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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Maria Antonietta Pizzichetta
Based on 17 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, M. Pizzichetta wrote the following 17 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Spitz/Reed nevi: proposal of management recommendations by the Dermoscopy Study Group of the Italian Society of Dermatology (SIDeMaST). 2014

Broganelli, P / Titli, S / Lallas, A / Alaibac M Annetta, A / Battarra, V / Brunetti, B / Castagno, I / Cavicchini, S / Ferrari, A / Ghigliotti, G / Landi, C / Manganoni, A / Moscarella, E / Pellacani, G / Pizzichetta, M A / Rosina, P / Rubegni, P / Satta, R / Scalvenzi, M / Stanganelli, I / Stinco, G / Zalaudek, I / Zampieri, P / Argenziano, G / Anonymous1410806. ·Department of Oncology and Hematology, Section of Dermatology, City of Health and Science Hospital of Turin, Turin, Italy - paolobroganelli@inwind.it. ·G Ital Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #25213387.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Article Clinicopathological predictors of recurrence in nodular and superficial spreading cutaneous melanoma: a multivariate analysis of 214 cases. 2017

Pizzichetta, Maria A / Massi, Daniela / Mandalà, Mario / Queirolo, Paola / Stanganelli, Ignazio / De Giorgi, Vincenzo / Ghigliotti, Giovanni / Cavicchini, Stefano / Quaglino, Pietro / Corradin, Maria T / Rubegni, Pietro / Alaibac, Mauro / Astorino, Stefano / Ayala, Fabrizio / Magi, Serena / Mazzoni, Laura / Manganoni, Maria Ausilia / Talamini, Renato / Serraino, Diego / Palmieri, Giuseppe / Anonymous1471021. ·Division of Oncology B, CRO Aviano National Cancer Institute, Via Franco Gallini 2, 33081, Aviano, Italy. pizzichetta@cro.it. · Division of Pathological Anatomy, Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · Unit of Medical Oncology, Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital, Bergamo, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, National Institute for Cancer Research, IRCCS San Martino, Genoa, Italy. · Skin Cancer Unit, Istituto Tumori Romagna (IRST), Meldola, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Parma, Parma, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · Clinic of Dermatology, IRCCS San Martino-IST, Genoa, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Fondazione Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico IRCCS, Milan, Italy. · Dermatologic Clinic, Dept Medical Sciences, University of Torino, Turin, Italy. · Division of Dermatology, Pordenone Hospital, Pordenone, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Siena, Siena, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Padova, Padua, Italy. · Division of Dermatology, Celio Hospital, Rome, Italy. · National Cancer Institute, "Fondazione G. Pascale"-IRCCS, Naples, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, ASST degli Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia, Italy. · Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, CRO Aviano National Cancer Institute, Aviano, Italy. · Unit of Cancer Genetics, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry (ICB), National Research Council (CNR), Sassari, Italy. ·J Transl Med · Pubmed #29115977.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Nodular melanoma (NM) accounts for most thick melanomas and because of their frequent association with ulceration, fast growth rate and high mitotic rate, contribute substantially to melanoma-related mortality. In a multicentric series of 214 primary melanomas including 96 NM and 118 superficial spreading melanoma (SSM), histopathological features were examined with the aim to identify clinicopathological predictors of recurrence. METHODS: All consecutive cases of histopathologically diagnosed primary invasive SSM and NM during the period 2005-2010, were retrieved from the 12 participating Italian Melanoma Intergroup (IMI) centers. Each center provided clinico-pathological data such as gender, age at diagnosis, anatomical site, histopathological conventional parameters, date of excision and first melanoma recurrence. RESULTS: Results showed that NM subtype was significantly associated with Breslow thickness (BT) at multivariate analysis: [BT 1.01-2 mm (OR 7.22; 95% CI 2.73-19.05), BT 2.01-4 mm (OR 7.04; 95% CI 2.54-19.56), and BT > 4 mm (OR 51.78; 95% CI 5.65-474.86) (p < 0.0001)]. Furthermore, mitotic rate (MR) was significantly correlated with NM histotype: [(MR 3-5 mitoses/mm CONCLUSIONS: We found that NM subtype was significantly associated with higher BT and MR but it was not a prognostic factor since it did not significantly correlate with melanoma recurrence rate. Conversely, increased BT and MR as well as SNLB positivity were significantly associated with a higher risk of melanoma recurrence.

