Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Ashfaq A. Marghoob
Based on 117 articles published since 2008
||||

Between 2008 and 2019, A. Marghoob wrote the following 117 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5
1 Editorial Melanoma surveillance in "high-risk" individuals. 2014

Halpern, Allan C / Marchetti, Michael A / Marghoob, Ashfaq A. ·Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #24965763.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Dermatologists, general practitioners, and the best method to biopsy suspect melanocytic neoplasms. 2010

Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Terushkin, Vitaly / Dusza, Stephen W / Busam, Klaus / Scope, Alon. · ·Arch Dermatol · Pubmed #20231507.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Remodeling of the dermoepidermal junction in superficial spreading melanoma: insights gained from correlation of dermoscopy, reflectance confocal microscopy, and histopathologic analysis. 2008

Scope, Alon / Zalaudek, Iris / Ferrara, Gerardo / Argenziano, Giuseppe / Braun, Ralph P / Marghoob, Ashfaq A. · ·Arch Dermatol · Pubmed #19075152.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Three roots of melanoma. 2008

Zalaudek, Iris / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Scope, Alon / Leinweber, Bernd / Ferrara, Gerardo / Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer / Pellacani, Giovanni / Soyer, H Peter / Argenziano, Giuseppe. · ·Arch Dermatol · Pubmed #18936403.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Review Usefulness of dermoscopy to improve the clinical and histopathologic diagnosis of skin cancers. 2019

Yélamos, Oriol / Braun, Ralph P / Liopyris, Konstantinos / Wolner, Zachary J / Kerl, Katrin / Gerami, Pedram / Marghoob, Ashfaq A. ·Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York; Dermatology Department, Hospital Clínic, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: oyelamos@gmail.com. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland. · Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, The Robert H. Lurie Cancer Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York; Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Hauppauge, New York. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30321580.

ABSTRACT: Multiple studies have shown that dermoscopy increases the sensitivity and specificity for the detection of skin cancers compared with examination by the naked eye. Dermoscopy can also lead to the detection of thinner and smaller cancers. In addition, dermoscopy leads to the more precise selection of lesions requiring excision. In essence, dermoscopy helps clinicians differentiate benign from malignant lesions through the presence or absence of specific dermoscopic structures. Therefore, because most dermoscopic structures have direct histopathologic correlates, dermoscopy can allow the prediction of certain histologic findings present in skin cancers, thus helping select management and treatment options for select types of skin cancers. Visualizing dermoscopic structures in the ex vivo specimens can also be beneficial. It can improve the histologic diagnostic accuracy by targeted step-sectioning in areas of concern, which can be marked by the clinician before sending the specimen to the pathologist, or by the pathologist on the excised specimen in the laboratory. In addition, ex vivo dermoscopy can also be used to select tumor areas with genetic importance because some dermoscopic structures have been related to mutations with theragnostic relevance. In the second article in this continuing medical education series, we review the impact of dermoscopy on the diagnostic accuracy of skin cancer, how dermoscopy can affect the histopathologic examination, and which dermoscopic features may be more relevant in terms of histologic and genetic prediction.

6 Review Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy in Skin Cancer Diagnosis. 2017

Braun, Ralph P / Mangana, Johanna / Goldinger, Simone / French, Lars / Dummer, Reinhard / Marghoob, Ashfaq A. ·Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Zürich, Gloriastr 31, 8091 Zürich, Switzerland. Electronic address: Ralph.Braun@usz.ch. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Zürich, Gloriastr 31, 8091 Zürich, Switzerland. · Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065, USA. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #28886804.

ABSTRACT: Electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is a noninvasive method that aims to help diagnose skin cancer. The EIS device consists of a handheld probe with a disposable electrode that is applied directly on the skin and uses electrical impendence differences to differentiate between normal and abnormal skin lesions. The EIS algorithm is best used on lesions that are deemed clinically or dermoscopically suspicious and has a high sensitivity in detecting malignant melanoma. The greatest usefulness of EIS is achieved in conjunction with a physician who has experience with this modality and excellent training in the clinical detection of suspicious lesions.

