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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Susan M. Swetter
Based on 78 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, S. Swetter wrote the following 78 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4
1 Guideline Guidelines of care for the management of primary cutaneous melanoma. 2019

Swetter, Susan M / Tsao, Hensin / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Elder, David E / Gershenwald, Jeffrey E / Guild, Valerie / Grant-Kels, Jane M / Halpern, Allan C / Johnson, Timothy M / Sober, Arthur J / Thompson, John A / Wisco, Oliver J / Wyatt, Samantha / Hu, Shasa / Lamina, Toyin. ·Department of Dermatology, Stanford University Medical Center and Cancer Institute, Stanford, California; Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. Electronic address: sswetter@stanford.edu. · Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Division of Dermatology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona; University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, Arizona. · Department of Dermatology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Department of Pathology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas; Department of Cancer Biology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · AIM at Melanoma Foundation, Plano, Texas. · Department of Dermatology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut; Department of Pathology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut; Department of Pediatrics, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut. · Department of Dermatology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Dermatology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon. · Decatur Dermatology, Decatur, Alabama. · Department of Dermatology, University of Miami Health System, Miami, Florida. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30392755.

ABSTRACT: The incidence of primary cutaneous melanoma continues to increase each year. Melanoma accounts for the majority of skin cancer-related deaths, but treatment is usually curative following early detection of disease. In this American Academy of Dermatology clinical practice guideline, updated treatment recommendations are provided for patients with primary cutaneous melanoma (American Joint Committee on Cancer stages 0-IIC and pathologic stage III by virtue of a positive sentinel lymph node biopsy). Biopsy techniques for a lesion that is clinically suggestive of melanoma are reviewed, as are recommendations for the histopathologic interpretation of cutaneous melanoma. The use of laboratory, molecular, and imaging tests is examined in the initial work-up of patients with newly diagnosed melanoma and for follow-up of asymptomatic patients. With regard to treatment of primary cutaneous melanoma, recommendations for surgical margins and the concepts of staged excision (including Mohs micrographic surgery) and nonsurgical treatments for melanoma in situ, lentigo maligna type (including topical imiquimod and radiation therapy), are updated. The role of sentinel lymph node biopsy as a staging technique for cutaneous melanoma is described, with recommendations for its use in clinical practice. Finally, current data regarding pregnancy and melanoma, genetic testing for familial melanoma, and management of dermatologic toxicities related to novel targeted agents and immunotherapies for patients with advanced disease are summarized.

2 Guideline NCCN Guidelines Insights: Melanoma, Version 3.2016. 2016

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Algazi, Alain / Andtbacka, Robert / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / DiMaio, Dominick / Fields, Ryan C / Fleming, Martin D / Gastman, Brian / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Johnson, Douglas / Joseph, Richard W / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Materin, Miguel A / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ott, Patrick / Gupta, Aparna Priyanath / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April K / Skitzki, Joseph / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Torres-Roca, Javier F / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Engh, Anita. ·From Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine; The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute; University of Colorado Cancer Center; Aim at Melanoma; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital; Fox Chase Cancer Center; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; Duke Cancer Institute; Roswell Park Cancer Institute; Stanford Cancer Institute; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; Moffitt Cancer Center; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; and National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #27496110.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma have been significantly revised over the past few years in response to emerging data on a number of novel agents and treatment regimens. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the data and rationale supporting extensive changes to the recommendations for systemic therapy in patients with metastatic or unresectable melanoma.

3 Guideline Melanoma, Version 2.2016, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. 2016

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Algazi, Alain / Andtbacka, Robert / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / DiMaio, Dominick / Ernstoff, Marc / Fields, Ryan C / Fleming, Martin D / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Joseph, Richard W / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Materin, Miguel A / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April K / Skitzki, Joseph / Sosman, Jeff / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Torres-Roca, Javier F / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Engh, Anita. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #27059193.

ABSTRACT: This selection from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Melanoma focuses on adjuvant therapy and treatment of in-transit disease, because substantial changes were made to the recommendations for the 2016 update. Depending on the stage of the disease, options for adjuvant therapy now include biochemotherapy and high-dose ipilimumab. Treatment options for in-transit disease now include intralesional injection with talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC), a new immunotherapy. These additions prompted re-assessment of the data supporting older recommended treatment options for adjuvant therapy and in-transit disease, resulting in extensive revisions to the supporting discussion sections.

