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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Dr. Vernon Sondak
Based on 143 articles published since 2009
(Why 143 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, V. Sondak wrote the following 143 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6
1 Guideline The Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer consensus statement on tumour immunotherapy for the treatment of cutaneous melanoma. 2013

Kaufman, Howard L / Kirkwood, John M / Hodi, F Stephen / Agarwala, Sanjiv / Amatruda, Thomas / Bines, Steven D / Clark, Joseph I / Curti, Brendan / Ernstoff, Marc S / Gajewski, Thomas / Gonzalez, Rene / Hyde, Laura Jane / Lawson, David / Lotze, Michael / Lutzky, Jose / Margolin, Kim / McDermott, David F / Morton, Donald / Pavlick, Anna / Richards, Jon M / Sharfman, William / Sondak, Vernon K / Sosman, Jeffrey / Steel, Susan / Tarhini, Ahmad / Thompson, John A / Titze, Jill / Urba, Walter / White, Richard / Atkins, Michael B. ·Rush University Cancer Center, 1725 West Harrison Street, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. ·Nat Rev Clin Oncol · Pubmed #23982524.

ABSTRACT: Immunotherapy is associated with durable clinical benefit in patients with melanoma. The goal of this article is to provide evidence-based consensus recommendations for the use of immunotherapy in the clinical management of patients with high-risk and advanced-stage melanoma in the USA. To achieve this goal, the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer sponsored a panel of melanoma experts--including physicians, nurses, and patient advocates--to develop a consensus for the clinical application of tumour immunotherapy for patients with melanoma. The Institute of Medicine clinical practice guidelines were used as a basis for this consensus development. A systematic literature search was performed for high-impact studies in English between 1992 and 2012 and was supplemented as appropriate by the panel. This consensus report focuses on issues related to patient selection, toxicity management, clinical end points and sequencing or combination of therapy. The literature review and consensus panel voting and discussion were used to generate recommendations for the use of immunotherapy in patients with melanoma, and to assess and rate the strength of the supporting evidence. From the peer-reviewed literature the consensus panel identified a role for interferon-α2b, pegylated-interferon-α2b, interleukin-2 (IL-2) and ipilimumab in the clinical management of melanoma. Expert recommendations for how to incorporate these agents into the therapeutic approach to melanoma are provided in this consensus statement. Tumour immunotherapy is a useful therapeutic strategy in the management of patients with melanoma and evidence-based consensus recommendations for clinical integration are provided and will be updated as warranted.

2 Editorial Resistance patterns to anti-PD-1 therapy in metastatic melanoma. 2016

Ozgun, Alpaslan / Sondak, Vernon K / Markowitz, Joseph. ·Department of Cutaneous Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, and Department of Oncologic Sciences, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA. · Department of Cutaneous Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, and Department of Oncologic Sciences, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA. joseph.markowitz@moffitt.org. ·Chin Clin Oncol · Pubmed #27701871.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Prediction is Difficult, Especially About the Future: Clinical Prognostic Tools in Melanoma. 2016

Sondak, Vernon K / Messina, Jane L. ·Department of Cutaneous Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA. vernon.sondak@moffitt.org. · Department of Oncologic Sciences, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA. vernon.sondak@moffitt.org. · Department of Cutaneous Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA. · Department of Oncologic Sciences, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA. · Department of Anatomic Pathology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA. · Departments of Pathology and Cell Biology, Dermatology and Oncologic Sciences, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #27198510.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Vitamin D and Melanoma: What Do We Tell Our Patients? 2016

Sondak, Vernon K / McIver, Bryan / Kanetsky, Peter A. ·Moffitt Cancer Center and University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL vernon.sondak@moffitt.org. · Moffitt Cancer Center and University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #27044934.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial The challenge of defining guidelines for sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with thin primary cutaneous melanomas. 2012

