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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Michael G. Smylie
Based on 19 articles published since 2009
(Why 19 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Michael Smylie wrote the following 19 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Management of malignant melanoma: best practices. 2009

Smylie, Michael / Claveau, Joël / Alanen, Kenneth / Taillefer, Raymond / George, Ralph / Wong, Ralph / Mason, Warren P / Anonymous4010629. ·Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB, Canada. michaels@cancerboard.ab.ca ·J Cutan Med Surg · Pubmed #19459245.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Melanoma is a commonly occurring cancer in Canada, with an estimated age-standardized incidence of 10 to 13 per 100,000. An estimated 4,300 new cases were diagnosed, and there were 800 reported deaths in 2005. OBJECTIVE AND CONCLUSION: The Canadian Expert Panel on Malignant Melanoma has developed best practices to improve the management of malignant melanoma. Sections include recommendations on primary diagnosis, dermatopathologic assessment, and reporting; use of preoperative lymphoscintigraphy and an intraoperative gamma probe to map and biopsy the sentinel lymph node; indications for surgical resection, sentinel node biopsy, and surgery for advance disease; use of interferon-alpha adjuvant therapy and treatment options for stage IV disease; and management of central nervous system metastases.

2 Clinical Trial Nivolumab plus ipilimumab or nivolumab alone versus ipilimumab alone in advanced melanoma (CheckMate 067): 4-year outcomes of a multicentre, randomised, phase 3 trial. 2018

Hodi, Frank Stephen / Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna / Gonzalez, Rene / Grob, Jean-Jacques / Rutkowski, Piotr / Cowey, Charles Lance / Lao, Christopher D / Schadendorf, Dirk / Wagstaff, John / Dummer, Reinhard / Ferrucci, Pier Francesco / Smylie, Michael / Hill, Andrew / Hogg, David / Marquez-Rodas, Ivan / Jiang, Joel / Rizzo, Jasmine / Larkin, James / Wolchok, Jedd D. ·Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: stephen_hodi@dfci.harvard.edu. · Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, Padua, Italy. · University of Colorado Cancer Center, Denver, CO, USA. · Aix-Marseille University and APHM Hospital CHU Timone, Marseille, France. · Maria Skłodowska-Curie Institute - Oncology Centre, Warsaw, Poland. · Texas Oncology-Baylor Charles A Sammons Cancer Center, Dallas, TX, USA. · Department of Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of Essen, Essen, Germany; German Cancer Consortium, Heidelberg, Germany. · The College of Medicine, Swansea University, Swansea, UK. · Department of Dermatology, Universitäts Spital, Zürich, Switzerland. · European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB, Canada. · Tasman Oncology Research, Southport, QLD, Australia. · Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada. · General University Hospital Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain. · Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ, USA. · The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA; Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA. ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #30361170.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Previously reported results from the phase 3 CheckMate 067 trial showed a significant improvement in objective responses, progression-free survival, and overall survival with nivolumab plus ipilimumab or nivolumab alone compared with ipilimumab alone in patients with advanced melanoma. The aim of this report is to provide 4-year updated efficacy and safety data from this study. METHODS: In this phase 3 trial, eligible patients were aged 18 years or older with previously untreated, unresectable, stage III or stage IV melanoma, known BRAF FINDINGS: Between July 3, 2013, and March 31, 2014, 945 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to nivolumab plus ipilimumab (n=314), nivolumab (n=316), or ipilimumab (n=315). Median follow-up was 46·9 months (IQR 10·9-51·8) in the nivolumab plus ipilimumab group, 36·0 months (10·5-51·4) in the nivolumab group, and 18·6 months (7·6-49·5) in the ipilimumab group. At a minimum follow-up of 48 months from the date that the final patient was enrolled and randomised, median overall survival was not reached (95% CI 38·2-not reached) in the nivolumab plus ipilimumab group, 36·9 months (28·3-not reached) in the nivolumab group, and 19·9 months (16·9-24·6) in the ipilimumab group. The hazard ratio for death for the combination versus ipilimumab was 0·54 (95% CI 0·44-0·67; p<0·0001) and for nivolumab versus ipilimumab was 0·65 (0·53-0·79; p<0·0001). Median progression-free survival was 11·5 months (95% CI 8·7-19·3) in the nivolumab plus ipilimumab group, 6·9 months (5·1-10·2) in the nivolumab group, and 2·9 months (2·8-3·2) in the ipilimumab group. The hazard ratio for progression-free survival for the combination versus ipilimumab was 0·42 (95% CI 0·35-0·51; p<0·0001) and for nivolumab versus ipilimumab was 0·53 (0·44-0·64; p<0·0001). Treatment-related grade 3-4 adverse events were reported in 185 (59%) of 313 patients who received nivolumab plus ipilimumab, 70 (22%) of 313 who received nivolumab, and 86 (28%) of 311 who received ipilimumab. The most common treatment-related grade 3 adverse events were diarrhoea in the nivolumab plus ipilimumab group (29 [9%] of 313) and in the nivolumab group (nine [3%] of 313) and colitis in the ipilimumab group (23 [7%] of 311); the most common grade 4 adverse event in all three groups was increased lipase (15 [5%] of 313 in the combination group, ten [3%] of 313 in the nivolumab group, and four [1%] of 311 in the ipilimumab group). Serious adverse events were not analysed for the 4-year follow-up. In total for the study, there were four treatment-related deaths: two in the nivolumab plus ipilimumab group (one cardiomyopathy and one liver necrosis), one in the nivolumab group (neutropenia), and one in the ipilimumab group (colon perforation). No additional treatment-related deaths have occurred since the previous (3-year) analysis. INTERPRETATION: The results of this analysis at 4 years of follow-up show that a durable, sustained survival benefit can be achieved with first-line nivolumab plus ipilimumab or nivolumab alone in patients with advanced melanoma. FUNDING: Bristol-Myers Squibb.

3 Clinical Trial Overall Survival in Patients With Advanced Melanoma Who Received Nivolumab Versus Investigator's Choice Chemotherapy in CheckMate 037: A Randomized, Controlled, Open-Label Phase III Trial. 2018

Larkin, James / Minor, David / D'Angelo, Sandra / Neyns, Bart / Smylie, Michael / Miller, Wilson H / Gutzmer, Ralf / Linette, Gerald / Chmielowski, Bartosz / Lao, Christopher D / Lorigan, Paul / Grossmann, Kenneth / Hassel, Jessica C / Sznol, Mario / Daud, Adil / Sosman, Jeffrey / Khushalani, Nikhil / Schadendorf, Dirk / Hoeller, Christoph / Walker, Dana / Kong, George / Horak, Christine / Weber, Jeffrey. ·James Larkin, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London · Paul Lorigan, The Christie National Health Service Foundation Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom · David Minor, California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute · Adil Daud, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco · Bartosz Chmielowski, University of California, Santa Monica, CA · Sandra D'Angelo, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Weill Cornell Medical College · Jeffrey Weber, Perlmutter Cancer Center at New York University-Langone Medical Center, New York · Nikhil Khushalani, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY · Gerald Linette, Washington University, St. Louis, MO · Christopher D. Lao, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI · Kenneth Grossmann, Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City, UT · Mario Sznol, Yale Comprehensive Cancer Center, New Haven, CT · Jeffrey Sosman, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL · Dana Walker, George Kong, and Christine Horak, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ · Bart Neyns, University Hospital, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium · Michael Smylie, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta · Wilson H. Miller Jr, Jewish General Hospital and Segal Cancer Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebc, Canada · Ralf Gutzmer, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover · Jessica C. Hassel, Nationale Centrum für Tumorerkrankungen Heidelberg, Heidelberg · Dirk Schadendorf, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany · and Christoph Hoeller, Medical University of Vienna, Wien, Austria. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #28671856.