4 Guideline Melanoma, version 4.2014. 2014

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / Daud, Adil / Dimaio, Dominick / Fleming, Martin D / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole R / Ho, Maria / Anonymous5170793. ·From 1Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; 2Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; 3Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; 4University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; 5The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; 6UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; 7UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; 8Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center; 9St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; 10University of Colorado Cancer Center; 11Aim at Melanoma; 12Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; 13Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; 14Roswell Park Cancer Institute; 15Moffitt Cancer Center; 16The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; 17Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; 18Fox Chase Cancer Center; 19The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; 20Duke Cancer Institute; 21Stanford Cancer Institute; 22Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; 23City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; 24University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; and 25National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #24812131.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma provide multidisciplinary recommendations for the management of patients with melanoma. These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight notable recent updates. Dabrafenib and trametinib, either as monotherapy (category 1) or combination therapy, have been added as systemic options for patients with unresectable metastatic melanoma harboring BRAF V600 mutations. Controversy continues regarding the value of adjuvant radiation for patients at high risk of nodal relapse. This is reflected in the category 2B designation to consider adjuvant radiation following lymphadenectomy for stage III melanoma with clinically positive nodes or recurrent disease.

5 Guideline Melanoma, version 2.2013: featured updates to the NCCN guidelines. 2013

Coit, Daniel G / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daud, Adil / Dimaio, Dominick / Fleming, Martin D / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Lind, Anne / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Pruitt, Scott K / Ross, Merrick I / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Thompson, John A / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Ho, Maria / Anonymous4310755. ·Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #23584343.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma provide multidisciplinary recommendations on the clinical management of patients with melanoma. This NCCN Guidelines Insights report highlights notable recent updates. Foremost of these is the exciting addition of the novel agents ipilimumab and vemurafenib for treatment of advanced melanoma. The NCCN panel also included imatinib as a treatment for KIT-mutated tumors and pegylated interferon alfa-2b as an option for adjuvant therapy. Also important are revisions to the initial stratification of early-stage lesions based on the risk of sentinel lymph node metastases, and revised recommendations on the use of sentinel lymph node biopsy for low-risk groups. Finally, the NCCN panel reached clinical consensus on clarifying the role of imaging in the workup of patients with melanoma.

6 Guideline Melanoma. 2012

Coit, Daniel G / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daud, Adil / Dilawari, Raza A / Dimaio, Dominick / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Lind, Anne / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Pruitt, Scott K / Ross, Merrick I / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Thompson, John A / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / Anonymous590720. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #22393197.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Guideline Guidelines of care for the management of primary cutaneous melanoma. American Academy of Dermatology. 2011

Bichakjian, Christopher K / Halpern, Allan C / Johnson, Timothy M / Foote Hood, Antoinette / Grichnik, James M / Swetter, Susan M / Tsao, Hensin / Barbosa, Victoria Holloway / Chuang, Tsu-Yi / Duvic, Madeleine / Ho, Vincent C / Sober, Arthur J / Beutner, Karl R / Bhushan, Reva / Smith Begolka, Wendy / Anonymous6410703. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan Health System and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #21868127.

ABSTRACT: The incidence of primary cutaneous melanoma has been increasing dramatically for several decades. Melanoma accounts for the majority of skin cancer-related deaths, but treatment is nearly always curative with early detection of disease. In this update of the guidelines of care, we will discuss the treatment of patients with primary cutaneous melanoma. We will discuss biopsy techniques of a lesion clinically suspicious for melanoma and offer recommendations for the histopathologic interpretation of cutaneous melanoma. We will offer recommendations for the use of laboratory and imaging tests in the initial workup of patients with newly diagnosed melanoma and for follow-up of asymptomatic patients. With regard to treatment of primary cutaneous melanoma, we will provide recommendations for surgical margins and briefly discuss nonsurgical treatments. Finally, we will discuss the value and limitations of sentinel lymph node biopsy and offer recommendations for its use in patients with primary cutaneous melanoma.

