Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Melanoma: HELP
Articles by H. Peter Soyer
Based on 88 articles published since 2008
||||

Between 2008 and 2019, H. Soyer wrote the following 88 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4
1 Editorial Whither melanoma in Australia? 2017

Smithers, B Mark / Dunn, Jeff / Soyer, H Peter. ·University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD m.smithers@uq.edu.au. · Institute for Resilient Regions, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, QLD. · Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD. ·Med J Aust · Pubmed #29020902.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial A plea for biobanking of all equivocal melanocytic proliferations. 2013

Soyer, H Peter / Lin, Lynlee L / Prow, Tarl W. ·Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia2Department of Dermatology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #23864136.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial The user-generated web-based Dermoscopy Image Archive of the International Dermoscopy Society: a contribution to e-learning and exchange of knowledge. 2011

Niederkorn, A / Gabler, G / Argenziano, G / Muir, J / Zalaudek, I / Soyer, H P / Hofmann-Wellenhof, R. · ·Dermatology · Pubmed #21389684.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Three roots of melanoma. 2008

Zalaudek, Iris / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Scope, Alon / Leinweber, Bernd / Ferrara, Gerardo / Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer / Pellacani, Giovanni / Soyer, H Peter / Argenziano, Giuseppe. · ·Arch Dermatol · Pubmed #18936403.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Review Defining the Molecular Genetics of Dermoscopic Naevus Patterns. 2019

Tan, Jean-Marie / Tom, Lisa N / Soyer, H Peter / Stark, Mitchell S. ·Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Department of Dermatology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australiam.stark@uq.edu.au. ·Dermatology · Pubmed #30332666.

ABSTRACT: Melanocytic naevi are common melanocytic proliferations that may simulate the appearance of cutaneous melanoma. Naevi commonly harbour somatic mutations implicated in melanomagenesis but in most cases lack the necessary genomic alterations required for melanoma development. While the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and ultraviolet radiation strongly contribute to naevogenesis, the somatic mutational landscape of dermoscopic naevus subsets distinguishes some of the molecular hallmarks of naevi in relation to melanoma. We herein discuss the classification of naevi and theories of naevogenesis and review the current literature on the somatic alterations in naevi and melanoma. This review focusses on the clinical-dermoscopic-pathological and genomic correlation of naevi that shapes the current understanding of naevi.

6 Review Fighting Melanoma with Smartphones: A Snapshot of Where We are a Decade after App Stores Opened Their Doors. 2018

Ngoo, Alexander / Finnane, Anna / McMeniman, Erin / Soyer, H Peter / Janda, Monika. ·Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, The University of QueenslandDiamantina Institute, Brisbane, Australia. Electronic address: alexander.ngoo@uqconnect.edu.au. · Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, The University of QueenslandDiamantina Institute, Brisbane, Australia; School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Australia. · Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, The University of QueenslandDiamantina Institute, Brisbane, Australia; Department of Dermatology, The Princess Alexandra Hospital, Australia. · Centre For Health Services Research, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Australia. ·Int J Med Inform · Pubmed #30153928.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Smartphone applications ("apps") exist for primary and secondary prevention of melanoma. Our aim was to review currently available apps for community, patient and generalist clinician users. DESIGN: Prospective study, April 2017 - May 2017. MAIN OUTCOMES: Appropriate apps available to Android and Apple smartphones were assessed in regards to app specific information (target user, cost, store rating, last update), functions offered and clinician, professional or scientific input and or peer review. Comparison was made with a similar 2014 review of the app market. RESULTS: 43 apps meeting inclusion criteria were found. Compared to 2014, 24 of 43 (55.8%) were new, and apps performing automated image analysis declined from 46.1% to 23.3% market share. 23 of 43 (53.4%) were free to download, 48.8% (n = 20) required payments of some form. The most common functionality was monitoring/tracking with 24 of 43 (55.8%) apps performing this. 15 of 43 apps (34.9%) reported clinician, professional or scientific input; in 2014 it was only 4 of 39 (10.3%). 2 of 43 apps (5%) mentioned peer-reviewed evidence along with professional input. Not all apps had ratings. On Android 20 of 22 apps had ratings; average app rating was 3.5, range 1.6 to 4.6. On Apple, 13 of 13 had ratings; average rating was 3.5; range 1- 5. CONCLUSIONS: Since 2014 there have been an expanding and changing landscape of apps targeting melanoma diagnosis. There remains a lack of evidence backing their efficacy. This is concerning given their public availability and the gravity of their subject matter.

7 Review Skin Pigmentation Genetics for the Clinic. 2017

Ainger, Stephen A / Jagirdar, Kasturee / Lee, Katie J / Soyer, H Peter / Sturm, Richard A. ·Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. ·Dermatology · Pubmed #28463841.