Gershenwald, Jeffrey E / Coit, Daniel G / Sondak, Vernon K / Thompson, John F. · ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #22868918.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Gender disparities in patients with melanoma: breaking the glass ceiling. 2012

Sondak, Vernon K / Swetter, Susan M / Berwick, Marianne A. · ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #22547593.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Individualizing follow-up for patients with early-stage melanoma. 2011

Sondak, Vernon K / Leachman, Sancy A. · ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #22067394.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial What is the significance of the in transit or interval sentinel node in melanoma? 2011

Zager, Jonathan S / Puleo, Christopher A / Sondak, Vernon K. · ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #21837524.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial How do we know when a lymph node dissection is adequate? 2011

Sondak, Vernon K. · ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #21537859.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Melanoma--an unlikely poster child for personalized cancer therapy. 2010

Smalley, Keiran S M / Sondak, Vernon K. · ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #20818849.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Refining the criteria for sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with thinner melanoma: a roadmap for the future. 2010

Messina, Jane L / Sondak, Vernon K. · ·Cancer · Pubmed #20091836.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Who is to blame for false-negative sentinel node biopsies in melanoma? 2010

Sondak, Vernon K / Zager, Jonathan S. · ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #19953329.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Nonsentinel node metastases in melanoma: do they reflect the biology of the tumor, the lymph node or the surgeon? : Editorial to Accompany Ghaferi et al., ASO-2009-03-0312.R1. 2009

Sondak, Vernon K. · ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #19669838.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Review A Comprehensive Approach to Pediatric Atypical Melanocytic Neoplasms with Comment on the Role of Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy. 2016

Sondak, Vernon K / Reed, Damon / Messina, Jane L. ·Moffitt Cancer Center and University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida. · Moffitt Cancer Center and University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida; All Children's Hospital, St. Petersburg, Florida. ·Crit Rev Oncog · Pubmed #27481000.

ABSTRACT: Pediatric melanoma has been rising in incidence in recent years and its management poses challenges that are frequently exacerbated by diagnostic uncertainty about the benign or malignant nature of many pediatric melanocytic neoplasms. Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB), originally described by Dr. Donald L. Morton, has been incorporated selectively into the management of pediatric atypical melanocytic neoplasms (AMNs), but its value and significance in this scenario have been controversial. Herein, we describe a comprehensive approach to the evaluation and management of pediatric AMNs that involves SLNB as a diagnostic, staging, and potentially therapeutic tool. We also describe our approach to educating patients and their families about the inherent uncertainties involved in diagnosing and predicting the ultimate behavior of pediatric melanocytic lesions. In addition, we stress the importance of long-term follow-up, as well as ongoing research to improve our understanding of the prognostic factors and histopathologic characteristics that may one day allow us to minimize or eliminate entirely this diagnostically uncertain category of skin lesions.

15 Review Improving patient outcomes to targeted therapies in melanoma. 2016

Eroglu, Zeynep / Smalley, Keiran S M / Sondak, Vernon K. ·a The Department of Cutaneous Oncology , The Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute , Tampa , FL , USA. · b The Department of Tumor Biology , The Moffitt Cancer Center & Research Institute , Tampa , FL , USA. ·Expert Rev Anticancer Ther · Pubmed #27137746.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The arrival of targeted therapies has led to significant improvements in clinical outcomes for patients with BRAFV600 mutated advanced melanoma over the past five years. AREAS COVERED: In several clinical trials, BRAF and MEK inhibitors have shown improvement in progression free and overall survival, along with much higher tumor response rates in comparison to chemotherapy, with the combination of these drugs superior to monotherapy. These agents are also being tested in earlier-stage patients, in addition to alternative dosing regimens and in combinations with other therapeutics. Efforts are also ongoing to expand the success found with targeted therapies to other subtypes of melanoma, including NRAS and c-kit mutated melanomas, uveal melanomas, and BRAF/NRAS wild type melanomas. Expert Commentary: We aim to provide an overview of clinical outcomes with targeted therapies in melanoma patients.