8 Guideline Melanoma. 2009

Coit, Daniel G / Andtbacka, Robert / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Dilawari, Raza A / Dimaio, Dominick / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed / Lange, Julie R / Lind, Anne / Martin, Lainie / Martini, Mary C / Pruitt, Scott K / Ross, Merrick I / Sener, Stephen F / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Thompson, John A / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / Weber, Jeffrey / Wong, Michael K / Anonymous5080627. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #19401060.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Commentary: Improved patient outcomes remain elusive after intensive imaging surveillance for high-risk melanoma. 2016

Swetter, Susan M. ·Dermatology Service, Department of Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California; Department of Dermatology, Pigmented Lesion and Melanoma Program, Stanford University Medical Center and Cancer Institute, Stanford, California. Electronic address: sswetter@stanford.edu. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #27317056.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Role of aspirin and non-aspirin NSAIDs in preventing melanoma. 2013

Ally, Mina S / Swetter, Susan M / Tang, Jean Y. ·Department of Dermatology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 450 Broadway, Pavilion C, MC 5334, Redwood City, CA, USA. ·Future Oncol · Pubmed #23731359.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Gender disparities in patients with melanoma: breaking the glass ceiling. 2012

Sondak, Vernon K / Swetter, Susan M / Berwick, Marianne A. · ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #22547593.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Melanoma underreporting: why does it happen, how big is the problem, and how do we fix it? 2008

Cockburn, Myles / Swetter, Susan M / Peng, David / Keegan, Theresa H M / Deapen, Dennis / Clarke, Christina A. ·Department of Preventive Medicine, USC/Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, USA. Cockburn@usc.edu ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #19022107.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Review Cutaneous Complications of Targeted Melanoma Therapy. 2016

de Golian, Emily / Kwong, Bernice Y / Swetter, Susan M / Pugliese, Silvina B. ·Department of Dermatology, Cutaneous Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center and Cancer Institute, 780 Welch Road, CJ220F, Palo Alto, CA, 94304-5779, USA. · Dermatology Service, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, CA, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Cutaneous Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center and Cancer Institute, 780 Welch Road, CJ220F, Palo Alto, CA, 94304-5779, USA. spugliese@stanford.edu. ·Curr Treat Options Oncol · Pubmed #27645330.

ABSTRACT: OPINION STATEMENT: The landscape of advanced and metastatic melanoma therapy has shifted dramatically in recent years. Since 2011, eight drugs (ipilimumab, vemurafenib, dabrafenib, trametinib, cometinib, pembrolizumab, nivolumab, and talimogene laherparepvec) have received FDA approval for the treatment of advanced or metastatic melanoma, including combination regimens of both small molecule kinase and immune checkpoint inhibitors. These therapies have revolutionized the management of unresectable regional nodal and distant melanoma, providing hope of extended survival to patients. As the use of novel agents has increased, so have the cutaneous toxicities associated with these medications. While most skin reactions are low-grade and can be managed conservatively with topical therapies, malignant lesions and more serious or life-threatening drug reactions can arise during therapy, requiring prompt dermatologic recognition and treatment in order to improve patient outcome. Given the survival benefit attributed to these new agents, treating skin toxicity and maintaining patient quality of life is of paramount importance. Oncologists should be aware of the common cutaneous toxicities associated with these medications and should be encouraged to involve dermatologists in the collaborative care of advanced melanoma patients. Close communication between oncologists and dermatologists can help to avoid unnecessary dose reduction or treatment discontinuation and identify situations when treatment cessation is truly warranted.

14 Review Molecular Profiling in Cutaneous Melanoma. 2016

Ji, Andrew L / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Swetter, Susan M. ·From VA Palo Alto Health Care System, Dermatology Service, Palo Alto, and Stanford University Medical Center and Cancer Institute, Department of Dermatology Department of Dermatology, Pigmented Lesion and Melanoma Program, Stanford, California; and University of Michigan Health System, Department of Dermatology, Ann Arbor, Michigan. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #27059194.