ABSTRACT: Human pigmentation characteristics play an important role in the effects of sun exposure, skin cancer induction and disease outcomes. Several of the genes most important for this diversity are involved in the regulation and distribution of melanin pigmentation or enzymes involved in melanogenesis itself within the melanocyte cell present in the skin, hair and eyes. The single nucleotide polymorphisms and extended haplotypes within or surrounding these genes have been identified as risk factors for skin cancer, in particular, melanoma. These same polymorphisms have been under selective pressure leading towards lighter pigmentation in Europeans in the last 5,000-20,000 years that have driven the increase in frequency in modern populations. Although pigmentation is a polygenic trait, due to interactive and quantitative gene effects, strong phenotypic associations are readily apparent for these major genes. However, predictive value and utility are increased when considering gene polymorphism interactions. In melanoma, an increased penetrance is found in cases when pigmentation gene risk alleles such as MC1R variants are coincident with mutation of higher-risk melanoma genes including CDKN2A, CDK4 and MITF E318K, demonstrating an interface between the pathways for pigmentation, naevogenesis and melanoma. The clinical phenotypes associated with germline changes in pigmentation and naevogenic genes must be understood by clinicians, and will be of increasing relevance to dermatologists, as genomics is incorporated into the delivery of personalised medicine.

8 Review A systematic review of non-surgical treatments for lentigo maligna. 2016

Read, T / Noonan, C / David, M / Wagels, M / Foote, M / Schaider, H / Soyer, H P / Smithers, B M. ·Queensland Melanoma Project, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Queensland Health, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · Discipline of Surgery, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · School of Medicine, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Christchurch Hospital, Canterbury District Health, Christchurch, New Zealand. · Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, School of Public Health, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · Dermatology Research Centre, Translational Research Institute, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #26299846.

ABSTRACT: Lentigo maligna (LM) is the most common melanocytic malignancy of the head and neck. If left untreated, LM can progress to lentigo maligna melanoma (LMM). Complete surgical excision is the gold standard for treatment, however, due to the location, size, and advanced age of patients, surgery is not always acceptable. As a result, there is ongoing interest in alternative, less invasive treatment modalities. The objective was to provide a structured review of key literature reporting the use of radiotherapy, imiquimod and laser therapy for the management of LM in patients where surgical resection is prohibited. An independent review was conducted following a comprehensive search of the National Library of Medicine using MEDLINE and PubMed, Embase, Scopus, ScienceDirect and Cochrane Library databases. Data were presented in tabular format, and crude data pooled to calculate mean recurrence rates for each therapy. 29 studies met the inclusion criteria: radiotherapy 10; topical imiquimod 10; laser therapies 9. Radiotherapy demostrated recurrence rates of up to 31% (mean 11.5%), with follow-up durations of 1-96 months. Topical imiquimod recurrence rates were up to 50% (mean 24.5%), with follow-up durations of 2-49 months. Laser therapy yielded recurrence rates of up to 100% (mean 34.4%), and follow-up durations of 8-78 months. in each of the treatment series the I(2) value measuring statistical heterogeneity exceeded the accepted threshold of 50% and as such a meta-analysis of included data were inappropriate. For non-surgical patients with LM, radiotherapy and topical imiquimod were efficacious treatments. Radiotherapy produced superior complete response rates and fewer recurrences than imiquimod although both are promising non-invasive modalities. There was no consistent body of evidence regarding laser therapy although response rates of up to 100% were reported in low quality studies. A prospective comparative trial is indicated and would provide accurate data on the long-term efficacy and overall utility of these treatments.

9 Review A clinico-dermoscopic approach for skin cancer screening: recommendations involving a survey of the International Dermoscopy Society. 2013

Argenziano, Giuseppe / Giacomel, Jason / Zalaudek, Iris / Blum, Andreas / Braun, Ralph P / Cabo, Horacio / Halpern, Allan / Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer / Malvehy, Josep / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Menzies, Scott / Moscarella, Elvira / Pellacani, Giovanni / Puig, Susana / Rabinovitz, Harold / Saida, Toshiaki / Seidenari, Stefania / Soyer, H Peter / Stolz, Wilhelm / Thomas, Luc / Kittler, Harald. ·Dermatology and Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova IRCCS, Viale Risorgimento 80, Reggio Emilia 42100, Italy. Electronic address: g.argenziano@gmail.com. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #24075542.

ABSTRACT: Dermoscopy is useful for skin cancer screening, but a detailed approach is required that integrates this tool into a rational clinical work flow. To investigate clinician perceptions and behavior in approaching patients with skin tumors, a survey was launched by electronic mail through the International Dermoscopy Society. After 4 months, the responses were analyzed and significant findings calculated. Considering the current approach of study participants in examining patients for skin cancer, an up-to-date system of triage is presented in this review, which aims to promote an improved diagnostic accuracy and more timely management of skin malignancy.

10 Review Modelling melanoma in mice. 2011

Walker, Graeme J / Soyer, H P / Terzian, Tamara / Box, Neil F. ·Skin Carcinogenesis Laboratory, Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Herston, Qld, Australia. ·Pigment Cell Melanoma Res · Pubmed #21985222.

ABSTRACT: Phenotypic and molecular heterogeneity in human melanoma has impaired efforts to explain many of the clinically important features of melanoma. For example, many of the underlying mechanisms that might predict age-of-onset, time to metastasis and other key elements in melanoma progression remain unknown. Furthermore, melanoma staging used to predict outcome and treatment has not yet moved beyond a basic phenotypic classification. While molecularly targeted therapies show great promise for melanoma patients, establishing accurate animal models that recapitulate human cutaneous melanoma progression remains a priority. We examine the relevance of mice as models for human melanoma progression and for key molecular and histopathologic variants of melanoma. These mice may be used as preclinical models to probe the relationships between causative mutations, disease progression and outcome for molecularly targeted therapeutics. We ask how new mouse models, or more detailed histopathologic and molecular analyses of existing mouse models, may be used to advance our understanding of genotype-phenotype correlations in this tumour type. This necessarily involves a consideration of the utility of mice as models for ultraviolet radiation-induced melanoma, and how this might be improved.

11 Clinical Trial Protocol for the TIDAL Melanoma Study: topical imiquimod or diphenylcyclopropenone for the management of cutaneous in-transit melanoma metastases-a phase II, single centre, randomised, pilot study. 2017

Read, Tavis / Webber, Scott / Thomas, Janine / Wagels, Michael / Schaider, Helmut / Soyer, H Peter / Smithers, B Mark. ·Queensland Melanoma Project, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Queensland Health, Brisbane, Australia. · Department of Surgery, The University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. · Griffith University, School of Medicine, Gold Coast, Australia. · Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Brisbane, Australia. · Department of Dermatology, The University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. ·BMJ Open · Pubmed #28988173.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Patients with in-transit melanoma metastases present a therapeutic challenge. Complete surgical excision of localised disease is considered as the gold standard; however, surgery is not always acceptable and alternatives are required. Treatment results reported using imiquimod and diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) suggest that topical immunotherapies can be used to successfully treat select patients with melanoma metastases. A phase II, randomised, single centre, pilot study was designed to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of DPCP and imiquimod for the treatment of superficial, cutaneous in-transit melanoma metastases. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This is an open-label, non-superiority, pilot study with no treatment cross-over. Eligible patients are randomised in a 1:1 ratio to receive topical therapy for up to 12 months with a minimum follow-up period of 12 months. The target sample size is 30 patients, with 15 allocated to each treatment arm. The primary endpoint is the number of patients experiencing a complete response of treated lesions as determined clinically using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours. This trial incorporates health-related quality of life measures and biological tissue collection for further experimental substudies. The study will also facilitate a health economic analysis. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Approval was obtained from the Human Research Ethics Committee at the participating centre, and recruitment has commenced. The results of this study will be submitted for formal publication within a peer-reviewed journal. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: Prospectively registered on 16 October 2015 with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12615001088538). This study conforms to WHO Trial Registration Data Set.

12 Article A systematic review and meta-analysis of locoregional treatments for in-transit melanoma. 2019

Read, Tavis / Lonne, Michael / Sparks, David S / David, Michael / Wagels, Michael / Schaider, Helmut / Soyer, H Peter / Smithers, B Mark. ·Queensland Melanoma Project, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · The University of Queensland, Faculty of Medicine, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Griffith University, School of Medicine, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. · The University of Queensland, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · The University of Newcastle, School of Medicine and Public Health, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. · The University of Queensland, Dermatology Research Centre, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #30734295.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In-transit melanoma (ITM) metastases present a therapeutic challenge and management decisions can be difficult. There are multiple treatments available, with differing efficacy, and supported by different levels of evidence. The primary objective was to perform a systematic review and where suitable, a meta-analysis of the literature reporting on the use of locoregional treatments for the management of ITM. METHODS: An independent review was conducted including a comprehensive search of the National Library of Medicine using PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases. Key data were tabulated, synthesized and pooled to calculate relevant weighted effect sizes for each therapy using random-effect models. The statistical heterogeneity was calculated using the Higgins' method. RESULTS: Of the initial 32 612 articles identified, 57 original articles satisfied eligibility criteria. Eight treatment modalities were identified comprising: amputation (7); hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion (15); isolated limb infusion (8); carbon dioxide laser (9); PV-10 intralesional therapy (5); IL-2 intralesional therapy (8); imiquimod (7); diphenylcyclopropenone (3). Only amputation and topical imiquimod were suitable for formal meta-analysis. CONCLUSIONS: All of the assessed therapies have significant selection bias. Variable levels of evidence support the ongoing use of locoregional treatments and these may significantly improve disease-free survival.