16 Review Combination Therapies for Melanoma: A New Standard of Care? 2016

Smalley, Keiran S M / Eroglu, Zeynep / Sondak, Vernon K. ·The Department of Cutaneous Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL, USA. keiran.smalley@moffitt.org. · The Department of Tumor Biology, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA. keiran.smalley@moffitt.org. · The Department of Cutaneous Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL, USA. ·Am J Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #26860106.

ABSTRACT: Recent data have demonstrated improved survival with targeted and immune therapies in patients with advanced melanoma, leading to much excitement amongst the oncology community and the widespread use of these drugs in combination regimens. However, the place of these combination therapies in the treatment of advanced melanoma remains to be fully determined. In this perspectives article, we critically review the available data and outline the rationale for these combinations being adopted as the standard of care for patients with advanced melanoma in the future.

17 Review Pediatric Melanoma and Atypical Melanocytic Neoplasms. 2016

Sreeraman Kumar, Radhika / Messina, Jane L / Reed, Damon / Navid, Fariba / Sondak, Vernon K. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA. · Department of Anatomic Pathology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA. · Department of Cutaneous Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL, 33612, USA. · Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA. · Department of Oncologic Sciences, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA. · Department of Dermatology, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA. · Adolescent and Young Adult (AYA) Program, Sarcoma Department, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA. · Department of Hematology/Oncology , All Children's Hospital Johns Hopkins Medicine , St. Petersburg, FL, USA. · Department of Oncology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA. · Department of Cutaneous Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL, 33612, USA. vernon.sondak@moffitt.org. · Department of Oncologic Sciences and Surgery, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA. vernon.sondak@moffitt.org. ·Cancer Treat Res · Pubmed #26601871.

ABSTRACT: Melanoma is uncommon in the pediatric age range, but is increasing in frequency and often presents with atypical features compared to the classic ABCDE criteria common to adult melanoma cases. Moreover, many melanocytic neoplasms in childhood pose diagnostic challenges to the pathologist, and sometimes cannot be unequivocally classified as benign nevi or melanoma. This chapter addresses the evaluation and management of pediatric patients with melanoma and atypical melanocytic neoplasms, including the roles of and unresolved questions surrounding sentinel lymph node biopsy, completion lymphadenectomy, adjuvant therapy, and treatment of advanced disease.

18 Review Beyond BRAF: where next for melanoma therapy? 2015

Fedorenko, I V / Gibney, G T / Sondak, V K / Smalley, K S M. ·The Department of Molecular Oncology, The Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612, USA. · The Department of Cutaneous Oncology, The Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612, USA. · 1] The Department of Molecular Oncology, The Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612, USA [2] The Department of Cutaneous Oncology, The Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612, USA. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #25180764.

ABSTRACT: In recent years, melanoma has become a poster-child for the development of oncogene-directed targeted therapies. This approach, which has been exemplified by the development of small-molecule BRAF inhibitors and the BRAF/MEK inhibitor combination for BRAF-mutant melanoma, has brought new hope to patients. Despite these successes, treatment failure seems near inevitable in the majority of cases—even in individuals treated with the BRAF/MEK inhibitor doublet. In the current review, we discuss the future of combination strategies for patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma as well as the emerging therapeutic options for patients with NRAS-mutant and BRAF/NRAS-wild-type melanoma. We also outline some of the newest developments in the in-depth personalisation of therapy that should allow melanoma treatment to continue shaping the field precision cancer medicine.

19 Review Unusual presentations of melanoma: melanoma of unknown primary site, melanoma arising in childhood, and melanoma arising in the eye and on mucosal surfaces. 2014

Sondak, Vernon K / Messina, Jane L. ·Department of Cutaneous Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612, USA; Department of Oncologic Sciences, USF Morsani College of Medicine, 12901 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33612, USA; Department of Surgery, USF Morsani College of Medicine, 12901 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33612, USA. Electronic address: vernon.sondak@moffitt.org. · Department of Cutaneous Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612, USA; Department of Anatomic Pathology, Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612, USA; Department of Pathology & Cell Biology, USF Morsani College of Medicine, 12901 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33612, USA; Department of Dermatology, USF Morsani College of Medicine, 12901 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33612, USA. ·Surg Clin North Am · Pubmed #25245968.