ABSTRACT: Molecular profiling of malignant tumors is gaining increasing interest in oncology. In recent years, several molecular techniques have been studied in melanoma, with the goal to improve upon the diagnostic and prognostic abilities of currently available clinical and histopathologic parameters. Reliable tests performed early in the diagnosis and management of melanoma could lead to decreased morbidity and mortality by selecting appropriate patients for more-aggressive therapy and sparing those for whom it is not indicated. This article reviews the molecular diagnostic and prognostic techniques currently available for melanoma and evaluates their potential role in clinical practice.

15 Review Methods of Melanoma Detection. 2016

Leachman, Sancy A / Cassidy, Pamela B / Chen, Suephy C / Curiel, Clara / Geller, Alan / Gareau, Daniel / Pellacani, Giovanni / Grichnik, James M / Malvehy, Josep / North, Jeffrey / Jacques, Steven L / Petrie, Tracy / Puig, Susana / Swetter, Susan M / Tofte, Susan / Weinstock, Martin A. ·Department of Dermatology and Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, 3303 SW Bond Avenue, CH16D, Portland, OR, 97239, USA. leachmas@ohsu.edu. · Department of Dermatology and Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, 3125 SW Sam Jackson Park Road, L468R, Portland, OR, 97239, USA. cassidyp@ohsu.edu. · Department of Dermatology, Emory University School of Medicine, 1525 Clifton Road NE, 1st Floor, Atlanta, GA, 30322, USA. schen2@emory.edu. · Department of Dermatology and Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 N Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ, 85721, USA. ccuriel@email.arizona.edu. · Department of Dermatology, Harvard School of Public Health and Massachusetts General Hospital, Landmark Center, 401 Park Drive, 3rd Floor East, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. ageller@hsph.harvard.edu. · Laboratory of Investigative Dermatology, The Rockefeller University, 1230 York Avenue, New York, NY, 10065, USA. daniel.gareau@rockefeller.edu. · Department of Dermatology, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via del Pozzo 71, Modena, Italy. giovanni.pellacani@unimore.it. · Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami School of Medicine, Room 912, BRB (R-125), 1501 NW 10th Avenue, Miami, FL, 33136, USA. grichnik@miami.edu. · Melanoma Unit, Dermatology Department, Hospital Clinic Barcelona, Villarroel 170, 08036, Barcelona, Spain. jmalvehy@clinic.ub.es. · University of California, San Francisco, 1701 Divisadero Street, Suite 280, San Francisco, CA, 94115, USA. jeffrey.north@ucsf.edu. · Department of Biomedical Engineering and Dermatology, Oregon Health and Science University, 3303 SW Bond Avenue, CH13B, Portland, OR, 97239, USA. jacquess@ohsu.edu. · Department of Biomedical Engineering, Oregon Health and Science University, 3303 SW Bond Avenue, CH13B, Portland, OR, 97239, USA. petrie@ohsu.edu. · Melanoma Unit, Dermatology Department, Hospital Clinic Barcelona, Villarroel 170, 08036, Barcelona, Spain. spuig@clinic.ub.es. · Department of Dermatology/Cutaneous Oncology, Stanford University, 900 Blake Wilbur Drive, W3045, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA. sswetter@stanford.edu. · Department of Dermatology, Oregon Health and Science University, 3303 SW Bond Avenue, CH16D, Portland, OR, 97239, USA. toftes@ohsu.edu. · Departments of Dermatology and Epidemiology, Brown University, V A Medical Center 111D, 830 Chalkstone Avenue, Providence, RI, 02908, USA. maw@brown.edu. ·Cancer Treat Res · Pubmed #26601859.

ABSTRACT: Detection and removal of melanoma, before it has metastasized, dramatically improves prognosis and survival. The purpose of this chapter is to (1) summarize current methods of melanoma detection and (2) review state-of-the-art detection methods and technologies that have the potential to reduce melanoma mortality. Current strategies for the detection of melanoma range from population-based educational campaigns and screening to the use of algorithm-driven imaging technologies and performance of assays that identify markers of transformation. This chapter will begin by describing state-of-the-art methods for educating and increasing awareness of at-risk individuals and for performing comprehensive screening examinations. Standard and advanced photographic methods designed to improve reliability and reproducibility of the clinical examination will also be reviewed. Devices that magnify and/or enhance malignant features of individual melanocytic lesions (and algorithms that are available to interpret the results obtained from these devices) will be compared and contrasted. In vivo confocal microscopy and other cellular-level in vivo technologies will be compared to traditional tissue biopsy, and the role of a noninvasive "optical biopsy" in the clinical setting will be discussed. Finally, cellular and molecular methods that have been applied to the diagnosis of melanoma, such as comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), will be discussed.

