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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Anthony J. Olszanski
Based on 12 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, A. Olszanski wrote the following 12 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline NCCN Guidelines Insights: Melanoma, Version 3.2016. 2016

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Algazi, Alain / Andtbacka, Robert / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / DiMaio, Dominick / Fields, Ryan C / Fleming, Martin D / Gastman, Brian / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Johnson, Douglas / Joseph, Richard W / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Materin, Miguel A / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ott, Patrick / Gupta, Aparna Priyanath / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April K / Skitzki, Joseph / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Torres-Roca, Javier F / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Engh, Anita. ·From Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine; The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute; University of Colorado Cancer Center; Aim at Melanoma; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital; Fox Chase Cancer Center; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; Duke Cancer Institute; Roswell Park Cancer Institute; Stanford Cancer Institute; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; Moffitt Cancer Center; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; and National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #27496110.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma have been significantly revised over the past few years in response to emerging data on a number of novel agents and treatment regimens. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the data and rationale supporting extensive changes to the recommendations for systemic therapy in patients with metastatic or unresectable melanoma.

2 Guideline Melanoma, Version 2.2016, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. 2016

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Algazi, Alain / Andtbacka, Robert / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / DiMaio, Dominick / Ernstoff, Marc / Fields, Ryan C / Fleming, Martin D / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Joseph, Richard W / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Materin, Miguel A / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April K / Skitzki, Joseph / Sosman, Jeff / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Torres-Roca, Javier F / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Engh, Anita. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #27059193.

ABSTRACT: This selection from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Melanoma focuses on adjuvant therapy and treatment of in-transit disease, because substantial changes were made to the recommendations for the 2016 update. Depending on the stage of the disease, options for adjuvant therapy now include biochemotherapy and high-dose ipilimumab. Treatment options for in-transit disease now include intralesional injection with talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC), a new immunotherapy. These additions prompted re-assessment of the data supporting older recommended treatment options for adjuvant therapy and in-transit disease, resulting in extensive revisions to the supporting discussion sections.

3 Guideline Melanoma, version 4.2014. 2014

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / Daud, Adil / Dimaio, Dominick / Fleming, Martin D / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole R / Ho, Maria / Anonymous5170793. ·From 1Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; 2Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; 3Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; 4University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; 5The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; 6UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; 7UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; 8Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center; 9St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; 10University of Colorado Cancer Center; 11Aim at Melanoma; 12Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; 13Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; 14Roswell Park Cancer Institute; 15Moffitt Cancer Center; 16The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; 17Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; 18Fox Chase Cancer Center; 19The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; 20Duke Cancer Institute; 21Stanford Cancer Institute; 22Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; 23City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; 24University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; and 25National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #24812131.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma provide multidisciplinary recommendations for the management of patients with melanoma. These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight notable recent updates. Dabrafenib and trametinib, either as monotherapy (category 1) or combination therapy, have been added as systemic options for patients with unresectable metastatic melanoma harboring BRAF V600 mutations. Controversy continues regarding the value of adjuvant radiation for patients at high risk of nodal relapse. This is reflected in the category 2B designation to consider adjuvant radiation following lymphadenectomy for stage III melanoma with clinically positive nodes or recurrent disease.

4 Guideline Melanoma, version 2.2013: featured updates to the NCCN guidelines. 2013

Coit, Daniel G / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daud, Adil / Dimaio, Dominick / Fleming, Martin D / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Lind, Anne / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Pruitt, Scott K / Ross, Merrick I / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Thompson, John A / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Ho, Maria / Anonymous4310755. ·Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #23584343.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma provide multidisciplinary recommendations on the clinical management of patients with melanoma. This NCCN Guidelines Insights report highlights notable recent updates. Foremost of these is the exciting addition of the novel agents ipilimumab and vemurafenib for treatment of advanced melanoma. The NCCN panel also included imatinib as a treatment for KIT-mutated tumors and pegylated interferon alfa-2b as an option for adjuvant therapy. Also important are revisions to the initial stratification of early-stage lesions based on the risk of sentinel lymph node metastases, and revised recommendations on the use of sentinel lymph node biopsy for low-risk groups. Finally, the NCCN panel reached clinical consensus on clarifying the role of imaging in the workup of patients with melanoma.