3 Article Pigmented nodular melanoma: the predictive value of dermoscopic features using multivariate analysis. 2015

Pizzichetta, M A / Kittler, H / Stanganelli, I / Bono, R / Cavicchini, S / De Giorgi, V / Ghigliotti, G / Quaglino, P / Rubegni, P / Argenziano, G / Talamini, R / Anonymous1690828. ·Division of Medical Oncology - Preventive Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, National Cancer Institute, Via Franco Gallini, 2, 33081, Aviano, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Skin Cancer Unit, Istituto Tumori Romagna (IRST), Meldola, Italy. · Istituto Dermopatico Immacolata, IRCCS, Rome, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Fondazione Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico IRCCS, Milan, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · Clinic of Dermatology, IRCCS San Martino - Ist, Genoa, Italy. · Dermatologic Clinic, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Siena, Siena, Italy. · Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, National Cancer Institute, Via Franco Gallini, 2, 33081, Aviano, Italy. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #25916655.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Nodular melanoma (NM), representing 10-30% of all melanomas, plays a major role in global mortality related to melanoma. Nonetheless, the literature on dermoscopy of NM is scanty. OBJECTIVES: To assess odds ratios (ORs) to quantify dermoscopic features of pigmented NM vs. pigmented superficial spreading melanoma (SSM), and pigmented nodular nonmelanocytic and benign melanocytic lesions. METHODS: To assess the presence or absence of global patterns and dermoscopic criteria, digitized images of 457 pigmented skin lesions from patients with a histopathological diagnosis of NM (n = 75), SSM (n = 93), and nodular nonmelanocytic and benign melanocytic lesions (n = 289; namely, 39 basal cell carcinomas, 85 seborrhoeic keratoses, 81 blue naevi, and 84 compound/dermal naevi) were retrospectively collected and blindly evaluated by three observers. RESULTS: Multivariate analysis showed that ulceration (OR 4.07), homogeneous disorganized pattern (OR 10.76), and homogeneous blue pigmented structureless areas (OR 2.37) were significantly independent prognostic factors for NM vs. SSM. Multivariate analysis of dermoscopic features of NM vs. nonmelanocytic and benign melanocytic lesions showed that the positive correlating features leading to a significantly increased risk of NM were asymmetric pigmentation (OR 6.70), blue-black pigmented areas (OR 7.15), homogeneous disorganized pattern (OR 9.62), a combination of polymorphous vessels and milky-red globules/areas (OR 23.65), and polymorphous vessels combined with homogeneous red areas (OR 33.88). CONCLUSIONS: Dermoscopy may be helpful in improving the recognition of pigmented NM by revealing asymmetric pigmentation, blue-black pigmented areas, homogeneous disorganized pattern and abnormal vascular structures, including polymorphous vessels, milky-red globules/areas and homogeneous red areas.

4 Article Differences in clinicopathological features and distribution of risk factors in Italian melanoma patients. 2015

Fava, P / Astrua, C / Chiarugi, A / Crocetti, E / Pimpinelli, N / Fargnoli, M C / Maurichi, A / Rubegni, P / Manganoni, A M / Bottoni, U / Catricalà, C / Cavicchini, S / Santinami, M / Alaibac, M / Annetta, A / Borghi, A / Calzavara Pinton, P / Capizzi, R / Clerico, R / Colombo, E / Corradin, M T / De Simone, P / Fantini, F / Ferreli, C / Filosa, G / Girgenti, V / Giulioni, E / Guarneri, C / Lamberti, A / Lisi, P / Nardini, P / Papini, M / Peris, K / Pizzichetta, M A / Salvini, C / Savoia, P / Strippoli, D / Tolomio, E / Tomassini, M A / Vena, G A / Zichichi, L / Patrizi, A / Argenziano, G / Simonacci, M / Quaglino, P. ·Dermatologic Clinic, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Turin, Turin, Italy. ·Dermatology · Pubmed #25659983.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: No studies are available in the literature on the distribution of different melanoma features and risk factors in the Italian geographical areas. OBJECTIVE: To identify the differences in clinical-pathological features of melanoma, the distribution of risk factors and sun exposure in various Italian macro-areas. METHODS: Multicentric-observational study involving 1,472 melanoma cases (713 north, 345 centre, 414 south) from 26 referral centres belonging to the Italian Multidisciplinary Group for Melanoma. RESULTS: Melanoma patients in northern regions are younger, with thinner melanoma, multiple primaries, lower-intermediate phototype and higher counts of naevi with respect to southern patients; detection of a primary was mostly connected with a physician examination, while relatives were more involved in the south. Northern patients reported a more frequent use of sunbeds and occurrence of sunburns before melanoma despite sunscreen use and a lower sun exposure during the central hours of the day. CONCLUSIONS: The understanding of differences in risk factors distribution could represent the basis for tailored prevention programmes.