ABSTRACT: Purpose Until recently, limited options existed for patients with advanced melanoma who experienced disease progression while receiving treatment with ipilimumab. Here, we report the coprimary overall survival (OS) end point of CheckMate 037, which has previously shown that nivolumab resulted in more patients achieving an objective response compared with chemotherapy regimens in ipilimumab-refractory patients with advanced melanoma. Patients and Methods Patients were stratified by programmed death-ligand 1 expression, BRAF status, and best prior cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 therapy response, then randomly assigned 2:1 to nivolumab 3 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks or investigator's choice chemotherapy (ICC; dacarbazine 1,000 mg/m

4 Clinical Trial Adjuvant Nivolumab versus Ipilimumab in Resected Stage III or IV Melanoma. 2017

Weber, Jeffrey / Mandala, Mario / Del Vecchio, Michele / Gogas, Helen J / Arance, Ana M / Cowey, C Lance / Dalle, Stéphane / Schenker, Michael / Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna / Marquez-Rodas, Ivan / Grob, Jean-Jacques / Butler, Marcus O / Middleton, Mark R / Maio, Michele / Atkinson, Victoria / Queirolo, Paola / Gonzalez, Rene / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Smylie, Michael / Meyer, Nicolas / Mortier, Laurent / Atkins, Michael B / Long, Georgina V / Bhatia, Shailender / Lebbé, Celeste / Rutkowski, Piotr / Yokota, Kenji / Yamazaki, Naoya / Kim, Tae M / de Pril, Veerle / Sabater, Javier / Qureshi, Anila / Larkin, James / Ascierto, Paolo A / Anonymous7111184. ·From New York University Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York (J.W.) · Papa Giovanni XXIII Cancer Center Hospital, Bergamo (M. Mandala), Medical Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Milan (M.D.V.), Oncology Institute of Veneto Istituti di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, Padua (V.C.-S.), Center for Immuno-Oncology, University Hospital of Siena, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Siena (M. Maio), Ospedale Policlinico San Martino, Genoa (P.Q.), and Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Pascale, Naples (P.A.A.) - all in Italy · National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens (H.J.G.) · Hospital Clinic de Barcelona, Barcelona (A.M.A.), and General University Hospital Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (I.M.-R.) - both in Spain · Texas Oncology-Baylor Cancer Center, Dallas (C.L.C.) · Hospices Civils de Lyon, Pierre Bénite (S.D.), Aix-Marseille University, Hospital de la Timone, Marseille (J.-J.G.), Institut Universitaire du Cancer de Toulouse and Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU), Toulouse (N.M.), Université Lille, INSERM Unité 1189, CHU Lille, Lille (L.M.), and Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Dermatology and Centres d'Investigation Clinique, INSERM Unité 976, Hôpital Saint Louis, Université Paris Diderot, Paris (C.L.) - all in France · Oncology Center Sf. Nectarie, Craiova, Romania (M. Schenker) · Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (M.O.B.), and Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (M. Smylie) - both in Canada · the Department of Oncology, University of Oxford, Oxford (M.R.M.), and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (J.L.) - both in the United Kingdom · Gallipoli Medical Research Foundation and University of Queensland, Queensland, VIC (V.A.), and Melanoma Institute Australia, University of Sydney, and Royal North Shore and Mater Hospitals, Sydney (G.V.L.) - all in Australia · University of Colorado, Denver (R.G.) · Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta (R.R.K.) · Georgetown-Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Washington DC (M.B.A.) · University of Washington, Seattle (S.B.) · Maria Sklodowska-Curie Institute-Oncology Center, Warsaw, Poland (P.R.) · Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (K.Y.), and the National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (N.Y.) - both in Japan · Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, South Korea (T.M.K.) · and Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ (V.P, J.S., A.Q.). ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #28891423.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Nivolumab and ipilimumab are immune checkpoint inhibitors that have been approved for the treatment of advanced melanoma. In the United States, ipilimumab has also been approved as adjuvant therapy for melanoma on the basis of recurrence-free and overall survival rates that were higher than those with placebo in a phase 3 trial. We wanted to determine the efficacy of nivolumab versus ipilimumab for adjuvant therapy in patients with resected advanced melanoma. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, phase 3 trial, we randomly assigned 906 patients (≥15 years of age) who were undergoing complete resection of stage IIIB, IIIC, or IV melanoma to receive an intravenous infusion of either nivolumab at a dose of 3 mg per kilogram of body weight every 2 weeks (453 patients) or ipilimumab at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram every 3 weeks for four doses and then every 12 weeks (453 patients). The patients were treated for a period of up to 1 year or until disease recurrence, a report of unacceptable toxic effects, or withdrawal of consent. The primary end point was recurrence-free survival in the intention-to-treat population. RESULTS: At a minimum follow-up of 18 months, the 12-month rate of recurrence-free survival was 70.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 66.1 to 74.5) in the nivolumab group and 60.8% (95% CI, 56.0 to 65.2) in the ipilimumab group (hazard ratio for disease recurrence or death, 0.65; 97.56% CI, 0.51 to 0.83; P<0.001). Treatment-related grade 3 or 4 adverse events were reported in 14.4% of the patients in the nivolumab group and in 45.9% of those in the ipilimumab group; treatment was discontinued because of any adverse event in 9.7% and 42.6% of the patients, respectively. Two deaths (0.4%) related to toxic effects were reported in the ipilimumab group more than 100 days after treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients undergoing resection of stage IIIB, IIIC, or IV melanoma, adjuvant therapy with nivolumab resulted in significantly longer recurrence-free survival and a lower rate of grade 3 or 4 adverse events than adjuvant therapy with ipilimumab. (Funded by Bristol-Myers Squibb and Ono Pharmaceutical; CheckMate 238 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02388906 ; Eudra-CT number, 2014-002351-26 .).

5 Clinical Trial Overall Survival with Combined Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Advanced Melanoma. 2017

Wolchok, Jedd D / Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna / Gonzalez, Rene / Rutkowski, Piotr / Grob, Jean-Jacques / Cowey, C Lance / Lao, Christopher D / Wagstaff, John / Schadendorf, Dirk / Ferrucci, Pier F / Smylie, Michael / Dummer, Reinhard / Hill, Andrew / Hogg, David / Haanen, John / Carlino, Matteo S / Bechter, Oliver / Maio, Michele / Marquez-Rodas, Ivan / Guidoboni, Massimo / McArthur, Grant / Lebbé, Celeste / Ascierto, Paolo A / Long, Georgina V / Cebon, Jonathan / Sosman, Jeffrey / Postow, Michael A / Callahan, Margaret K / Walker, Dana / Rollin, Linda / Bhore, Rafia / Hodi, F Stephen / Larkin, James. ·From the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Weill Cornell Medical College, New York (J.D.W., M.A.P., M.K.C.) · Oncology Institute of Veneto Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS), Padua (V.C.-S.), European Institute of Oncology, Milan (P.F.F.), Center for Immuno-Oncology, University Hospital of Siena, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Siena (M.M.), the Immunotherapy and Somatic Cell Therapy Unit, IRCCS Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Meldola (M.G.), and Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Pascale, Naples (P.A.A.) - all in Italy · University of Colorado, Denver (R.G.) · Maria Sklodowska-Curie Institute-Oncology Center, Warsaw, Poland (P.R.) · Aix-Marseille University, Hôpital de la Timone, Marseille (J.-J.G.), and Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Dermatology and Centres d'Investigation Clinique, INSERM Unité 976, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Université Paris Diderot, Paris (C.L.) - both in France · Texas Oncology-Baylor Cancer Center, Dallas (C.L.C.) · University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (C.D.L.) · the College of Medicine, Swansea University, Swansea (J.W.), and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (J.L.) - both in the United Kingdom · the Department of Dermatology, University of Essen, Essen, and the German Cancer Consortium, Heidelberg - both in Germany (D.S.) · Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (M.S.), and Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto (D.H.) - both in Canada · Universitäts Spital, Zurich, Switzerland (R.D.) · Tasman Oncology Research, Southport Gold Coast, QLD (A.H.), Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Melanoma Institute Australia, University of Sydney (M.S.C.), and Melanoma Institute Australia, University of Sydney, and Royal North Shore and Mater Hospitals (G.V.L.), Sydney, and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre (G.M.) and the Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute, University of Melbourne (J.C.), Melbourne, VIC - all in Australia · Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (J.H.) · University Hospitals Leuven, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium (O.B.) · General University Hospital Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (I.M.-R.) · Northwestern University, Chicago (J.S.) · Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ (D.W., L.R., R.B.) · and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston (F.S.H.). ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #28889792.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Nivolumab combined with ipilimumab resulted in longer progression-free survival and a higher objective response rate than ipilimumab alone in a phase 3 trial involving patients with advanced melanoma. We now report 3-year overall survival outcomes in this trial. METHODS: We randomly assigned, in a 1:1:1 ratio, patients with previously untreated advanced melanoma to receive nivolumab at a dose of 1 mg per kilogram of body weight plus ipilimumab at a dose of 3 mg per kilogram every 3 weeks for four doses, followed by nivolumab at a dose of 3 mg per kilogram every 2 weeks; nivolumab at a dose of 3 mg per kilogram every 2 weeks plus placebo; or ipilimumab at a dose of 3 mg per kilogram every 3 weeks for four doses plus placebo, until progression, the occurrence of unacceptable toxic effects, or withdrawal of consent. Randomization was stratified according to programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) status, BRAF mutation status, and metastasis stage. The two primary end points were progression-free survival and overall survival in the nivolumab-plus-ipilimumab group and in the nivolumab group versus the ipilimumab group. RESULTS: At a minimum follow-up of 36 months, the median overall survival had not been reached in the nivolumab-plus-ipilimumab group and was 37.6 months in the nivolumab group, as compared with 19.9 months in the ipilimumab group (hazard ratio for death with nivolumab plus ipilimumab vs. ipilimumab, 0.55 [P<0.001]; hazard ratio for death with nivolumab vs. ipilimumab, 0.65 [P<0.001]). The overall survival rate at 3 years was 58% in the nivolumab-plus-ipilimumab group and 52% in the nivolumab group, as compared with 34% in the ipilimumab group. The safety profile was unchanged from the initial report. Treatment-related adverse events of grade 3 or 4 occurred in 59% of the patients in the nivolumab-plus-ipilimumab group, in 21% of those in the nivolumab group, and in 28% of those in the ipilimumab group. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with advanced melanoma, significantly longer overall survival occurred with combination therapy with nivolumab plus ipilimumab or with nivolumab alone than with ipilimumab alone. (Funded by Bristol-Myers Squibb and others; CheckMate 067 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01844505 .).

