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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Nathalie Lassau
Based on 10 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, N. Lassau wrote the following 10 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline French updated recommendations in Stage I to III melanoma treatment and management. 2017

Guillot, B / Dalac, S / Denis, M G / Dupuy, A / Emile, J F / De La Fouchardiere, A / Hindie, E / Jouary, T / Lassau, N / Mirabel, X / Piperno Neumann, S / De Raucourt, S / Vanwijck, R. ·Dermatology Department, CHU Montpellier. · Dermatology Department, CHU Dijon. · Laboratory of Biochemistry, CHU Nantes. · Dermatology Department, CHU Rennes. · Laboratory of Pathology, AP-HP Ambroise Paré Hospital, Boulogne, France. · Laboratory of Pathology, Centre Léon Bérard Lyon. · Department of Nuclear medicine, CHU Bordeaux. · Dermatology Department, CH Pau. · Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave Roussy Villejuif. · Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret Lille. · Institut Curie, Paris, France. · 1 Avenue du 6 Juin, 1945, 14000 Caen, France. · Louvain Catholic University, Brussels, Belgium. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28120528.

ABSTRACT: As knowledge continues to develop, regular updates are necessary concerning recommendations for practice. The recommendations for the management of melanoma stages I to III were drawn up in 2005. At the request of the Société Française de Dermatologie, they have now been updated using the methodology for recommendations proposed by the Haute Autorité de Santé in France. In practice, the principal recommendations are as follows: for staging, it is recommended that the 7th edition of AJCC be used. The maximum excision margins have been reduced to 2 cm. Regarding adjuvant therapy, the place of interferon has been reduced and no validated emerging medication has yet been identified. Radiotherapy may be considered for patients in Stage III at high risk of relapse. The sentinel lymph node technique remains an option. Initial examination includes routine ultrasound as of Stage II, with other examinations being optional in stages IIC and III. A shorter strict follow-up period (3 years) is recommended for patients, but with greater emphasis on imaging.

2 Guideline [Update to the recommendations for management of melanoma stages I to III]. 2016

Guillot, B / Dalac, S / Denis, M G / Dupuy, A / Emile, J-F / De La Fouchardière, A / Hindie, E / Jouary, T / Lassau, N / Mirabel, X / Piperno Neumann, S / De Raucourt, S / Vanwijck, R. ·Département de dermatologie, hôpital Saint-Éloi, CHU de Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier cedex 5, France. Electronic address: b-guillot@chu-montpellier.fr. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital du Bocage sud, CHU de Dijon, BP 1542, 21079 Dijon cedex, France. · Laboratoire de biochimie, institut de biologie, 9, quai Moncousu, 44093 Nantes cedex, France. · Service de dermatologie, CHU de Rennes, Rennes, France. · Service d'anatomie pathologique, CHU Ambroise-Paré-Boulogne, 92104 Boulogne cedex, France. · Centre anticancéreux Léon-Bérard, 28, rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon, France. · Service de médecine nucléire Sud et Pellegrin, CHU de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. · Service de médecine, centre hospitalier de Pau, 64000 Pau, France. · Service d'imagerie médicale, institut Gustave-Roussy, 94800 Villejuif, France. · Centre Oscar-Lambret, 3, rue Fréderic-Combemale, 59000 Lille, France. · Institut Curie, 26, rue d'Ulm, 75005 Paris, France. · 1, avenue du 6-Juin, 14000 Caen, France. · Université catholique de Louvain, 10, avenue Hippocrate, 1200 Bruxelles, Belgique. ·Ann Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #27527567.

ABSTRACT: As knowledge continues to develop, regular updates are necessary concerning recommendations for practice. The recommendations for the management of melanoma stages I to III were drawn up in 2005. At the request of the Société Française de Dermatologie, they have now been updated using the methodology for recommendations proposed by the Haute Autorité de Santé. In practice, the principal recommendations are as follows: for staging, it is recommended that the 7th edition of AJCC be used. The maximum excision margins have been reduced to 2cm. Regarding adjuvant therapy, the place of interferon has been reduced and no validated emerging medication has yet been identified. Radiotherapy may be considered for patients in stage III at high risk of relapse. The sentinel lymph node technique remains an option. Initial examination includes routine ultrasound as of stage II, with other examinations being optional in stages IIC and III. A shorter strict follow-up period (3years) is recommended for patients, but with greater emphasis on imaging.