ABSTRACT: Most melanomas present as primary tumors on the skin surface in adults; however, melanomas also arise in the eye and on the mucosal surfaces or present as apparently metastatic disease without any known history of a cutaneous primary. Melanoma is also being diagnosed during childhood more frequently than ever. Surgeons need to be aware of and understand these unusual presentations of melanoma to optimally manage their patients.

20 Review Indications and options for systemic therapy in melanoma. 2014

Sondak, Vernon K / Gibney, Geoffrey T. ·Department of Cutaneous Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612, USA; Department of Oncologic Sciences, USF Morsani College of Medicine, 12901 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33612, USA. ·Surg Clin North Am · Pubmed #25245967.

ABSTRACT: The management of unresectable metastatic melanoma has dramatically improved in recent years. Surgeons need to familiarize themselves with new drugs and the biology behind them, and ongoing clinical trials and new drugs in development for adjuvant therapy and treatment of metastatic disease.

21 Review Surgical management of melanoma. 2014

Sondak, Vernon K / Gibney, Geoffrey T. ·Department of Cutaneous Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612, USA; Department of Oncologic Sciences, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA; Department of Surgery, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA. Electronic address: vernon.sondak@moffitt.org. · Department of Cutaneous Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33612, USA; Department of Oncologic Sciences, University of South Florida Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, FL, USA. ·Hematol Oncol Clin North Am · Pubmed #24880941.

ABSTRACT: Surgery remains the mainstay of treatment of every patient in whom complete excision of all disease is feasible. For clinically localized melanoma (clinical stages 0-II), wide excision and, when appropriate, sentinel lymph node biopsy are well established. The management of stage III melanoma is more contentious. Resection remains the first choice of therapy for patients with oligometastatic melanoma in accessible locations, but careful consideration of preoperative use of highly active drugs is appropriate. Decisions regarding surgical management of stage IV melanoma should routinely be made in the context of a multidisciplinary team approach.

22 Review Frontline approach to metastatic BRAF-mutant melanoma diagnosis, molecular evaluation, and treatment choice. 2014

Chapman, Paul B / Hauschild, Axel / Sondak, Vernon K. ·From the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel, Germany; Department of Cutaneous Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, and Departments of Oncologic Sciences and Surgery, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL. ·Am Soc Clin Oncol Educ Book · Pubmed #24857132.

ABSTRACT: An estimated 76,100 patients will be diagnosed with invasive melanoma in the United States in 2014, and 9,710 patients will die from the disease. In almost all cases, the cause of death is related to the development of widespread metastatic disease. Although death rates from most types of cancer have steadily decreased in the United States--a 20% decrease during two decades from a peak of 215.1 deaths per 100,000 population in 1991 to 171.8 in 2010--death rates from melanoma have steadily increased during the same time, especially among males. The news regarding melanoma is far from all bad. Increases in our understanding of the human immune system have led to the development of new immunotherapeutic drugs such as ipilimumab, which has been shown to improve survival in phase III trials in metastatic melanoma, and anti-programmed death 1 (anti-PD1) antibodies, recently hailed by ASCO as one of the past year's most noteworthy clinical cancer advances. However, no discovery has influenced and, indeed, transformed the management of metastatic melanoma more than the identifıcation of activating mutations in the BRAF gene in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, which occur in about half of cutaneous melanomas and can be targeted with small molecule inhibitors of the BRAF protein, the downstream MEK protein, or both. This article will address how patients with metastatic melanoma are evaluated for their mutation status and how the presence of a targetable mutation influences therapeutic decisions regarding systemic therapy and even surgery.

