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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by H. Peter Soyer
Based on 103 articles published since 2010
(Why 103 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, H. Soyer wrote the following 103 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5
1 Editorial Using Advances in Skin Imaging Technology and Genomics for the Early Detection and Prevention of Melanoma. 2019

Janda, Monika / Soyer, H Peter. ·Centre of Health Services Research, Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australiam.janda@uq.edu.au. · School of Public Health and Social Work, Institute for Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australiam.janda@uq.edu.au. · Translational Research Institute, University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Dermatology Research Centre, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Dermatology Department, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. ·Dermatology · Pubmed #30253394.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Artificial intelligence for melanoma diagnosis: how can we deliver on the promise? 2019

Mar, V J / Soyer, H P. ·Victorian Melanoma Service, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne; School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Clayton; Skin and Cancer Foundation Inc. Melbourne. · Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Brisbane; Dermatology Department, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. Electronic address: p.soyer@uq.edu.au. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #29790922.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Artificial intelligence for melanoma diagnosis: how can we deliver on the promise? 2018

Mar, V J / Soyer, H P. ·Victorian Melanoma Service, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Australia; School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia; Skin and Cancer Foundation Inc., Melbourne, Australia. · Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Brisbane, Australia; Dermatology Department, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. Electronic address: p.soyer@uq.edu.au. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #29846499.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Whither melanoma in Australia? 2017

Smithers, B Mark / Dunn, Jeff / Soyer, H Peter. ·University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD m.smithers@uq.edu.au. · Institute for Resilient Regions, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, QLD. · Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD. ·Med J Aust · Pubmed #29020902.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial A plea for biobanking of all equivocal melanocytic proliferations. 2013

Soyer, H Peter / Lin, Lynlee L / Prow, Tarl W. ·Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia2Department of Dermatology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #23864136.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial The user-generated web-based Dermoscopy Image Archive of the International Dermoscopy Society: a contribution to e-learning and exchange of knowledge. 2011

Niederkorn, A / Gabler, G / Argenziano, G / Muir, J / Zalaudek, I / Soyer, H P / Hofmann-Wellenhof, R. · ·Dermatology · Pubmed #21389684.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Review Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Patients with Lentigo Maligna. 2020

Robinson, Mitchell / Primiero, Clare / Guitera, Pascale / Hong, Angela / Scolyer, Richard A / Stretch, Jonathan R / Strutton, Geoffrey / Thompson, John F / Soyer, H Peter. ·Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Department of Dermatology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Cancer Council Australia Melanoma Guidelines Working Party, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Melanoma and Surgical Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Anatomical Pathology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, p.soyer@uq.edu.au. · Department of Dermatology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, p.soyer@uq.edu.au. · Cancer Council Australia Melanoma Guidelines Working Party, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, p.soyer@uq.edu.au. ·Dermatology · Pubmed #31639788.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Lentigo maligna (LM) is a subtype of melanoma in situ that usually occurs in sun-damaged skin and is characterised by an atypical proliferation of melanocytes within the basal epidermis. If left untreated, LM can develop into invasive melanoma, termed lentigo maligna melanoma, which shares the same prognosis as other types of invasive melanoma. The incidence rates of LM are steadily increasing worldwide, in parallel with increases in the incidence rates of invasive melanoma, and establishing appropriate guidelines for the management of LM is therefore of great importance. METHODS: A multidisciplinary working party established by Cancer Council Australia has recently produced up-to-date, evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the management of melanoma and LM. Following selection of the most relevant clinical questions, a comprehensive literature search for relevant studies was conducted, followed by systematic review of these studies. Data were summarised and the evidence was assessed, leading to the development of recommendations. After public consultation and approval by the full guidelines working party, these recommendations were published on the Cancer Council Australia wiki platform (https://wiki.cancer.org.au/australia/Clinical_question:Effective_interventions_to_improve_outcomes_in_lentigo_maligna%3F). Main Recommendations: Surgical removal of LM remains the standard treatment, with 5- to 10-mm clinical margins when possible. While yet to be fully validated, the use of peri-operative reflectance confocal microscopy to assess margins should be considered where available. There is a lack of high-quality evidence to infer the most effective non-surgical treatment. When surgical removal of LM is not possible or refused, radiotherapy is recommended. When both surgery and radiotherapy are not appropriate or refused, topical imiquimod is the recommended treatment. Cryotherapy and laser therapy are not recommended for the treatment of LM.

8 Review Defining the Molecular Genetics of Dermoscopic Naevus Patterns. 2019

Tan, Jean-Marie / Tom, Lisa N / Soyer, H Peter / Stark, Mitchell S. ·Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Department of Dermatology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australiam.stark@uq.edu.au. ·Dermatology · Pubmed #30332666.

