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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Miguel A. Materin
Based on 16 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, M. Materin wrote the following 16 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline NCCN Guidelines Insights: Melanoma, Version 3.2016. 2016

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Algazi, Alain / Andtbacka, Robert / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / DiMaio, Dominick / Fields, Ryan C / Fleming, Martin D / Gastman, Brian / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Johnson, Douglas / Joseph, Richard W / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Materin, Miguel A / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ott, Patrick / Gupta, Aparna Priyanath / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April K / Skitzki, Joseph / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Torres-Roca, Javier F / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Engh, Anita. ·From Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine; The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute; University of Colorado Cancer Center; Aim at Melanoma; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital; Fox Chase Cancer Center; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; Duke Cancer Institute; Roswell Park Cancer Institute; Stanford Cancer Institute; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; Moffitt Cancer Center; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; and National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #27496110.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma have been significantly revised over the past few years in response to emerging data on a number of novel agents and treatment regimens. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the data and rationale supporting extensive changes to the recommendations for systemic therapy in patients with metastatic or unresectable melanoma.

2 Guideline Melanoma, Version 2.2016, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. 2016

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Algazi, Alain / Andtbacka, Robert / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / DiMaio, Dominick / Ernstoff, Marc / Fields, Ryan C / Fleming, Martin D / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Joseph, Richard W / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Materin, Miguel A / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April K / Skitzki, Joseph / Sosman, Jeff / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Torres-Roca, Javier F / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Engh, Anita. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #27059193.

ABSTRACT: This selection from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Melanoma focuses on adjuvant therapy and treatment of in-transit disease, because substantial changes were made to the recommendations for the 2016 update. Depending on the stage of the disease, options for adjuvant therapy now include biochemotherapy and high-dose ipilimumab. Treatment options for in-transit disease now include intralesional injection with talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC), a new immunotherapy. These additions prompted re-assessment of the data supporting older recommended treatment options for adjuvant therapy and in-transit disease, resulting in extensive revisions to the supporting discussion sections.

3 Review CHOROIDAL TUMOR BIOPSY: A Review of the Current State and a Glance Into Future Techniques. 2018

Finn, Avni P / Materin, Miguel A / Mruthyunjaya, Prithvi. ·Department of Ophthalmology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. · Departments of Vitreoretinal and Macular diseases and Orbital and Ocular Oncology, Byers Eye Institute, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California. ·Retina · Pubmed #29280938.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To review the indications for and the methods of obtaining biopsies in eyes with uveal melanoma. In addition, this review provides recommendations for avoiding biopsy-related complications and discusses the future directions of biopsy techniques for uveal melanoma. METHODS: This review is based on a presentation by the authors (PM and MM) at the 2017 Duke Advanced Vitreoretinal Surgery Course and an extensive literature review using PubMed. RESULTS: Transscleral and transvitreal fine-needle aspiration biopsy, and transvitreal vitrectomy-assisted biopsy techniques are described. The use of 25- and 27-gauge needles and vitreous cutters through a transvitreal approach are most commonly used. Complications are uncommon but may include vitreous hemorrhage, retinal detachment, and rarely, extraocular extension. Proper technique and precautions will minimize the occurrence of these rare complications. CONCLUSION: Biopsy of uveal melanoma either using a needle or vitrectomy-assisted procedures is safe and these techniques continue to improve with new vitreoretinal surgical advances.

4 Review Ocular neoplastic disease. 2011

Mahajan, Amit / Crum, Alison / Johnson, Michele H / Materin, Miguel A. ·Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT, USA. ·Semin Ultrasound CT MR · Pubmed #21277489.

ABSTRACT: Ocular neoplasms, both primary and metastatic, may present with visual disturbance or vision loss and often are asymptomatic. Clinical ophthalmologic examination may demonstrate leukocoria, abnormal pupillary light reflex, or a mass lesion with or without retinal detachment or hemorrhage. Retinoblastoma in children and uveal melanoma and ocular metastases in adults are the most important ocular malignant neoplasms referred for imaging to aid with diagnosis and staging. Familiarity with their common imaging appearances, the common patterns of spread, and the diagnostic findings of greatest concern to the ocular oncologist will enhance accuracy of imaging interpretation. Clinical ophthalmologic examination and imaging using B-scan ultrasound, A-scan ultrasound, fluorescein angiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have complementary roles in ocular tumor staging and treatment assessment.