23 Review Integrating molecular biomarkers into current clinical management in melanoma. 2014

Kudchadkar, Ragini / Gibney, Geoffrey / Sondak, Vernon K. ·Department of Cutaneous Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA. ·Methods Mol Biol · Pubmed #24258972.

ABSTRACT: Personalized melanoma medicine has progressed from histopathologic features to serum markers to molecular profiles. Since the identification of activating BRAF mutations and subsequent development of drugs targeting the mutant BRAF protein, oncologists now need to incorporate prognostic and predictive biomarkers into treatment decisions for their melanoma patients. Examples include subgrouping patients by genotype profiles for targeted therapy and the development of serologic, immunohistochemical, and genotype profiles for the selection of patients for immunotherapies. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the current status of BRAF mutation testing, as well as promising serologic and molecular profiles that will impact patient care. As further research helps clarify the roles of these factors, the clinical outcomes of melanoma patients promise to be greatly improved.

24 Review Novel treatments for melanoma brain metastases. 2013

Kenchappa, Rajappa S / Tran, Nam / Rao, Nikhil G / Smalley, Keiran S / Gibney, Geoffrey T / Sondak, Vernon K / Forsyth, Peter A. ·Department of Neuro-Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL 33612, USA. Peter.Forsyth@Moffitt.org. ·Cancer Control · Pubmed #24077406.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The development of brain metastases is common in patients with melanoma and is associated with a poor prognosis. Treating patients with melanoma brain metastases (MBMs) is a major therapeutic challenge. Standard approaches with conventional chemotherapy are disappointing, while surgery and radiotherapy have improved outcomes. METHODS: In this article, we discuss the biology of MBMs, briefly outline current treatment approaches, and emphasize novel and emerging therapies for MBMs. RESULTS: The mechanisms that underlie the metastases of melanoma to the brain are unknown; therefore, it is necessary to identify pathways to target MBMs. Most patients with MBMs have short survival times. Recent use of immune-based and targeted therapies has changed the natural history of metastatic melanoma and may be effective for the treatment of patients with MBMs. CONCLUSIONS: Developing a better understanding of the factors responsible for MBMs will lead to improved management of this disease. In addition, determining the optimal treatments for MBMs and how they can be optimized or combined with other therapies, along with appropriate patient selection, are challenges for the management of this disease.

25 Review Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on the use of sentinel lymph node biopsy in melanoma. 2013

Sondak, Vernon K / Wong, Sandra L / Gershenwald, Jeffrey E / Thompson, John F. ·From the Department of Cutaneous Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, and Departments of Oncologic Sciences and Surgery, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL; Department of Surgery, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI; Departments of Surgical Oncology and Cancer Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; Melanoma Institute Australia and the University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. ·Am Soc Clin Oncol Educ Book · Pubmed #23714536.

ABSTRACT: Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) was introduced in 1992 to allow histopathologic evaluation of the "sentinel" node, that is, the first node along the lymphatic drainage pathway from the primary melanoma. This procedure has less risk of complications than a complete lymphadenectomy, and if the sentinel node is uninvolved by tumor the likelihood a complete lymphadenectomy would find metastatic disease in that nodal basin is very low. SLNB is now widely used worldwide in the staging of melanoma as well as breast and Merkel cell carcinomas. SLNB provides safe, reliable staging for patients with clinically node-negative melanomas 1 mm or greater in thickness, with an acceptably low rate of failure in the sentinel node-negative basin. Evidence-based guidelines jointly produced by ASCO and the Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO) recommend SLNB for patients with intermediate-thickness melanomas and also state that SLNB may be recommended for patients with thick melanomas. Major remaining areas of uncertainty include the indications for SLNB in patients with thin melanomas, pediatric patients, and patients with atypical melanocytic neoplasms; the optimal radiotracers and dyes for lymphatic mapping; and the necessity of complete lymphadenectomy in all sentinel node-positive patients.

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