13 Article Consumer Acceptance and Expectations of a Mobile Health Application to Photograph Skin Lesions for Early Detection of Melanoma. 2019

Koh, Uyen / Horsham, Caitlin / Soyer, H Peter / Loescher, Lois J / Gillespie, Nicole / Vagenas, Dimitrios / Janda, Monika. ·Centre of Health Services Research, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · School of Public Health and Social Work, Institute for Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Dermatology Department, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Colleges of Nursing and Public Health, The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA. · UQ Business School, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Centre of Health Services Research, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, m.janda@uq.edu.au. · School of Public Health and Social Work, Institute for Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, m.janda@uq.edu.au. ·Dermatology · Pubmed #30404081.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Mobile teledermoscopy may facilitate skin self-examinations (SSEs) and further improve monitoring and detection of melanoma. OBJECTIVE: To assess consumer acceptability and expectations of a mobile health app used to: (i) instruct SSE and (ii) conduct consumer-performed mobile teledermoscopy. METHODS: People aged 18 years and above were invited to participate in either (i) an online survey or (ii) focus group in Brisbane, Australia. Participants were asked about their SSE practices, mobile teledermoscopy acceptance, and app design and functionality. The online survey responses and focus group discussions were coded by two researchers who conducted thematic analysis. RESULTS: Four focus groups were held with a total of 28 participants; 88 participants completed the online survey. The mean ages of participants in the focus group and online survey were 46 and 38 years, respectively. There were more males in the focus groups (61%, 17/28) compared to the online survey (19%, 17/88). Regular SSEs were conducted by 56 (64%) of the online survey participants. Barriers to SSE were forgetfulness (44%), low self-perceived risk of melanoma (25%) and low confidence in conducting SSEs (25%). The large majority of online survey participants (95%) would consider sending photos of their skin lesions to a medical practitioner via an app. Focus group participants reported that they would accept using mobile teledermoscopy; however, they would prefer to use it to monitor lesions between face-to-face consultations. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, participants had positive views on using mobile teledermoscopy to send images of skin lesions to a dermatologist or other medical practitioner.

14 Article Dermoscopy and Overdiagnosis of Melanoma In Situ. 2018

Nufer, Kaitlin L / Raphael, Anthony P / Soyer, H Peter. ·Dermatology Research Centre, University of Queensland, University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #29466567.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Article Generational shift in melanoma incidence and mortality in Queensland, Australia, 1995-2014. 2018

Aitken, Joanne F / Youlden, Danny R / Baade, Peter D / Soyer, H Peter / Green, Adèle C / Smithers, B Mark. ·Cancer Council Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · Institute for Resilient Regions, University of Southern Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · Menzies Health Institute, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. · School of Mathematical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · Department of Dermatology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · CRUK Manchester Institute and Division of Musculoskeletal & Dermatological Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. · Australian Skin and Skin Cancer Research Centre, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · Queensland Melanoma Project, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · Discipline of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #29105744.

ABSTRACT: Public campaigns encouraging sun protection for skin cancer prevention began in Queensland, Australia, in the early 1980s. We examined recent trends to assess whether earlier evidence of stabilizing melanoma incidence in young people has persisted. Anonymized incidence and mortality data for in situ and invasive melanoma for the 20 years 1995-2014 were obtained from the Queensland Cancer Registry. Time trends were analyzed using JoinPoint regression. Birth cohort patterns were assessed using age-period-cohort models. Melanoma incidence in Queensland remains the highest recorded in the world (age-standardized incidence of invasive melanoma (2010-2014) = 72/100,000/annum). Over the 20-year period, incidence of in situ melanoma increased in all age groups. Incidence of both thin (≤1 mm) and thick (>1 mm) invasive melanoma was either stable or decreased in people under 60, while it increased in those aged 60 and above, particularly in men. Age-period-cohort analysis revealed decreasing age-specific incidence of invasive melanoma under 40 years of age, beginning with the birth cohort born around the mid-1960s, with steepest falls for those born around 1980 and later. Age-specific incidence was stable between 40 and 59 years of age from the 1945 birth cohort onwards. Melanoma mortality over the period was stable or decreased in all groups except in men aged 60 or over. These findings are evidence of real advances in the prevention and early detection of invasive melanoma in this very high-risk population. They make a compelling case for continued public health efforts to reduce the burden of melanoma in susceptible populations.

16 Article Efficacy of smartphone applications in high-risk pigmented lesions. 2018

Ngoo, Alexander / Finnane, Anna / McMeniman, Erin / Tan, Jean-Marie / Janda, Monika / Soyer, H Peter. ·Dermatology Research Centre, School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Department of Dermatology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · School of Public Health and Social Work, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. ·Australas J Dermatol · Pubmed #28240347.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Melanoma apps are smartphone applications that assess risk of pigmented lesions using a smartphone camera and underlying algorithm. We aimed to assess the capability of melanoma smartphone applications (apps) in making clinical decisions about risk, compared with lesion assessment by specialist trained dermatologists. METHODS: A prospective study of 3 melanoma apps was conducted between 2015 and 2016, recruiting 30 patients with 57 pigmented lesions. Risk categories assigned by the apps were compared with the clinical decisions of two consultant dermatologists classifying lesions as 'suspicious' or 'benign'. RESULTS: Of the 42 lesions deemed clinically suspicious to a dermatologist, from 9 to 26 were classified as suspicious by the apps; of the 15 clinically benign lesions 3 to 15 were correctly classified as benign by the apps. The apps' sensitivity and specificity ranged from 21 to 72% and 27 to 100.0%, respectively, when compared with the specialists' decisions. Two apps were unable to analyse 14 and 18% of lesions submitted, respectively. Interrater agreement between dermatologists and apps was poor (κ = -0.01 SE = 0.16; P = 0.97) to slight (κ = 0.16 SE = 0.09; P = 0.12). CONCLUSIONS: None of the melanoma apps tested had high enough agreement with the dermatologist's clinical opinion to be considered to provide additional benefit to patients in assessing their skin for high-risk pigmented lesions. The low sensitivity in detecting lesions that are suspicious to a trained specialist may mean false reassurance is being given to patients. Development of highly sensitive and specific melanoma apps remains a work in progress.

17 Article Classifying dermoscopic patterns of naevi in a case-control study of melanoma. 2017

McWhirter, Seamus R / Duffy, David L / Lee, Katie J / Wimberley, Glen / McClenahan, Philip / Ling, Natalie / Ardigo, Marco / Schaider, Helmut / Soyer, H Peter / Sturm, Richard A. ·Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia. · San Gallicano Dermatological Institute, IRCCS, IFO, Rome, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #29040338.

ABSTRACT: Changes in dermoscopic patterns of naevi may be associated with melanoma; however, there is no consensus on which dermoscopic classification system is optimal. To determine whether different classification systems give comparable results and can be combined for analysis, we applied two systems to a case-control study of melanoma with 1037 participants: 573 classified using a "1/3 major feature" system, 464 classified based on rules of appearance, and 263 classified with both criteria. There was strong correlation for non-specific (Spearman R = 0.96) and reticular (Spearman R = 0.82) naevi, with a slight bias for globular naevi with the rules of appearance system. Inter-observer reliability was high for the rules of appearance system, particularly for reticular naevi (Pearson >0.97). We show that different classification systems for naevi can be combined for data analysis, and describe a method for determining what adjustments may need to be applied to combine data sets.

18 Article Diphenylcyclopropenone for the treatment of cutaneous in-transit melanoma metastases - results of a prospective, non-randomized, single-centre study. 2017

Read, T / Webber, S / Tan, J / Wagels, M / Schaider, H / Soyer, H P / Smithers, B M. ·Queensland Melanoma Project, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Queensland Health, Brisbane, Qld, Australia. · Discipline of Surgery, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld, Australia. · School of Medicine, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Qld, Australia. · Department of Dermatology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Queensland Health, Brisbane, Qld, Australia. · Dermatology Research Centre, School of Medicine, Translational Research Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld, Australia. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28626861.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Current treatments for in-transit melanoma (ITM) metastases are frequently invasive and do not improve overall survival. Recently, there has been increasing investigation into the use of topical agents. Diphenylcyclopropenone or diphencyprone (DPCP) is a novel, topical therapy that has been reported to have immune-sensitizing properties useful in the treatment of ITM. OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinical outcomes of patients treated within a prospective, non-randomized, non-comparative study using DPCP for cutaneous ITM metastases. METHODS: A review was conducted assessing the outcomes of 58 patients prospectively treated using DPCP. Patients had satellite or in-transit disease (stage IIIB+), with all lesion morphology types included. The patients were treated through a single, specialized clinic with regular outpatient follow-up. DPCP was topically applied as an aqueous cream in 0.005-1% concentrations once to twice per week for up to 24-48 h of duration. To assess variables associated with response, a per-protocol statistical analysis was performed. RESULTS: Fifty-four patients were treated who satisfied eligibility criteria for analysis. The overall response rates were as follows: complete response 22%, partial response 39%, stable disease 24% and progressive disease 15%. The mean time to complete response was 10.5 months, mean duration (disease-free interval) 12.3 months and recurrence rate in complete responders 41%. Lesion morphology was predictive of clinical benefit with a higher response in epidermotropic disease (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: DPCP provided a well-tolerated, convenient and efficacious treatment for cutaneous ITM metastases. Identifying patterns of response may assist treatment selection and improve patient-rated outcomes.

19 Article The impact of dermoscopy on melanoma detection in the practice of dermatologists in Europe: results of a pan-European survey. 2017

Forsea, A M / Tschandl, P / Zalaudek, I / Del Marmol, V / Soyer, H P / Anonymous2150894 / Argenziano, G / Geller, A C. ·Dermatology Department, Elias University Hospital, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer Unit, Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. · Dermatology Department, Hopital Erasme, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Bruxelles, Belgium. · Dermatology Research Centre, School of Medicine, Translational Research Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld, Australia. · Dermatology Unit, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy. · Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28109068.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Dermoscopy is a widely used technique that can increase the sensitivity and specificity of melanoma detection. Information is lacking on the impact of dermoscopy use on the detection of melanoma in the real-life practice of European dermatologists. OBJECTIVE: To identify factors that influence the benefit of using dermoscopy for increasing melanoma detection and lowering the number of unnecessary biopsies in the practice of European dermatologists. METHODS: We conducted a survey of dermatologists registered in 32 European countries regarding the following: the demographic and practice characteristics, dermoscopy training and use, opinions on dermoscopy and the self-estimated impact of dermoscopy use on the number of melanomas detected and the number of unnecessary biopsies performed in practice. RESULTS: Valid answers were collected for 7480 respondents, of which 6602 reported using dermoscopy. Eighty-six per cent of dermoscopy users reported that dermoscopy increased the numbers of melanomas they detected, and 70% reported that dermoscopy decreased the number of unnecessary biopsies of benign lesions they performed. The dermatologists reporting these benefits were more likely to have received dermoscopy training during residency, to use dermoscopy frequently and intensively, and to use digital dermoscopy systems and pattern analysis compared to dermatologists who did not perceive any benefit of dermoscopy for the melanoma recognition in their practice. CONCLUSIONS: Improving dermoscopy training, especially during residency and increasing access to digital dermoscopy equipment are important paths to enhance the benefit of dermoscopy for melanoma detection in the practice of European dermatologists.

20 Article The "melanoma-enriched" microRNA miR-4731-5p acts as a tumour suppressor. 2016

Stark, Mitchell S / Tom, Lisa N / Boyle, Glen M / Bonazzi, Vanessa F / Soyer, H Peter / Herington, Adrian C / Pollock, Pamela M / Hayward, Nicholas K. ·Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · School of Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, at The Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #27331623.

ABSTRACT: We previously identified miR-4731-5p (miR-4731) as a melanoma-enriched microRNA following comparison of melanoma with other cell lines from solid malignancies. Additionally, miR-4731 has been found in serum from melanoma patients and expressed less abundantly in metastatic melanoma tissues from stage IV patients relative to stage III patients. As miR-4731 has no known function, we used biotin-labelled miRNA duplex pull-down to identify binding targets of miR-4731 in three melanoma cell lines (HT144, MM96L and MM253). Using the miRanda miRNA binding algorithm, all pulled-down transcripts common to the three cell lines (n=1092) had potential to be targets of miR-4731 and gene-set enrichment analysis of these (via STRING v9.1) highlighted significantly associated genes related to the 'cell cycle' pathway and the 'melanosome'. Following miR-4731 overexpression, a selection (n=81) of pull-down transcripts underwent validation using a custom qRT-PCR array. These data revealed that miR-4731 regulates multiple genes associated with the cell cycle (e.g. CCNA2, ORC5L, and PCNA) and the melanosome (e.g. RAB7A, CTSD, and GNA13). Furthermore, members of the synovial sarcoma X breakpoint family (SSX) (melanoma growth promoters) were also down-regulated (e.g. SSX2, SSX4, and SSX4B) as a result of miR-4731 overexpression. Moreover, this down-regulation of mRNA expression resulted in ablation or reduction of SSX4 protein, which, in keeping with previous studies, resulted in loss of 2D colony formation. We therefore speculate that loss of miR-4731 expression in stage IV patient tumours supports melanoma growth by, in part; reducing its regulatory control of SSX expression levels.

21 Article Multiparameter analysis of naevi and primary melanomas identifies a subset of naevi with elevated markers of transformation. 2016

Fox, Carly / Lambie, Duncan / Wilmott, James S / Pinder, Alex / Pavey, Sandra / Lê Cao, Kim-Anh / Akalin, Taner / Karaarslan, Isil Kilinc / Ozdemir, Fezal / Scolyer, Richard A / Yamada, Miko / Soyer, H Peter / Schaider, Helmut / Gabrielli, Brian. ·The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, Qld, Australia. · IQ Pathology, Brisbane, Qld, Australia. · Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Department of Pathology, Ege University, Izmir, Turkey. · Department of Dermatology, Ege University, Izmir, Turkey. · Dermatology Research Centre, Translational Research Institute, The University of Queensland School of Medicine, Brisbane, Qld, Australia. ·Pigment Cell Melanoma Res · Pubmed #27166757.

ABSTRACT: Here we have carried out a multiparameter analysis using a panel of 28 immunohistochemical markers to identify markers of transformation from benign and dysplastic naevus to primary melanoma in three separate cohorts totalling 279 lesions. We have identified a set of eight markers that distinguish naevi from melanoma. None of markers or parameters assessed differentiated benign from dysplastic naevi. Indeed, the naevi clustered tightly in terms of their immunostaining patterns whereas primary melanomas showed more diverse staining patterns. A small subset of histopathologically benign lesions had elevated levels of multiple markers associated with melanoma, suggesting that these represent naevi with an increased potential for transformation to melanoma.

22 Article Validity and Reliability of Dermoscopic Criteria Used to Differentiate Nevi From Melanoma: A Web-Based International Dermoscopy Society Study. 2016

Carrera, Cristina / Marchetti, Michael A / Dusza, Stephen W / Argenziano, Giuseppe / Braun, Ralph P / Halpern, Allan C / Jaimes, Natalia / Kittler, Harald J / Malvehy, Josep / Menzies, Scott W / Pellacani, Giovanni / Puig, Susana / Rabinovitz, Harold S / Scope, Alon / Soyer, H Peter / Stolz, Wilhelm / Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer / Zalaudek, Iris / Marghoob, Ashfaq A. ·Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York2Melanoma Unit, Department of Dermatology, Hospital Clinic Barcelona, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, University of Barcelona. · Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Dermatology Unit, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland. · Dermatology Service, Aurora Skin Cancer Center, Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana, Medellín, Colombia. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Melanoma Unit, Department of Dermatology, Hospital Clinic Barcelona, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, University of Barcelona, Centro de Investigacion Biomedica en red de enfermedades raras, Barcelona, Spain. · Sydney Melanoma Diagnostic Centre, Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, Australia8Discipline of Dermatology, The University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Center for Environmental, Genetic, and Nutritional Epidemiology, Department of Diagnostic, Clinical, and Public Health Medicine, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy. · Skin and Cancer Associates, Plantation, Florida. · Department of Dermatology, Sheba Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia13School of Medicine, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Clinic for Dermatology, Allergology, and Environmental Medicine, Klinik Thalkirchner Straße Städt, Klinikum München GmbH, Munich, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #27074267.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: The comparative diagnostic performance of dermoscopic algorithms and their individual criteria are not well studied. OBJECTIVES: To analyze the discriminatory power and reliability of dermoscopic criteria used in melanoma detection and compare the diagnostic accuracy of existing algorithms. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: This was a retrospective, observational study of 477 lesions (119 melanomas [24.9%] and 358 nevi [75.1%]), which were divided into 12 image sets that consisted of 39 or 40 images per set. A link on the International Dermoscopy Society website from January 1, 2011, through December 31, 2011, directed participants to the study website. Data analysis was performed from June 1, 2013, through May 31, 2015. Participants included physicians, residents, and medical students, and there were no specialty-type or experience-level restrictions. Participants were randomly assigned to evaluate 1 of the 12 image sets. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Associations with melanoma and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were evaluated for the presence of dermoscopic criteria. Diagnostic accuracy measures were estimated for the following algorithms: the ABCD rule, the Menzies method, the 7-point checklist, the 3-point checklist, chaos and clues, and CASH (color, architecture, symmetry, and homogeneity). RESULTS: A total of 240 participants registered, and 103 (42.9%) evaluated all images. The 110 participants (45.8%) who evaluated fewer than 20 lesions were excluded, resulting in data from 130 participants (54.2%), 121 (93.1%) of whom were regular dermoscopy users. Criteria associated with melanoma included marked architectural disorder (odds ratio [OR], 6.6; 95% CI, 5.6-7.8), pattern asymmetry (OR, 4.9; 95% CI, 4.1-5.8), nonorganized pattern (OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 2.9-3.7), border score of 6 (OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 2.5-4.3), and contour asymmetry (OR, 3.2; 95% CI, 2.7-3.7) (P < .001 for all). Most dermoscopic criteria had poor to fair interobserver agreement. Criteria that reached moderate levels of agreement included comma vessels (ICC, 0.44; 95% CI, 0.40-0.49), absence of vessels (ICC, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.42-0.51), dark brown color (ICC, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.35-0.44), and architectural disorder (ICC, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.39-0.48). The Menzies method had the highest sensitivity for melanoma diagnosis (95.1%) but the lowest specificity (24.8%) compared with any other method (P < .001). The ABCD rule had the highest specificity (59.4%). All methods had similar areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Important dermoscopic criteria for melanoma recognition were revalidated by participants with varied experience. Six algorithms tested had similar but modest levels of diagnostic accuracy, and the interobserver agreement of most individual criteria was poor.

23 Article Consumer acceptance of patient-performed mobile teledermoscopy for the early detection of melanoma. 2016

Horsham, C / Loescher, L J / Whiteman, D C / Soyer, H P / Janda, M. ·Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology, Queensland, Australia. · The University of Arizona Colleges of Nursing and Public Health, Tucson, AZ, U.S.A. · Department of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #27037999.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Mobile teledermoscopy allows consumers to send images of skin lesions to a teledermatologist for remote diagnosis. Currently, technology acceptance of mobile teledermoscopy by people at high risk of melanoma is unknown. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to determine the acceptance of mobile teledermoscopy by consumers based on perceived usefulness, ease of use, compatibility, attitude/intention, subjective norms, facilitators and trust before use. Consumer satisfaction was explored after use. METHODS: Consumers aged 50-64 years at high risk of melanoma (fair skin or previous skin cancer) were recruited from a population-based cohort study and via media announcements in Brisbane, Australia in 2013. The participants completed a 27-item questionnaire preteledermoscopy modified from a technology acceptance model. The first 49 participants with a suitable smartphone then conducted mobile teledermoscopy in their homes for early detection of melanoma and were asked to rate their satisfaction. RESULTS: The preteledermoscopy questionnaire was completed by 228 participants. Most participants (87%) agreed that mobile teledermoscopy would improve their skin self-examination performance and 91% agreed that it would be in their best interest to use mobile teledermoscopy. However, nearly half of participants (45%) were unsure about whether they had complete trust in the telediagnosis. The participants who conducted mobile teledermoscopy (n = 49) reported that the dermatoscope was easy to use (94%) and motivated them to examine their skin more often (86%). However, 18% could not take photographs in hard-to-see areas and 35% required help to submit the photograph to the teledermatologist. CONCLUSIONS: Mobile teledermoscopy consumer acceptance appears to be favourable. This new technology warrants further assessment for its utility in the early detection of melanoma or follow-up.

24 Article Ten-Year Survival after Multiple Invasive Melanomas Is Worse than after a Single Melanoma: a Population-Based Study. 2016

Youlden, Danny R / Baade, Peter D / Soyer, H Peter / Youl, Philippa H / Kimlin, Michael G / Aitken, Joanne F / Green, Adele C / Khosrotehrani, Kiarash. ·Cancer Council Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Cancer Council Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. · Dermatology Research Centre, School of Medicine, Translational Research Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Department of Dermatology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Cancer Council Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Health Research Institute, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sunshine Coast, Queensland, Australia. · Cancer Council Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; CRUK Manchester Institute and Institute of Inflammation and Repair, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. · Department of Dermatology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; UQ Centre for Clinical Research, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; UQ Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: k.khosrotehrani@uq.edu.au. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #27019458.

ABSTRACT: The prognosis of melanoma patients who are diagnosed with multiple primary lesions remains controversial. We used a large population-based cohort to re-examine this issue, applying a delayed entry methodology to avoid survival bias. Of 32,238 eligible patients diagnosed between 1995 and 2008, 29,908 (93%) had a single invasive melanoma, 2,075 (6%) had two, and 255 (1%) had three. Allowing for differences in entry time, 10-year cause-specific survival for these three groups was 89% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 88-90%), 83% (95% CI = 80-86%), and 67% (95% CI = 54-81%), respectively. After adjustment for key prognostic factors, the hazard ratio of death within 10 years from melanoma was two times higher for those with two melanomas (hazard ratio = 2.01, 95% CI = 1.57-2.59; P < 0.001) and nearly three times higher when three melanomas were diagnosed (hazard ratio = 2.91, 95% CI = 1.64-5.18; P < 0.001) compared with people with a single melanoma. Melanoma-specific mortality remained elevated after adjusting for maximum thickness or ulceration of any melanoma regardless of the index tumor. After appropriately accounting for the interval between diagnosis of the first and subsequent melanomas, patients with multiple invasive melanomas have significantly poorer survival than patients with a single invasive melanoma.

25 Article Heritability of naevus patterns in an adult twin cohort from the Brisbane Twin Registry: a cross-sectional study. 2016

Lee, S / Duffy, D L / McClenahan, P / Lee, K J / McEniery, E / Burke, B / Jagirdar, K / Martin, N G / Sturm, R A / Soyer, H P / Schaider, H. ·Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia. · Department of Dermatology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #26871925.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Heritability of naevi counts is widely acknowledged as a potential surveillance parameter for prevention purposes. The contribution of heritability to the changes seen in naevus number and morphology over time and their corresponding dermoscopic characteristics is unknown, but is important to understand in order to account for adequate prevention measures. OBJECTIVES: To identify naevus characteristics that are strongly influenced by heritability. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 220 individuals [76 monozygotic (MZ), 144 dizygotic (DZ)], recruited from the Brisbane Twin Naevus Study. Participants received full body imaging and dermoscopy of naevi ≥ 5 mm in diameter. Dermoscopic type, total naevus count (TNC), change in TNC with age, and naevus distribution, size, colour and profile were compared between MZ and DZ twins. Heritability of these traits was assessed via Falconer's estimate. RESULTS: Significant differences were found in comparing MZ and DZ twins for TNC, numbers of naevi 5·0-7·9 mm in diameter, counts of light-brown naevi, naevi on the back and sun-protected sites, and naevi with the 'nonspecific' dermoscopic pattern. CONCLUSIONS: This study strongly supports a heritable component to TNC, as well as changes in TNC, and the number of medium-sized naevi, light-brown naevi, specific sites and certain dermoscopic features in adults. These characteristics should be taken into account by naevus surveillance programmes and further studied to identify candidate gene associations for clinical and dermoscopic patterns in conjunction with melanoma risk stratification.

Next