6 Clinical Trial Health-related quality of life results from the phase III CheckMate 067 study. 2017

Schadendorf, Dirk / Larkin, James / Wolchok, Jedd / Hodi, F Stephen / Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna / Gonzalez, Rene / Rutkowski, Piotr / Grob, Jean-Jacques / Cowey, C Lance / Lao, Christopher / Wagstaff, John / Callahan, Margaret K / Postow, Michael A / Smylie, Michael / Ferrucci, Pier Francesco / Dummer, Reinhard / Hill, Andrew / Taylor, Fiona / Sabater, Javier / Walker, Dana / Kotapati, Srividya / Abernethy, Amy / Long, Georgina V. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Essen, Essen, Germany; German Cancer Consortium, Heidelberg, Germany. · Royal Marsden Hospital, London, UK. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA. · Istituto Oncologico Veneto, Veneto, Italy. · University of Colorado, Denver, CO, USA. · Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland. · Hospital de la Timone, Marseille, France. · Texas Oncology-Baylor Cancer Center, Dallas, TX, USA. · University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · The College of Medicine, Swansea University, Swansea, UK. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA; Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA. · Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milan, Italy. · University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Tasman Oncology Research, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · Adelphi Values, Boston, MA, USA. · Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ, USA. · Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA. · Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Royal North Shore and Mater Hospitals, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: georgina.long@sydney.edu.au. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #28651159.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Nivolumab, a monoclonal antibody of immune checkpoint programmed death 1 on T cells (PD-1), combined with ipilimumab, an immune checkpoint cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) inhibitor, as combination therapy on the one hand and nivolumab as monotherapy on the other, have both demonstrated improved efficacy compared with ipilimumab alone in the CheckMate 067 study. However, the combination resulted in a higher frequency of grade 3/4 adverse events (AEs), which could result in diminished health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Here we report analyses of HRQoL for patients with advanced melanoma in clinical trial CheckMate 067. PATIENTS AND METHODS: HRQoL was assessed at weeks 1 and 5 per 6-week cycle for the first 6 months, once every 6 weeks thereafter, and at two follow-up visits using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Care Core Quality of Life Questionnaire and the EuroQoL Five Dimensions Questionnaire. In addition to the randomised population, patient subgroups, including BRAF mutation status, partial or complete response, treatment-related AEs of grade 3/4, and those who discontinued due to any reason and due to an AE, were investigated. RESULTS: Nivolumab and ipilimumab combination and nivolumab alone both maintained HRQoL, and no clinically meaningful deterioration was observed over time compared with ipilimumab. In addition, similar results were observed across patient subgroups, and no clinically meaningful changes in HRQoL were observed during follow-up visits for patients who discontinued due to any cause. CONCLUSION: These results further support the clinical benefit of nivolumab monotherapy and nivolumab and ipilimumab combination therapy in patients with advanced melanoma. The finding that the difference in grade 3/4 AEs between the arms did not translate into clinically meaningful differences in the reported HRQoL may be relevant in the clinical setting. STUDY NUMBER: NCT01844505.

7 Clinical Trial Ipilimumab 10 mg/kg versus ipilimumab 3 mg/kg in patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma: a randomised, double-blind, multicentre, phase 3 trial. 2017

Ascierto, Paolo A / Del Vecchio, Michele / Robert, Caroline / Mackiewicz, Andrzej / Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna / Arance, Ana / Lebbé, Céleste / Bastholt, Lars / Hamid, Omid / Rutkowski, Piotr / McNeil, Catriona / Garbe, Claus / Loquai, Carmen / Dreno, Brigitte / Thomas, Luc / Grob, Jean-Jacques / Liszkay, Gabriella / Nyakas, Marta / Gutzmer, Ralf / Pikiel, Joanna / Grange, Florent / Hoeller, Christoph / Ferraresi, Virginia / Smylie, Michael / Schadendorf, Dirk / Mortier, Laurent / Svane, Inge Marie / Hennicken, Delphine / Qureshi, Anila / Maio, Michele. ·Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Pascale, Naples, Italy. Electronic address: paolo.ascierto@gmail.com. · Medical Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Milan, Italy. · Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus Grand Paris, Villejuif, France. · Department of Diagnostics and Cancer Immunology, Greater Poland Cancer Centre, Poznan Medical University, Poznan, Poland. · IOV-IRCCS, Melanoma Oncology Unit, Padova, Italy. · Hospital Clinic and Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi I Sunyer, Barcelona, Spain. · AP-HP Dermatology CIC Departments, Saint-Louis Hospital, INSERM U976, Université Paris Diderot, Paris, France. · Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. · The Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center, Warsaw, Poland. · Chris O'Brien Lifehouse and Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW, Australia; Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Eberhard Karls University, Tübingen, Germany. · University Medical Center, Mainz, Germany. · Department of Oncodermatology, INSERM Research Unit 892, Nantes University Hospital, Nantes, France. · Department of Dermatology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Pierre-Bénite, France. · Hospital de la Timone, Marseille, France. · National Institute of Oncology, Budapest, Hungary. · Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Medizinische Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Germany. · Wojewodzkie Centrum Oncologii, Gdańsk, Poland. · Department of Dermatology, Reims University Hospital, Reims, France. · Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Istituti Fisioterapici Ospitalieri, Rome, Italy. · Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB, Canada. · University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany. · Hôspital Claude Huriez, Lille, France. · Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark. · Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ, USA. · University Hospital of Siena, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Siena, Italy. ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #28359784.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A phase 2 trial suggested increased overall survival and increased incidence of treatment-related grade 3-4 adverse events with ipilimumab 10 mg/kg compared with ipilimumab 3 mg/kg in patients with advanced melanoma. We report a phase 3 trial comparing the benefit-risk profile of ipilimumab 10 mg/kg versus 3 mg/kg. METHODS: This randomised, double-blind, multicentre, phase 3 trial was done in 87 centres in 21 countries worldwide. Patients with untreated or previously treated unresectable stage III or IV melanoma, without previous treatment with BRAF inhibitors or immune checkpoint inhibitors, were randomly assigned (1:1) with an interactive voice response system by the permuted block method using block size 4 to ipilimumab 10 mg/kg or 3 mg/kg, administered by intravenous infusion for 90 min every 3 weeks for four doses. Patients were stratified by metastasis stage, previous treatment for metastatic melanoma, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status. The patients, investigators, and site staff were masked to treatment assignment. The primary endpoint was overall survival in the intention-to-treat population and safety was assessed in all patients who received at least one dose of study treatment. This study is completed and was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01515189. FINDINGS: Between Feb 29, and July 9, 2012, 727 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to ipilimumab 10 mg/kg (365 patients; 364 treated) or ipilimumab 3 mg/kg (362 patients; all treated). Median follow-up was 14·5 months (IQR 4·6-42·3) for the ipilimumab 10 mg/kg group and 11·2 months (4·9-29·4) for the ipilimumab 3 mg/kg group. Median overall survival was 15·7 months (95% CI 11·6-17·8) for ipilimumab 10 mg/kg compared with 11·5 months (9·9-13·3) for ipilimumab 3 mg/kg (hazard ratio 0·84, 95% CI 0·70-0·99; p=0·04). The most common grade 3-4 treatment-related adverse events were diarrhoea (37 [10%] of 364 patients in the 10 mg/kg group vs 21 [6%] of 362 patients in the 3 mg/kg group), colitis (19 [5%] vs nine [2%]), increased alanine aminotransferase (12 [3%] vs two [1%]), and hypophysitis (ten [3%] vs seven [2%]). Treatment-related serious adverse events were reported in 133 (37%) patients in the 10 mg/kg group and 66 (18%) patients in the 3 mg/kg group; four (1%) versus two (<1%) patients died from treatment-related adverse events. INTERPRETATION: In patients with advanced melanoma, ipilimumab 10 mg/kg resulted in significantly longer overall survival than did ipilimumab 3 mg/kg, but with increased treatment-related adverse events. Although the treatment landscape for advanced melanoma has changed since this study was initiated, the clinical use of ipilimumab in refractory patients with unmet medical needs could warrant further assessment. FUNDING: Bristol-Myers Squibb.