5 Article Dermoscopy of acral melanoma: a multicenter study on behalf of the international dermoscopy society. 2013

Braun, Ralph P / Thomas, L / Dusza, S W / Gaide, O / Menzies, S / Dalle, S / Blum, A / Argenziano, G / Zalaudek, I / Kopf, A / Rabinovitz, H / Oliviero, M / Perrinaud, A / Cabo, H / Pizzichetta, M / Pozo, L / Langford, D / Tanaka, M / Saida, T / Perusquia Ortiz, A M / Kreusch, J / De Giorgi, V / Piccolo, D / Grichnik, J M / Kittler, H / Puig, S / Malvehy, J / Seidenari, S / Stanganelli, I / French, L / Marghoob, A A. ·Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland. ·Dermatology · Pubmed #24296632.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Most studies on dermoscopy of acral lesions were conducted in Asian populations. In this study, we analyzed these features in a predominantly Caucasian population. OBJECTIVE: Estimate the prevalence of dermoscopic features in acral lesions, and assess their level of agreement between observers. METHODS: In this retrospective multicenter study, 167 acral lesions (66 melanomas) were evaluated for 13 dermoscopic patterns by 26 physicians, via a secured Internet platform. RESULTS: Parallel furrow pattern, bizarre pattern, and diffuse pigmentation with variable shades of brown had the highest prevalence. The agreement for lesion patterns between physicians was variable. Agreement was dependent on the level of diagnostic difficulty. CONCLUSION: Lesions with a diameter >1 cm were more likely to be melanoma. We found as well that a benign pattern can be seen in parts of melanomas. For this reason one should evaluate an acral lesion for the presence of malignant patterns first.

6 Article BRAF and KIT somatic mutations are present in amelanotic melanoma. 2013

Massi, Daniela / Pinzani, Pamela / Simi, Lisa / Salvianti, Francesca / De Giorgi, Vincenzo / Pizzichetta, Maria A / Mirri, Francesco / Steffan, Agostino / Orlando, Claudio / Santucci, Marco / Canzonieri, Vincenzo. ·Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, Division of Pathological Anatomy, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. daniela.massi@unifi.it ·Melanoma Res · Pubmed #23938765.

ABSTRACT: The genotypic profile of rare amelanotic melanomas (AMs) has been poorly investigated, thus preventing either an accurate identification as a distinctive melanoma subtype or therapy stratification. Here, we investigated the presence of the BRAF(V600E) mutation by real-time quantitative PCR and KIT mutations (exons 11 and 17) by sequencing analysis in 33 AMs. AMs included 'truly' amelanotic lesions (n = 19), with no melanin pigmentation upon dermoscopic inspection and hypomelanotic lesions (n = 14), by definition partially pigmented lesions showing a melanin pigmentation area of less than 25% of the total surface area. The frequency of the BRAF(V600E) mutation was 70.3% in the 33 cases, a percentage that increased to 89% when only the subgroup of thin melanomas (≤ 1 mm in thickness, n = 9) was considered. KIT mutations were found in 12.1% of AMs, all of which developed in nonacral sites. The identification of a relatively high frequency of BRAF(V600E) and KIT mutations in AMs may have important consequences for implementation of the novel targeted therapies now available to treat this life-threatening disease.