5 Article Clinical and histologic findings in patients with uveal melanomas after taking tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitors. 2014

Damento, Gena / Kavoussi, Shaheen C / Materin, Miguel A / Salomão, Diva R / Quiram, Polly A / Balasubramaniam, Saranya / Pulido, Jose S. ·Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. · Department of Ophthalmology, Yale University, New Haven, CT. · Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Division of Anatomic Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. · VitreoRetinal Surgery, PA, Edina, MN. · Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. Electronic address: pulido.jose@mayo.edu. ·Mayo Clin Proc · Pubmed #25444484.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To describe the progression of uveal melanocytic lesions to melanomas after initiation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) inhibitors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We report 3 cases of uveal melanoma occurring after treatment with TNF-α inhibitors, 2 from Mayo Clinic and 1 from Yale University. The study took place from February 27, 2009, through July 15, 2013. RESULTS: Two women and one man with inflammatory disease who received TNF-α inhibitors had subsequent development of uveal melanomas. The 2 women had inflammatory bowel disease and had been followed up for melanocytic tumors that grew markedly within 1 year after beginning treatment with TNF-α inhibitors to the point of requiring treatment. One had histologic confirmation of the melanoma. The male patient had rheumatoid arthritis that was being treated with TNF-α inhibitors. Serial ultrasonography was performed to monitor bilateral diffuse scleritis, and within 16 months of initiation of TNF-α inhibitor therapy, a choroidal mass was detected that continued to grow over the next 3 months. The patient elected to have enucleation, which revealed uveal melanoma and thinning of the sclera from the previous scleritis. CONCLUSION: Our 3 cases of uveal melanocytic tumors occurring after the use of TNF-α inhibitors add to the growing literature suggesting a correlation between TNF-α inhibitors and the development of malignant neoplasms. Considering the association between cutaneous melanoma and TNF-α inhibitors, we recommend that patients have an eye examination before initiation of TNF-α inhibitors, and those with preexisting nevi should be followed up at regular intervals.

6 Article Exome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic RAC1 mutations in melanoma. 2012

Krauthammer, Michael / Kong, Yong / Ha, Byung Hak / Evans, Perry / Bacchiocchi, Antonella / McCusker, James P / Cheng, Elaine / Davis, Matthew J / Goh, Gerald / Choi, Murim / Ariyan, Stephan / Narayan, Deepak / Dutton-Regester, Ken / Capatana, Ana / Holman, Edna C / Bosenberg, Marcus / Sznol, Mario / Kluger, Harriet M / Brash, Douglas E / Stern, David F / Materin, Miguel A / Lo, Roger S / Mane, Shrikant / Ma, Shuangge / Kidd, Kenneth K / Hayward, Nicholas K / Lifton, Richard P / Schlessinger, Joseph / Boggon, Titus J / Halaban, Ruth. ·Department of Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #22842228.

ABSTRACT: We characterized the mutational landscape of melanoma, the form of skin cancer with the highest mortality rate, by sequencing the exomes of 147 melanomas. Sun-exposed melanomas had markedly more ultraviolet (UV)-like C>T somatic mutations compared to sun-shielded acral, mucosal and uveal melanomas. Among the newly identified cancer genes was PPP6C, encoding a serine/threonine phosphatase, which harbored mutations that clustered in the active site in 12% of sun-exposed melanomas, exclusively in tumors with mutations in BRAF or NRAS. Notably, we identified a recurrent UV-signature, an activating mutation in RAC1 in 9.2% of sun-exposed melanomas. This activating mutation, the third most frequent in our cohort of sun-exposed melanoma after those of BRAF and NRAS, changes Pro29 to serine (RAC1(P29S)) in the highly conserved switch I domain. Crystal structures, and biochemical and functional studies of RAC1(P29S) showed that the alteration releases the conformational restraint conferred by the conserved proline, causes an increased binding of the protein to downstream effectors, and promotes melanocyte proliferation and migration. These findings raise the possibility that pharmacological inhibition of downstream effectors of RAC1 signaling could be of therapeutic benefit.

