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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Anthony M. Rossi
Based on 11 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Anthony M. Rossi wrote the following 11 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Editorial Health-related quality of life in skin cancer patients. 2014

Hibler, Brian / Rossi, Anthony M. ·RossiA@mskcc.org. ·Cutis · Pubmed #25474447.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Skin cancer in skin of color. 2012

Alexis, Andrew F / Rossi, Anthony M. · ·Cutis · Pubmed #22768430.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Review Atypical Melanocytic Proliferations: A Review of the Literature. 2018

Ensslin, Courtney J / Hibler, Brian P / Lee, Erica H / Nehal, Kishwer S / Busam, Klaus J / Rossi, Anthony M. ·Department of Dermatology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Medicine, Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York. · Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. ·Dermatol Surg · Pubmed #29059147.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Ambiguous histopathologic diagnoses represent a challenge for clinicians because of a lack of definitive diagnosis and related uncertainty about management. OBJECTIVE: To review the literature on atypical melanocytic proliferations and detail synonymous terms, epidemiology, diagnostic work-up, histopathology, treatment, and prognosis. METHODS: Databases from PubMed and Web of Science were searched for articles related to atypical melanocytic proliferations. RESULTS: Intraepidermal melanocytic proliferations with features worrisome for possible melanoma in situ (MIS) are generally excised as for MIS. Reported rates of upstaging of such cases to invasive melanoma on review of the excision are very low. Because invasion, lymph node spread, and metastasis can occur in atypical melanocytic lesions with a thick intradermal component, these are often treated as for malignant melanoma. CONCLUSION: Because the diagnosis dictates treatment, it is incumbent to establish a diagnosis as definitive as possible, obtaining second or third opinions and using ancillary studies when appropriate. When the diagnosis remains uncertain, it is difficult to provide guidelines for treatment. Clinical care decisions for patients with an uncertain diagnosis are best done on a case-by-case basis weighing probabilities of adverse outcomes against potential benefits and risks from various treatment options.

4 Article Melanoma and melanoma in-situ diagnosis after excision of atypical intraepidermal melanocytic proliferation: A retrospective cross-sectional analysis. 2019

Blank, Nina R / Hibler, Brian P / Tattersall, Ian W / Ensslin, Courtney J / Lee, Erica H / Dusza, Stephen W / Nehal, Kishwer S / Busam, Klaus J / Rossi, Anthony M. ·Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York; Department of Dermatology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York. · Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York; Department of Dermatology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. · Department of Dermatology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. Electronic address: rossia@mskcc.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30654079.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is little evidence to guide surgical management of biopsies yielding the histologic descriptor atypical intraepidermal melanocytic proliferation (AIMP). OBJECTIVE: Determine frequency of and factors associated with melanoma and melanoma in-situ (MIS) diagnoses after excision of AIMP and evaluate margins used to completely excise AIMP. METHODS: Retrospective, cross-sectional study of 1127 biopsies reported as AIMP and subsequently excised within one academic institution. RESULTS: Melanoma (in situ, stage 1A) was diagnosed after excision in 8.2% (92/1127) of AIMP samples. Characteristics associated with melanoma/MIS diagnosis included age 60-79 years (odds ratio [OR] 8.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.5-26.2), age ≥80 years (OR 7.2, 95% CI 1.7-31.5), head/neck location (OR 4.9, 95% CI 3.1-7.7), clinical lesion partially biopsied (OR 11.0, 95% CI 6.7-18.1), and lesion extending to deep biopsy margin (OR 15.1, 95% CI 1.7-136.0). Average ± standard deviation surgical margin used to excise AIMP lesions was 4.5 ± 1.8 mm. LIMITATIONS: Single-site, retrospective, observational study; interobserver variability across dermatopathologists. CONCLUSION: Dermatologists and pathologists can endeavor to avoid ambiguous melanocytic designations whenever possible through excisional biopsy technique, interdisciplinary communication, and ancillary studies. In the event of AIMP biopsy, physicians should consider the term a histologic description rather than a diagnosis, and, during surgical planning, use clinicopathologic correlation while bearing in mind factors that might predict true melanoma/MIS.

5 Article Correlation of Handheld Reflectance Confocal Microscopy With Radial Video Mosaicing for Margin Mapping of Lentigo Maligna and Lentigo Maligna Melanoma. 2017

Yélamos, Oriol / Cordova, Miguel / Blank, Nina / Kose, Kivanc / Dusza, Stephen W / Lee, Erica / Rajadhyaksha, Milind / Nehal, Kishwer S / Rossi, Anthony M. ·Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Dermatology Department, Hospital Clínic, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #29049429.

ABSTRACT: Importance: The management of lentigo maligna (LM) and LM melanoma (LMM) is challenging because of extensive subclinical spread and its occurrence on cosmetically sensitive areas. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) improves diagnostic accuracy for LM and LMM and can be used to delineate their margins. Objectives: To evaluate whether handheld RCM with radial video mosaicing (HRCM-RV) offers accurate presurgical assessment of LM and LMM margins. Design, Setting, and Participants: This prospective study included consecutive patients with biopsy-proven LM and LMM located on the head and neck area who sought consultation for surgical management from March 1, 2016, through March 31, 2017, at the Dermatology Service of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Thirty-two patients underwent imaging using HRCM-RV, and 22 patients with 23 LM or LMM lesions underwent staged surgery and contributed to the analysis. Main Outcomes and Measures: Clinical lesion size and area, LM and LMM area based on HRCM-RV findings, surgical defect area estimated by HRCM-RV, and observed surgical defect area. In addition, the margins measured in millimeters estimated for tumor clearance in each quadrant based on HRCM-RV findings were calculated and compared with the surgical margins. Results: Among the 22 patients (12 men and 10 women; mean [SD] age, 69.0 [8.6] years [range, 46-83 years]) with 23 lesions included in the final analysis, the mean (SD) surgical defect area estimated with HRCM-RV was 6.34 (4.02) cm2 and the mean (SD) area of surgical excision with clear margins was 7.74 (5.28) cm2. Overall, controlling for patient age and previous surgery, surgical margins were a mean of 0.76 mm (95% CI, 0.67-0.84 mm; P < .001) larger than the HRCM-RV estimate. Conclusions and Relevance: Mapping of LM and LMM with HRCM-RV estimated defects that were similar to but slightly smaller than those found in staged excision. Thus, mapping of LM using HRCM-RV can help spare healthy tissue by reducing the number of biopsies needed in clinically uncertain areas and may be used to plan treatment of LM and LMM and counsel patients appropriately.

6 Article Handheld reflectance confocal microscopy to aid in the management of complex facial lentigo maligna. 2017

Hibler, Brian P / Yélamos, Oriol / Cordova, Miguel / Sierra, Heidy / Rajadhyaksha, Milind / Nehal, Kishwer S / Rossi, Anthony M. ·Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA, and Dermatology Department, Hospital Clínic, Universitat de Barcelona, Spain. · Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, and Department of Dermatology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, USA. ·Cutis · Pubmed #28632796.

ABSTRACT: Diagnosis and management of lentigo maligna (LM) and LM melanoma (LMM) is challenging. Novel noninvasive imaging technologies such as reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) have advanced the ability to better diagnose and monitor challenging lesions. In addition, the new handheld RCM (HRCM) together with the use of videomosaics has allowed an accurate evaluation of large lesions in concave/convex areas of the body (eg, the face). Herein, we review the impact of HRCM in the detection, treatment decision-making, and monitoring of 5 cases of complex facial LM/LMM. In the cases presented, HRCM enabled the detection of subclinical margins, presence of invasion, detection of persistence/recurrence, and monitoring of surgical and nonsurgical therapies. In this preliminary report, our results suggest that HRCM is a versatile ancillary tool in pretreatment decision-making, intraoperative surgical mapping, and posttreatment monitoring of complex facial LM/LMM.

7 Article Lentigo maligna melanoma with a history of cosmetic treatment: Prevalence, surgical outcomes and considerations. 2017

Hibler, Brian P / Connolly, Karen L / Lee, Erica H / Rossi, Anthony M / Nehal, Kishwer S. ·Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Dermatology Service, 16 E. 60th Street, 4th Floor Dermatology, New York, New York, 10022. · Lincoln Hospital, Dermatology Service, 234 E. 149th Street, Bronx, New York, 10451. ·Lasers Surg Med · Pubmed #28555933.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Lentigo maligna (LM) is melanoma in situ on sun-damaged skin and presents diagnostic challenges due to overlapping features with benign pigmented lesions. Cosmetic treatments may be inadvertently performed on LM. The aim of this study is to estimate the prevalence of LM with prior cosmetic treatment, and evaluate surgical outcomes. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Retrospective review of biopsy-proven LM presenting over a 10-year-period (2006-2015). Prior cosmetic treatment and biopsies were recorded. Records were reviewed for demographic data, clinical characteristics, and surgical outcomes. RESULTS: 37/503 (7.4%) patients with LM reported prior cosmetic therapy. Most (95%) were on the head and neck; mean size 1.9 cm. Most patients reported cryotherapy (73%), followed by laser (29.7%), topical bleaching agents (18.9%), and electrodessication, and/or curettage (5.3%). Ten patients (27%) received two or more modalities. Eight patients (21.6%) reported prior benign biopsies. Six patients (16%) had invasive disease, two on initial biopsy and 4/34 (11.7%) upstaged upon excision. Average margin for clearance was 9.1 mm. CONCLUSION: Prior cosmetic treatment of LM is not uncommon, and may delay diagnosis and obscure borders, resulting in wider surgical margins. Clinicians should consider a biopsy confirming the benign nature of equivocal lesions prior to cosmetic treatment. Lasers Surg. Med. 49:819-826, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