5 Guideline Melanoma. 2012

Coit, Daniel G / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daud, Adil / Dilawari, Raza A / Dimaio, Dominick / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Lind, Anne / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Pruitt, Scott K / Ross, Merrick I / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Thompson, John A / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / Anonymous590720. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #22393197.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Review Current and future roles of targeted therapy and immunotherapy in advanced melanoma. 2014

Olszanski, Anthony J. ·Fox Chase Cancer Center, 333 Cottman Ave., Ste. C303, Philadelphia, PA 19111, USA. Anthony.Olszanski@fccc.edu. ·J Manag Care Spec Pharm · Pubmed #24684639.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Melanoma is an aggressive disease that accounts for approximately 75% of skin cancer-related deaths. Historically, treatment options for patients with advanced stage melanoma have been limited by modest response rates and failure to improve overall survival. The treatment landscape for advanced stage melanoma was revolutionized in 2011 with the approval of ipilimumab and vemurafenib, both of which improved overall survival in phase III clinical trials. More recently, the targeted inhibitors dabrafenib and trametinib have demonstrated similar therapeutic profiles. OBJECTIVES: To (a) discuss emerging treatment options for advanced melanoma, specifically ilpilimumab, vemurafenib, dabrafenib, and trametinib, in the context of their mechanisms of action and their potential for long-term improvement in patient outcome, and (b) to consider the impact of these agents on the current treatment landscape. METHODS: A literature search was conducted to collect data from clinical trials involving ipilimumab, vemurafenib, dabrafenib, and trametinib. Emphasis was placed on outcome measures related to long-term clinical benefit. RESULTS: Ipilimumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody, exploits the natural ability of the immune system to eradicate primary cancer cells. It inhibits the binding of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 to its ligands, thereby potentiating T-cell response and antitumor immunity. In a phase III clinical trial, ipilimumab at 3 mg/kg improved overall survival in previously treated patients with metastatic melanoma. Components of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway are particularly relevant in melanoma and have been targeted by small molecular inhibitors. Vemurafenib and dabrafenib inhibit the BRAF V600 mutation, which prevents oncogenic activities such as uncheck proliferation and evasion of immune response. Data from phase III clinical trials suggest that both vemurafenib and dabrafenib improve patient outcomes, with vemurafenib showing an overall survival benefit and dabrafenib showing improved median progression-free survival. The targeted-therapy approach in melanoma continued to gain momentum with the development of trametinib, which inhibits the MEK protein, the only known substrate of the BRAF V600 protein. Inhibition of MEK leads to decreased cell signaling and proliferation in cancer cells. In phase III trials, trametinib demonstrated significant improvement in median progression-free survival and median overall survival compared with chemotherapy treatment, making this treatment a valuable addition to the current armamentarium. The adverse events associated with these new treatments are generally tolerable and mild to moderate in severity; however, care should be taken when selecting a therapy, since the specific adverse events associated with these treatments are unique, and serious events have been reported. CONCLUSIONS: The immunotherapy ipilimumab and the MAPK-targeted inhibitors vemurafenib, dabrafenib, and trametinib have forever changed the treatment landscape for melanoma. Indeed, these new therapies have demonstrated long-term improvement in patient outcome, a benefit not afforded by traditional therapeutics. Important research continues on the molecular basis of melanoma, and new targets are likely to emerge. Other areas of work include optimization of sequencing and/or combination of current treatments, which may increase the number of patients who experience clinical benefit.

7 Review Progress in the management of melanoma in 2013. 2013

Coit, Daniel G / Olszanski, Anthony J. ·Melanoma Disease Management Team at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA. coitd@mskcc.org ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #23704234.