16 Review Addressing the knowledge gap in clinical recommendations for management and complete excision of clinically atypical nevi/dysplastic nevi: Pigmented Lesion Subcommittee consensus statement. 2015

Kim, Caroline C / Swetter, Susan M / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Grichnik, James M / Grossman, Douglas / Halpern, Allan C / Kirkwood, John M / Leachman, Sancy A / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Ming, Michael E / Nelson, Kelly C / Veledar, Emir / Venna, Suraj S / Chen, Suephy C. ·Pigmented Lesion Clinic and Cutaneous Oncology Program, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Pigmented Lesion and Melanoma Program, Department of Dermatology, Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, California3Dermatology Service, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Pigmented Lesion Clinic and Multidisciplinary Cutaneous Oncology Program, Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson. · Melanoma Program, Department of Dermatology, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida. · Pigmented Lesion Clinic, Departments of Dermatology and Oncological Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City. · Pigmented Lesion Clinic, Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Melanoma Program, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine, Dermatology and Translational Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Melanoma and Cutaneous Oncology Program, Department of Dermatology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland. · Pigmented Lesion Clinic, Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. · Pigmented Lesion Clinic, Department of Dermatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. · Center for Research and Grants, Baptist Health South Florida, Miami. · Skin Oncology and Melanoma Center, Department of Medicine, MedStar Washington Cancer Institute and Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC. · Melanoma and Pigmented Lesion Clinic, Department of Dermatology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia15Division of Dermatology, Atlanta Veterans Administration Medical Center, Decatur, Georgia. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #25409291.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: The management of clinically atypical nevi/dysplastic nevi (CAN/DN) is controversial, with few data to guide the process. Management recommendations for DN with positive histologic margins were developed by the Delphi method to achieve consensus among members of the Pigmented Lesion Subcommittee (PLS) of the Melanoma Prevention Working Group (MPWG) after reviewing the current evidence. OBJECTIVES: To outline key issues related to the management of CAN/DN: (1) biopsies of CAN and how positive margins arise, (2) whether incompletely excised DN evolve into melanoma, (3) current data on the outcomes of DN with positive histologic margins, (4) consensus recommendations, and (5) a proposal for future studies, including a large-scale study to help guide the management of DN with positive margins. EVIDENCE REVIEW: The literature, including recent studies examining management and outcomes of DN with positive margins between 2009 to 2014, was reviewed. FINDINGS: A consensus statement by the PLS of the MPWG following review of the literature, group discussions, and a structured Delphi method consensus. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This consensus statement reviews the complexities of management of CAN/DN. A review of the literature and 2 rounds of a structured Delphi consensus resulted in the following recommendations: (1) mildly and moderately DN with clear margins do not need to be reexcised, (2) mildly DN biopsied with positive histologic margins without clinical residual pigmentation may be safely observed rather than reexcised, and (3) observation may be a reasonable option for management of moderately DN with positive histologic margins without clinically apparent residual pigmentation; however, more data are needed to make definitive recommendations in this clinical scenario.

17 Review Screening, early detection, education, and trends for melanoma: current status (2007-2013) and future directions: Part II. Screening, education, and future directions. 2014

Mayer, Jonathan E / Swetter, Susan M / Fu, Teresa / Geller, Alan C. ·Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Stanford University, Redwood City, California; Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Department of Dermatology, Stanford University, Redwood City, California. · Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: ageller@hsph.harvard.edu. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #25219717.

ABSTRACT: New evidence has accumulated over the past several years that supports improved melanoma outcomes associated with both clinician and patient screening. Population-based and workplace studies conducted in Australia and the Unites States, respectively, have shown decreases in the incidence of thick melanoma and overall melanoma mortality, and a year-long statewide screening program in Germany has shown a nearly 50% reduction in mortality 5 years after the screening ended. Current melanoma screening guidelines in the United States are inconsistent among various organizations, and therefore rates of both physician and patient skin examinations are low. As policymaking organizations update national screening recommendations in the United States, the latest research reviewed in part II of this continuing medical education article should be considered to establish the most effective recommendations. Patient and provider education will be necessary to ensure that appropriate patients receive recommended screening.