7 Article Surgical management of suspicious melanocytic lesions in Italy. 2013

De Giorgi, Vincenzo / Ascierto, Paolo / Bono, Riccardo / Pimpinelli, Nicola / Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna / Palmieri, Giuseppe / Pizzichetta, Maria Antonietta / Testori, Alessandro / Stanganelli, Ignazio. ·Dermatologic Clinic, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. ·Dermatology · Pubmed #23736266.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: In melanoma, the surgical approach is important for both diagnosis and therapy. Although surgery is relatively simple, the methods should be performed by experts in melanoma management. We analyze the techniques and methods used in the Italian hospital network for suspicious skin lesions and confirmed melanomas. METHODS: A nationwide survey was conducted of a representative sample of 120 hospitals with ≥ 200 beds. RESULTS: Excision biopsies remove suspected melanomas. However, some approaches to excision margins and sentinel lymph node procedures differ from international protocols. Overall, 21% of centers perform excisional biopsy of a suspicious lesion using 1 cm margins, and 22% of centers perform sentinel node procedures concurrently with removal of primary melanoma. CONCLUSIONS: Standardized treatment protocols are needed for suspicious lesions and clinically evident melanoma, particularly regarding the critical aspect of excision margins. The sentinel lymph node procedure may be distorted by initial margins that are too wide.

8 Article Impact of mole mapping in the Italian health system. 2013

Stanganelli, Ignazio / Ascierto, Paolo / Bono, Riccardo / De Giorgi, Vincenzo / Pimpinelli, Nicola / Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna / Palmieri, Giuseppe / Pizzichetta, Maria Antonietta / Testori, Alessandro. ·Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, IRCCS IRST, Meldola, Italy. ·Dermatology · Pubmed #23736265.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To analyze routine clinical management of atypical melanocytic lesions through monitoring or surgery in Italian hospitals. METHODS: A nationwide survey of clinical practices was conducted. RESULTS: Digital monitoring is performed in most Italian hospitals and is preferred over excision for single atypical melanocytic lesions in 82% of hospitals. For multiple atypical lesions, 60% of high-volume hospitals prefer digital monitoring to surgical excision (40%). There is a statistically significant difference between high- and low-volume hospitals (60 vs. 39%; p = 0.003). Digital monitoring is performed at mean intervals of 4/5 months for both types of lesions. CONCLUSIONS: We show an asymmetric relation between application of the method and practical impact based on available clinical evidence. Although digital monitoring provides better characterization of the evolution of melanocytic lesions, our results indicate that the advantages and limitations of this method require further investigation.

9 Article Diagnostic services for melanoma in Italy. 2013

Stanganelli, Ignazio / Ascierto, Paolo / Bono, Riccardo / De Giorgi, Vincenzo / Pimpinelli, Nicola / Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna / Palmieri, Giuseppe / Pizzichetta, Maria Antonietta / Testori, Alessandro. ·Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, IRCCS IRST, Meldola, Italy. ·Dermatology · Pubmed #23736263.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To evaluate organizational structure and diagnostic procedures used by the Italian hospital network for identifying cutaneous melanoma. METHODS: A nationwide survey of a representative sample of centers was conducted. RESULTS: Diagnosis occurs mainly in ambulatory dermatology clinics (91%). In all high-volume hospitals, clinical and dermoscopic examination is available at first consultation or as an additional service, compared to 89% of low-volume hospitals. Computer-assisted videodermoscopy is available in 75% of hospitals, with a statistically significant difference between high- and low-volume hospitals (86 vs. 62%; p < 0.001). First consultation is generally an integrated clinical/dermoscopic evaluation (55% of high-volume centers vs. 47% of low-volume hospitals); digital evaluation is available for monitoring suspicious lesions and high-risk patients in 25% of high-volume centers versus 19% of low-volume centers. CONCLUSIONS: The organizational structure and diagnostic procedures in Italian hospitals are in line with modern diagnostic procedures for early diagnosis of melanoma. Dermatologists have a central role in managing diagnosis of primitive melanoma.