ABSTRACT: Melanocytic naevi are common melanocytic proliferations that may simulate the appearance of cutaneous melanoma. Naevi commonly harbour somatic mutations implicated in melanomagenesis but in most cases lack the necessary genomic alterations required for melanoma development. While the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway and ultraviolet radiation strongly contribute to naevogenesis, the somatic mutational landscape of dermoscopic naevus subsets distinguishes some of the molecular hallmarks of naevi in relation to melanoma. We herein discuss the classification of naevi and theories of naevogenesis and review the current literature on the somatic alterations in naevi and melanoma. This review focusses on the clinical-dermoscopic-pathological and genomic correlation of naevi that shapes the current understanding of naevi.

9 Review Fighting Melanoma with Smartphones: A Snapshot of Where We are a Decade after App Stores Opened Their Doors. 2018

Ngoo, Alexander / Finnane, Anna / McMeniman, Erin / Soyer, H Peter / Janda, Monika. ·Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, The University of QueenslandDiamantina Institute, Brisbane, Australia. Electronic address: alexander.ngoo@uqconnect.edu.au. · Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, The University of QueenslandDiamantina Institute, Brisbane, Australia; School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Australia. · Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, The University of QueenslandDiamantina Institute, Brisbane, Australia; Department of Dermatology, The Princess Alexandra Hospital, Australia. · Centre For Health Services Research, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Australia. ·Int J Med Inform · Pubmed #30153928.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Smartphone applications ("apps") exist for primary and secondary prevention of melanoma. Our aim was to review currently available apps for community, patient and generalist clinician users. DESIGN: Prospective study, April 2017 - May 2017. MAIN OUTCOMES: Appropriate apps available to Android and Apple smartphones were assessed in regards to app specific information (target user, cost, store rating, last update), functions offered and clinician, professional or scientific input and or peer review. Comparison was made with a similar 2014 review of the app market. RESULTS: 43 apps meeting inclusion criteria were found. Compared to 2014, 24 of 43 (55.8%) were new, and apps performing automated image analysis declined from 46.1% to 23.3% market share. 23 of 43 (53.4%) were free to download, 48.8% (n = 20) required payments of some form. The most common functionality was monitoring/tracking with 24 of 43 (55.8%) apps performing this. 15 of 43 apps (34.9%) reported clinician, professional or scientific input; in 2014 it was only 4 of 39 (10.3%). 2 of 43 apps (5%) mentioned peer-reviewed evidence along with professional input. Not all apps had ratings. On Android 20 of 22 apps had ratings; average app rating was 3.5, range 1.6 to 4.6. On Apple, 13 of 13 had ratings; average rating was 3.5; range 1- 5. CONCLUSIONS: Since 2014 there have been an expanding and changing landscape of apps targeting melanoma diagnosis. There remains a lack of evidence backing their efficacy. This is concerning given their public availability and the gravity of their subject matter.

10 Review Skin Pigmentation Genetics for the Clinic. 2017

Ainger, Stephen A / Jagirdar, Kasturee / Lee, Katie J / Soyer, H Peter / Sturm, Richard A. ·Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, Diamantina Institute, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. ·Dermatology · Pubmed #28463841.

ABSTRACT: Human pigmentation characteristics play an important role in the effects of sun exposure, skin cancer induction and disease outcomes. Several of the genes most important for this diversity are involved in the regulation and distribution of melanin pigmentation or enzymes involved in melanogenesis itself within the melanocyte cell present in the skin, hair and eyes. The single nucleotide polymorphisms and extended haplotypes within or surrounding these genes have been identified as risk factors for skin cancer, in particular, melanoma. These same polymorphisms have been under selective pressure leading towards lighter pigmentation in Europeans in the last 5,000-20,000 years that have driven the increase in frequency in modern populations. Although pigmentation is a polygenic trait, due to interactive and quantitative gene effects, strong phenotypic associations are readily apparent for these major genes. However, predictive value and utility are increased when considering gene polymorphism interactions. In melanoma, an increased penetrance is found in cases when pigmentation gene risk alleles such as MC1R variants are coincident with mutation of higher-risk melanoma genes including CDKN2A, CDK4 and MITF E318K, demonstrating an interface between the pathways for pigmentation, naevogenesis and melanoma. The clinical phenotypes associated with germline changes in pigmentation and naevogenic genes must be understood by clinicians, and will be of increasing relevance to dermatologists, as genomics is incorporated into the delivery of personalised medicine.

11 Review Standardization of terminology in dermoscopy/dermatoscopy: Results of the third consensus conference of the International Society of Dermoscopy. 2016