8 Clinical Trial Health-related quality of life with adjuvant ipilimumab versus placebo after complete resection of high-risk stage III melanoma (EORTC 18071): secondary outcomes of a multinational, randomised, double-blind, phase 3 trial. 2017

Coens, Corneel / Suciu, Stefan / Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna / Grob, Jean-Jacques / Dummer, Reinhard / Wolchok, Jedd D / Schmidt, Henrik / Hamid, Omid / Robert, Caroline / Ascierto, Paolo A / Richards, Jon M / Lebbé, Celeste / Ferraresi, Virginia / Smylie, Michael / Weber, Jeffrey S / Maio, Michele / Bottomley, Andrew / Kotapati, Srividya / de Pril, Veerle / Testori, Alessandro / Eggermont, Alexander M M. ·EORTC Headquarters, Brussels, Belgium. Electronic address: corneel.coens@eortc.be. · EORTC Headquarters, Brussels, Belgium. · IOV-IRCCS, Melanoma Oncology Unit, Padova, Italy. · Hôpital de la Timone, Marseille, France. · University of Zürich Hospital, Zürich, Switzerland. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · The Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus Grand Paris, Villejuif, France. · Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione "G. Pascale", Naples, Italy. · Oncology Specialists S C, Park Ridge, IL, USA. · Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris. · Istituti Fisioterapici Ospitalieri, Rome, Italy. · Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB, Canada. · H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA. · University Hospital of Siena, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Siena, Italy. · Bristol-Myers Squibb, Wallingford, CT, USA. · Bristol-Myers Squibb, Braine-l'Alleud, Belgium. · European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #28162999.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The EORTC 18071 phase 3 trial compared adjuvant ipilimumab with placebo in patients with stage III melanoma. The primary endpoint, recurrence-free survival, was significantly longer in the ipilimumab group than in the placebo group. Investigator-reported toxic effects of ipilimumab consisted mainly of skin, gastrointestinal, endocrine, and hepatic immune-related adverse events. Adjuvant treatment with ipilimumab in this setting was approved in October, 2014, by the US Food and Drug Administration based on the results of the primary outcome of this trial. Here, we report the results of the secondary endpoint, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), of this trial. METHODS: EORTC 18071 was a multinational, double-blind, randomised, phase 3 trial in patients with stage III cutaneous melanoma (excluding lymph node metastasis ≤1 mm or in-transit metastasis) in 19 countries worldwide. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1) centrally by an interactive voice response system, to receive either ipilimumab 10 mg/kg or placebo every 3 weeks for four doses, then every 3 months for up to 3 years. Using a minimisation technique, randomisation was stratified by disease stage and geographical region. HRQoL was assessed with the EORTC QLQ-C30 quality-of-life instrument at baseline, weeks 4, 7, 10, and 24, and every 12 weeks thereafter up to 2 years, irrespective of disease progression. Results were summarised by timepoint and in a longitudinal manner in the intention-to-treat population. Two summary scores were calculated for each HRQoL scale: the average score reported during induction (ipilimumab or placebo at a dose of 10 mg/kg, administered as one single dose at the start of days 1, 22, 43, and 64-ie, four doses in 3 weeks), and the average score reported after induction. A predefined threshold of a 10 point difference between arms was considered clinically relevant. The primary HRQoL endpoint was the global health scale, with the predefined hypothesis of no clinically relevant differences after induction between groups. This trial is registered with EudraCT, number 2007-001974-10, and ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00636168. FINDINGS: Between July 10, 2008, and Aug 1, 2011, 951 patients were randomly assigned to treatment: 475 in the ipilimumab group and 476 in the placebo group. Compliance with completing the HRQoL questionnaire was 893 (94%) of 951 patients at baseline, 693 (75%) of 924 at week 24, and 354 (51%) of 697 at week 108. Patient mean global health scores during (77·32 [SD 17·36] vs 72·96 [17·82]; p=0·00011) and after induction (76·48 [17·52] vs 72·32 [18·60]; p=0·00067) were statistically significantly different between groups but were not clinically relevant. Mean global health scores differed most between the groups at week 7 (77 [SD 19] in the placebo group vs 72 [22] in the ipilimumab group) and week 10 (77 [20] vs 70 [23]). Mean HRQoL scores differed by more than 10 points at week 10 between treatment groups for diarrhoea (7·67 [SD 17·05] for placebo vs 18·17 [28·35] for ipilimumab) and insomnia (15·17 [22·53] vs 25·60 [29·19]). INTERPRETATION: Despite increased toxicity, which led to treatment discontinuation for most patients during the induction phase of ipilimumab administration, overall HRQoL, as measured by the EORTC QLQ-C30, was similar between groups, as no clinically relevant differences (10 points or more) in global health status scores were observed during or after induction. Clinically relevant deterioration for some symptoms was observed at week 10, but after induction, no clinically relevant differences remained. Together with the primary analysis, results from this trial show that treatment with ipilimumab results in longer recurrence-free survival compared with that for treatment with placebo, with little impairment in HRQoL despite grade 3-4 investigator-reported adverse events. FUNDING: Bristol-Myers Squibb.

9 Clinical Trial Phase III Randomized Study of 4 Weeks of High-Dose Interferon-α-2b in Stage T2bNO, T3a-bNO, T4a-bNO, and T1-4N1a-2a (microscopic) Melanoma: A Trial of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-American College of Radiology Imaging Network Cancer Research Group (E1697). 2017

Agarwala, Sanjiv S / Lee, Sandra J / Yip, Waiki / Rao, Uma N / Tarhini, Ahmad A / Cohen, Gary I / Reintgen, Douglas S / Evans, Terry L / Brell, Joanna M / Albertini, Mark R / Atkins, Michael B / Dakhil, Shaker R / Conry, Robert M / Sosman, Jeffrey A / Flaherty, Lawrence E / Sondak, Vernon K / Carson, William E / Smylie, Michael G / Pappo, Alberto S / Kefford, Richard F / Kirkwood, John M. ·Sanjiv S. Agarwala, Saint Luke's University Hospital, Easton · Uma N. Rao, Ahmad A. Tarhini, Terry L. Evans, and John M. Kirkwood, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA · Sandra J. Lee, and Waiki Yip, Dana Farber Cancer Institute-ECOG-ACRIN Biostatistics Center, Boston, MA · Gary I. Cohen, Greater Baltimore Medical Center, Baltimore, MD · Douglas S. Reintgen, Lakeland Regional Cancer Center, Lakeland · Vernon K. Sondak, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL · Joanna M. Brell, MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland · William E. Carson, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, OH · Mark R. Albertini, University of Wisconsin Hospital, Madison, WI · Michael B. Atkins, Georgetown Medical Center, Washington, DC · Shaker R. Dakhil, Cancer Center of Kansas, Wichita, KS · Robert M. Conry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL · Jeffrey A. Sosman, Vanderbilt University, Nashville · Alberto S. Pappo, Saint Jude Children's Research Hospital Oncology, Memphis, TN · Lawrence E. Flaherty, Wayne State University/Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI · Michael G. Smylie, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Canada · and Richard F. Kefford, Sydney West Area Health Service, Westmead, Australia. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #28135150.

ABSTRACT: Purpose To test the efficacy of 4 weeks of intravenous (IV) induction with high-dose interferon (IFN) as part of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group regimen compared with observation (OBS) in patients with surgically resected intermediate-risk melanoma. Patients and Methods In this intergroup international trial, eligible patients had surgically resected cutaneous melanoma in the following categories: (1) T2bN0, (2) T3a-bN0, (3) T4a-bN0, and (4) T1-4N1a-2a (microscopic). Patients were randomly assigned to receive IFN α-2b at 20 MU/m

10 Clinical Trial Prolonged Survival in Stage III Melanoma with Ipilimumab Adjuvant Therapy. 2016

Eggermont, Alexander M M / Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna / Grob, Jean-Jacques / Dummer, Reinhard / Wolchok, Jedd D / Schmidt, Henrik / Hamid, Omid / Robert, Caroline / Ascierto, Paolo A / Richards, Jon M / Lebbé, Céleste / Ferraresi, Virginia / Smylie, Michael / Weber, Jeffrey S / Maio, Michele / Bastholt, Lars / Mortier, Laurent / Thomas, Luc / Tahir, Saad / Hauschild, Axel / Hassel, Jessica C / Hodi, F Stephen / Taitt, Corina / de Pril, Veerle / de Schaetzen, Gaetan / Suciu, Stefan / Testori, Alessandro. ·From Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus Grand Paris, Villejuif (A.M.M.E., C.R.), Aix-Marseille University, Hôpital de La Timone, Marseille (J.-J.G.), Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Hôpital Saint-Louis, Paris (C.L.), University Lille, INSERM Unité-1189, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Lille, Service de Dermatologie, Lille (L.M.), and CHU Lyon, Lyon (L.T.) - all in France · the Oncology Institute of Veneto-Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, Padua (V.C.-S.), Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione G. Pascale, Naples (P.A.A.), Istituti Fisioterapici Ospitalieri, Rome (V.F.), University Hospital of Siena, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Siena (M.M.), and the European Institute of Oncology, Milan (A.T.) - all in Italy · University of Zurich Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland (R.D.) · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (J.D.W.) · Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (H.S.), and Odense University Hospital, Odense (L.B.) - both in Denmark · the Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Los Angeles (O.H.) · Oncology Specialists, Park Ridge, IL (J.M.R.) · Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB, Canada (M.S.) · H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (J.S.W.) · Broomfield Hospital, Chelmsford, United Kingdom (S.T.) · Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (A.H.), and University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (J.C.H.) - both in Germany · Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston (F.S.H.) · Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ (C.T., V.P.) · and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, Brussels (G.S., S.S.). ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #27717298.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: On the basis of data from a phase 2 trial that compared the checkpoint inhibitor ipilimumab at doses of 0.3 mg, 3 mg, and 10 mg per kilogram of body weight in patients with advanced melanoma, this phase 3 trial evaluated ipilimumab at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram in patients who had undergone complete resection of stage III melanoma. METHODS: After patients had undergone complete resection of stage III cutaneous melanoma, we randomly assigned them to receive ipilimumab at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram (475 patients) or placebo (476) every 3 weeks for four doses, then every 3 months for up to 3 years or until disease recurrence or an unacceptable level of toxic effects occurred. Recurrence-free survival was the primary end point. Secondary end points included overall survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and safety. RESULTS: At a median follow-up of 5.3 years, the 5-year rate of recurrence-free survival was 40.8% in the ipilimumab group, as compared with 30.3% in the placebo group (hazard ratio for recurrence or death, 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.64 to 0.89; P<0.001). The rate of overall survival at 5 years was 65.4% in the ipilimumab group, as compared with 54.4% in the placebo group (hazard ratio for death, 0.72; 95.1% CI, 0.58 to 0.88; P=0.001). The rate of distant metastasis-free survival at 5 years was 48.3% in the ipilimumab group, as compared with 38.9% in the placebo group (hazard ratio for death or distant metastasis, 0.76; 95.8% CI, 0.64 to 0.92; P=0.002). Adverse events of grade 3 or 4 occurred in 54.1% of the patients in the ipilimumab group and in 26.2% of those in the placebo group. Immune-related adverse events of grade 3 or 4 occurred in 41.6% of the patients in the ipilimumab group and in 2.7% of those in the placebo group. In the ipilimumab group, 5 patients (1.1%) died owing to immune-related adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: As adjuvant therapy for high-risk stage III melanoma, ipilimumab at a dose of 10 mg per kilogram resulted in significantly higher rates of recurrence-free survival, overall survival, and distant metastasis-free survival than placebo. There were more immune-related adverse events with ipilimumab than with placebo. (Funded by Bristol-Myers Squibb; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00636168 , and EudraCT number, 2007-001974-10 .).

11 Clinical Trial A phase 2 study of tremelimumab in patients with advanced uveal melanoma. 2015

Joshua, Anthony M / Monzon, Jose G / Mihalcioiu, Catalin / Hogg, David / Smylie, Michael / Cheng, Tina. ·aDepartment of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario bDepartment of Medical Oncology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary cDepartment of Medical Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta dDepartment of Medical Oncology, Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ·Melanoma Res · Pubmed #26050146.

ABSTRACT: Similar to cutaneous melanoma, several strategies of immune escape have been documented in uveal melanomas (UMs). We hypothesized that these cancers could respond to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4) inhibition with tremelimumab by potentiating T-cell activation. This was an open-label, multicentre phase 2 study in patients with advanced UM who had not received prior immunotherapy. Patient received tremelimumab at 15 mg/kg administered every 90 days for up to four cycles. The primary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS). Secondary endpoints were safety, durable response rate, objective response rate, duration of objective response, duration of complete response, and median overall survival (OS). Eleven patients, all with M1c disease, were enrolled with no responses observed. The median follow-up was 11 months (range 2-36 months). The median PFS was 2.9 months (95% confidence interval 2.8-3.0) and the 6-month PFS rate was 9.1%. The median OS was 12.8 months (95% confidence interval 3.8-19.7). Toxicities were consistent with CTLA-4 blockade and were manageable. Although the median OS of 12.8 months and the manageable toxicity profile of tremelimumab observed in this study seem promising, the modest 6-month PFS and the lack of responses observed resulted in the study being stopped due to futility at the first interim stage. To date, no systemic treatment has demonstrated a survival benefit in patients with advanced UM. The standard treatment for patients with advanced UM should be a clinical trial.

12 Clinical Trial Combined Nivolumab and Ipilimumab or Monotherapy in Untreated Melanoma. 2015

Larkin, James / Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna / Gonzalez, Rene / Grob, Jean Jacques / Cowey, C Lance / Lao, Christopher D / Schadendorf, Dirk / Dummer, Reinhard / Smylie, Michael / Rutkowski, Piotr / Ferrucci, Pier F / Hill, Andrew / Wagstaff, John / Carlino, Matteo S / Haanen, John B / Maio, Michele / Marquez-Rodas, Ivan / McArthur, Grant A / Ascierto, Paolo A / Long, Georgina V / Callahan, Margaret K / Postow, Michael A / Grossmann, Kenneth / Sznol, Mario / Dreno, Brigitte / Bastholt, Lars / Yang, Arvin / Rollin, Linda M / Horak, Christine / Hodi, F Stephen / Wolchok, Jedd D. ·From the Department of Medical Oncology, Royal Marsden Hospital, London (J.L.), and South West Wales Cancer Institute, Singleton Hospital, Swansea (J.W.) - both in the United Kingdom · Melanoma Oncology Unit, Veneto Region Oncology Research Institute, Padua (V.C.-S.), Oncology of Melanoma Unit, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (P.F.F.), University Hospital of Siena, Siena (M.M.), and Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione Pascale, Naples (P.A.A.) - all in Italy · Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado, Denver, Denver (R.G.) · Aix-Marseille University, Hôpital de La Timone, Assitance Publique-Hôpitaux de Marseille, Marseille (J.J.G.), and Hôtel Dieu Place Alexis Ricordeau, Nantes (B.D.) - both in France · Baylor Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center, Dallas (C.L.C.) · Departments of Internal Medicine and Dermatology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (C.D.L.) · Department of Dermatology, University of Essen, Essen, Germany (D.S.) · University of Zürich Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland (R.D.) · Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB, Canada (M. Smylie) · Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland (P.R.) · Tasman Oncology Research, Southport Gold Coast, QLD (A.H.), and Westmead and Blacktown Hospitals (M.S.C.) and Melanoma Institute Australia (M.S.C., G.V.L.), University of Sydney, and the Mater Hospital (G.V.L.), Sydney, and Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (G.A.M.) - all in Australia · Division of Medical Oncology, the Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (J.B.H.) · Servicio de Oncología Médica, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid (I.M.-R.) · Ludwig Center, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (M.K.C., M.A.P., J.D.W.) and Weill Cornell Medical College (M.K.C., M.A.P., J.D.W.) - both in New York · Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (K.G.) · Yale Cancer Center, Smilow Cancer Hospital of the Yale-New Haven Hospital, Yale University Sc ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #26027431.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Nivolumab (a programmed death 1 [PD-1] checkpoint inhibitor) and ipilimumab (a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 [CTLA-4] checkpoint inhibitor) have been shown to have complementary activity in metastatic melanoma. In this randomized, double-blind, phase 3 study, nivolumab alone or nivolumab plus ipilimumab was compared with ipilimumab alone in patients with metastatic melanoma. METHODS: We assigned, in a 1:1:1 ratio, 945 previously untreated patients with unresectable stage III or IV melanoma to nivolumab alone, nivolumab plus ipilimumab, or ipilimumab alone. Progression-free survival and overall survival were coprimary end points. Results regarding progression-free survival are presented here. RESULTS: The median progression-free survival was 11.5 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.9 to 16.7) with nivolumab plus ipilimumab, as compared with 2.9 months (95% CI, 2.8 to 3.4) with ipilimumab (hazard ratio for death or disease progression, 0.42; 99.5% CI, 0.31 to 0.57; P<0.001), and 6.9 months (95% CI, 4.3 to 9.5) with nivolumab (hazard ratio for the comparison with ipilimumab, 0.57; 99.5% CI, 0.43 to 0.76; P<0.001). In patients with tumors positive for the PD-1 ligand (PD-L1), the median progression-free survival was 14.0 months in the nivolumab-plus-ipilimumab group and in the nivolumab group, but in patients with PD-L1-negative tumors, progression-free survival was longer with the combination therapy than with nivolumab alone (11.2 months [95% CI, 8.0 to not reached] vs. 5.3 months [95% CI, 2.8 to 7.1]). Treatment-related adverse events of grade 3 or 4 occurred in 16.3% of the patients in the nivolumab group, 55.0% of those in the nivolumab-plus-ipilimumab group, and 27.3% of those in the ipilimumab group. CONCLUSIONS: Among previously untreated patients with metastatic melanoma, nivolumab alone or combined with ipilimumab resulted in significantly longer progression-free survival than ipilimumab alone. In patients with PD-L1-negative tumors, the combination of PD-1 and CTLA-4 blockade was more effective than either agent alone. (Funded by Bristol-Myers Squibb; CheckMate 067 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01844505.).

13 Clinical Trial Adjuvant ipilimumab versus placebo after complete resection of high-risk stage III melanoma (EORTC 18071): a randomised, double-blind, phase 3 trial. 2015

Eggermont, Alexander M M / Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna / Grob, Jean-Jacques / Dummer, Reinhard / Wolchok, Jedd D / Schmidt, Henrik / Hamid, Omid / Robert, Caroline / Ascierto, Paolo A / Richards, Jon M / Lebbé, Céleste / Ferraresi, Virginia / Smylie, Michael / Weber, Jeffrey S / Maio, Michele / Konto, Cyril / Hoos, Axel / de Pril, Veerle / Gurunath, Ravichandra Karra / de Schaetzen, Gaetan / Suciu, Stefan / Testori, Alessandro. ·Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus Grand Paris, Villejuif, France. Electronic address: alexander.eggermont@gustaveroussy.fr. · IOV-IRCCS, Melanoma Oncology Unit, Padova, Italy. · Aix-Marseille University, Hôpital de La Timone APHM, Marseille, France. · University of Zürich Hospital, Zürich, Switzerland. · Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · The Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus Grand Paris, Villejuif, France. · Istituto Nazionale Tumori Fondazione G Pascale, Naples, Italy. · Oncology Specialists SC, Park Ridge, IL, USA. · Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Dermatology and CIC Departments, Hôpital Saint Louis, University Paris 7, INSERM U976, France. · Istituti Fisioterapici Ospitalieri, Rome, Italy. · Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. · H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA. · University Hospital of Siena, Istituto Toscano Tumori, Siena, Italy. · Bristol-Myers Squibb, Wallingford, CT, USA. · Bristol-Myers Squibb, Braine-l'Alleud, Belgium. · EORTC Headquarters, Brussels, Belgium. · European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #25840693.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Ipilimumab is an approved treatment for patients with advanced melanoma. We aimed to assess ipilimumab as adjuvant therapy for patients with completely resected stage III melanoma at high risk of recurrence. METHODS: We did a double-blind, phase 3 trial in patients with stage III cutaneous melanoma (excluding lymph node metastasis ≤1 mm or in-transit metastasis) with adequate resection of lymph nodes (ie, the primary cutaneous melanoma must have been completely excised with adequate surgical margins) who had not received previous systemic therapy for melanoma from 91 hospitals located in 19 countries. Patients were randomly assigned (1:1), centrally by an interactive voice response system, to receive intravenous infusions of 10 mg/kg ipilimumab or placebo every 3 weeks for four doses, then every 3 months for up to 3 years. Using a minimisation technique, randomisation was stratified by disease stage and geographical region. The primary endpoint was recurrence-free survival, assessed by an independent review committee, and analysed by intention to treat. Enrollment is complete but the study is ongoing for follow-up for analysis of secondary endpoints. This trial is registered with EudraCT, number 2007-001974-10, and ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00636168. FINDINGS: Between July 10, 2008, and Aug 1, 2011, 951 patients were randomly assigned to ipilimumab (n=475) or placebo (n=476), all of whom were included in the intention-to-treat analyses. At a median follow-up of 2·74 years (IQR 2·28-3·22), there were 528 recurrence-free survival events (234 in the ipilimumab group vs 294 in the placebo group). Median recurrence-free survival was 26·1 months (95% CI 19·3-39·3) in the ipilimumab group versus 17·1 months (95% CI 13·4-21·6) in the placebo group (hazard ratio 0·75; 95% CI 0·64-0·90; p=0·0013); 3-year recurrence-free survival was 46·5% (95% CI 41·5-51·3) in the ipilimumab group versus 34·8% (30·1-39·5) in the placebo group. The most common grade 3-4 immune-related adverse events in the ipilimumab group were gastrointestinal (75 [16%] vs four [<1%] in the placebo group), hepatic (50 [11%] vs one [<1%]), and endocrine (40 [8%] vs none). Adverse events led to discontinuation of treatment in 245 (52%) of 471 patients who started ipilimumab (182 [39%] during the initial treatment period of four doses). Five patients (1%) died due to drug-related adverse events. Five (1%) participants died because of drug-related adverse events in the ipilimumab group; three patients died because of colitis (two with gastrointestinal perforation), one patient because of myocarditis, and one patient because of multiorgan failure with Guillain-Barré syndrome. INTERPRETATION: Adjuvant ipilimumab significantly improved recurrence-free survival for patients with completely resected high-risk stage III melanoma. The adverse event profile was consistent with that observed in advanced melanoma, but at higher incidences in particular for endocrinopathies. The risk-benefit ratio of adjuvant ipilimumab at this dose and schedule requires additional assessment based on distant metastasis-free survival and overall survival endpoints to define its definitive value. FUNDING: Bristol-Myers Squibb.