18 Review Screening, early detection, education, and trends for melanoma: current status (2007-2013) and future directions: Part I. Epidemiology, high-risk groups, clinical strategies, and diagnostic technology. 2014

Mayer, Jonathan E / Swetter, Susan M / Fu, Teresa / Geller, Alan C. ·Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts; Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Stanford University, Redwood City, California; Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Department of Dermatology, Stanford University, Redwood City, California. · Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: ageller@hsph.harvard.edu. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #25219716.

ABSTRACT: While most cancers have shown both decreased incidence and mortality over the past several decades, the incidence of melanoma has continued to grow, and mortality has only recently stabilized in the United States and in many other countries. Certain populations, such as men >60 years of age and lower socioeconomic status groups, face a greater burden from disease. For any given stage and across all ages, men have shown worse melanoma survival than women, and low socioeconomic status groups have increased levels of mortality. Novel risk factors can help identify populations at greatest risk for melanoma and can aid in targeted early detection. Risk assessment tools have been created to identify high-risk patients based on various factors, and these tools can reduce the number of patients needed to screen for melanoma detection. Diagnostic techniques, such as dermatoscopy and total body photography, and new technologies, such as multispectral imaging, may increase the accuracy and reliability of early melanoma detection.

19 Review Screening and prevention measures for melanoma: is there a survival advantage? 2012

Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Chen, Suephy C / Swetter, Susan M / Anonymous4170734. ·The University of Arizona Cancer Center, 1515 N. Campbell Ave, Box 245024, Tucson, AZ, 85724, USA. ccuriel@azcc.arizona.edu ·Curr Oncol Rep · Pubmed #22907282.

ABSTRACT: Controversy has emerged over the past decades regarding the value and impact of melanoma screening to detect early stage disease for improved prognosis. Those questioning the benefits of prevention efforts base their arguments on the absence of prospective, randomized studies demonstrating decreased melanoma mortality to justify the cost associated with screening and educational campaigns. For those in favor of melanoma screening, the lack of proven survival benefit is not a justification to abandon this approach, but rather a reflection of the lack of resources necessary to conduct a long-term trial. In 2009, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF)report did not recommend routine primary care screening for the general population given the absence of evidence. However, since the USPSTF report, a series of new studies are available, which support the potential benefit of screening and have the potential to significantly impact current policies regarding skin cancer screening, particularly for melanoma.

20 Review Survival is not the only valuable end point in melanoma screening. 2012

Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Kim, Caroline C / Swetter, Susan M / Chen, Suephy C / Halpern, Allan C / Kirkwood, John M / Leachman, Sancy A / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Ming, Michael E / Grichnik, James M / Anonymous1021005. ·Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona, USA. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #22336950.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Review Selection criteria for genetic assessment of patients with familial melanoma. 2009

Leachman, Sancy A / Carucci, John / Kohlmann, Wendy / Banks, Kimberly C / Asgari, Maryam M / Bergman, Wilma / Bianchi-Scarrà, Giovanna / Brentnall, Teresa / Bressac-de Paillerets, Brigitte / Bruno, William / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / de Snoo, Femke A / Debniak, Tadeusz / Demierre, Marie-France / Elder, David / Goldstein, Alisa M / Grant-Kels, Jane / Halpern, Allan C / Ingvar, Christian / Kefford, Richard F / Lang, Julie / MacKie, Rona M / Mann, Graham J / Mueller, Kurt / Newton-Bishop, Julia / Olsson, Håkan / Petersen, Gloria M / Puig, Susana / Rigel, Darrell / Swetter, Susan M / Tucker, Margaret A / Yakobson, Emanuel / Zitelli, John A / Tsao, Hensin. ·Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-5550, USA. sancy.leachman@hci.utah.edu ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #19751883.

