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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Rosanna Satta
Based on 5 articles published since 2009
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, R. Satta wrote the following 5 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Spitz/Reed nevi: proposal of management recommendations by the Dermoscopy Study Group of the Italian Society of Dermatology (SIDeMaST). 2014

Broganelli, P / Titli, S / Lallas, A / Alaibac M Annetta, A / Battarra, V / Brunetti, B / Castagno, I / Cavicchini, S / Ferrari, A / Ghigliotti, G / Landi, C / Manganoni, A / Moscarella, E / Pellacani, G / Pizzichetta, M A / Rosina, P / Rubegni, P / Satta, R / Scalvenzi, M / Stanganelli, I / Stinco, G / Zalaudek, I / Zampieri, P / Argenziano, G / Anonymous1410806. ·Department of Oncology and Hematology, Section of Dermatology, City of Health and Science Hospital of Turin, Turin, Italy - paolobroganelli@inwind.it. ·G Ital Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #25213387.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Article Dermoscopy and confocal microscopy for metachronous multiple melanomas: morphological, clinical, and molecular correlations. 2018

Colombino, Maria / Paliogiannis, Panagiotis / Pagliarello, Calogero / Cossu, Antonio / Lissia, Amelia / Satta, Rosanna / Mazzoni, Laura / Magi, Serena / Sini, Maria Cristina / Manca, Antonella / Casula, Milena / Doneddu, Valentina / Palmieri, Giuseppe / Stanganelli, Ignazio. ·Unit of Cancer Genetics, Institute of Biomolecular Chemistry (ICB), National Research Council (CNR), Traversa La Crucca 3, 07100, Sassari, Italy. · Experimental Pathology and Oncology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Sassari, Via Padre Manzella 4, 07100, Sassari, Italy. · Dermatologic Unit, University of Parma, 43121 Parma, Italy. · Anatomic Pathology Unit, Department of Surgical, Microsurgical and Medical Sciences, University of Sassari, Via Matteotti 64, 07100, Sassari, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Sassari, V.le San Pietro 43, 07100, Sassari, Italy. · Skin Cancer Unit, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST), Meldola, FC, Italy. · Experimental Pathology and Oncology, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Sassari, Via Padre Manzella 4, 07100, Sassari, Italy, Skin Cancer Unit, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori (IRST), Meldola, FC, Italy. ·Eur J Dermatol · Pubmed #29180316.

ABSTRACT: Cutaneous melanoma is one of the most frequent malignancies of the skin in Caucasian populations. Patients who develop cutaneous melanoma are at increased risk of developing a second primary melanoma. The estimated incidence of multiple primary melanoma (MPM) ranges from 1.2% to 8.2% of cases, with a high preponderance of melanomas occurring metachronously. The aim of this study was to describe dermoscopic, microscopic, clinical, and molecular correlations between first and subsequent melanomas in patients with metachronous MPMs. Twenty-four paired melanomas from 12 MPM patients were evaluated for architectural characteristics based on dermoscopy and confocal microscopy, as well as for mutations in BRAF and NRAS genes by Sanger-based sequencing analysis. Specific scores used for classifying features of dermoscopy (global pattern; 7-point check list; ABCD Stolz score) and confocal microscopy (Segura and Pellacani) were compared with genetic and histological data. Consistency in dermoscopic patterns between the primary and subsequent cutaneous melanomas were observed in about two thirds of cases, whereas concordant features based on confocal microscopy were found in only about two fifths of cases. The majority of patients (7/12; 58%) presented consistent BRAF/NRAS mutation patterns between first and subsequent primary melanomas. A significant association between BRAF mutations and Pellacani score was evident. Similarities between the index melanoma and subsequent cutaneous melanomas were observed with regards to dermoscopic features and, to a much less extent, confocal microscopy findings. Our data further indicate that the Pellacani score may be used to predict BRAF mutations.

3 Article Second primary melanoma on a patient undergoing vemurafenib therapy. A case report. 2017

Onnis, Giuliana / Palmieri, Giuseppe / Montesu, Maria Antonietta / Satta, Rosanna. ·Department of Surgical, Microsurgical and Medical Sciences, Dermatology Unit, University of Sassari, ICB-CNR, Sassari, Italy. · Unit of Cancer Genetics, ICB-CNR, Sassari, Italy. ·Int J Dermatol · Pubmed #28345133.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Several side effects have been reported during treatment with vemurafenib, including multiple benign lesions and, less frequently, atypical melanocytic proliferations and second primary melanomas. METHODS: A 46-year-old man undergoing vemurafenib therapy for metastatic malignant melanoma was clinically and dermoscopically monitored using total-body mapping. RESULTS: During BRAF inhibitor (BRAFi) treatment, the patient developed atypical melanocytic lesions and particularly secondary primary melanoma. CONCLUSIONS: Secondary melanomas are usually diagnosed during the early disease stage, and no case of advanced melanomas is reported in the literature, mostly due to careful surveillance in BRAFi-treated patients.

4 Article Both short-term and long-term dermoscopy monitoring is useful in detecting melanoma in patients with multiple atypical nevi. 2017

Moscarella, E / Tion, I / Zalaudek, I / Lallas, A / Kyrgidis, A / Longo, C / Lombardi, M / Raucci, M / Satta, R / Alfano, R / Argenziano, G. ·Dermatology and Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Unit of Dermatology, Department of Surgical, Microsurgical and Medical Sciences, University of Sassari, Sassari, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. · Department of Anesthesiology, Surgery and Emergency, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy. · Dermatology Unit, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #27422807.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Digital dermoscopy monitoring (DDM) is an effective strategy for melanoma detection. Two methods are currently employed. Short-term follow-up (STFU) for the evaluation of single, atypical lesions to detect subtle changes over a short period of time (3-6 months). Long-term follow-up (LTFU) is recommended for patients with multiple nevi. Although a study demonstrated that STFU improves the patients' compliance for DDM, little remains known about the impact and reliability of STFU in this setting. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this retrospective, observational study was to evaluate the impact and reliability of a schedule combining STFU and LTFU in patients with multiple atypical nevi. METHODS: We searched our database for all cases of patients with multiple atypical nevi occurring between 2006 and 2014. RESULTS: A total of 3823 lesions in 541 patients were dermoscopically monitored (mean number = 7 lesions per patient; median = 6 lesions; range, 2-51). In all, 264 (6.9%) lesions in 184 (34.4%) patients were excised (mean of 0.5 lesions per patient). In total, 197 (74.6%) lesions were excised at follow-up, with melanomas representing 30.5% of lesions excised after follow-up. A total of 30 (33.3%) melanomas were excised at baseline, 23 (25.6%) after STFU and 37 (41.1%) after LTFU. There was no difference in the number of in situ melanomas detected at baseline with those detected after follow-up. The mean Breslow thickness of melanomas detected at baseline was higher than those detected after STFU (P = 0.038) and LTFU (P = 0.055). CONCLUSIONS: Our study confirm that digital dermoscopy follow-up is a valid management strategy for patients with multiple atypical nevi, with short-term monitoring playing an effective role also in this setting of patients.

5 Article Melanoma detection in Italian pigmented lesion clinics. 2014

Argenziano, G / Moscarella, E / Annetta, A / Battarra, V C / Brunetti, B / Buligan, C / Cantisani, C / Capizzi, R / Carbone, A / Carlino, A / Corsetti, V / Damiano, A / De Salvo, V / De Simone, P / Di Caterino, P / Fargnoli, M C / Ferrari, A / Fossati, B / Frascione, P / Ghigliotti, G / González Inchaurraga, M A / Guerriero, C / Landi, C / Mazzoni, L / Mirizzi, S / Palazzo, G / Pedretti, A / Peris, K / Piemonte, P / Rossi, A / Satta, R / Savoia, F / Scalvenzi, M / Stanganelli, I / Stinco, G / Zampieri, P / Zalaudek, I. ·Skin Cancer Unit Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova IRCCS Reggio Emilia, Italy - g.argenziano@gmail.com. ·G Ital Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #24819635.

ABSTRACT: AIM: Accuracy in melanoma detection is important to recognize early curable melanomas and to minimize the unnecessary excision of benign lesions. The aim of this paper was to evaluate melanoma screening accuracy of Italian pigmented lesion clinics in terms of number needed to excise (NNE), melanoma thickness, and number of melanomas diagnosed during patient follow-up. METHODS: Information on all skin tumors excised in 2011 were extracted from the databases of the participating centers. Information whether the lesion was excised at the baseline examination or during patient follow-up was recorded, as well as the overall number of patients examined in each center in 2011. RESULTS: After e-mail solicitation, 22 of 40 centers agreed to participate. A total of 8229 excised lesions were collected. The overall number of examined patients was 86.564, thus 9.5% of screened patients had a lesion removed. Of the excised lesions, 866 were diagnosed as melanoma (1% of examined patients) and 5311 (88.9%) were melanocytic nevi. Three NNE were calculated giving values of 7.9 excised lesions to find 1 melanoma, 7.1 melanocytic lesions to find 1 melanoma, and 3.7 lesions to find 1 skin malignancy. The median melanoma thickness was 0.6 mm, with only 15.1% of melanomas ≥ 1 mm of thickness. Melanomas detected over time were 96 (11.1%; mean thickness, 0.3 mm), with 15.6% of lesions excised after short-term follow-up and 84.4% after long-term follow-up. CONCLUSION: The NNE values comparable to those achieved in specialized clinical settings and the high number of early melanomas diagnosed at the baseline examination or during patient follow-up indicate a high level of accuracy in melanoma screening achieved by Italian pigmented lesion clinics.