3 Guideline [Guidelines for stage I to III melanoma]. 2016

Guillot, Bernard / Dalac, Sophie / Denis, Marc / Dupuy, Alain / Emile, Jean François / De La Fouchardiere, Arnaud / Hindie, Elif / Jouary, Thomas / Lassau, Nathalie / Mirabel, Xavier / Piperno Neumann, Sophie / De Raucourt, Sixtine / Vanwijck, Romain. ·Département de dermatologie, hôpital Saint-Eloi, CHU de Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier cedex 5, France. Electronic address: b-guillot@chu-montpellier.fr. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital du Bocage sud, CHU de Dijon, BP 1542, 21079 Dijon cedex, France. · Laboratoire de biochimie, institut de biologie, 9, quai Moncousu, 44093 Nantes cedex, France. · Service de dermatologie, CHU de Rennes, Rennes, France. · Service d'anatomie pathologique, CHU Ambroise-Paré Boulogne, 92104 Boulogne cedex, France. · Centre anticancéreux Léon-Bérard, 28, rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon, France. · Service de médecine nucléire sud et pellegrin, CHU de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. · Service de médecine, CH de Pau, 64000 Pau, France. · Service d'imagerie médicale, institut Gustave-Roussy, 94800 Villejuif, France. · Centre Oscar-Lambret, 3, rue Fréderic-Combemale, 59000 Lille, France. · Institut Curie, 26, rue d'Ulm, 75005 Paris, France. · Sixtine, 1, avenue du 6 juin, 14000 Caen, France. · Université catholique de Louvain, avenue Hippocrate, 10 B-1200 Bruxelles, Belgique. ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #27456259.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Article Molecular ultrasound imaging using contrast agents targeting endoglin, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 and integrin. 2015

Leguerney, Ingrid / Scoazec, Jean-Yves / Gadot, Nicolas / Robin, Nina / Pénault-Llorca, Frédérique / Victorin, Steeve / Lassau, Nathalie. ·IR4 M, UMR 8081, Paris-Sud University, CNRS, Orsay, France. Electronic address: ingrid.leguerney@gustaveroussy.fr. · Anipath, Faculté Laennec, Université Lyon 1, Lyon, France. · Département d'anatomie et de cytologie pathologiques, Centre Jean Perrin, Clermont-Ferrand, France. · IR4 M, UMR 8081, Paris-Sud University, CNRS, Orsay, France. ·Ultrasound Med Biol · Pubmed #25308938.

ABSTRACT: Expression levels of endoglin, αv integrin and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) were investigated using targeted, contrast-enhanced ultrasonography in murine melanoma tumor models. Microvasculature and expression levels of biomarkers were investigated using specific contrast agents conjugated with biotinylated monoclonal antibodies. Ultrasound signal intensity from bound contrast agents was evaluated in two groups of mice: control mice and mice treated with sorafenib. Expression levels were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Endoglin biomarkers were more highly expressed than αv integrin and VEGFR2. Endoglin decreased in the sorafenib group, whereas it tended to increase with time in the control group. Targeted ultrasound contrast agents may be used for non-invasive longitudinal evaluation of tumor angiogenesis during tumor growth or therapeutic treatment in preclinical studies. Endoglin protein, which plays an important role in angiogenesis, seems to be a target of interest for detection of cancer and for prediction of therapeutic efficacy.

5 Article Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound parametric maps to evaluate intratumoral vascularization. 2015