Kittler, Harald / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Argenziano, Giuseppe / Carrera, Cristina / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer / Malvehy, Josep / Menzies, Scott / Puig, Susana / Rabinovitz, Harold / Stolz, Wilhelm / Saida, Toshiaki / Soyer, H Peter / Siegel, Eliot / Stoecker, William V / Scope, Alon / Tanaka, Masaru / Thomas, Luc / Tschandl, Philipp / Zalaudek, Iris / Halpern, Allan. ·Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: harald.kittler@meduniwien.ac.at. · Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Dermatology and Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Istituto di Ricerca e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS), Reggio Emilia, Italy. · Melanoma Unit, Department of Dermatology, Hospital Clinic, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Universitat de Barcelona, and Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Enfermedades Raras (CIBER ER), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Barcelona, Spain. · University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, Arizona. · Department of Dermatology and Venerology, Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer Unit, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. · Sydney Melanoma Diagnostic Center, Sydney Cancer Center, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, Australia. · Skin and Cancer Associates, Plantation, Florida. · Department of Dermatology, Klinikum München, Munich, Germany. · Department of Dermatology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Japan. · Dermatology Research Center, University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia. · University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Dermatology, University of Missouri Health Sciences Center, Columbia, Missouri. · Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York; Department of Dermatology, Sheba Medical Center and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Department of Dermatology, Keio University, Tokyo, Japan. · Service de Dermatologie, Center Hospitalier Universitaire de Lyon, Lyon, France. · Department of Dermatology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #26896294.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Evolving dermoscopic terminology motivated us to initiate a new consensus. OBJECTIVE: We sought to establish a dictionary of standardized terms. METHODS: We reviewed the medical literature, conducted a survey, and convened a discussion among experts. RESULTS: Two competitive terminologies exist, a more metaphoric terminology that includes numerous terms and a descriptive terminology based on 5 basic terms. In a survey among members of the International Society of Dermoscopy (IDS) 23.5% (n = 201) participants preferentially use descriptive terminology, 20.1% (n = 172) use metaphoric terminology, and 484 (56.5%) use both. More participants who had been initially trained by metaphoric terminology prefer using descriptive terminology than vice versa (9.7% vs 2.6%, P < .001). Most new terms that were published since the last consensus conference in 2003 were unknown to the majority of the participants. There was uniform consensus that both terminologies are suitable, that metaphoric terms need definitions, that synonyms should be avoided, and that the creation of new metaphoric terms should be discouraged. The expert panel proposed a dictionary of standardized terms taking account of metaphoric and descriptive terms. LIMITATIONS: A consensus seeks a workable compromise but does not guarantee its implementation. CONCLUSION: The new consensus provides a revised framework of standardized terms to enhance the consistent use of dermoscopic terminology.

12 Review A systematic review of non-surgical treatments for lentigo maligna. 2016

Read, T / Noonan, C / David, M / Wagels, M / Foote, M / Schaider, H / Soyer, H P / Smithers, B M. ·Queensland Melanoma Project, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Queensland Health, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · Discipline of Surgery, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · School of Medicine, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD, Australia. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Christchurch Hospital, Canterbury District Health, Christchurch, New Zealand. · Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, School of Public Health, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · Dermatology Research Centre, Translational Research Institute, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #26299846.

ABSTRACT: Lentigo maligna (LM) is the most common melanocytic malignancy of the head and neck. If left untreated, LM can progress to lentigo maligna melanoma (LMM). Complete surgical excision is the gold standard for treatment, however, due to the location, size, and advanced age of patients, surgery is not always acceptable. As a result, there is ongoing interest in alternative, less invasive treatment modalities. The objective was to provide a structured review of key literature reporting the use of radiotherapy, imiquimod and laser therapy for the management of LM in patients where surgical resection is prohibited. An independent review was conducted following a comprehensive search of the National Library of Medicine using MEDLINE and PubMed, Embase, Scopus, ScienceDirect and Cochrane Library databases. Data were presented in tabular format, and crude data pooled to calculate mean recurrence rates for each therapy. 29 studies met the inclusion criteria: radiotherapy 10; topical imiquimod 10; laser therapies 9. Radiotherapy demostrated recurrence rates of up to 31% (mean 11.5%), with follow-up durations of 1-96 months. Topical imiquimod recurrence rates were up to 50% (mean 24.5%), with follow-up durations of 2-49 months. Laser therapy yielded recurrence rates of up to 100% (mean 34.4%), and follow-up durations of 8-78 months. in each of the treatment series the I(2) value measuring statistical heterogeneity exceeded the accepted threshold of 50% and as such a meta-analysis of included data were inappropriate. For non-surgical patients with LM, radiotherapy and topical imiquimod were efficacious treatments. Radiotherapy produced superior complete response rates and fewer recurrences than imiquimod although both are promising non-invasive modalities. There was no consistent body of evidence regarding laser therapy although response rates of up to 100% were reported in low quality studies. A prospective comparative trial is indicated and would provide accurate data on the long-term efficacy and overall utility of these treatments.

13 Review Defining incidental perineural invasion: the need for a national registry. 2014

Buchanan, Lauren / De'Ambrosis, Brian / DeAmbrosis, Kathryn / Warren, Timothy / Huilgol, Shyamala / Soyer, H Peter / Panizza, Benedict. ·Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Translational Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Department of Dermatology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. ·Australas J Dermatol · Pubmed #24372092.