7 Article Sector laser photocoagulation for the prevention of macular edema after plaque radiotherapy for uveal melanoma: a pilot study. 2012

Materin, Miguel A / Bianciotto, Carlos G / Wu, Chengqing / Shields, Carol L. ·Ocular Oncology Service, Wills Eye Institute, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. miguel.materin@yale.edu ·Retina · Pubmed #22466484.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of sector laser photocoagulation for prevention of macular edema after plaque radiotherapy for uveal melanoma. METHODS: Noncomparative, pilot interventional case series. The main outcome measure was optical coherence tomography-evident macular edema. RESULTS: A total of 29 patients had sector laser photocoagulation (sector panretinal photocoagulation) and sub-Tenon triamcinolone injection. The median tumor thickness and base was 3.3 mm and 10.0 mm. The median radiation dose and rate to the macula was 2,944 cGy and 31.0 cGy/hour. At the 12-month and 24-months follow-up, cystoid macular edema was found in 17% and 24% of the sector panretinal photocoagulation group. There were no major side effects registered. CONCLUSION: Sector panretinal photocoagulation in combination with sub-Tenon triamcinolone appears to show potential as a safe and beneficial intervention for the prevention of macular edema after plaque radiotherapy for uveal melanoma in this series.

8 Article Molecular alternations in uveal melanoma. 2011

Materin, Miguel A / Faries, Mark / Kluger, Harriet M. · ·Curr Probl Cancer · Pubmed #21911184.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Article Paraneoplastic retinopathy with multiple detachments of the neurosensory retina and autoantibodies against interphotoreceptor retinoid binding protein (IRBP) in cutaneous melanoma. 2010

Bianciotto, Carlos / Shields, Carol L / Thirkill, Charles E / Materin, Miguel A / Shields, Jerry A. ·Ocular Oncology Service, Wills Eye Institute, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107, USA. ·Br J Ophthalmol · Pubmed #19286685.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Article Periocular triamcinolone for prevention of macular edema after plaque radiotherapy of uveal melanoma: a randomized controlled trial. 2009

Horgan, Noel / Shields, Carol L / Mashayekhi, Arman / Salazar, Pedro F / Materin, Miguel A / O'Regan, Myra / Shields, Jerry A. ·Ocular Oncology Service, Wills Eye Institute, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107, USA. ·Ophthalmology · Pubmed #19481812.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy and safety of periocular triamcinolone acetonide (40 mg) for the prevention of macular edema in patients undergoing plaque radiotherapy for uveal melanoma. DESIGN: Prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial. PARTICIPANTS AND CONTROLS: One-hundred sixty-three patients with newly diagnosed uveal melanoma undergoing iodine 125 plaque radiotherapy were entered into the study. Fifty-five patients were randomized to the control group and 108 to the triamcinolone group. Eighteen-month data were available for 143 (88%) of the 163 patients. INTERVENTION: Periocular injection of triamcinolone acetonide (40 mg in 1 ml) at the time of plaque radiotherapy and 4 months and 8 months later. Optical coherence tomography was performed at each patient evaluation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Optical coherence tomography-evident macular edema, moderate vision loss, and poor final visual acuity. RESULTS: Optical coherence tomography-evident macular edema occurred significantly less often in the triamcinolone group compared with the control group up to 18 months after plaque radiotherapy (hazard estimate, 0.45; 95% confidence interval, 0.19-0.70; P = 0.001). At the 18-month follow-up, moderate vision loss (loss of 3 lines or more of best-corrected visual acuity [BCVA]) and severe vision loss (BCVA <5/200 Snellen) occurred significantly less frequently in the triamcinolone group than in the control group (31% vs. 48% [P = 0.039] and 5% vs. 15% [P = 0.048], respectively). Rates of elevated intraocular pressure and cataract progression were similar in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Periocular triamcinolone is beneficial in reducing the risk of macular edema up to 18 months after plaque radiotherapy for uveal melanoma and significantly reduces the risk of moderate vision loss and poor visual acuity in these patients.