ABSTRACT: The treatment of melanoma in 2013 has evolved significantly over the past 2 years, according to presentations at the recent NCCN 18th Annual Conference. Ipilimumab and vemurafenib have prolonged the survival of patients with advanced disease, and the research pipeline continues to evaluate a number of new agents highlighting a tremendous optimism to further improve outcomes. These new treatment options were incorporated into the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology in 2012. A recent presentation of these guidelines highlighted changes in both the initial management of very thin melanomas and the ongoing importance of targeted agents and immunotherapy in more advanced disease. This presentation included refining the indication for sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB), which, according to the updated guidelines, is not recommended for very thin lesions (≤ 0.75 mm). Dr. Daniel G. Coit discussed the rationale for this change during the presentation, and Dr. Anthony J. Olszanski reviewed the evidence for new classes of agents that impact survival.

8 Clinical Trial Oncolytic Virotherapy Promotes Intratumoral T Cell Infiltration and Improves Anti-PD-1 Immunotherapy. 2017

Ribas, Antoni / Dummer, Reinhard / Puzanov, Igor / VanderWalde, Ari / Andtbacka, Robert H I / Michielin, Olivier / Olszanski, Anthony J / Malvehy, Josep / Cebon, Jonathan / Fernandez, Eugenio / Kirkwood, John M / Gajewski, Thomas F / Chen, Lisa / Gorski, Kevin S / Anderson, Abraham A / Diede, Scott J / Lassman, Michael E / Gansert, Jennifer / Hodi, F Stephen / Long, Georgina V. ·University of California at Los Angeles, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA. Electronic address: aribas@mednet.ucla.edu. · University Hospital of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY, USA. · The West Clinic, Memphis, TN, USA. · University of Utah Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT, USA. · Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Hospital Clinic i Provincial de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute, Austin Health, School of Cancer Medicine, LaTrobe University, Heidelberg, VIC, Australia. · Hopitaux Universitaires de Genève, Geneva, Switzerland. · University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and Hillman UPMC Cancer Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · The University of Chicago School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USA. · Amgen Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA, USA. · Amgen Inc., South San Francisco, CA, USA. · Merck & Co., Inc., Kenilworth, NJ, USA. · Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA. · Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney and Royal North Shore and Mater Hospitals, Sydney, NSW, Australia. ·Cell · Pubmed #28886381.

ABSTRACT: Here we report a phase 1b clinical trial testing the impact of oncolytic virotherapy with talimogene laherparepvec on cytotoxic T cell infiltration and therapeutic efficacy of the anti-PD-1 antibody pembrolizumab. Twenty-one patients with advanced melanoma were treated with talimogene laherparepvec followed by combination therapy with pembrolizumab. Therapy was generally well tolerated, with fatigue, fevers, and chills as the most common adverse events. No dose-limiting toxicities occurred. Confirmed objective response rate was 62%, with a complete response rate of 33% per immune-related response criteria. Patients who responded to combination therapy had increased CD8

9 Clinical Trial Clinical activity and safety of combination therapy with temsirolimus and bevacizumab for advanced melanoma: a phase II trial (CTEP 7190/Mel47). 2013

Slingluff, Craig L / Petroni, Gina R / Molhoek, Kerrington R / Brautigan, David L / Chianese-Bullock, Kimberly A / Shada, Amber L / Smolkin, Mark E / Olson, Walter C / Gaucher, Alison / Chase, Cheryl Murphy / Grosh, William W / Weiss, Geoffrey R / Wagenseller, Aubrey G / Olszanski, Anthony J / Martin, Lainie / Shea, Sofia M / Erdag, Gulsun / Ram, Prahlad / Gershenwald, Jeffrey E / Weber, Michael J. ·University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA. cls8h@virginia.edu ·Clin Cancer Res · Pubmed #23620404.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: A CTEP-sponsored phase II trial was conducted to evaluate safety and clinical activity of combination therapy with CCI-779 (temsirolimus) and bevacizumab in patients with advanced melanoma. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Patients with unresectable stage III to IV melanoma were treated intravenously with temsirolimus 25 mg weekly and bevacizumab 10 mg every 2 weeks. Adverse events were recorded using CTCAE v3.0. Tumor response was assessed by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors and overall survival was recorded. Correlative studies measured protein kinases and histology of tumor biopsies and immune function in peripheral blood. RESULTS: Seventeen patients were treated. Most patients tolerated treatment well, but 2 had grade 4 lymphopenia and 1 developed reversible grade 2 leukoencephalopathy. Best clinical response was partial response (PR) in 3 patients [17.7%, 90% confidence interval (CI) 5, 0-39.6], stable disease at 8 weeks (SD) in 9 patients, progressive disease (PD) in 4 patients, and not evaluable in 1 patient. Maximal response duration for PR was 35 months. Ten evaluable patients had BRAF(WT) tumors, among whom 3 had PRs, 5 had SD, and 2 had PD. Correlative studies of tumor biopsies revealed decreased phospho-S6K (d2 and d23 vs. d1, P < 0.001), and decreased mitotic rate (Ki67(+)) among melanoma cells by d23 (P = 0.007). Effects on immune functions were mixed, with decreased alloreactive T-cell responses and decreased circulating CD4(+)FoxP3(+) cells. CONCLUSION: These data provide preliminary evidence for clinical activity of combination therapy with temsirolimus and bevacizumab, which may be greater in patients with BRAF(wt) melanoma. Mixed effects on immunologic function also support combination with immune therapies.