ABSTRACT: This article by the Perineural Invasion (PNI) Registry Group aims to clarify clinical and histopathological ambiguities surrounding PNI in non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). PNI is reportedly present in approximately 2-6% of cases of NMSC and is associated with greater rates of morbidity and mortality. The distinction between clinical PNI and incidental PNI is somewhat unclear, especially in regard to management and prognosis. One important objective of the PNI Registry is to develop a standardised method of classifying perineural invasion. Hence, in this article we propose a definition for PNI and for its sub-classification. This article also provides a critical analysis of the current literature on the treatment of incidental PNI by evaluating the key cohort studies that have investigated the use of surgery or radiotherapy in the management of incidental PNI. At present, there are no universal clinical guidelines that specify the acceptable treatment of NMSC exhibiting incidental PNI. Consequently, patients often receive surgery with varying wider margins, or radiotherapy despite the limited evidence substantiating such management options. It is evident from the existing literature that current opinion is divided over the benefit of adjuvant radiotherapy. Certain prognostic factors have been proposed, such as the size and depth of tumour invasion, nerve diameter, the presence of multifocal PNI and the type of tumour. The PNI Registry is a web-based registry that has been developed to assist in attaining further data pertaining to incidental PNI in NMSC. It is envisaged that this information will provide the foundation for identifying and defining best practice in managing incidental PNI.

14 Review A clinico-dermoscopic approach for skin cancer screening: recommendations involving a survey of the International Dermoscopy Society. 2013

Argenziano, Giuseppe / Giacomel, Jason / Zalaudek, Iris / Blum, Andreas / Braun, Ralph P / Cabo, Horacio / Halpern, Allan / Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer / Malvehy, Josep / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Menzies, Scott / Moscarella, Elvira / Pellacani, Giovanni / Puig, Susana / Rabinovitz, Harold / Saida, Toshiaki / Seidenari, Stefania / Soyer, H Peter / Stolz, Wilhelm / Thomas, Luc / Kittler, Harald. ·Dermatology and Skin Cancer Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova IRCCS, Viale Risorgimento 80, Reggio Emilia 42100, Italy. Electronic address: g.argenziano@gmail.com. ·Dermatol Clin · Pubmed #24075542.

ABSTRACT: Dermoscopy is useful for skin cancer screening, but a detailed approach is required that integrates this tool into a rational clinical work flow. To investigate clinician perceptions and behavior in approaching patients with skin tumors, a survey was launched by electronic mail through the International Dermoscopy Society. After 4 months, the responses were analyzed and significant findings calculated. Considering the current approach of study participants in examining patients for skin cancer, an up-to-date system of triage is presented in this review, which aims to promote an improved diagnostic accuracy and more timely management of skin malignancy.

15 Review Modelling melanoma in mice. 2011

Walker, Graeme J / Soyer, H P / Terzian, Tamara / Box, Neil F. ·Skin Carcinogenesis Laboratory, Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Herston, Qld, Australia. ·Pigment Cell Melanoma Res · Pubmed #21985222.

ABSTRACT: Phenotypic and molecular heterogeneity in human melanoma has impaired efforts to explain many of the clinically important features of melanoma. For example, many of the underlying mechanisms that might predict age-of-onset, time to metastasis and other key elements in melanoma progression remain unknown. Furthermore, melanoma staging used to predict outcome and treatment has not yet moved beyond a basic phenotypic classification. While molecularly targeted therapies show great promise for melanoma patients, establishing accurate animal models that recapitulate human cutaneous melanoma progression remains a priority. We examine the relevance of mice as models for human melanoma progression and for key molecular and histopathologic variants of melanoma. These mice may be used as preclinical models to probe the relationships between causative mutations, disease progression and outcome for molecularly targeted therapeutics. We ask how new mouse models, or more detailed histopathologic and molecular analyses of existing mouse models, may be used to advance our understanding of genotype-phenotype correlations in this tumour type. This necessarily involves a consideration of the utility of mice as models for ultraviolet radiation-induced melanoma, and how this might be improved.

16 Clinical Trial Protocol for the TIDAL Melanoma Study: topical imiquimod or diphenylcyclopropenone for the management of cutaneous in-transit melanoma metastases-a phase II, single centre, randomised, pilot study. 2017

Read, Tavis / Webber, Scott / Thomas, Janine / Wagels, Michael / Schaider, Helmut / Soyer, H Peter / Smithers, B Mark. ·Queensland Melanoma Project, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Queensland Health, Brisbane, Australia. · Department of Surgery, The University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. · Griffith University, School of Medicine, Gold Coast, Australia. · Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Brisbane, Australia. · Department of Dermatology, The University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. ·BMJ Open · Pubmed #28988173.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Patients with in-transit melanoma metastases present a therapeutic challenge. Complete surgical excision of localised disease is considered as the gold standard; however, surgery is not always acceptable and alternatives are required. Treatment results reported using imiquimod and diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) suggest that topical immunotherapies can be used to successfully treat select patients with melanoma metastases. A phase II, randomised, single centre, pilot study was designed to assess the clinical efficacy and safety of DPCP and imiquimod for the treatment of superficial, cutaneous in-transit melanoma metastases. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This is an open-label, non-superiority, pilot study with no treatment cross-over. Eligible patients are randomised in a 1:1 ratio to receive topical therapy for up to 12 months with a minimum follow-up period of 12 months. The target sample size is 30 patients, with 15 allocated to each treatment arm. The primary endpoint is the number of patients experiencing a complete response of treated lesions as determined clinically using Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumours. This trial incorporates health-related quality of life measures and biological tissue collection for further experimental substudies. The study will also facilitate a health economic analysis. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Approval was obtained from the Human Research Ethics Committee at the participating centre, and recruitment has commenced. The results of this study will be submitted for formal publication within a peer-reviewed journal. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: Prospectively registered on 16 October 2015 with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12615001088538). This study conforms to WHO Trial Registration Data Set.

17 Article A case of recurrent lentigo maligna diagnosed with precise reflectance confocal microscopy-guided biopsy technique. 2020

Robinson, Mitchell / Soyer, H Peter / Salkeld, Anna. ·University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, The University of Queensland, Dermatology Research Centre, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Department of Dermatology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · IQ Pathology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. ·JAAD Case Rep · Pubmed #32382627.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Article Early detection of melanoma: a consensus report from the Australian Skin and Skin Cancer Research Centre Melanoma Screening Summit. 2020

Janda, Monika / Cust, Anne E / Neale, Rachel E / Aitken, Joanne F / Baade, Peter D / Green, Adele C / Khosrotehrani, Kiarash / Mar, Victoria / Soyer, H Peter / Whiteman, David C. ·Centre for Health Services Research, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland. · Sydney School of Public Health and Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, New South Wales. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Queensland. · Cancer Council Queensland. · CRUK Manchester Institute and University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, UK. · The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, The University of Queensland, Dermatology Research Centre, Queensland. · School of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Victoria. ·Aust N Z J Public Health · Pubmed #32190955.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: A Melanoma Screening Summit was held in Brisbane, Australia, to review evidence regarding current approaches for early detection of melanomas and explore new opportunities. RESULTS: Formal population-based melanoma screening is not carried out in Australia, but there is evidence of considerable opportunistic screening as well as early detection. Biopsy rates are rising and most melanomas are now diagnosed when in situ. Based on evidence review and expert opinion, the Summit attendees concluded that there is currently insufficient information in terms of comparative benefits, harms and costs to support change from opportunistic to systematic screening. Assessment of gains in precision and cost-effectiveness of integrating total body imaging, artificial intelligence algorithms and genetic risk information is required, as well as better understanding of clinical and molecular features of thin fatal melanomas. CONCLUSIONS: Research is needed to understand how to further optimise early detection of melanoma in Australia. Integrating risk-based population stratification and more precise diagnostic tests is likely to improve the balance of benefits and harms of opportunistic screening, pending assessment of cost-effectiveness. Implications for public health: The Summit Group identified that the personal and financial costs to the community of detecting and treating melanoma are rising, and this may be mitigated by developing and implementing a more systematic process for diagnosing melanoma.

19 Article Consumer Preferences for Skin Cancer Screening Using Mobile Teledermoscopy: A Qualitative Study. 2020

Kong, Fleur / Horsham, Caitlin / Rayner, Jenna / Simunovic, Marko / O'Hara, Montana / Soyer, H Peter / Janda, Monika. ·Centre for Health Services Research, Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · School of Public Health and Social Work, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Dermatology Research Centre, University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Centre for Health Services Research, Faculty of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, m.janda@uq.edu.au. · School of Public Health and Social Work, Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, m.janda@uq.edu.au. ·Dermatology · Pubmed #32126557.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Mobile teledermoscopy is a rapidly advancing technology that promotes early detection and management of skin cancers. Whilst the use of teledermoscopy has proven to be effective and has a role in the detection of skin cancers, patients' attitudes towards the multiple ways in which this technology can be utilised has not been explored. METHODS: Data were obtained from a large randomised controlled trial comparing mobile teledermoscopy-enhanced skin self-examinations (SSEs) with naked-eye SSE. A semi-structured interview guide was developed by the investigators with questions focusing on people's previous skin screening behaviours and 2 of the major pathways which can be utilised in mobile teledermoscopy: (i) direct-to-consumer and (ii) doctor-to-doctor. All interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was undertaken by 2 independent researchers. RESULTS: Twenty-eight participants were interviewed. Eighty-six percent of participants (n = 24/28) had previously had a clinical skin examination. Only 18% of participants (n = 5/28) visited the same doctor for each clinical skin examination. Five main themes were identified in the interviews that affected how people felt about the integration of mobile teledermoscopy into skin screening pathways: history of clinical skin examinations, continuity of the doctor-patient relationship, convenience of the direct-to-consumer teledermoscopy, expedited review enhancing the doctor-to-doctor setting and mobile teledermoscopy as a partner-assisted task. CONCLUSIONS: Overall mobile teledermoscopy was viewed positively for both direct-to-consumer and doctor-to-doctor interaction. Continuity of care in the doctor-patient relationship was not found to be a priority for clinical skin examination with most participants visiting several doctors throughout their clinical skin examination history.