10 Article Dermoscopic evaluation of nodular melanoma. 2013

Menzies, Scott W / Moloney, Fergal J / Byth, Karen / Avramidis, Michelle / Argenziano, Giuseppe / Zalaudek, Iris / Braun, Ralph P / Malvehy, Josep / Puig, Susana / Rabinovitz, Harold S / Oliviero, Margaret / Cabo, Horacio / Bono, Riccardo / Pizzichetta, Maria A / Claeson, Magdalena / Gaffney, Daniel C / Soyer, H Peter / Stanganelli, Ignazio / Scolyer, Richard A / Guitera, Pascale / Kelly, John / McCurdy, Olivia / Llambrich, Alex / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Zaballos, Pedro / Kirchesch, Herbert M / Piccolo, Domenico / Bowling, Jonathan / Thomas, Luc / Terstappen, Karin / Tanaka, Masaru / Pellacani, Giovanni / Pagnanelli, Gianluca / Ghigliotti, Giovanni / Ortega, Blanca Carlos / Crafter, Greg / Ortiz, Ana María Perusquía / Tromme, Isabelle / Karaarslan, Isil Kilinc / Ozdemir, Fezal / Tam, Anthony / Landi, Christian / Norton, Peter / Kaçar, Nida / Rudnicka, Lidia / Slowinska, Monika / Simionescu, Olga / Di Stefani, Alessandro / Coates, Elliot / Kreusch, Juergen. ·Sydney Melanoma Diagnostic Centre, Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW 2050, Australia. scott.menzies@sswahs.nsw.gov.au ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #23553375.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: Nodular melanoma (NM) is a rapidly progressing potentially lethal skin tumor for which early diagnosis is critical. OBJECTIVE: To determine the dermoscopy features of NM. DESIGN: Eighty-three cases of NM, 134 of invasive non-NM, 115 of nodular benign melanocytic tumors, and 135 of nodular nonmelanocytic tumors were scored for dermoscopy features using modified and previously described methods. Lesions were separated into amelanotic/hypomelanotic or pigmented to assess outcomes. SETTING: Predominantly hospital-based clinics from 5 continents. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Sensitivity, specificity, and odds ratios for features/models for the diagnosis of melanoma. RESULTS: Nodular melanoma occurred more frequently as amelanotic/hypomelanotic (37.3%) than did invasive non-NM (7.5%). Pigmented NM had a more frequent (compared with invasive non-NM; in descending order of odds ratio) symmetrical pigmentation pattern (5.8% vs 0.8%), large-diameter vessels, areas of homogeneous blue pigmentation, symmetrical shape, predominant peripheral vessels, blue-white veil, pink color, black color, and milky red/pink areas. Pigmented NM less frequently displayed an atypical broadened network, pigment network or pseudonetwork, multiple blue-gray dots, scarlike depigmentation, irregularly distributed and sized brown dots and globules, tan color, irregularly shaped depigmentation, and irregularly distributed and sized dots and globules of any color. The most important positive correlating features of pigmented NM vs nodular nonmelanoma were peripheral black dots/globules, multiple brown dots, irregular black dots/globules, blue-white veil, homogeneous blue pigmentation, 5 to 6 colors, and black color. A model to classify a lesion as melanocytic gave a high sensitivity (>98.0%) for both nodular pigmented and nonnodular pigmented melanoma but a lower sensitivity for amelanotic/hypomelanotic NM (84%). A method for diagnosing amelanotic/hypomelanotic malignant lesions (including basal cell carcinoma) gave a 93% sensitivity and 70% specificity for NM. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: When a progressively growing, symmetrically patterned melanocytic nodule is identified, NM needs to be excluded.