14 Clinical Trial Phase III randomized clinical trial comparing tremelimumab with standard-of-care chemotherapy in patients with advanced melanoma. 2013

Ribas, Antoni / Kefford, Richard / Marshall, Margaret A / Punt, Cornelis J A / Haanen, John B / Marmol, Maribel / Garbe, Claus / Gogas, Helen / Schachter, Jacob / Linette, Gerald / Lorigan, Paul / Kendra, Kari L / Maio, Michele / Trefzer, Uwe / Smylie, Michael / McArthur, Grant A / Dreno, Brigitte / Nathan, Paul D / Mackiewicz, Jacek / Kirkwood, John M / Gomez-Navarro, Jesus / Huang, Bo / Pavlov, Dmitri / Hauschild, Axel. ·Division of Hematology-Oncology, 11-934 Factor Building, UCLA Medical Center, 10833 Le Conte Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1782, USA. aribas@mednet.ucla.edu ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #23295794.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: In phase I/II trials, the cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen-4-blocking monoclonal antibody tremelimumab induced durable responses in a subset of patients with advanced melanoma. This phase III study evaluated overall survival (OS) and other safety and efficacy end points in patients with advanced melanoma treated with tremelimumab or standard-of-care chemotherapy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with treatment-naive, unresectable stage IIIc or IV melanoma were randomly assigned at a ratio of one to one to tremelimumab (15 mg/kg once every 90 days) or physician's choice of standard-of-care chemotherapy (temozolomide or dacarbazine). RESULTS: In all, 655 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned. The test statistic crossed the prespecified futility boundary at second interim analysis after 340 deaths, but survival follow-up continued. At final analysis with 534 events, median OS by intent to treat was 12.6 months (95% CI, 10.8 to 14.3) for tremelimumab and 10.7 months (95% CI, 9.36 to 11.96) for chemotherapy (hazard ratio, 0.88; P = .127). Objective response rates were similar in the two arms: 10.7% in the tremelimumab arm and 9.8% in the chemotherapy arm. However, response duration (measured from date of random assignment) was significantly longer after tremelimumab (35.8 v 13.7 months; P = .0011). Diarrhea, pruritus, and rash were the most common treatment-related adverse events in the tremelimumab arm; 7.4% had endocrine toxicities. Seven deaths in the tremelimumab arm and one in the chemotherapy arm were considered treatment related by either investigators or sponsor. CONCLUSION: This study failed to demonstrate a statistically significant survival advantage of treatment with tremelimumab over standard-of-care chemotherapy in first-line treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma.

15 Clinical Trial Interleukin-21 has activity in patients with metastatic melanoma: a phase II study. 2012

Petrella, Teresa M / Tozer, Richard / Belanger, Karl / Savage, Kerry J / Wong, Ralph / Smylie, Michael / Kamel-Reid, Suzanne / Tron, Victor / Chen, Bingshu E / Hunder, Naomi N / Hagerman, Linda / Walsh, Wendy / Eisenhauer, Elizabeth A. ·Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M4N 3M5. teresa.petrella@sunnybrook.ca ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #22915661.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: We report a multicenter phase II study of patients with metastatic melanoma (MM), evaluating the efficacy, toxicity, progression-free survival (PFS), immunogenicity, and biomarker profile of interleukin-21 (IL-21). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with no prior systemic therapy and with limited-disease MM were treated with IL-21 by using three different dosing regimens. Cohort 1 received 50 μg/kg per day by outpatient intravenous bolus injection for 5 days of each week during weeks 1, 3, and 5 of an 8-week cycle. Cohort 2 received 30 μg/kg per day on the same schedule, and cohort 3 received 50 μg/kg per day for 5 days of each week during weeks 1 and 3 of a 6-week cycle. RESULTS: Forty patients were enrolled: three in cohort 1, 30 in cohort 2, and seven in cohort 3. Two patients in cohort 1 and four in cohort 3 had dose-limiting toxicities; all other patients were treated with a dose of 30 μg/kg per day. Common adverse events were fatigue, rash, diarrhea, nausea, and myalgia. Overall response rate (ORR) was 22.5%, with nine confirmed partial responses (median response duration, 5.3 months); 16 had stable disease (median response duration, 5.3 months). ORR did not appear to depended on IL-21 receptor expression or BRAF mutation status. The median PFS was 4.3 months and median overall survival (OS) was 12.4 months (95% CI, 10.09 to 17.81 months). CONCLUSION: The ORR to IL-21 is 22.5% for first-line MM and warrants further investigation. The favorable PFS and OS suggest that this is an active agent in comparison to both historical NCIC Clinical Trials Group data and data from meta-analysis of Cooperative Group phase II trials.

16 Clinical Trial Ipilimumab monotherapy in patients with pretreated advanced melanoma: a randomised, double-blind, multicentre, phase 2, dose-ranging study. 2010

Wolchok, Jedd D / Neyns, Bart / Linette, Gerald / Negrier, Sylvie / Lutzky, Jose / Thomas, Luc / Waterfield, William / Schadendorf, Dirk / Smylie, Michael / Guthrie, Troy / Grob, Jean-Jacques / Chesney, Jason / Chin, Kevin / Chen, Kun / Hoos, Axel / O'Day, Steven J / Lebbé, Celeste. ·Ludwig Center for Cancer Immunotherapy, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10021, USA. wolchokj@mskcc.org ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #20004617.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Ipilimumab is a human monoclonal antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 and has shown promising activity in advanced melanoma. We aimed to ascertain the antitumour efficacy of ipilimumab in patients with advanced melanoma. METHODS: We undertook a randomised, double-blind, phase 2 trial in 66 centres from 12 countries. 217 patients with previously treated stage III (unresectable) or stage IV melanoma were randomly assigned a fixed dose of ipilimumab of either 10 mg/kg (n=73), 3 mg/kg (n=72), or 0.3 mg/kg (n=72) every 3 weeks for four cycles (induction) followed by maintenance therapy every 3 months. Randomisation was done with a permuted block procedure, stratified on the basis of type of previous treatment. The primary endpoint was best overall response rate (the proportion of patients with a complete or partial response, according to modified WHO criteria). Efficacy analyses were done by intention to treat, whereas safety analyses included patients who received at least one dose of ipilimumab. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00289640. FINDINGS: The best overall response rate was 11.1% (95% CI 4.9-20.7) for 10 mg/kg, 4.2% (0.9-11.7) for 3 mg/kg, and 0% (0.0-4.9) for 0.3 mg/kg (p=0.0015; trend test). Immune-related adverse events of any grade arose in 50 of 71, 46 of 71, and 19 of 72 patients at doses of 10 mg/kg, 3 mg/kg, and 0.3 mg/kg, respectively; the most common grade 3-4 adverse events were gastrointestinal immune-related events (11 in the 10 mg/kg group, two in the 3 mg/kg group, none in the 0.3 mg/kg group) and diarrhoea (ten in the 10 mg/kg group, one in the 3 mg/kg group, none in the 0.3 mg/kg group). INTERPRETATION: Ipilimumab elicited a dose-dependent effect on efficacy and safety measures in pretreated patients with advanced melanoma, lending support to further studies at a dose of 10 mg/kg. FUNDING: Bristol-Myers Squibb.