7 Review Enhancing Skin Cancer Diagnosis with Dermoscopy. 2017

Wolner, Zachary J / Yélamos, Oriol / Liopyris, Konstantinos / Rogers, Tova / Marchetti, Michael A / Marghoob, Ashfaq A. ·Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 16 East 60th Street, New York, NY 10022, USA. · Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 16 East 60th Street, New York, NY 10022, USA. Electronic address: marghooa@mskcc.org. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #28886798.

ABSTRACT: Dermoscopy increases the sensitivity for skin cancer detection, decreases the number of benign lesions biopsied for each malignant diagnosis, and enables the diagnosis of thinner melanomas compared with naked eye examination. Multiple meta-analyses have identified that dermoscopy improves the diagnostic accuracy for melanoma when compared with naked eye examination. In addition, studies have established that dermoscopy can aid in the detection of keratinocyte carcinomas. Dermoscopy triage algorithms have been developed to help novices decide when a biopsy or a referral is most appropriate. In this article, the authors illustrate the dermoscopic features that assist in identifying melanoma and keratinocyte carcinomas.

8 Review Discriminating Nevi from Melanomas: Clues and Pitfalls. 2016

Carrera, Cristina / Marghoob, Ashfaq A. ·Melanoma Unit, Department of Dermatology, Hospital Clinic, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, CIBER de Enfermedades Raras, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, University of Barcelona, Villarroel 170, Escala 1-4, Barcelona 08036, Spain. · Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 800 Veterans Memorial Highway, 2nd Floor, Hauppauge, NY 11788, USA. Electronic address: marghooa@mskcc.org. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #27692446.

ABSTRACT: Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) together with dermoscopy enables improved differentiation of melanomas from most nevi. The resulting high sensitivity for detecting melanoma with RCM is complemented by a concomitant increased specificity, which results in the reduction of unnecessary biopsies of nevi. Although RCM can achieve high diagnostic accuracy for early melanoma detection, false-negative and false-positive cases of melanoma are occasionally encountered. This article reviews the essential clues and pitfalls for the diagnosis of melanoma via RCM and highlights the importance of evaluating RCM findings in light of the clinical scenario and dermoscopic features.

9 Review Practice Gaps in Dermatology: Melanocytic Lesions and Melanoma. 2016

Marino, Maria L / Carrera, Cristina / Marchetti, Michael A / Marghoob, Ashfaq A. ·Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 16 East 60th Street, New York, NY 10022, USA. · Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 16 East 60th Street, New York, NY 10022, USA; Melanoma Unit, Department of Dermatology, Hospital Clinic, IDIBAPS, CIBERER, University of Barcelona, Villarroel 170, Barcelona 08036, Spain. · Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 16 East 60th Street, New York, NY 10022, USA. Electronic address: marchetm@mskcc.org. · Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 16 East 60th Street, New York, NY 10022, USA. Electronic address: marghooa@mskcc.org. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #27363893.

ABSTRACT: Early detection remains the most important strategy to reduce melanoma mortality. The identification and evaluation of new or changing skin lesions are important components of melanoma screening and are best performed today using complementary noninvasive imaging technologies, such as total body photography (TBP), dermoscopy, sequential digital dermoscopic imaging (SDDI), and reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM). Despite strong evidence showing that these screening techniques improve diagnostic accuracy for melanoma, they are not widely used by dermatologists. In this practice gaps review, the authors highlight the use, evidence, and rationale for TBP, dermoscopy, SDDI, and RCM.

10 Review Biologically distinct subsets of nevi. 2016

Rogers, Tova / Marino, Maria L / Raciti, Patricia / Jain, Manu / Busam, Klaus J / Marchetti, Michael A / Marghoob, Ashfaq A. ·Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA - marghooa@mskcc.org. ·G Ital Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #27119653.