20 Article Is Teledermoscopy Ready to Replace Face-to-Face Examinations for the Early Detection of Skin Cancer? Consumer Views, Technology Acceptance, and Satisfaction with Care. 2020

Horsham, Caitlin / Snoswell, Centaine / Vagenas, Dimitrios / Loescher, Lois J / Gillespie, Nicole / Soyer, H Peter / Janda, Monika. ·Centre for Health Services Research, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · The University of Arizona Colleges of Nursing and Public Health, and The University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, Arizona, USA. · UQ Business School, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, The University of Queensland, Dermatology Research Centre, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Centre for Health Services Research, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, m.janda@uq.edu.au. · Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, School of Public Health and Social Work, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, m.janda@uq.edu.au. ·Dermatology · Pubmed #32114570.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Previous cross-sectional research indicates high acceptance of mobile teledermoscopy-enhanced skin self-examination (SSE) by consumers based on the technology acceptance model (TAM) domains: perceived usefulness, ease of use, compatibility, attitude and intention, subjective norms, facilitator, and trust. However, no study has assessed this outcome longitudinally among people who actually used the technology in their own homes. METHODS: Participants were living in Brisbane, Australia, aged 18 years or older, and at high risk of skin cancer. Participants randomly assigned to the intervention group (n = 98) completed a self-administered questionnaire on mobile teledermoscopy acceptance for skin cancer detection both before use and after performing mobile teledermoscopy-enhanced SSE in their homes. The survey included a 25-item scale assessing seven TAM domains. Item scores ranged from 5 (strongly agree) to 1 (strongly disagree). Participants also answered survey questions on satisfaction with use of teledermoscopy, and a 9-item "thoughts about melanoma" scale that measures cancer worry. RESULTS: Participants were 19-73 years old, had high skin cancer risk, blue or grey eyes (53.1%), fair or very fair skin (88.8%), and previous skin cancer treatments (61.2%). Participants were more accepting of mobile teledermoscopy at baseline: mean TAM score of 4.15 (SE 0.05); their level of acceptance decreased significantly after teledermoscopy use: mean score 3.94 (SE 0.05; p = 0.001). In linear regression analysis, the decrease in TAM scores was similar across demographic and skin cancer risk categories. Ninety-two percent (n = 90) of participants agreed that mobile teledermoscopy was easy to use. The mean score of the "thoughts about melanoma" scale did not change significantly from baseline to follow-up. CONCLUSION: Consumers had high TAM scores before they used mobile teledermoscopy within a randomised control trial. At the end of the intervention period, TAM scores decreased, although participants' average score still indicated "agreement" that mobile teledermoscopy was acceptable.

21 Article A Panel of Circulating MicroRNAs Detects Uveal Melanoma With High Precision. 2019

Stark, Mitchell S / Gray, Elin S / Isaacs, Timothy / Chen, Fred K / Millward, Michael / McEvoy, Ashleigh / Zaenker, Pauline / Ziman, Melanie / Soyer, H Peter / Glasson, William J / Warrier, Sunil K / Stark, Andrew L / Rolfe, Olivia J / Palmer, Jane M / Hayward, Nicholas K. ·The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, The University of Queensland, Dermatology Research Centre, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia. · Centre for Ophthalmology and Visual Science, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia. · Department of Ophthalmology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. · Perth Retina, West Leederville, Western Australia, Australia. · Lions Eye Institute, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia. · School of Medicine and Pharmacology, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia. · Department of Medical Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia. · School of Biomedical Science, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia. · Department of Dermatology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Queensland Ocular Oncology Service, The Terrace Eye Centre, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. ·Transl Vis Sci Technol · Pubmed #31737436.

ABSTRACT: Purpose: To determine if a circulating microRNA (miRNA) panel could be used to distinguish between uveal melanoma and uveal nevi. Methods: We report on a multicenter, cross-sectional study conducted between June 2012 and September 2015. The follow-up time was approximately 3 to 5 years. Blood was drawn from participants presenting with a uveal nevus ( Results: A panel of six miRNAs (miR-16, miR-145, miR-146a, miR-204, miR-211, and miR-363-3p) showed significant differences between participants with uveal nevi compared with patients with localized and metastatic uveal melanoma. Importantly, miR-211 was able to accurately distinguish metastatic disease from localized uveal melanoma ( Conclusions: This miRNA panel, in tandem with clinical findings, may be suited to confirm benign lesions. In addition, due to the panel's high precision in identifying malignancy, it has the potential to augment melanoma detection in subsequent clinical follow-up of lesions with atypical clinical features. Translational Relevance: Uveal nevi mimic the appearance of uveal melanoma and their transformation potential cannot be definitively determined without a biopsy. This panel is most relevant at the nevus stage and in lesions with uncertain malignant potential as a companion diagnostic tool to assist in clinical decision-making.

22 Article Evaluation of the efficacy of 3D total-body photography with sequential digital dermoscopy in a high-risk melanoma cohort: protocol for a randomised controlled trial. 2019

Primiero, Clare Amy / McInerney-Leo, Aideen M / Betz-Stablein, Brigid / Whiteman, David C / Gordon, Louisa / Caffery, Liam / Aitken, Joanne F / Eakin, Elizabeth / Osborne, Sonya / Gray, Len / Smithers, B Mark / Janda, Monika / Soyer, H Peter / Finnane, Anna. ·The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Cancer Control Group, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · School of Nursing, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · School of Public Health, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Centre for Online Health, Centre for Health Services Research, The University of Queensland, Woolloongabba, Queensland, Australia. · Department of Dermatology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Cancer Research Centre, Cancer Council Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Institute for Resilient Religions, University of Southern Queensland, Springfield, Queensland, Australia. · Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Southern Queensland, Toowoomba, Queensland, Australia. · Queensland Melanoma Project, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia p.soyer@uq.edu.au. ·BMJ Open · Pubmed #31712348.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Melanoma is Australia's fourth most common cancer. Early detection is fundamental in maximising health outcomes and minimising treatment costs. To date, population-based screening programmes have not been justified in health economic studies. However, a skin surveillance approach targeting high-risk individuals could improve the cost-benefit ratio. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This paper describes a 2-year longitudinal randomised controlled trial (RCT) to compare routine clinical care (control) with an intensive skin surveillance programme (intervention) consisting of novel three-dimensional (3D) total-body photography (TBP), sequential digital dermoscopy and melanoma-risk stratification, in a high-risk melanoma cohort. Primary outcomes will evaluate clinical, economic and consumer impact of the intervention. Clinical outcomes will evaluate differences in the rate of lesion excisions/biopsies per person, benign to malignant ratio for excisions and thickness of melanomas diagnosed. A health economic analysis using government data repositories will capture healthcare utilisation and costs relating to skin surveillance. Consumer questionnaires will examine intervention acceptability, the psychological impact, and attitudes towards melanoma risk and sun protective behaviour. Secondary outcomes include the development of a holistic risk algorithm incorporating clinical, phenotypic and genetic factors to facilitate the identification of those most likely to benefit from this surveillance approach. Furthermore, the feasibility of integrating the intervention with teledermatology to enhance specialist care in remote locations will be evaluated. This will be the first RCT to compare a targeted surveillance programme utilising new 3D TBP technology against current routine clinical care for individuals at high risk of melanoma. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study has received Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC) approval from both Metro South Health HREC (HREC/17/QPAH/816) and The University of Queensland HREC (2018000074). TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ANZCTR12618000267257; Pre-results.

23 Article A systematic review and meta-analysis of locoregional treatments for in-transit melanoma. 2019

Read, Tavis / Lonne, Michael / Sparks, David S / David, Michael / Wagels, Michael / Schaider, Helmut / Soyer, H Peter / Smithers, B Mark. ·Queensland Melanoma Project, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · The University of Queensland, Faculty of Medicine, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Griffith University, School of Medicine, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. · The University of Queensland, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · The University of Newcastle, School of Medicine and Public Health, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. · The University of Queensland, Dermatology Research Centre, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #30734295.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In-transit melanoma (ITM) metastases present a therapeutic challenge and management decisions can be difficult. There are multiple treatments available, with differing efficacy, and supported by different levels of evidence. The primary objective was to perform a systematic review and where suitable, a meta-analysis of the literature reporting on the use of locoregional treatments for the management of ITM. METHODS: An independent review was conducted including a comprehensive search of the National Library of Medicine using PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases. Key data were tabulated, synthesized and pooled to calculate relevant weighted effect sizes for each therapy using random-effect models. The statistical heterogeneity was calculated using the Higgins' method. RESULTS: Of the initial 32 612 articles identified, 57 original articles satisfied eligibility criteria. Eight treatment modalities were identified comprising: amputation (7); hyperthermic isolated limb perfusion (15); isolated limb infusion (8); carbon dioxide laser (9); PV-10 intralesional therapy (5); IL-2 intralesional therapy (8); imiquimod (7); diphenylcyclopropenone (3). Only amputation and topical imiquimod were suitable for formal meta-analysis. CONCLUSIONS: All of the assessed therapies have significant selection bias. Variable levels of evidence support the ongoing use of locoregional treatments and these may significantly improve disease-free survival.

