75 years old or had lower extremity melanomas. Of the patients who underwent a CLND, only 42% underwent the CLND at a separate procedure after the SLNB. Of those who underwent a CLND, 69.2% had > or = 10 nodes examined. Patients were significantly less likely to have > or = 10 nodes examined if they were > 75 years old or had lower extremity melanomas. Patients treated at NCCN/NCI-designated centers were significantly more likely to undergo nodal evaluation in concordance with established guidelines. CONCLUSIONS: Only half of patients with sentinel node-positive melanoma underwent CLND. Quality surveillance measures are needed to monitor, standardize, and improve the care of patients with malignant melanoma.