Pitre-Champagnat, Stephanie / Leguerney, Ingrid / Bosq, Jacques / Peronneau, Pierre / Kiessling, Fabian / Calmels, Lucie / Coulot, Jeremy / Lassau, Nathalie. ·From the *IR4M, UMR8081, CNRS, University of Paris-Sud; †Research Department, Gustave Roussy, ‡Department of Bio-pathology, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; §Department of Experimental Molecular Imaging, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen, Germany. ·Invest Radiol · Pubmed #25275834.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The purposes of this study were to assess the reliability of parametric maps from dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) to reflect the heterogeneous distribution of intratumoral vascularization and to predict the tissue features linked to vasculature. This study was designed to compare DCE-US parametric maps with histologic vascularity measurements. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound was performed on 17 melanoma-bearing nude mice after a 0.1-mL bolus injection of SonoVue (Bracco SPA, Milan, Italy). The parametric maps were developed from raw linear data to extract pixelwise 2 semiquantitative parameters related to perfusion and blood volume, namely, area under the curve (AUC) and peak intensity (PI). The mathematical method to fit the time-intensity curve for each pixel was a polynomial model used in clinical routine and patented by the team. Regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn on DCE-US parametric maps for whole tumors and for several local areas of 15 mm within each tumor (iROI), the latter reflecting the heterogeneity of intratumoral blood volume. As the criterion standard correlation, microvessel densities (MVDs) were determined for both ROI categories. In detail, for all iROI of 15 mm, MVD and maturity were divided separately for vessels of 0 to 10 μm, 10 to 40 μm, and greater than 40 μm in diameter, and the results were correlated with the ultrasound findings. RESULTS: Among the 17 studied mice, a total of 64 iROIs were analyzed. For the whole-tumor ROI set, AUC and PI values significantly correlated with MVD (rAUC = 0.52 [P = 0.0408] and rPI = 0.70 [P = 0.0026]). In the case of multiple iROI, a strong linear correlation was observed between the DCE-US parameters and the density of vessels ranging in their diameter from 0 to 10 μm (rAUC = 0.68 [P < 0.0001]; rPI = 0.63 [P < 0.0001]), 10 to 40 μm (rAUC = 0.98 [P = 0.0003]; rPI = 0.98 [P = 0.0004]), and greater than 40 μm (rAUC = 0.86 [P = 0.0120]; rPI = 0.92 [P = 0.0034]), respectively. However, the DCE-US parameter values of perfusion and blood volume were not significantly different according to the diameters (AUC: P = 0.1731; PI: P = 0.2918) and maturity of blood vessels. CONCLUSIONS: Parametric maps of DCE-US can be reliably established from raw linear data and reflect the heterogeneous histological measures of vascularization within tumors. In contrast, the values of DCE-US parametric maps (AUC, PI) do not allow deduction of heterogeneous tissue features such as the diameters and maturity of vascular networks.

6 Article Assessment of quantitative perfusion parameters by dynamic contrast-enhanced sonography using a deconvolution method: an in vitro and in vivo study. 2012

Gauthier, Marianne / Tabarout, Farid / Leguerney, Ingrid / Polrot, Mélanie / Pitre, Stéphanie / Peronneau, Pierre / Lassau, Nathalie. ·Laboratoire d'Imagerie du Petit Animal, Unité Mixte de Recherche, Institut Gustave Roussy, Pavillon de Recherche I, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif, France. marianne.gauthier@igr.fr ·J Ultrasound Med · Pubmed #22441917.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the arterial input on perfusion parameters measured using dynamic contrast-enhanced sonography combined with a deconvolution method after bolus injections of a contrast agent. METHODS: The in vitro experiments were conducted using a custom-made setup consisting of pumping a fluid through a phantom made of 3 intertwined silicone pipes, mimicking a complex structure akin to that of vessels in a tumor, combined with their feeding pipe, mimicking the arterial input. In the in vivo experiments, B16F10 melanoma cells were xenografted to 5 nude mice. An ultrasound scanner combined with a linear transducer was used to perform pulse inversion imaging based on linear raw data throughout the experiments. A mathematical model developed by the Gustave Roussy Institute (patent WO/2008/053268) and based on the dye dilution theory was used to evaluate 7 semiquantitative perfusion parameters directly from time-intensity curves and 3 quantitative perfusion parameters from the residue function obtained after a deconvolution process developed in our laboratory based on the Tikhonov regularization method. We evaluated and compared the intraoperator variability values of perfusion parameters determined after these two signal-processing methods. RESULTS: In vitro, semiquantitative perfusion parameters exhibited intraoperator variability values ranging from 3.39% to 13.60%. Quantitative parameters derived after the deconvolution process ranged from 4.46% to 11.82%. In vivo, tumors exhibited perfusion parameter intraoperator variability values ranging from 3.74% to 29.34%, whereas quantitative ones varied from 5.00% to 12.43%. CONCLUSIONS: Taking into account the arterial input in evaluating perfusion parameters improves the intraoperator variability and may improve the dynamic contrast-enhanced sonographic technique.

7 Article Combining functional imaging and interstitial pressure measurements to evaluate two anti-angiogenic treatments. 2012

Leguerney, Ingrid / Lassau, Nathalie / Koscielny, Serge / Rodrigues, Mélanie / Massard, Christophe / Rouffiac, Valérie / Benatsou, Baya / Thalmensi, Jessie / Bawa, Olivia / Opolon, Paule / Peronneau, Pierre / Roche, Alain. ·IR4M/UMR 8081, Paris-Sud University, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif, France. ingrid.leguerney@igr.fr ·Invest New Drugs · Pubmed #20924644.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Interstitial hypertension is responsible for poor capillary blood flow and hampered drug delivery. The efficacy of combined sorafenib/bevacizumab treatment given according to different administration schedules has been evaluated by measuring both interstitial pressure (IP) and quantitative dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (DCE-US) parameters in melanoma-bearing mice. MATERIAL AND METHODS: [corrected] Sixty mice were xenografted with B16F10 melanoma. Animals received a daily administration over 4 days (D0 to D3) of either sorafenib at 30 mg/kg, bevacizumab at 2.5 mg/kg alone, or different schedules of combined treatments. Perfusion parameters determined using an Aplio® sonograph (Toshiba) with SonoVue® contrast agent (Bracco) were compared to IP measurements using fiberoptic probes (Samba®) at D0, D2, D4, D8. RESULTS: The mean baseline IP values ranged between 6.55 and 31.29 mmHg in all the groups. A transient IP decrease occurred at D2 in all treated groups, and especially in the concomitant group which exhibited a significant IP reduction compared to D0. A significant decrease in both the peak intensity and the area under the curve was observed at D4 in the group with concomitant administration of both molecules which yielded maximal inhibition of the tumor volume and the number of vessels. No correlation was found between IP values and volume or perfusion parameters, indicating complex relationships between IP and vascularization. No IP gradients were found between the center and the periphery but IP values in these two regions were significantly correlated (R = 0.93). CONCLUSION: The results suggest that IP variations could be predictive of vascular changes and that one single IP measurement is sufficient to fully characterize the whole tumor.

8 Article Contrast ultrasonography: necessity of linear data processing for the quantification of tumor vascularization. 2010

Peronneau, P / Lassau, N / Leguerney, I / Roche, A / Cosgrove, D. ·Imaging Department, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. pierre.peronneau@igr.fr ·Ultraschall Med · Pubmed #20577941.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: This study is intended to compare the value of uncompressed ultrasonic data, obtained after linear power detection of the ultrasonic radiofrequencies that we call linear data, with usual compressed video data for the quantification of tumor perfusion, particularly for monitoring antivascular therapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To form a clinically useful ultrasonic image, the detected power of the received signals (linear data) is compressed in a quasi-logarithmic fashion in order to match the limited dynamic range of the video monitor. The resulting reduced range of signals from an injected contrast agent may limit the sensitivity to changes in the time-intensity curves. Following a theoretical evaluation of the effects of compression on time-intensity curves and as an in vivo example, we measured at different times the effects of an antivascular drug administered to mice bearing melanoma tumors. The mean time-intensity curves within the tumors after bolus injection of a contrast agent were determined using both linear and video data. Linearized data was recovered using the inverse of the true scanner's compression law, which was experimentally determined. Three features were extracted from the time-intensity curves: peak intensity (PI), time to peak intensity (TPI) and area under the curve in the wash-in phase (AUC (wash-in)). When contrast reached its maximum value, the coefficient of variation reflecting the heterogeneity of the intensity of contrast uptake within the tumor, was computed using both data sets. RESULTS: TPI was found to be similar with either data set (r = 0.98, p < 0.05, factor of 1.09). Linear PI and AUC (wash-in) had significantly earlier decreases after drug administration than video data (p = 0.015 and p = 0.03, respectively). The coefficient of variation was significantly lower when using video rather than linear data (p < 10 (-4)). CONCLUSION: In conclusion, the use of linear data is the only mathematically valid methodology for determining a tumor's time-intensity curve and, in practice, it allows earlier demonstration of responses to antivascular drugs.

9 Article Early quantitative evaluation of a tumor vasculature disruptive agent AVE8062 using dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography. 2008

Lavisse, Sonia / Lejeune, Pascale / Rouffiac, Valérie / Elie, Nicolas / Bribes, Estelle / Demers, Brigitte / Vrignaud, Patricia / Bissery, Marie-Christine / Brulé, Aude / Koscielny, Serge / Péronneau, Pierre / Lassau, Nathalie. ·UPRES EA 4040, Univ Paris-Sud, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. ·Invest Radiol · Pubmed #18197062.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the early tumor vasculature disrupting effects of the AVE8062 molecule and the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (DCE-US) in the quantitative assessment of these effects. MATERIAL AND METHODS: AVE8062 was administered at a single dose (41 mg/kg) to 40 melanoma-bearing nude mice, which were all imaged before and after drug administration (5 + 15 minutes, 1, 6, and 24 hours). Using an ultrasound scanner (Aplio, Toshiba), intratumor vessels were counted in power Doppler mode and tumor microvasculature was assessed in a specific harmonic mode associated with a perfusion and quantification software for contrast-uptake quantification (Sonovue, Bracco). The peak intensity (PI), time-to-PI (T PI), and full-width at half maximum (FWHM) were extracted from the time-intensity curves expressed as linear raw data. Histologic analysis evaluated microvessel density (MVD) and necrosis at each time point studied. Statistical significance was estimated (paired sum rank and Mann-Whitney tests) to evaluate drug activity and to compare its efficacy at the different time points. RESULTS: In power Doppler mode, intratumoral vessels depletion started 15 minutes postinjection (32%, P = 0.004) and the decrease was maximal at 6 hours (51%, P = 0.002). PI decreased by 3.5- and 45.7-fold at 1 and 6 hours, respectively, compared with preinjection values (P = 0.016 and P = 0.008). The decrease at 6 hours was significantly different from the variation at 1 hour (P = 0.0012) and at 24 hours (P = 0.0008). T PI and FWHM showed a significant increase exclusively at 6 hours (P = 0.0034, P = 0.0039). Histology revealed significantly decreased MVD and increased necrosis at 24 hours (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: DCE-US allowed quantitative in vivo evaluation of the functional effects of AVE8062, which was found most effective on tumoral microvasculature 6 hours after its administration. A clinical phase-1 study of AVE8062 is ongoing using the same ultrasonography methodology before and 6 and 24 hours postadministration.

10 Article Acoustic characterization of a new trisacryl contrast agent. Part II: Flow phantom study and in vivo quantification. 2008

Lavisse, Sonia / Peronneau, Pierre / Rouffiac, Valerie / Paci, Angelo / Vigouroux, Julie / Opolon, Paule / Roche, Alain / Lassau, Nathalie. ·Universite de Paris-Sud, Imaging Department and UPRES EA 4040, Orsay F-91405, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39, Rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex, France. ·Ultrasonics · Pubmed #18191434.

ABSTRACT: The biocompatible trisacryl particles (TMP) are made of a cross-linked acrylic copolymer. Their inherent acoustic properties, studied for a contrast agent application, have been previously demonstrated in a in vitro Couette device. To measure their acoustic behaviour under circulating blood conditions, the TMP backscatter enhancement was further evaluated on a home-made flow phantom at different TMP doses (0.12-15.6 mg/ml) suspended in aqueous and blood media, and in nude mice (aorta and B16 grafted melanoma). Integrated backscatter (IB) was measured by spectral analysis of the Doppler signals recorded from an ultrasound system (Aplio) combined with a 12-MHz probe. Doppler phantom experiments revealed a maximal IB of 17+/-0.88 dB and 7.5+/-0.7 dB in aqueous and blood media, respectively. IB measured on mice aorta, in pulsed Doppler mode, confirmed a constant maximal value of 7.29+/-1.72 dB over the first minutes after injection of a 7.8 mg/ml TMP suspension. Following the injection, a 60% enhancement of intratumoral vascularization detection was observed in power Doppler mode. A preliminary histological study revealed inert presence of some TMP in lungs 8 and 16 days after injection. Doppler phantom experiments on whole blood allowed to anticipate the in vivo acoustic behaviour. Both protocols demonstrated TMP effectiveness in significantly increasing Doppler signal intensity and intratumoral vascularization detection. However, it was also shown that blood conditions seemed to shadow the TMP contrast effect, as compared to in vitro observations. These results encourage further investigations on the specific TMP targeting and on their bio-distribution in the different tissues.