11 Article Negative pigment network: an additional dermoscopic feature for the diagnosis of melanoma. 2013

Pizzichetta, Maria A / Talamini, Renato / Marghoob, Ash A / Soyer, H Peter / Argenziano, Giuseppe / Bono, Riccardo / Corradin, M Teresa / De Giorgi, Vincenzo / Gonzalez, Marian A / Kolm, Isabel / Kopf, Andrew W / Malvehy, Joseph / Nami, Niccolò / Oliviero, Margaret / Pellacani, Giovanni / Puig, Susana / Rabinovitz, Harold / Rubegni, Pietro / Seidenari, Stefania / Stanganelli, Ignazio / Veronesi, Andrea / Zalaudek, Iris / Zampieri, Pierfrancesco / Menzies, Scott W. ·Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, National Cancer Institute, Aviano, Italy. Electronic address: pizzichetta@cro.it. · Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, National Cancer Institute, Aviano, Italy. · Dermatology Section, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Dermatology Research Center, University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. · Dermatology and Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico(IRCCS), Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Istituto Dermopatico Immacolata, IRCCS, Rome, Italy. · Division of Dermatology, Pordenone Hospital, Pordenone, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · Division of Dermatology, Merano Hospital, Merano, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Miami, Miami, Florida. · New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York. · Melanoma Unit, Department of Dermatology, Hospital Clinic, Institut d'Investigacions Biomediques August Pi i Sunyer, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Dermatology, University of Siena, Siena, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena and Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Skin Cancer Unit, Istituto Tumori Romagna, Meldola, Italy. · Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. · Sydney Melanoma Diagnostic Center, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital and Discipline of Dermatology, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #23062610.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The negative pigment network (NPN) is seen as a negative of the pigmented network and it is purported to be a melanoma-specific structure. OBJECTIVES: We sought to assess the frequency, sensitivity, specificity, and odds ratios (ORs) of NPN between melanoma cases and a group of control lesions. METHODS: Digitalized images of skin lesions from 679 patients with histopathological diagnosis of dermatofibroma (115), melanocytic nevus (220), Spitz nevus (139), and melanoma (205) were retrospectively collected and blindly evaluated to assess the presence/absence of NPN. RESULTS: The frequency of occurrence of NPN was higher in the melanoma group (34.6%) than in Spitz nevus (28.8%), melanocytic nevus (18.2%), and dermatofibroma (11.3%) groups. An OR of 1.8 emerged for the diagnosis of melanoma in the presence of NPN as compared with nonmelanoma diagnosis. Conversely, for melanocytic nevi and dermatofibromas the OR was very low (0.5 and 0.3, respectively). For Spitz nevi the OR of 1.1 was not statistically significant. When comparing melanoma with dermatofibroma, melanocytic nevus, and Spitz nevus, we observed a significantly higher frequency of multicomponent pattern (68.1%), asymmetric pigmentation (92.9%), irregularly distributed NPN (87.3%), and peripheral location of NPN (66.2%) in melanomas. LIMITATIONS: Further studies can provide the precise dermoscopic-histopathologic correlation of NPN in melanoma and other lesions. CONCLUSIONS: The overall morphologic pattern of NPN, such as the irregular distribution and the peripheral location of NPN, along with the multicomponent pattern and the asymmetric pigmentation could be used as additional features in distinguishing melanoma from Spitz nevus and other benign lesions.

12 Article Role of the EGF +61A>G polymorphism in melanoma pathogenesis: an experience on a large series of Italian cases and controls. 2009

Casula, Milena / Alaibac, Mauro / Pizzichetta, Maria A / Bono, Riccardo / Ascierto, Paolo A / Stanganelli, Ignazio / Canzanella, Sergio / Palomba, Grazia / Zattra, Edoardo / Anonymous3140634 / Palmieri, Giuseppe. ·Unit of Cancer Genetics, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Sassari, Italy. casulam@yahoo.it ·BMC Dermatol · Pubmed #19624835.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A single nucleotide polymorphism (61A>G) in the epidermal growth factor (EGF) gene has been implicated in both melanoma pathogenesis and increased melanoma risk. To further evaluate this association, we conducted a case-control study in a clinic-based Italian population. METHODS: Individuals with less than 10 (N = 127) or more than 100 (N = 128) benign nevi, and patients with cutaneous melanoma (N = 418) were investigated for the EGF +61A>G polymorphism, using an automated sequencing approach. RESULTS: Overall, no difference in EGF genotype frequencies was observed among subjects with different number of nevi as well as when non-melanoma healthy controls were compared with the melanoma patients. However, a heterogeneous distribution of the frequencies of the G/G genotype was detected among cases and controls originating from North Italy (21.1 and 18.3%, respectively) vs. those from South Italy (12.6 and 17.1%, respectively). CONCLUSION: Our findings further suggest that EGF +61A>G polymorphism may have a limited impact on predisposition and/or pathogenesis of melanoma and its prevalence may vary in different populations.