8 Article Locally Recurrent Lentigo Maligna and Lentigo Maligna Melanoma: Characteristics and Time to Recurrence After Surgery. 2017

Connolly, Karen L / Hibler, Brian P / Lee, Erica H / Rossi, Anthony M / Busam, Klaus J / Nehal, Kishwer S. ·*Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York; †Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. ·Dermatol Surg · Pubmed #28296789.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Various studies have reported local recurrence (LR) rates after surgical treatment of lentigo maligna (LM) and lentigo maligna melanoma (LMM). However, the time to LR of LM/LMM is not currently known, as few studies report time to LR and have long-term follow-up. OBJECTIVE: To define time to LR in LM/LMM after surgical treatment, and to describe features of observed LR. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective single-center study of consecutive patients presenting with locally recurrent LM/LMM. RESULTS: Six hundred forty-nine cases of LM/LMM were reviewed; 29 (21 LM, and 8 LMM) of 41 locally recurrent cases had original histology reports and were included. The mean time to LR was 57.5 months (range 7-194). For cases presenting as primary LM, LR was also in situ in 14/21 (67%) of cases. Seven of 21 LM recurred as LMM. Of the 8 primary LMM, 3/8 (37.5%) presented with subsequent LMM and all were slightly deeper on re-excision. CONCLUSION: The mean time to LR of LM/LMM is at least 57.5 months, underscoring the importance of long-term follow-up. Seven of 21 LM recurred as invasive disease, but the lack of development of LMM from LM in most recurrent cases confirms LM is slowly progressive.

9 Article Concordance of handheld reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) with histopathology in the diagnosis of lentigo maligna (LM): A prospective study. 2016

Menge, Tyler D / Hibler, Brian P / Cordova, Miguel A / Nehal, Kishwer S / Rossi, Anthony M. ·University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. Electronic address: rossia@mskcc.org. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #26826051.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) provides real-time noninvasive imaging of cell structure and may be useful in diagnosing lentigo maligna (LM). Few studies have compared performance of RCM with histopathology in diagnosing LM, and specific features influencing RCM interpretation are not well described. OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine concordance rate between RCM and histopathology in the evaluation of suspected LM and to identify factors that may obscure diagnosis. METHODS: We designed a prospective study involving 17 participants seen for evaluation at a large tertiary referral center. Cases included primary lesions and possible recurrent and/or previously treated lesions. A total of 63 clinically equivocal sites were assessed by RCM and histopathology. RESULTS: RCM and histopathology interpretations were concordant in 56 of 63 sites (89%). There were no false-negative and 7 false-positive results using RCM (sensitivity 100%, specificity 71%, positive predictive value 85%, negative predictive value 100%). Features suggestive of LM in the false-positive group included the presence of numerous hyperreflectile large cells at the dermoepidermal junction and follicular localization of these cells. LIMITATIONS: A larger test set is needed to more reliably distinguish LM from benign lesions using RCM and to improve specificity. CONCLUSION: RCM shows excellent sensitivity for detecting LM although features of benign macules on a background of actinically damaged skin can obscure diagnosis and limit its specificity.

10 Article Radiation therapy for synchronous basal cell carcinoma and lentigo maligna of the nose: Response assessment by clinical examination and reflectance confocal microscopy. 2015

Hibler, Brian P / Connolly, Karen L / Cordova, Miguel / Nehal, Kishwer S / Rossi, Anthony M / Barker, Christopher A. ·Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York; Multidisciplinary Skin Cancer Management Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Multidisciplinary Skin Cancer Management Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York; Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. Electronic address: barkerc@mskcc.org. ·Pract Radiat Oncol · Pubmed #26142026.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Minor Intraoperative real-time reflectance confocal microscopy for guiding surgical margins of lentigo maligna melanoma. 2015

Hibler, Brian P / Cordova, Miguel / Wong, Richard J / Rossi, Anthony M. ·Department of Dermatology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York Department of Dermatology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. ·Dermatol Surg · Pubmed #26050216.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --