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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Anne C. Lind
Based on 6 articles published since 2010
(Why 6 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Anne Lind wrote the following 6 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Melanoma, version 2.2013: featured updates to the NCCN guidelines. 2013

Coit, Daniel G / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daud, Adil / Dimaio, Dominick / Fleming, Martin D / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Lind, Anne / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Pruitt, Scott K / Ross, Merrick I / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Thompson, John A / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Ho, Maria / Anonymous4400755. ·Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #23584343.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma provide multidisciplinary recommendations on the clinical management of patients with melanoma. This NCCN Guidelines Insights report highlights notable recent updates. Foremost of these is the exciting addition of the novel agents ipilimumab and vemurafenib for treatment of advanced melanoma. The NCCN panel also included imatinib as a treatment for KIT-mutated tumors and pegylated interferon alfa-2b as an option for adjuvant therapy. Also important are revisions to the initial stratification of early-stage lesions based on the risk of sentinel lymph node metastases, and revised recommendations on the use of sentinel lymph node biopsy for low-risk groups. Finally, the NCCN panel reached clinical consensus on clarifying the role of imaging in the workup of patients with melanoma.

2 Guideline Melanoma. 2012

Coit, Daniel G / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daud, Adil / Dilawari, Raza A / Dimaio, Dominick / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Lind, Anne / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Pruitt, Scott K / Ross, Merrick I / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Thompson, John A / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / Anonymous590720. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #22393197.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Review Melanoma: from patient presentation to pathology report. 2010

Jassim, Omar W / Lind, Anne C. ·Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, USA. ojassim@dom.wustl.edu ·Mo Med · Pubmed #20446516.

ABSTRACT: Melanoma is an increasingly common and potentially fatal malignancy of the skin and some mucous membranes. Early detection and diagnosis based on patient or primary care physician awareness can potentially reduce both related morbidity and mortality. This article will detail a basic clinical approach to pigmented skin lesions followed by a discussion of pathologic analysis and staging.

4 Article Histopathologic characteristics of therapy-associated cutaneous neoplasms with vemurafenib, a selective BRAF kinase inhibitor, used in the treatment of melanoma. 2014

Sufficool, Kari E / Hepper, Donna M / Linette, Gerald P / Hurst, Eva A / Lu, Dongsi / Lind, Anne C / Cornelius, Lynn A. ·Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA. ·J Cutan Pathol · Pubmed #24641301.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Activating mutations in BRAF have been observed in up to 60% of melanomas, indicating a pivotal role for kinase deregulation in tumor progression. Vemurafenib is a specific inhibitor of BRAF for treatment of melanomas with activating BRAF V600E mutations and has been a major advancement in melanoma treatment. Treatment with vemurafenib, and to a lesser extent, sorafenib, a relatively non-specific inhibitor of BRAF, has been associated with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). METHODS: Clinical and microscopic characteristics of cutaneous neoplasms were evaluated following vemurafenib administration. RESULTS: Twenty-four of 47 (51%) patients receiving vemurafenib at our institution developed 146 total cutaneous neoplasms, with 75% developing multiple lesions. The median number of lesions in affected patients was three. Body distribution included head/neck (29%), chest/back (21%), upper (23%) and lower extremities (27%). Lesions were biopsied and pathologically showed multiple types of epidermal tumors including, but not limited to, verrucous keratoses with/without partial thickness dysplasia, actinic keratoses and well-differentiated and invasive SCCs with/without keratoacanthomatous features. CONCLUSIONS: We describe the histopathologic findings of skin lesions potentially associated with vemurafenib. Additional investigation is necessary to further elucidate cutaneous neoplasms associated with vemurafenib; however, frequent dermatologic evaluation is warranted in all patients receiving BRAF inhibitors.

5 Article Growth-associated protein 43 in differentiating peripheral nerve sheath tumors from other non-neural spindle cell neoplasms. 2014

Chen, Wei-Shen / Chen, Pei-Ling / Lu, Dongsi / Lind, Anne C / Dehner, Louis P. ·Division of Anatomic and Molecular Pathology, Department of Pathology and Immunology and the Lauren V Ackerman Laboratory of Surgical Pathology, Barnes-Jewish Hospital, Washington University Medical Center, Washington University in St Louis, St Louis, MO, USA. ·Mod Pathol · Pubmed #23887302.