ABSTRACT: Approximately 5% to 10% of melanoma may be hereditary in nature, and about 2% of melanoma can be specifically attributed to pathogenic germline mutations in cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A). To appropriately identify the small proportion of patients who benefit most from referral to a genetics specialist for consideration of genetic testing for CDKN2A, we have reviewed available published studies of CDKN2A mutation analysis in cohorts with invasive, cutaneous melanoma and found variability in the rate of CDKN2A mutations based on geography, ethnicity, and the type of study and eligibility criteria used. Except in regions of high melanoma incidence, such as Australia, we found higher rates of CDKN2A positivity in individuals with 3 or more primary invasive melanomas and/or families with at least one invasive melanoma and two or more other diagnoses of invasive melanoma and/or pancreatic cancer among first- or second-degree relatives on the same side of the family. The work summarized in this review should help identify individuals who are appropriate candidates for referral for genetic consultation and possible testing.

22 Article Cross-contamination of pathology specimens: a cautionary tale. 2018

Lewellis, Stephen W / Roy, Katherine / Gojenola, Linda / Swetter, Susan M / Rieger, Kerri E. ·Department of Dermatology, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Redwood City, California, USA. · Dermatology Group of the Carolinas, Concord, North Carolina, USA. · Department of Pathology, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Redwood City, California, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Redwood City, and Dermatology Service, VA Palo Alto Health Care System, California, USA. · Departments of Dermatology and Pathology, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Redwood City, California, USA. ·Cutis · Pubmed #30489571.

ABSTRACT: There are many potential sources of error in clinical practice. An astute clinician must not only work hard to prevent errors but also minimize harmful sequelae that could arise from errors that do occur. A rare but real source of error is cross-contamination of pathology specimens. Such contaminants are colloquially referred to as floaters. If not recognized expediently, floaters can lead to misdiagnoses that may prompt unnecessary and inappropriate treatment. We report the case of a patient with a benign adnexal neoplasm on the face that, due to cross-contamination of pathology specimens, was initially diagnosed as an aggressive invasive melanoma that would have warranted wide local excision and sentinel lymph node biopsy.

23 Article Frontiers in pigment cell and melanoma research. 2018

Filipp, Fabian V / Birlea, Stanca / Bosenberg, Marcus W / Brash, Douglas / Cassidy, Pamela B / Chen, Suzie / D'Orazio, John A / Fujita, Mayumi / Goh, Boon-Kee / Herlyn, Meenhard / Indra, Arup K / Larue, Lionel / Leachman, Sancy A / Le Poole, Caroline / Liu-Smith, Feng / Manga, Prashiela / Montoliu, Lluis / Norris, David A / Shellman, Yiqun / Smalley, Keiran S M / Spritz, Richard A / Sturm, Richard A / Swetter, Susan M / Terzian, Tamara / Wakamatsu, Kazumasa / Weber, Jeffrey S / Box, Neil F. ·Systems Biology and Cancer Metabolism, Program for Quantitative Systems Biology, University of California Merced, Merced, California. · Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado. · Department of Dermatology and Dermatopathology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. · Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. · Department of Dermatology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon. · Susan Lehman Cullman Laboratory for Cancer Research, Department of Chemical Biology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey. · Markey Cancer Center, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, Kentucky. · Mount Elizabeth Medical Centre, Skin Physicians Private Limited, Singapore, Singapore. · Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncogenesis, Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon. · Equipe Labellisée Ligue Contre le Cancer, Normal and Pathological Development of Melanocytes, UMR 3347, CNRS, Institut Curie, Orsay, France. · Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center, Northwestern University at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. · Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California Irvine, Orange, California. · Ronald O Perlman Department of Dermatology, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, New York. · CNB-CSIC, CIBERER-ISCIII, Campus de Cantoblanco, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Tumor Biology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida. · Human Medical Genetics and Genomics Program, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado. · Dermatology Research Centre, University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Department of Dermatology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California. · Department of Chemistry, Fujita Health University School of Health Sciences, Toyoake, Japan. · Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, New York. ·Pigment Cell Melanoma Res · Pubmed #30281213.

ABSTRACT: In this perspective, we identify emerging frontiers in clinical and basic research of melanocyte biology and its associated biomedical disciplines. We describe challenges and opportunities in clinical and basic research of normal and diseased melanocytes that impact current approaches to research in melanoma and the dermatological sciences. We focus on four themes: (1) clinical melanoma research, (2) basic melanoma research, (3) clinical dermatology, and (4) basic pigment cell research, with the goal of outlining current highlights, challenges, and frontiers associated with pigmentation and melanocyte biology. Significantly, this document encapsulates important advances in melanocyte and melanoma research including emerging frontiers in melanoma immunotherapy, medical and surgical oncology, dermatology, vitiligo, albinism, genomics and systems biology, epidemiology, pigment biophysics and chemistry, and evolution.

