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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Sophie Taillibert
Based on 5 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, S. Taillibert wrote the following 5 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline [ANOCEF guidelines for the management of brain metastases]. 2015

Le Rhun, É / Dhermain, F / Noël, G / Reyns, N / Carpentier, A / Mandonnet, E / Taillibert, S / Metellus, P / Anonymous2980820. ·Neuro-oncologie, département de neurochirurgie, hôpital Roger-Salengro, CHRU de Lille, rue Émile-Laine, 59037 Lille cedex, France; Oncologie médicale, centre Oscar-Lambret, 3, rue Frédéric-Combemale, BP 307, 59020 Lille cedex, France; Laboratoire Prism, université Lille 1, Inserm U1192, bâtiment SN3 1(er) étage, 59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq cedex, France; Groupe de réflexion sur la prise en charge des métastases cérébrales (GRPCMaC) , 13273 Marseille cedex 09, France. Electronic address: emilie.lerhun@chru-lille.fr. · Groupe de réflexion sur la prise en charge des métastases cérébrales (GRPCMaC) , 13273 Marseille cedex 09, France; Département de radiothérapie, institut de cancérologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue Édouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif cedex, France; Réunion de concertation pluridisciplinaire de neuro-oncologie, institut de cancérologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue Édouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif cedex, France. · Département universitaire de radiothérapie, centre de lutte contre le cancer Paul-Strauss, 3, rue de la Porte-de-l'Hôpital, BP 42, 67065 Strasbourg cedex, France; Laboratoire EA 3430, fédération de médecine translationnelle de Strasbourg (FMTS), université de Strasbourg, 4, rue Kirschleger, 67085 Strasbourg cedex, France. · Département de neurochirurgie, hôpital Roger-Salengro, CHRU de Lille, rue Émile-Laine, 59037 Lille cedex, France. · Service de neurologie, hôpital Avicenne, Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), 125, rue de Stalingrad, 93009 Bobigny cedex, France. · Département de neurochirurgie, hôpital Lariboisière, 2, rue Ambroise-Paré, 75010 Paris, France. · Département de neurologie 2, groupe hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, 47-83, boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France; Département de radiothérapie, groupe hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, 47-83, boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France; Université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie Paris VI, 4, place Jussieu, 75005 Paris, France. · Groupe de réflexion sur la prise en charge des métastases cérébrales (GRPCMaC) , 13273 Marseille cedex 09, France; Département de neurochirurgie, centre hospitalo-universitaire La Timone, AP-HM, 264, rue Saint-Pierre, 13385 Marseille cedex 05, France; Centre de recherche en oncologie et oncopharmacologie (CRO2), faculté de médecine Timone, université Aix-Marseille, 27, boulevard Jean-Moulin, 13385 Marseille cedex 05, France; Inserm U911, faculté de médecine Timone, 27, boulevard Jean-Moulin, 13385 Marseille cedex 05, France. ·Cancer Radiother · Pubmed #25666314.

ABSTRACT: The incidence of brain metastases is increasing because of the use of new therapeutic agents, which allow an improvement of overall survival, but with only a poor penetration into the central nervous system brain barriers. The management of brain metastases has changed due to a better knowledge of immunohistochemical data and molecular biological data, the development of new surgical, radiotherapeutic approaches and improvement of systemic treatments. Most of the time, the prognosis is still limited to several months, nevertheless, prolonged survival may be now observed in some sub-groups of patients. The main prognostic factors include the type and subtype of the primitive, age, general status of the patient, number and location of brain metastases, extracerebral disease. The multidisciplinary discussion should take into account all of these parameters. We should notice also that treatments including surgery or radiotherapy may be proposed in a symptomatic goal in advanced phases of the disease underlying the multidisciplinary approach until late in the evolution of the disease. This article reports on the ANOCEF (French neuro-oncology association) guidelines. The management of brain metastases of breast cancers and lung cancers are discussed in the same chapter, while the management of melanoma brain metastases is reported in a separate chapter due to different responses to the brain radiotherapy.