ABSTRACT: Melanocytic nevi (MN) encompass a range of benign tumors with varying microscopic and macroscopic features. Their development is a multifactorial process under genetic and environmental influences. The clinical importance of MN lies in distinguishing them from melanoma and in recognizing their associations with melanoma risk and cancer syndromes. Historically, the distinction between the different types of MN, as well as between MN and melanoma, was based on clinical history, gross morphology, and histopathological features. While histopathology with clinical correlation remains the gold standard for differentiating and diagnosing melanocytic lesions, in some cases, this may not be possible. The use of dermoscopy has allowed for the assessment of subsurface skin structures and has contributed to the clinical evaluation and classification of MN. Genetic profiling, while still in its early stages, has the greatest potential to refine the classification of MN by clarifying their developmental processes, biological behaviors, and relationships to melanoma. Here we review the most salient clinical, dermoscopic, histopathological, and genetic features of different MN subgroups.

11 Review Addressing the knowledge gap in clinical recommendations for management and complete excision of clinically atypical nevi/dysplastic nevi: Pigmented Lesion Subcommittee consensus statement. 2015

Kim, Caroline C / Swetter, Susan M / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Grichnik, James M / Grossman, Douglas / Halpern, Allan C / Kirkwood, John M / Leachman, Sancy A / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Ming, Michael E / Nelson, Kelly C / Veledar, Emir / Venna, Suraj S / Chen, Suephy C. ·Pigmented Lesion Clinic and Cutaneous Oncology Program, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Pigmented Lesion and Melanoma Program, Department of Dermatology, Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, California3Dermatology Service, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Pigmented Lesion Clinic and Multidisciplinary Cutaneous Oncology Program, Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson. · Melanoma Program, Department of Dermatology, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida. · Pigmented Lesion Clinic, Departments of Dermatology and Oncological Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · Pigmented Lesion Clinic, Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Melanoma Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine, Dermatology and Translational Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology Program, Department of Dermatology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland. · Pigmented Lesion Clinic, Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Pigmented Lesion Clinic, Department of Dermatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. · Center for Research and Grants, Baptist Health South Florida, Miami. · Skin Oncology and Melanoma Center, Department of Medicine, MedStar Washington Cancer Institute and Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC. · Melanoma and Pigmented Lesion Clinic, Department of Dermatology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia15Division of Dermatology, Atlanta Veterans Administration Medical Center, Decatur, Georgia. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #25409291.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: The management of clinically atypical nevi/dysplastic nevi (CAN/DN) is controversial, with few data to guide the process. Management recommendations for DN with positive histologic margins were developed by the Delphi method to achieve consensus among members of the Pigmented Lesion Subcommittee (PLS) of the Melanoma Prevention Working Group (MPWG) after reviewing the current evidence. OBJECTIVES: To outline key issues related to the management of CAN/DN: (1) biopsies of CAN and how positive margins arise, (2) whether incompletely excised DN evolve into melanoma, (3) current data on the outcomes of DN with positive histologic margins, (4) consensus recommendations, and (5) a proposal for future studies, including a large-scale study to help guide the management of DN with positive margins. EVIDENCE REVIEW: The literature, including recent studies examining management and outcomes of DN with positive margins between 2009 to 2014, was reviewed. FINDINGS: A consensus statement by the PLS of the MPWG following review of the literature, group discussions, and a structured Delphi method consensus. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This consensus statement reviews the complexities of management of CAN/DN. A review of the literature and 2 rounds of a structured Delphi consensus resulted in the following recommendations: (1) mildly and moderately DN with clear margins do not need to be reexcised, (2) mildly DN biopsied with positive histologic margins without clinical residual pigmentation may be safely observed rather than reexcised, and (3) observation may be a reasonable option for management of moderately DN with positive histologic margins without clinically apparent residual pigmentation; however, more data are needed to make definitive recommendations in this clinical scenario.

12 Review Melanoma patient self-detection: a review of efficacy of the skin self-examination and patient-directed educational efforts. 2013

Yagerman, Sarah / Marghoob, Ashfaq. ·Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA. ·Expert Rev Anticancer Ther · Pubmed #24236821.

ABSTRACT: Early detection of cutaneous melanoma results in reduced morbidity and mortality. Although screening by physicians has been shown effective, the role of skin self-examination (SSE) in melanoma secondary prevention is less well studied. Various methods and educational strategies have been implemented to empower patients to perform efficacious SSEs. Patient demographics play an important role in their likelihood to examine their own skin and ability to detect melanoma. Visual aids such as total body photography and dermoscopy, which have improved physician exams, are becoming elements accessible to patients for augmentation of self-exam. This review examines the literature of SSE in melanoma detection.

13 Review Dermoscopy for the family physician. 2013

Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Usatine, Richard P / Jaimes, Natalia. ·Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. ·Am Fam Physician · Pubmed #24134084.

ABSTRACT: Noninvasive in vivo imaging techniques have become an important diagnostic aid for skin cancer detection. Dermoscopy, also known as dermatoscopy, epiluminescence microscopy, incident light microscopy, or skin surface microscopy, has been shown to increase the clinician's diagnostic accuracy when evaluating cutaneous neoplasms. A handheld instrument called a dermatoscope or dermoscope, which has a transilluminating light source and standard magnifying optics, is used to perform dermoscopy. The dermatoscope facilitates the visualization of subsurface skin structures that are not visible to the unaided eye. The main purpose for using dermoscopy is to help correctly identify lesions that have a high likelihood of being malignant (i.e., melanoma or basal cell carcinoma) and to assist in differentiating them from benign lesions clinically mimicking these cancers. Colors and structures visible with dermoscopy are required for generating a correct diagnosis. Routinely using dermoscopy and recognizing the presence of atypical pigment network, blue-white color, and dermoscopic asymmetry will likely improve the observer's sensitivity for detecting pigmented basal cell carcinoma and melanoma. A two-step algorithm based on a seven-level criterion ladder is the foundation for dermoscopic evaluation of skin lesions. The first step of the algorithm is intended to help physicians differentiate melanocytic lesions from the following nonmelanocytic lesions: dermatofibroma, basal cell carcinoma, seborrheic keratosis, and hemangioma. The second step is intended to help physicians differentiate nevi from melanoma using one of several scoring systems. From a management perspective, the two-step algorithm is intended to guide the decision-making process on whether to perform a biopsy, or to refer or reassure the patient.

14 Review The morphologic universe of melanoma. 2013

Jaimes, Natalia / Marghoob, Ashfaq A. ·Dermatology Service, Aurora Skin Cancer Center and Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana, Cra. 25 # 1 A Sur 155, Ed. Platinum Superior. CS 342, Medellín, Colombia. Electronic address: njaimeslo@gmail.com. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #24075548.

ABSTRACT: Differentiating dysplastic nevi from melanoma remains one of the main objectives of dermoscopy. Melanomas tend not to manifest any of the benign patterns described for nevi and instead usually display chaotic dermoscopic morphologies. Melanomas located on the face, chronically sun-damaged skin, volar surfaces, nails, and mucosal surfaces have additional features that can assist in their identification. However, some melanomas lack any defined dermoscopic structures. These so-called featureless melanomas can be identified via digital surveillance. This article reviews the melanoma-specific structures as a function of anatomic location (ie, melanomas on nonglabrous skin, face, volar surfaces, mucosae, and nails).

15 Review A clinico-dermoscopic approach for skin cancer screening: recommendations involving a survey of the International Dermoscopy Society. 2013

Argenziano, Giuseppe / Giacomel, Jason / Zalaudek, Iris / Blum, Andreas / Braun, Ralph P / Cabo, Horacio / Halpern, Allan / Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer / Malvehy, Josep / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Menzies, Scott / Moscarella, Elvira / Pellacani, Giovanni / Puig, Susana / Rabinovitz, Harold / Saida, Toshiaki / Seidenari, Stefania / Soyer, H Peter / Stolz, Wilhelm / Thomas, Luc / Kittler, Harald. ·Dermatology and Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova IRCCS, Viale Risorgimento 80, Reggio Emilia 42100, Italy. Electronic address: g.argenziano@gmail.com. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #24075542.

ABSTRACT: Dermoscopy is useful for skin cancer screening, but a detailed approach is required that integrates this tool into a rational clinical work flow. To investigate clinician perceptions and behavior in approaching patients with skin tumors, a survey was launched by electronic mail through the International Dermoscopy Society. After 4 months, the responses were analyzed and significant findings calculated. Considering the current approach of study participants in examining patients for skin cancer, an up-to-date system of triage is presented in this review, which aims to promote an improved diagnostic accuracy and more timely management of skin malignancy.

16 Review Spitz nevi: a bridge between dermoscopic morphology and histopathology. 2013

Kerner, Miryam / Jaimes, Natalia / Scope, Alon / Marghoob, Ashfaq A. ·Department of Dermatology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 11788, USA. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #23557659.

ABSTRACT: Few benign melanocytic lesions encountered in clinical practice elicit the level of controversy as that generated by lesions within the spectrum of Spitz nevi. Unlike melanoma, the dermoscopic structures found in Spitz nevi tend to be distributed in a symmetric and organized manner. This review highlights the melanoma-specific structures and patterns commonly seen in Spitz nevi. Knowledge of the dermoscopic structures and patterns encountered in Spitz nevi (particularly the classic symmetric starburst pattern), together with understanding of their growth dynamics, can inform the decision whether to biopsy or monitor.

17 Review Desmoplastic melanoma: a review. 2013

Chen, Lucy L / Jaimes, Natalia / Barker, Christopher A / Busam, Klaus J / Marghoob, Ashfaq A. ·Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10022, USA. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #23267722.

ABSTRACT: Desmoplastic melanoma (DM) is a variant of spindle cell melanoma typically found on chronically sun-damaged skin of older individuals. Early diagnosis can be challenging because it is often amelanotic and has a predominantly dermal component. DM can be difficult to diagnose not only clinically but also histologically, and can be mistaken for a variety of benign and malignant nonmelanocytic spindle cell tumors when viewed on prepared histopathology slides. Pathologists have observed that DMs can manifest significant variation with respect to the extent of intratumoral cellularity, fibrosis, and/or perineural invasion. Furthermore, some tumors present with a pure desmoplastic invasive component (>90%) while other tumors display mixed features of DM and nondesmoplastic melanoma. This has led to the separation of DM into 2 histologic subtypes, pure and mixed. With a focus on the distinction between pure and mixed DM, this review will detail what is currently known about the diagnostic features of DM, discuss risk and prognostic factors, and examine the current literature on disease progression and management.

18 Review Dermoscopy for the pediatric dermatologist part III: dermoscopy of melanocytic lesions. 2013

Haliasos, Elena C / Kerner, Miryam / Jaimes, Natalia / Zalaudek, Iris / Malvehy, Josep / Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer / Braun, Ralph P / Marghoob, Ashfaq A. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA. ·Pediatr Dermatol · Pubmed #23252411.

ABSTRACT: Melanocytic nevi encompass a variety of lesions, including blue, Spitz, congenital, and acquired nevi. These nevi can occasionally manifest clinical morphologies resembling melanoma, and the presence of such nevi in children can elicit anxiety in patients, parents, and clinicians. Dermoscopy has been shown to increase the diagnostic accuracy for melanoma and to help differentiate melanoma from nevi, ultimately aiding in the decision-making process as to whether to perform a biopsy. Dermoscopy is the perfect instrument to use during the evaluation of pigmented skin lesions in children because it is painless and provides important information for the clinician that can assist in formulating appropriate management decisions. This review highlights the most common benign dermoscopic patterns encountered in nevi and discuss the 10 most common dermoscopic structures seen in melanomas. Lesions manifesting a benign dermoscopic pattern and lacking any melanoma-specific structures do not need to be excised and can safely be monitored. In contrast, melanomas will invariably deviate from the benign nevus patterns and will usually manifest at least 1 of the 10 melanoma-specific structures: atypical network, negative network, streaks, crystalline structures, atypical dots and globules, irregular blotch, blue-white veil, regression structures, peripheral brown structureless areas, and atypical vessels. It is important to be cognizant of the fact that melanomas in childhood usually do not manifest the clinical ABCD features. Instead, they are often symmetric, amelanotic, nodular lesions. Although the clinical appearance may not be alarming, with dermoscopy they will invariably manifest at least one melanoma-specific structure, the most common being atypical vascular structures and crystalline structures.