10 Article Melanoma in the Bronchus. 2018

Manley, Christopher / Olszanski, Anthony. ·Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA cjmanley@gmail.com. ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #30428282.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Article Donor-Derived Metastatic Melanoma and Checkpoint Inhibition. 2017

Boyle, S M / Ali, N / Olszanski, A J / Park, D J / Xiao, G / Guy, S / Doyle, A M. ·Division of Nephrology, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: suzanne.boyle@drexelmed.edu. · Division of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Division of Transplant Surgery, Hahnemann University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Division of Nephrology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, Virginia. ·Transplant Proc · Pubmed #28838438.

ABSTRACT: Donor-derived malignancy, particularly melanoma, is a rare but known complication of organ transplantation. Here we describe a case of metastatic melanoma in a deceased-donor kidney transplant recipient. After diagnosis, the patient was successfully treated with cessation of immunosuppression, explantation of the renal allograft, and novel melanoma therapies, including the mutation-targeted agents dabrafenib and trametinib and the immune checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab. These 2 new classes of melanoma therapy have revolutionized the course of metastatic melanoma, altering it from one of nearly certain mortality to one of potential cure. This case reviews the mechanisms of action of these therapies and reports our experience with them in the rare setting of donor-derived melanoma in a dialysis-dependent patient.

12 Article Outcomes in patients with mucosal melanomas. 2013

Keller, Deborah S / Thomay, Alan A / Gaughan, John / Olszanski, Anthony / Wu, Hong / Berger, Adam C / Farma, Jeffrey M. ·Department of Surgery, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #24132665.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Our goal was to evaluate the different subtypes of mucosal melanoma and describe specific variables that predict outcomes. METHODS: Prospective review of two tertiary care center databases identified 76 mucosal melanoma patients; 73 with complete records were included. Demographic and clinical data were analyzed. Cox regression determined variables impacting recurrence and survival. RESULTS: In the 73 patients, the mean age was 64 years, and 74% were female. Sixty-seven percent presented with lymph node involvement, and 73% had ulcerated tumors. Major sites affected were nasal/palate/oral (36%), vulvar/vaginal/cervical (48%), and anorectal (15%). Mean overall and disease-free survival were 56.9 and 27.2 months. Variables associated with decreased survival included: lymphovascular invasion (HR17.70, P = 0.0093), Caucasian race (HR3.02, P = 0.0362), nasal/palate/oral sub-group (HR1.85, P = 0.026), Breslow thickness (HR1.23, P = 0.00004), T stage (HR1.34, P = 0.0075), M stage (HR3.03, P = 0.0039), and chemotherapy (HR3.13, P = 0.0002). The worst prognosis was seen in the nasal/palate/oral sub-group, with a median overall survival of 9.7 months and recurrence-free time of 4.5 months. This subtype also demonstrated high lymph node positivity, ulceration, and larger tumor size. CONCLUSION: The nasal, palate, oral subtype has the worst prognosis compared to other mucosal melanoma locations. Studies are ongoing to evaluate pathologic and genomic variables that may predict outcomes.