13 Article Clinical genetic testing for familial melanoma in Italy: a cooperative study. 2009

Bruno, William / Ghiorzo, Paola / Battistuzzi, Linda / Ascierto, Paolo A / Barile, Monica / Gargiulo, Sara / Gensini, Francesca / Gliori, Sara / Guida, Michele / Lombardo, Maurizio / Manoukian, Siranoush / Menin, Chiara / Nasti, Sabina / Origone, Paola / Pasini, Barbara / Pastorino, Lorenza / Peissel, Bernard / Pizzichetta, Maria Antonietta / Queirolo, Paola / Rodolfo, Monica / Romanini, Antonella / Scaini, Maria Chiara / Testori, Alessandro / Tibiletti, Maria Grazia / Turchetti, Daniela / Leachman, Sancy A / Bianchi Scarrà, Giovanna / Anonymous5830630. ·Department of Oncology, Biology, and Genetics, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy. william.bruno@unige.it ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #19500876.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The Italian Society of Human Genetics' (SIGU) recommendations on genetic counseling and testing for hereditary melanoma state that clinical genetic testing can be offered to Italian melanoma families with at least two affected members. OBJECTIVE: In the framework of a cooperative study, we sought to establish the frequency of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A mutations in melanoma families that underwent clinical genetic counseling and testing in accordance with the SIGU recommendations at 9 centers in different Italian regions. METHODS: Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A testing was conducted by direct sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis in melanoma families with at least two affected members. RESULTS: A total of 33% (68/204) of the families harbored cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A mutations. In the 145 families with two affected members the mutation frequency was 25%. Three novel mutations, L94P, A86T, and c.407dupG, were identified among the cases and not in 200 controls. LIMITATIONS: We were unable to perform separate analyses for individual centers, as in some cases the number of families was too small. CONCLUSIONS: The availability of clinical genetic testing for melanoma to families with just two affected members in the same branch is justified in Italy in terms of the likelihood of identifying a mutation.

14 Article CDKN2A and MC1R analysis in amelanotic and pigmented melanoma. 2009

Ghiorzo, Paola / Pastorino, Lorenza / Pizzichetta, Maria A / Bono, Riccardo / Queirolo, Paola / Talamini, Renato / Annessi, Giorgio / Bruno, William / Nasti, Sabina / Gargiulo, Sara / Battistuzzi, Linda / Sini, Maria C / Palmieri, Giuseppe / Scarrà, Giovanna Bianchi / Anonymous40720625. ·Dipartimento di Oncologia, Biologia e Genetica, Università di Genova, Genova, Italy. paola.ghiorzo@unige.it ·Melanoma Res · Pubmed #19339902.

ABSTRACT: Amelanotic melanoma (AM) is a rare subtype of melanoma with little or no clinically visible pigment; it is more difficult to diagnose than pigmented melanoma (PM), and has a worse prognosis. In the attempt to find a genetic explanation for the distinction between AM and PM, we conducted a case-case study, matching AM and PM patients, and testing them for germline mutations in high- (p16INK4A, p14ARF, CDK4) and low-penetrance (MC1R) melanoma susceptibility genes. Similar CDKN2A mutations were found in both sets of melanomas. A p14ARF splice germline mutation was detected for the first time in an Italian family with AM. This rare mutation, which has been described only once previously, may be involved in predisposition to the amelanotic phenotype in combination with germline MC1R variants and coordinate somatic expression of pigmentation genes and their regulators.