19 Review Current management approaches for congenital melanocytic nevi. 2012

Krengel, Sven / Marghoob, Ashfaq A. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, Lübeck, Germany. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #22800546.

ABSTRACT: Lack of information and misinformation abounds regarding the potential risks of malignancy, management approaches, benefits of surgical intervention, follow-up strategies, and overall prognosis for individuals with congenital melanocytic nevi (CMN). This review is intended to provide answers to questions that frequently arise shortly after the birth of individuals with CMN, especially of larger types.

20 Review An update on risk factors, prognosis and management of melanoma patients. 2012

Jaimes, N / Marghoob, A A. ·Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. ·G Ital Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #22370565.

ABSTRACT: Cutaneous melanoma continues to be a public health problem worldwide and its incidence continues to increase around the globe. The recognition of melanoma risk factors allows for the identification of a subgroup of high-risk patients that will likely benefit most from approaches aimed at minimizing exposure to ultraviolet radiation and from surveillance strategies geared towards finding melanomas while thin and easily curable. Herein, we will provide an overview of the most pertinent, novel and newly described melanoma risk factors and melanoma prognostic factors. The potential benefits of skin cancer surveillance strategies including physician-based total body skin examination, total body photography, dermoscopy and patient-based self-skin examination will be examined. In addition, management of melanoma patients, focusing on prevention and early detection strategies will be discussed.

21 Review Survival is not the only valuable end point in melanoma screening. 2012

Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Kim, Caroline C / Swetter, Susan M / Chen, Suephy C / Halpern, Allan C / Kirkwood, John M / Leachman, Sancy A / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Ming, Michael E / Grichnik, James M / Anonymous1021005. ·Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #22336950.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Review Clinical and dermoscopic characteristics of amelanotic melanomas that are not of the nodular subtype. 2012

Jaimes, N / Braun, R P / Thomas, L / Marghoob, A A. ·Department of Dermatology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #21585561.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Amelanotic melanomas remain challenging to diagnose. OBJECTIVE: To analyze and describe the clinical and dermoscopic characteristics of amelanotic melanomas that are not of the nodular subtype. PATIENTS/METHODS: We conducted a retrospective review of 20 consecutively diagnosed amelanotic melanomas. The clinical and dermoscopic images of pathologically confirmed amelanotic melanomas that were not of the nodular subtype were analyzed. In addition, the clinical diagnosis and the reasons why these lesions were biopsied were examined. RESULTS: All 20 amelanotic melanomas were erythematous and lacked any of the clinical ABCD features commonly attributed to melanoma. The lesions appeared clinically to be relatively symmetric with regular borders and manifesting a circular to oval morphology. Dermoscopically, all lesions manifested polymorphous vascular pattern. CONCLUSIONS: Amelanotic melanomas that are not of the nodular subtype often present as clinically symmetric erythematous lesions. Therefore, it is important to consider AMs in the differential diagnosis of isolated and persistent erythematous outlier lesions, even if they are symmetric in appearance. Additionally, the presence of a polymorphous vascular pattern seen with dermoscopy can facilitate in correctly identifying these melanomas.

23 Review Skin cancer education for primary care physicians: a systematic review of published evaluated interventions. 2011

Goulart, Jacqueline M / Quigley, Elizabeth A / Dusza, Stephen / Jewell, Sarah T / Alexander, Gwen / Asgari, Maryam M / Eide, Melody J / Fletcher, Suzanne W / Geller, Alan C / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Weinstock, Martin A / Halpern, Allan C / Anonymous3480691. ·Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 07920, USA. ·J Gen Intern Med · Pubmed #21472502.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Early detection of melanoma may provide an opportunity to positively impact melanoma mortality. Numerous skin cancer educational interventions have been developed for primary care physicians (PCPs) to improve diagnostic accuracy. Standardized training is also a prerequisite for formal testing of melanoma screening in the primary care setting. OBJECTIVE: We conducted a systematic review to determine the extent of evaluated interventions designed to educate PCPs about skin cancer, including melanoma. DESIGN: Relevant studies in the English language were identified through systemic searches performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS, and Cochrane through December 2010. Supplementary information was obtained from corresponding authors of the included studies when necessary. APPROACH: Studies eligible for inclusion formally evaluated skin cancer education interventions and were designed primarily for PCPs. Excluded studies lacked a specified training intervention, used decision-making software, focused solely on risk factor identification, or did not directly educate or assess participants. Twenty studies met the selection criteria. Data were extracted according to intervention content and delivery format, and study outcomes. KEY RESULTS: All interventions included instructions about skin cancer diagnosis, but otherwise varied in content. Curricula utilized six distinct educational techniques, usually incorporating more than one. Intervention duration varied from 12 min to over 6 h. Eight of the 20 studies were randomized trials. Most studies (18/20, 90%) found a significant improvement in at least one of the following five outcome categories: knowledge, competence, confidence, diagnostic performance, or systems outcomes. Competence was most commonly measured; no study evaluated all categories. Variability in study design, interventions, and outcome measures prevented correlation of outcomes with intervention characteristics. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the development of many isolated educational interventions, few have been tested rigorously or evaluated under sufficient standardized conditions to allow for quantitative comparison. Improved and rigorously tested skin cancer educational interventions for PCPs with outcome measures focusing on changes in performance are needed.

24 Review Dermoscopy of benign and malignant neoplasms in the pediatric population. 2010

Haliasos, Helen C / Zalaudek, Iris / Malvehy, Josep / Lanschuetzer, Christoph / Hinter, Helmut / Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer / Braun, Ralph / Marghoob, Ashfaq A. ·Division of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. ·Semin Cutan Med Surg · Pubmed #21277535.

ABSTRACT: Dermoscopy is a noninvasive technique that enables visualization of subsurface colors and structures within the skin that are imperceptible to the naked eye. The dermatoscope allows the physician to examine both the macroscopic and microscopic primary morphology of skin lesions, identify subtle clinical clues, confirm naked-eye clinical diagnoses, and monitor treatment progress while posing little threat to the young patient. Dermoscopic findings have been formulated into diagnostic criteria that assist experienced clinicians in differentiating benign and malignant neoplasms. In this review, clinical morphology of melanocytic nevi and melanoma in the pediatric population is examined and the relevant dermoscopic findings and histopathologic correlates that aid in the diagnosis and management of these lesions are described.

25 Review Large congenital melanocytic nevi: associated risks and management considerations. 2010

Slutsky, Jordan B / Barr, Jeffrey M / Femia, Alisa N / Marghoob, Ashfaq A. ·Department of Dermatology, SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY, USA. ·Semin Cutan Med Surg · Pubmed #20579596.

ABSTRACT: Large congenital melanocytic nevi (LCMN) in neonates can cause considerable concern for parents, family members, and physicians. A detailed understanding of the medical risks, including cutaneous melanoma (CM), extracutaneous melanoma (ECM), and neurocutaneous melanocytosis (NCM), as well as the psychological stress that these lesions can cause in patients, will guide informed management decisions as well as provide comfort to parents. Current data indicate that LCMN greater than 20 cm, and more likely greater than 40 to 60 cm, are the lesions at greatest risk for complications such as CM, ECM, and NCM. Additionally, lesions on the trunk are at greater risk for developing CM, and LCMN in association with numerous satellite nevi are at greatest risk for NCM. Individualized management plans, including clinical observation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and possibly surgery should be based on the risk versus benefit ratio, taking into account the size of the LCMN, its location, the number of satellite nevi, symptoms, and numerous other factors which will be reviewed. This paper will provide a detailed analysis of the risks associated with LCMN, as well as a discussion regarding management and treatment options.

Next