24 Article Association of Skin Examination Behaviors and Thinner Nodular vs Superficial Spreading Melanoma at Diagnosis. 2018

Dessinioti, Clio / Geller, Alan C / Stergiopoulou, Aravella / Swetter, Susan M / Baltas, Eszter / Mayer, Jonathan E / Johnson, Timothy M / Talaganis, John / Trakatelli, Myrto / Tsoutsos, Dimitrios / Tsourouflis, Gerasimos / Stratigos, Alexander J. ·First Department of Dermatology-Venereology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens School of Medicine, Andreas Sygros Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Pigmented Lesion and Melanoma Program, Stanford University Medical Center, Palo Alto, California. · Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Department of Dermatology and Allergology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary. · Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora. · Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. · Second Department of Dermatology, Aristotle University Medical School, Papageorgiou General Hospital, Thessaloniki, Greece. · Department of Plastic Surgery, General Hospital of Athens Georgios Gennimatas, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, Laiko Hospital, Athens, Greece. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #29710122.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Early melanoma detection strategies include skin self-examination (SSE), physician skin examination (PSE), and promotion of patient knowledge about skin cancer. Objective: To investigate the association of SSE, PSE, and patient attitudes with the detection of thinner superficial spreading melanoma (SSM) and nodular melanoma (NM), the latter of which tends to elude early detection. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cross-sectional, questionnaire-based, multicenter study identified patients with newly diagnosed cutaneous melanoma at 4 referral hospital centers in the United States, Greece, and Hungary. Among 920 patients with a primary invasive melanoma, 685 patients with SSM or NM subtype were included. Interventions: A standardized questionnaire was used to record sociodemographic information, SSE and PSE practices, and patient perceptions in the year prior to diagnosis. Main Outcomes and Measures: Data were analyzed according to histologic thickness, with a 2-mm cutoff for thinner SSM and NM. Results: Of 685 participants (mean [SD] age, 55.6 [15.1] years; 318 [46%] female), thinner melanoma was detected in 437 of 538 SSM (81%) and in 40 of 147 NM (27%). Patients who routinely performed SSE were more likely to be diagnosed with thinner SSM (odds ratio [OR], 2.61; 95% CI, 1.14-5.40) but not thinner NM (OR, 2.39; 95% CI, 0.84-6.80). Self-detected clinical warning signs (eg, elevation and onset of pain) were markers of thicker SSM and NM. Whole-body PSE was associated with a 2-fold increase in detection of thinner SSM (OR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.16-4.35) and thinner NM (OR, 2.67; 95% CI, 1.05-6.82). Patient attitudes and perceptions focusing on increased interest in skin cancer were associated with the detection of thinner NM. Conclusions and Relevance: Our findings underscore the importance of complementary practices by patients and physicians for the early detection of melanoma, including regular whole-body PSE, SSE, and increased patient awareness.

25 Article Management strategies of academic pigmented lesion clinic directors in the United States. 2018

Nelson, Kelly C / Grossman, Douglas / Kim, Caroline C / Chen, Suephy C / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara N / Grichnik, James M / Kirkwood, John M / Leachman, Sancy A / Marghoob, Ashfaq A / Swetter, Susan M / Venna, Suraj S / Ming, Michael E. ·Department of Dermatology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · Department of Dermatology, University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, Utah. · Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia; Division of Dermatology, Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Decatur, Georgia. · University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, Arizona. · Scully-Welsh Cancer Center, Indian River Medical Center, Vero Beach, Florida. · University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Department of Dermatology, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, Oregon. · Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Skin Cancer Center, Hauppage, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Pigmented Lesion and Melanoma Program, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California; Cancer Institute, Stanford, California; Dermatology Service, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. · Inova Schar Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Fairfax, Virginia. · Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: michael.ming@uphs.upenn.edu. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #29307637.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

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