17 Article Five-Year Survival with Combined Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Advanced Melanoma. 2019

Larkin, James / Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna / Gonzalez, Rene / Grob, Jean-Jacques / Rutkowski, Piotr / Lao, Christopher D / Cowey, C Lance / Schadendorf, Dirk / Wagstaff, John / Dummer, Reinhard / Ferrucci, Pier F / Smylie, Michael / Hogg, David / Hill, Andrew / Márquez-Rodas, Ivan / Haanen, John / Guidoboni, Massimo / Maio, Michele / Schöffski, Patrick / Carlino, Matteo S / Lebbé, Céleste / McArthur, Grant / Ascierto, Paolo A / Daniels, Gregory A / Long, Georgina V / Bastholt, Lars / Rizzo, Jasmine I / Balogh, Agnes / Moshyk, Andriy / Hodi, F Stephen / Wolchok, Jedd D. ·From the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (J.L.), and the College of Medicine, Swansea University, Swansea (J.W.) - both in the United Kingdom · the Oncology Institute of Veneto IRCCS, Padua (V.C.-S.), the European Institute of Oncology, IRCCS, Milan (P.F.F.), Istituto Nazionale Tumori IRCCS Fondazione Pascale, Naples (P.A.A.), the Immunotherapy and Somatic Cell Therapy Unit, IRCCS Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Meldola (M.G.), and the Center for Immuno-Oncology, Medical Oncology and Immunotherapy, University Hospital, Siena (M.M.) - all in Italy · the University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora (R.G.) · Aix-Marseille University, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Marseille Hôpital Timone, Marseille (J.-J.G.), and Université de Paris, INSERM Unité 976, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris Dermatology and Centres d'Investigation Clinique, Saint Louis Hospital, Paris (C.L.) - both in France · the Maria Sklodowska-Curie Institute-Oncology Center, Warsaw, Poland (P.R.) · the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (C.D.L.) · Texas Oncology-Baylor Charles A. Sammons Cancer Center, Dallas (C.L.C.) · the Department of Dermatology, University of Essen, Essen, and the German Cancer Consortium, Heidelberg - both in Germany (D.S.) · Universitäts Spital, Zurich, Switzerland (R.D.) · Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (M.S.), and the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto (D.H.) - both in Canada · Tasman Oncology Research, Southport, QLD (A.H.), the Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Melanoma Institute Australia, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (M.S.C., G.V.L.), and the Royal North Shore and Mater Hospitals (G.V.L.), Sydney, and the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, VIC (G.M.) - all in Australia · General University Hospital Gregorio Marañon and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Oncología, Madrid (I.M.-R.) · the Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (J.H.) · the Leuven Cancer Institute, Department of General Medical Oncology, University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, Belgium (P.S.) · University of California San Diego Health-La Jolla Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla (G.A.D.) · the Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark (L.B.) · Bristol-Myers Squibb, Princeton, NJ (J.I.R., A.B., A.M.) · Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston (F.S.H.) · and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Weill Cornell Medical College, New York (J.D.W.). ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #31562797.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Nivolumab plus ipilimumab or nivolumab alone resulted in longer progression-free and overall survival than ipilimumab alone in a trial involving patients with advanced melanoma. We now report 5-year outcomes in the trial. METHODS: We randomly assigned patients with previously untreated advanced melanoma to receive one of the following regimens: nivolumab (at a dose of 1 mg per kilogram of body weight) plus ipilimumab (3 mg per kilogram) every 3 weeks for four doses, followed by nivolumab (3 mg per kilogram every 2 weeks); nivolumab (3 mg per kilogram every 2 weeks) plus ipilimumab-matched placebo; or ipilimumab (3 mg per kilogram every 3 weeks for four doses) plus nivolumab-matched placebo. The two primary end points were progression-free survival and overall survival in the nivolumab-plus-ipilimumab group and in the nivolumab group, as compared with the ipilimumab group. RESULTS: At a minimum follow-up of 60 months, the median overall survival was more than 60.0 months (median not reached) in the nivolumab-plus-ipilimumab group and 36.9 months in the nivolumab group, as compared with 19.9 months in the ipilimumab group (hazard ratio for death with nivolumab plus ipilimumab vs. ipilimumab, 0.52; hazard ratio for death with nivolumab vs. ipilimumab, 0.63). Overall survival at 5 years was 52% in the nivolumab-plus-ipilimumab group and 44% in the nivolumab group, as compared with 26% in the ipilimumab group. No sustained deterioration of health-related quality of life was observed during or after treatment with nivolumab plus ipilimumab or with nivolumab alone. No new late toxic effects were noted. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with advanced melanoma, sustained long-term overall survival at 5 years was observed in a greater percentage of patients who received nivolumab plus ipilimumab or nivolumab alone than in those who received ipilimumab alone, with no apparent loss of quality of life in the patients who received regimens containing nivolumab. (Funded by Bristol-Myers Squibb and others; CheckMate 067 ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01844505.).

18 Article An Association Between Glatiramer Acetate and Malignant Melanoma. 2016

Walker, John / Smylie, AnneLiese / Smylie, Michael. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. ·J Immunother · Pubmed #27404942.

ABSTRACT: A 43-year-old female receiving immunomodulatory therapy with glatiramer acetate (copaxone, GA) for relapsing, remitting multiple sclerosis was diagnosed with stage IIIB melanoma that recurred <7 months after resection and lymphadenectomy. In preparation for systemic therapy the patient discontinued GA, and shortly thereafter experienced spontaneous and complete clinical and radiographic resolution of her disease. The development and subsequent regression of melanoma in this patient may be due to the use and subsequent discontinuation of GA, and our discussion of the case includes the potential immunologic mechanisms that may provide an explanation for our findings. To the best of our knowledge, this case represents the first reported association between the immunomodulatory agent GA and malignant melanoma.

19 Article A population-based study of cutaneous melanoma in Alberta, Canada (1993-2002). 2010

Metelitsa, Andrei I / Dover, Douglas C / Smylie, Michael / de Gara, Chris J / Lauzon, Gilles J. ·Division of Dermatology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. andreim@ualberta.ca ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #20018405.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is evidence to suggest that melanoma incidence rates continue to rise in Canada and the United States. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to determine cutaneous melanoma trends from 1993 to 2002 in the province of Alberta and to compare the results to previously published provincial analyses for the decade of 1967-1976. METHODS: A retrospective study of 3479 patients with cutaneous melanoma diagnosed in Alberta between 1993 and 2002 was conducted. Estimates of relative survival compared the survival of melanoma patients with the Alberta population to derive the likelihood of surviving melanoma in the absence of other causes of death. Further comparison to published Canadian data was also conducted. RESULTS: For the period 1993-2002, the annual melanoma age-standardized incidence rates per 100,000 person-years ranged between 11.1 and 15.9 and between 9.8 and 14.1 among men and women, respectively. These rates are considerably higher than the previously reported (1976) highest Alberta incidence rates of 4.1 and 4.8 in men and women, respectively. The rates increased slightly for the period 1993-1999 with an average annual percentage change of +3.5%, but appeared to decrease for the interval 1999-2002 with an average annual percentage change of -6.4%. The majority of the tumors were less than 1.0 mm in thickness for both genders. On univariate analysis the following parameters were associated with decreasing patient survival: male gender, increasing age, head and neck tumors, Clark level of invasion, and Breslow tumor thickness. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that the strongest determinant of survival was Breslow tumor thickness. LIMITATIONS: Melanomas in-situ were not included in this study. CONCLUSIONS: Although melanoma incidence rates in Alberta are higher than previously reported, the incidence rates over the study period of 1993 to 2002 appear to have leveled and may in fact be declining over the past several years.