24 Article Phenotypic and genotypic analysis of amelanotic and hypomelanotic melanoma patients. 2019

Rayner, J E / McMeniman, E K / Duffy, D L / De'Ambrosis, B / Smithers, B M / Jagirdar, K / Lee, K J / Soyer, H P / Sturm, R A. ·Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld, Australia. · Dermatology Department, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Qld, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Qld, Australia. · Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld, Australia. · South East Dermatology, Annerley Square, Brisbane, Qld, Australia. · Queensland Melanoma Project, School of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld, Australia. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #30680790.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Amelanotic/hypomelanotic melanoma is associated with poorer outcomes due to a more advanced disease stage at diagnosis. OBJECTIVE: To determine phenotypic risks and genotypic associations with amelanotic/hypomelanotic melanoma to develop a clinical and genetic profile that could assist in identifying high-risk individuals. METHODS: The Brisbane Naevus Morphology Study conducted from 2009 to 2016 has recruited a core of 1254 participants. Participants were drawn from a combination of volunteers from dermatology outpatient clinics, private dermatology clinics, the Brisbane Longitudinal Twin Study and QSkin study. Case participants had a personal history of melanoma and control participants no personal history of melanoma. We specifically examined seven known candidate pigmentation and melanoma genes and pigmentary phenotypic characteristics in participants with amelanotic/hypomelanotic melanoma compared to pigmented melanomas. This assayed single nucleotide polymorphisms in MC1R, TYR, HERC/OCA2, IRF4, MTAP, PLA2G6 and MITF. RESULTS: Forty-seven participants had at least one amelanotic/hypomelanotic melanoma, and 389 had pigmented melanomas, with amelanotic/hypomelanotic melanoma patients significantly older than pigmented melanoma participants (63.3 ± 13.0 vs. 54.6 ± 15.3 years; P < 0.001). Amelanotic/hypomelanotic melanoma patients were more likely than pigmented melanoma patients to have red hair (34% vs. 15%; P = 0.01), severe hand freckling (13% vs. 5%; P = 0.01) and propensity to sunburn (63% vs. 44%; P = 0.01). MC1R R/R genotype was much more frequent in our amelanotic/hypomelanotic melanoma population (31.1% vs. 11%; P < 0.001; OR 26.4 vs. 5.9; control 1.0). Amelanotic/hypomelanotic melanoma was associated with TYR rs1126809*A/A [OR (CI 95%) 2.7 (1.1-6.8) vs. 1.2 (0.8-1.9)] and PLA2G6 rs11570734*A/A [OR (CI 95%) 3.7 (1.0-13.6) vs. 1.3 (0.9-2.0)]. The MTAP melanoma risk SNP genotype, associated with darker pigmentation, (rs4636294*A/A) was less common in amelanotic/hypomelanotic melanoma patients [OR (CI 95%) 0.8 (0.3-2.1) vs. 2.0 (1.3-3.1)]. CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge of phenotypic and genotypic associations of amelanotic/hypomelanotic melanoma can help predict risks and associations of this difficult to diagnose melanoma, which may ultimately assist clinical management and patient skin self-examination.

25 Article Methods of melanoma detection and of skin monitoring for individuals at high risk of melanoma: new Australian clinical practice. 2019

Adler, Nikki R / Kelly, John W / Guitera, Pascale / Menzies, Scott W / Chamberlain, Alex J / Fishburn, Paul / Button-Sloan, Alison E / Heal, Clinton / Soyer, H Peter / Thompson, John F. ·Victorian Melanoma Service, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, VIC. · Armadale Dermatology, Melbourne, VIC. · Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, NSW. · University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW. · Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW. · Sydney Melanoma Diagnostic Centre, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW. · Victorian Melanoma Service, Alfred Health, Melbourne, VIC. · Glenferrie Dermatology, Melbourne, VIC. · Norwest Skin Cancer Centre, Sydney, NSW. · Melanoma Patients Australia, Brisbane, QLD. · MelanomaWA, Perth, WA. · Dermatology Research Centre, Diamantina Institute, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD. · Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD. ·Med J Aust · Pubmed #30636296.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: The evidence-based national clinical practice guidelines for the management of cutaneous melanoma published in 2008 are currently being updated. This article summarises the findings from multiple chapters of the guidelines on different methods of melanoma detection and of monitoring the skin for patients at high risk of melanoma. Early detection of melanoma is critical, as thinner tumours are associated with enhanced survival; therefore, strategies to improve early detection are important to reduce melanoma-related mortality. MAIN RECOMMENDATIONS: Clinicians who perform skin examinations for the purpose of detecting skin cancer should be trained in and use dermoscopy. The use of short term sequential digital dermoscopy imaging to detect melanomas that lack dermoscopic features of melanoma is recommended to assess individual melanocytic lesions of concern. The use of long term sequential digital dermoscopy imaging to detect melanomas that lack dermoscopic features of melanoma is recommended to assess individual or multiple melanocytic lesions for routine surveillance of high risk patients. The use of total body photography should be considered in managing patients at increased risk for melanoma, particularly those with high naevus counts and dysplastic naevi. There is insufficient evidence to recommend the routine use of automated instruments for the clinical diagnosis of primary melanoma. MANAGEMENT OVERVIEW: Determining the relative indications for each diagnostic method and how each method should be introduced into the surveillance of a patient requires careful consideration and an individualised approach.

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