2 Review Leptomeningeal metastasis. 2018

Taillibert, Sophie / Chamberlain, Marc C. ·Department of Neurology 2, Pitié-Salpétrière Hospital, Paris, France. · Departments of Neurology and Neurological Surgery, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States. Electronic address: marccchamberlain@gmail.com. ·Handb Clin Neurol · Pubmed #29307353.

ABSTRACT: Leptomeningeal metastasis (LM) results from dissemination of cancer cells to both the leptomeninges (pia and arachnoid) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compartment. Breast cancer, lung cancer, and melanoma are the most common solid tumors that cause LM. Recent approval of more active anticancer therapies has resulted in improvement in survival that is partly responsible for an increased incidence of LM. Neurologic deficits, once manifest, are mostly irreversible, and often have a significant impact on patient quality of life. LM-directed therapy is based on symptom palliation, circumscribed use of neurosurgery, limited field radiotherapy, intra-CSF and systemic therapies. Novel methods of detecting LM include detection of CSF circulating tumor cells and tumor cell-free DNA. A recent international guideline for a standardization of response assessment in LM may improve cross-trial comparisons as well as within-trial evaluation of treatment. An increasing number of retrospective studies suggest that molecular-targeted therapy, such as EGFR and ALK inhibitors in lung cancer, trastuzumab in HER2+ breast cancer, and BRAF inhibitors in melanoma, may be effective as part of the multidisciplinary management of LM. Prospective randomized trials with standardized response assessment are needed to further validate these preliminary findings.

3 Review Neoplastic Meningitis Due to Lung, Breast, and Melanoma Metastases. 2017

Le Rhun, Emilie / Taillibert, Sophie / Chamberlain, Marc C. ·Division of Neuro-Oncology in the Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital and the Breast Unit in the Department of Medical Oncology, Oscar Lambret Center, Lille Cedex, France. · Division of Neuro-Oncology in the Departments of Neurology, and Radiation Oncology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, and Assistance Publique des Hopitaux de Paris, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France. · Department of Neurology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, and Division of Neuro-Oncology, Departments of Neurology and Neurological Surgery, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. marccchamberlain@gmail.com. ·Cancer Control · Pubmed #28178709.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Neoplastic meningitis, a central nervous system (CNS) complication of cancer metastatic to the meninges and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), is relevant to oncologists due to the impact of the disease on patient quality of life and survival rates. METHODS: A review of the literature of articles published in English was conducted with regard to neoplastic meningitis. RESULTS: The incidence of neoplastic meningitis is increasing because patients with cancer are surviving longer in part because of the use of novel therapies with poor CNS penetration. Up to 5% of patients with solid tumors develop neoplastic meningitis during the disease course (breast cancer, lung cancer, and melanoma being the predominantly causative cancers). The rate of median survival in patients with untreated neoplastic meningitis is 1 to 2 months, although it can be as long as 5 months in some cases. Therapeutic options for the treatment of neoplastic meningitis include systemic therapy (cancer-specific, CNS-penetrating chemotherapy or targeted therapies), intra-CSF administration of chemotherapy (methotrexate, cytarabine, thiotepa) and CNS site-specific radiotherapy. Determining whom to treat with neoplastic meningitis remains challenging and, in part, relates to the extent of systemic disease, the neurological burden of disease, the available systemic therapies, and estimated rates of survival. CONCLUSIONS: The prognosis of neoplastic meningitis remains poor. The increasing use of novel, targeted therapies and immunotherapy in solid tumors and its impact on neoplastic meningitis remains to be determined and is an area of active research. Thus, well conducted trials are needed.