ABSTRACT: The malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is a relatively uncommon type of soft tissue sarcoma arising from a peripheral nerve or extraneural soft tissues and showing nerve sheath differentiation. The diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is one of the most challenging tasks in surgical pathology because of its uncommon type (5-10% soft tissue sarcomas), morphologic resemblance to other spindle cell neoplasms and lack of sensitive and specific immunohistochemical markers. The pathologic diagnosis is more straightforward in the clinical setting of neurofibromatosis-1, but problems are mainly centered on the non-neurofibromatosis-1 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors. To date, S100 protein is the most widely applied marker in the case of a suspected malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, yet its suboptimal sensitivity and its expression in other spindle cell neoplasms, including spindle cell melanoma, clear-cell sarcoma, leiomyosarcoma and monophasic synovial sarcoma, add to the diagnostic conundrum. Growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43), a membrane-associated phosphoprotein expressed in neuronal growth cones and Schwann cell precursors during neural development and axonal regeneration, was applied to a set of nerve sheath and non-nerve sheath spindle cell neoplasms. The findings in this study indicate that GAP43 is expressed in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (n=18/21; 86%) and demonstrates a sensitivity superior to S100 protein (n=13/21; 62%). GAP43 is also positive in neurofibromas (n=17/18; 94%), schwannomas (n=11/12; 92%) and desmoplastic melanomas (n=7/10; 70%). In contrast, it is negative in the non-desmoplastic spindle cell melanomas (n=20/22; 91%). Of the other non-neural soft tissue sarcomas, GAP43 is non-reactive in most leiomyosarcomas (n=14/16; 88%) and clear-cell sarcomas (n=8/8), and only focally positive in monophasic synovial sarcomas (n=3/7; 43%). GAP43 is seemingly a highly sensitive marker for peripheral nerve sheath tumors and may serve as a useful diagnostic adjunct in the diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor from other spindle cell neoplasms, including spindle cell melanoma.

6 Article Diagnostic utility of neural stem and progenitor cell markers nestin and SOX2 in distinguishing nodal melanocytic nevi from metastatic melanomas. 2013

Chen, Pei-Ling / Chen, Wei-Shen / Li, Jianping / Lind, Anne C / Lu, Dongsi. ·Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA. ·Mod Pathol · Pubmed #22899289.

ABSTRACT: Sentinel lymph node evaluation is a critical component of melanoma staging, and lymph node status provides one of the most powerful predictors of melanoma recurrence and survival. One of the well-known diagnostic pitfalls in melanoma sentinel lymph node evaluation is the presence of nodal melanocytic nevi, which has been demonstrated in up to 26% of lymphadenectomy specimens and specifically in melanoma patients. Melanocytic markers enhance the sensitivity of melanoma detection in sentinel lymph nodes. However, established markers such as anti-melan-A/MART1, S100 protein and SOX10 antibodies cannot discriminate melanoma metastasis from nodal nevi. Recent studies have demonstrated strong expression of neural stem/progenitor cell markers nestin and SOX2 in melanoma. In this study, we tested the diagnostic utility of nestin and SOX2 in differentiating metastatic melanomas from nodal nevi. Twenty-three lymph nodes with metastatic melanomas and 17 with nodal nevi were examined. Of the 23 metastatic melanomas, 18 showed diffuse and strong (3+) nestin, 4 showed rare cells with strong (3+) nestin, and one showed diffuse but faint (1+) nestin staining. Nuclear SOX2 was positive in 13 metastatic melanomas. In contrast, 15 nodal nevi showed no nestin, and 2 showed rare cells with very faint (<1+) nestin staining. SOX2 was negative in 13 nodal nevi. Overall, nestin was strongly expressed in metastatic melanomas (n=22/23; 96%), but not in nodal melanocytic nevi (n=15/17; 88%; P<0.0001). SOX2 was also expressed in metastatic melanomas (n=13/23; 57%) but not in the majority of nodal melanocytic nevi (n=13/16; 81%; P=0.02). In one lymph node harboring metastatic melan-A-negative desmoplastic melanoma, nestin and SOX2 strongly highlighted the infiltrating tumor cells, suggesting the potential clinical value of these two markers in desmoplastic melanoma lymph node biopsies. This study provides evidence that nestin and SOX2 can effectively differentiate nodal melanocytic nevi from metastatic melanomas and serve as powerful diagnostic adjuncts in melanoma staging.