11 Article Periocular triamcinolone for prevention of macular edema after iodine 125 plaque radiotherapy of uveal melanoma. 2008

Horgan, Noel / Shields, Carol L / Mashayekhi, Arman / Teixeira, Luiz F / Materin, Miguel A / O'Regan, Myra / Shields, Jerry A. ·Ocular Oncology Service, Wills Eye Institute, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107, USA. ·Retina · Pubmed #18698302.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To investigate the potential benefit of periocular depot triamcinolone in the prevention of macular edema after iodine 125 plaque radiotherapy for uveal melanoma. METHODS: This comparative, nonrandomized, interventional study included 87 patients with uveal melanoma who underwent plaque radiotherapy. The triamcinolone group included 55 consecutive patients who were treated with 40 mg of periocular triamcinolone at the time of plaque application and 4 months and 8 months later. The comparison group comprised 32 consecutive patients treated with plaque radiotherapy without triamcinolone. Patients were evaluated at 4 months, 8 months, 12 months, 18 months, and 24 months after plaque application with clinical examination, fundus photography, and optical coherence tomography (OCT). The associations of clinical variables with the development of OCT-evident macular edema (the main outcome measure) were investigated using Cox proportional hazards analysis. RESULTS: By multivariate analysis, eyes treated with periocular triamcinolone had a significant reduction in the risk of radiation-induced macular edema (P = 0.002; hazard estimate = 0.49; 95% confidence interval, 0.17- 0.80). Adverse effects associated with periocular triamcinolone treatment included elevation of intraocular pressure (7% of cases) and blepharoptosis (5% of cases). CONCLUSIONS: Periocular triamcinolone treatment significantly lowered the risk of macular edema after plaque radiotherapy for uveal melanoma in this series but did not significantly alter the rate of vision loss at 24 months of follow-up.

12 Article Regression of uveal melanoma after plaque radiotherapy and thermotherapy based on chromosome 3 status. 2008

Shields, Carol L / Bianciotto, Carlos / Rudich, Danielle / Materin, Miguel A / Ganguly, Arupa / Shields, Jerry A. ·Ocular Oncology Service, Wills Eye Institute, Thomas Jefferson University, 840 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. carol.shields@shieldsoncology.com ·Retina · Pubmed #18628721.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To evaluate regression rates after plaque radiotherapy and thermotherapy of uveal melanoma with chromosome 3 monosomy versus disomy. DESIGN: Noncomparative case series. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred and seventy patients with uveal melanoma. METHODS: Fine needle aspiration biopsy was used at the time of plaque radiotherapy to sample tumor cells for genetic testing. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Tumor thickness regression based on chromosome 3 status. RESULTS: At the time of plaque radiotherapy, the median tumor thickness was 4.0 mm for melanomas with chromosome 3 monosomy and 3.5 mm for those with disomy 3. The median tumor thickness (% original thickness) at 4, 8, 12, 15, and 18 months after radiotherapy for melanoma with monosomy 3 was 77%, 67%, 58%, 55%, and 50% and for those with disomy 3 was 82%, 70%, 69%, 67%, and 61%. The median monthly regression rate was 3.1% for tumors with monosomy 3 and 2.7% for those with disomy 3. The overall regression and monthly rate of regression was statistically greater at 12 months (P < 0.001) and 15 months (P = 0.003) for melanomas with monosomy 3 compared with disomy 3. CONCLUSIONS: Uveal melanomas with chromosome 3 monosomy showed faster and greater tumor thickness regression at 12 and 15 months after plaque radiotherapy and thermotherapy than melanomas with disomy 3.

13 Article Uveal prolapse following cataract extraction simulating melanoma. 2008

Marr, Brian P / Shields, Jerry A / Shields, Carol L / Materin, Miguel A / Tuncer, Samuray. ·Ocular Oncology Service, Wills Eye Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107, USA. ·Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging · Pubmed #18556954.

ABSTRACT: Prolapsed uveal tissue through a cataract incision can simulate any pigmented epibulbar mass, including conjunctival melanoma, extraocular extension ofa ciliary body or choroidal melanoma, and pigmented squamous cell carcinoma of the conjunctiva. The authors describe an 88-year-old woman who presented with an enlarging pigmented epibulbar mass on the left eye. Although the lesion closely simulated a conjunctival melanoma or extraocular extension of a uveal melanoma, closer evaluation revealed thin uveal tissue extending through partial wound dehiscence from cataract surgery that was performed 3 years earlier. The lesion was consistent with prolapsed uveal tissue through a cataract wound masquerading as a melanoma. Therefore, uveal prolapse should be considered in the differential diagnosis of conjunctival melanoma or extraocular extension of uveal melanoma.

14 Article Autofluorescence of choroidal melanoma in 51 cases. 2008

Shields, C L / Bianciotto, C / Pirondini, C / Materin, M A / Harmon, S A / Shields, J A. ·Ocular Oncology Service, Suite 1440, Wills Eye Institute, 840 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. carol.shields@shieldsoncology.com ·Br J Ophthalmol · Pubmed #18441171.

ABSTRACT: AIM: To describe the autofluorescence features of choroidal melanoma. DESIGN: Non-comparative case series. PARTICIPANTS: 51 consecutive patients. METHODS: Standard fundus photography and autofluorescence photography (580 nm excitation, 695 nm barrier filter) were performed on all patients. Clinical features were correlated with autofluorescence features. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Autofluorescence features of choroidal melanoma and overlying retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). RESULTS: The mean patient age was 59 years. The choroidal melanoma was a mean of 3.6 mm from the optic disc and 2.6 mm from the foveola. The mean tumour basal dimension was 11 mm and the mean tumour thickness was 4 mm. The choroidal melanoma showed intrinsic hypoautofluorescence (39%), isoautofluorescence (6%) and hyperautofluorescence (55%). Slightly increased hyperautofluorescence of the melanoma was found in pigmented tumours (versus non-pigmented), those with greater thickness and basal dimensions, and those with overlying disrupted RPE. Related RPE hyperplasia and atrophy showed hypoautofluorescence, drusen, RPE detachment and subretinal fluid showed slight hyperautofluorescence, and orange pigment displayed the brightest hyperautofluorescence. CONCLUSIONS: Choroidal melanoma generally shows slight intrinsic hyperautofluorescence and the brightness increases with pigmented tumours, larger tumours, and those associated with disrupted RPE. Overlying orange pigment shows remarkably bright hyperautofluorescence.

15 Article Role of cytogenetics in management of uveal melanoma. 2008

Shields, Jerry A / Shields, Carol L / Materin, Miguel / Sato, Takami / Ganguly, Arupa. ·Wills Eye Institute, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. jerry.shields@shieldsoncology.com ·Arch Ophthalmol · Pubmed #18332325.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Article Early macular morphological changes following plaque radiotherapy for uveal melanoma. 2008

Horgan, Noel / Shields, Carol L / Mashayekhi, Arman / Teixeira, Luiz F / Materin, Miguel A / Shields, Jerry A. ·Ocular Oncology Service, Wills Eye Institute, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. ·Retina · Pubmed #18301032.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To evaluate the time of onset and risk factors for the development of macular edema following plaque radiotherapy for uveal melanoma, using optical coherence tomography (OCT). METHODS: This observational case series included 135 consecutive patients with uveal melanoma treated with Iodine(125) plaque radiotherapy and adjunctive transpupillary thermotherapy (TTT) laser. Patients were evaluated at baseline and 6-month intervals following treatment using ophthalmoscopy, B-scan ultrasonography, fundus photography, and OCT. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 24 months. The mean time to onset of macular edema by OCT was 12 months. Median best-corrected logMAR visual acuity at the time of onset of OCT-evident macular edema was 0.3 (equivalent to 20/40 Snellen). The development of OCT-evident macular edema was significantly associated with maximum tumor thickness (P = 0.0016), largest tumor base (P < 0.0001), radiation dose, and dose-rate to the tumor base (P = 0.0315 and P = 0.0204, respectively). Neither radiation dose to the foveola nor treatment with adjunctive TTT laser was significantly associated with the development of macular edema. CONCLUSIONS: OCT is useful in the early detection of radiation-induced macular edema, before clinical signs of radiation maculopathy develop and before substantial visual loss occurs. The development of macular edema is significantly associated with larger initial tumor size.