4 Review [Epidemiology of brain metastases]. 2015

Taillibert, S / Le Rhun, É. ·Service de neurologie 2, groupe hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, 47-83, boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France; Université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie, 4, place Jussieu, 75005 Paris, France; Radiothérapie, groupe hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, 47-83, boulevard de l'Hôpital, 75013 Paris, France. · Neuro-oncologie, département de neurochirurgie, hôpital Roger-Salengro, CHRU, rue Émile-Laine, 59037 Lille cedex, France; Oncologie médicale, centre Oscar-Lambret, 3, rue Frédéric-Combemale, BP 307, 59020 Lille cedex, France; Inserm U1192, laboratoire Prism, université Lille 1, bâtiment SN3 1(e) étage, 59655 Villeneuve d'Ascq cedex, France; Groupe de réflexion sur la prise en charge des métastases cérébrales (GRPCMaC), 13273 Marseille cedex 09, France. Electronic address: emilie.lerhun@chru-lille.fr. ·Cancer Radiother · Pubmed #25636729.

ABSTRACT: The most frequent intracranial brain tumours are brain metastases. All types of cancer can develop brain metastases but two thirds of brain metastases occurring in adult patients are secondary to one of these three cancers: lung cancer, breast cancer and melanoma. In accordance with these data, this review is focusing on the epidemiology of these three types of cancer. We report here the incidence, risk factors, median time of brain metastases occurrence after diagnosis of the primary cancer, prognosis and median survival for these three types of cancer. We also discuss the clinical implications of these data. The second part of this review is focusing on the Graded Prognostic Assessment scores in all types of primary cancer with brain metastases, how they can be applied in clinical research for a better stratification of patients, and to some extent in clinical practice to guide decisions for personalized treatments. These scores provide a better understanding of the different profiles of clinical evolution that can be observed amongst patients suffering from brain metastases according to the type of primary cancer. We highlighted the most remarkable and useful clinical implications of these data.

5 Article Complications related to the use of an intraventricular access device for the treatment of leptomeningeal metastases from solid tumor: a single centre experience in 112 patients. 2015

Zairi, Fahed / Le Rhun, Emilie / Bertrand, Nicolas / Boulanger, Thomas / Taillibert, Sophie / Aboukais, Rabih / Assaker, Richard / Chamberlain, Marc C. ·Department of Neurosurgery, Hopital Roger Salengro, Lille University Hospital, Rue Emile Laine, 59037, Lille, France. fahed.zairi@gmail.com. · Department of Neurosurgery, Hopital Roger Salengro, Lille University Hospital, Rue Emile Laine, 59037, Lille, France. · Department of Medical Oncology, Oscar Lambret Center, Lille, France. · Department of Radiology, Oscar Lambret Center, Lille, France. · Department of Neuro-Oncology Mazarin, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Paris, France. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Pitie-Salpetriere Hospital, Paris, France. · Department of Neurology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. ·J Neurooncol · Pubmed #26070555.

ABSTRACT: Ventricular access devices (VAD) offer several advantages compared to intralumbar injections for the administration of intra-CSF agents in the treatment of leptomeningeal metastases (LM). However, there are few prospective studies reporting on complications with the use of VADs. All complications were prospectively collected that pertained to the implantation and use of a VAD in consecutive patients with solid tumor-related LM from June 2006 to December 2013. Clinical follow-up was every 2 weeks during the initial 2 months of treatment and then once monthly. Complete neuraxis MRI was performed at baseline and then every 2-3 months. A total of 112 patients (88 women) with a mean age of 51.1 years (range 26-73) were included. Primary cancers included breast (79 patients), lung (12) and melanoma (6). All patients were treated with intra-CSF liposomal cytarabine. 72 % of the patients received concomitant systemic and intra-CSF chemotherapy. The placement of the VAD was performed under local anesthesia in all cases. The mean operative time was 15 min and no perioperative complications were reported. The mean number of intraventricular injections per patient was 9.34 (range 1-47). A total of 11 complications in 11 patients were seen including 7 infections, 1 intracranial hemorrhage, 2 instances of symptomatic leukoencephalopathy and 1 catheter malpositioning. 8 complications required an operation and 1 complication was fatal. The use of a VAD is safe and may improve patients' comfort and compliance with LM-directed therapy.