15 Article Dermoscopic evaluation of amelanotic and hypomelanotic melanoma. 2008

Menzies, Scott W / Kreusch, Juergen / Byth, Karen / Pizzichetta, Maria A / Marghoob, Ashfaq / Braun, Ralph / Malvehy, Josep / Puig, Susana / Argenziano, Giuseppe / Zalaudek, Iris / Rabinovitz, Harold S / Oliviero, Margaret / Cabo, Horacio / Ahlgrimm-Siess, Verena / Avramidis, Michelle / Guitera, Pascale / Soyer, H Peter / Ghigliotti, Giovanni / Tanaka, Masaru / Perusquia, Ana M / Pagnanelli, Gianluca / Bono, Riccardo / Thomas, Luc / Pellacani, Giovanni / Langford, David / Piccolo, Domenico / Terstappen, Karin / Stanganelli, Ignazio / Llambrich, Alex / Johr, Robert. ·Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney Melanoma Diagnostic Centre, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW 2050, Australia. scott.menzies@email.cs.nsw.gov.au ·Arch Dermatol · Pubmed #18794455.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine the predictive dermoscopic features of amelanotic and hypomelanotic melanoma. DESIGN: A total of 105 melanomas (median Breslow thickness, 0.76 mm), 170 benign melanocytic lesions, and 222 nonmelanocytic lesions lacking significant pigment (amelanotic, partially pigmented, and light colored) were imaged using glass-plate dermoscopy devices and scored for 99 dermoscopic features. Diagnostic models were derived from and tested on independent randomly selected lesions. SETTING: Predominantly hospital-based clinics from 5 continents. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Sensitivity, specificity, and odds ratios for individual features and models for the diagnosis of melanoma and malignancy. RESULTS: The most significant negative predictors of melanoma were having multiple (>3) milialike cysts (odds ratio, 0.09; 95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.64), comma vessels with a regular distribution (0.10; 0.01-0.70), comma vessels as the predominant vessel type (0.16; 0.05-0.52), symmetrical pigmentation pattern (0.18; 0.09-0.39), irregular blue-gray globules (0.20; 0.05-0.87), and multiple blue-gray globules (0.28; 0.10-0.81). The most significant positive predictors were having a blue-white veil (odds ratio,13; 95% confidence interval, 3.9-40.0), scarlike depigmentation (4.4; 2.4-8.0), multiple blue-gray dots (3.5; 1.9-6.4), irregularly shaped depigmentation (3.3; 2.0-5.3), irregular brown dots/globules (3.2; 1.8-5.6), 5 to 6 colors (3.2; 1.6-6.3), and predominant central vessels (3.1; 1.6-6.0). A simple model distinguishing melanomas from all nonmelanomas had a sensitivity of 70% and a specificity of 56% in the test set. A model distinguishing all malignant lesions from benign lesions had a sensitivity of 96% and a specificity of 37%. Conclusion Although the diagnostic accuracy of dermoscopy for melanoma lacking significant pigment is inferior to that of more pigmented lesions, features distinguishing the former from benign lesions can be visualized on dermoscopic evaluation.

16 Minor Dermoscopic diagnosis of amelanotic/hypomelanotic melanoma. 2017

Pizzichetta, M A / Kittler, H / Stanganelli, I / Ghigliotti, G / Corradin, M T / Rubegni, P / Cavicchini, S / De Giorgi, V / Bono, R / Alaibac, M / Astorino, S / Ayala, F / Quaglino, P / Pellacani, G / Argenziano, G / Guardoli, D / Specchio, F / Serraino, D / Talamini, R / Anonymous24890882. ·Division of Medical Oncology - Preventive Oncology, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, National Cancer Institute, Aviano, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Skin Cancer Unit, Istituto Tumori Romagna (IRST), Meldola, Department of Dermatology, University of Parma, Italy. · IRCCS San Martino - 1st Clinic of Dermatology, Genova, Italy. · Division of Dermatology, Pordenone Hospital, Pordenone, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Siena, Siena, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Fondazione Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico IRCCS, Milan, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · Istituto Dermopatico Immacolata, IRCCS, Rome, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Padova, Italy. · Division of Dermatology, Celio Hospital, Rome, Italy. · National Cancer Institute, 'Fondazione G. Pascale'-IRCCS, Naples, Italy. · Dermatologic Clinic, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Torino, Torino, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy. · Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, National Cancer Institute, Aviano, Italy. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #27681347.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Minor Pitfalls in the dermoscopic diagnosis of amelanotic melanoma. 2010

Pizzichetta, Maria A / Canzonieri, Vincenzo / Massarut, Samuele / Baresic, Tanja / Borsatti, Eugenio / Menzies, Scott W. · ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #20398822.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --