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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Dr. John Thompson
Based on 286 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, J. F. Thompson wrote the following 286 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12
1 Guideline Clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of melanoma: melanomas that lack classical clinical features. 2017

Mar, Victoria J / Chamberlain, Alex J / Kelly, John W / Murray, William K / Thompson, John F. ·Victorian Melanoma Service, Alfred Health, Melbourne, VIC victoria.mar@monash.edu. · Victorian Melanoma Service, Alfred Health, Melbourne, VIC. · Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, VIC. ·Med J Aust · Pubmed #29020893.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: A Cancer Council Australia multidisciplinary working group is currently revising and updating the 2008 evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the management of cutaneous melanoma. While there have been many recent improvements in treatment options for metastatic melanoma, early diagnosis remains critical to reducing mortality from the disease. Improved awareness of the atypical presentations of this common malignancy is required to achieve this. A chapter of the new guidelines was therefore developed to aid recognition of atypical melanomas. Main recommendations: Because thick, life-threatening melanomas may lack the more classical ABCD (asymmetry, border irregularity, colour variegation, diameter > 6 mm) features of melanoma, a thorough history of the lesion with regard to change in morphology and growth over time is essential. Any lesion that is changing in morphology or growing over a period of more than one month should be excised or referred for prompt expert opinion. Changes in management as a result of the guidelines: These guidelines provide greater emphasis on improved recognition of the atypical presentations of melanoma, in particular nodular, desmoplastic and acral lentiginous subtypes, with particular awareness of hypomelanotic and amelanotic lesions.

2 Guideline Data set for pathology reporting of cutaneous invasive melanoma: recommendations from the international collaboration on cancer reporting (ICCR). 2013

Scolyer, Richard A / Judge, Meagan J / Evans, Alan / Frishberg, David P / Prieto, Victor G / Thompson, John F / Trotter, Martin J / Walsh, Maureen Y / Walsh, Noreen M G / Ellis, David W / Anonymous3190770. ·*Melanoma Institute Australia Disciplines of †Pathology **Surgery, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney Departments of ‡Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology ††Melanoma and Surgical Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital §Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia, Sydney, NSW ¶¶Royal Adelaide Hospital and Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia ∥Department of Pathology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, Scotland ¶Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA #Departments of Pathology and Dermatology, University of Texas-MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX ‡‡Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB ∥∥Department of Pathology, Capital District Health Authority and Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada §§Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, UK. ·Am J Surg Pathol · Pubmed #24061524.

ABSTRACT: An accurate and complete pathology report is critical for the optimal management of cutaneous melanoma patients. Protocols for the pathologic reporting of melanoma have been independently developed by the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA), Royal College of Pathologists (United Kingdom) (RCPath), and College of American Pathologists (CAP). In this study, data sets, checklists, and structured reporting protocols for pathologic examination and reporting of cutaneous melanoma were analyzed by an international panel of melanoma pathologists and clinicians with the aim of developing a common, internationally agreed upon, evidence-based data set. The International Collaboration on Cancer Reporting cutaneous melanoma expert review panel analyzed the existing RCPA, RCPath, and CAP data sets to develop a protocol containing "required" (mandatory/core) and "recommended" (nonmandatory/noncore) elements. Required elements were defined as those that had agreed evidentiary support at National Health and Medical Research Council level III-2 level of evidence or above and that were unanimously agreed upon by the review panel to be essential for the clinical management, staging, or assessment of the prognosis of melanoma or fundamental for pathologic diagnosis. Recommended elements were those considered to be clinically important and recommended for good practice but with lesser degrees of supportive evidence. Sixteen core/required data elements for cutaneous melanoma pathology reports were defined (with an additional 4 core/required elements for specimens received with lymph nodes). Eighteen additional data elements with a lesser level of evidentiary support were included in the recommended data set. Consensus response values (permitted responses) were formulated for each data item. Development and agreement of this evidence-based protocol at an international level was accomplished in a timely and efficient manner, and the processes described herein may facilitate the development of protocols for other tumor types. Widespread utilization of an internationally agreed upon, structured pathology data set for melanoma will lead not only to improved patient management but is a prerequisite for research and for international benchmarking in health care.

3 Guideline EANM-EORTC general recommendations for sentinel node diagnostics in melanoma. 2009

Chakera, Annette H / Hesse, Birger / Burak, Zeynep / Ballinger, James R / Britten, Allan / Caracò, Corrado / Cochran, Alistair J / Cook, Martin G / Drzewiecki, Krzysztof T / Essner, Richard / Even-Sapir, Einat / Eggermont, Alexander M M / Stopar, Tanja Gmeiner / Ingvar, Christian / Mihm, Martin C / McCarthy, Stanley W / Mozzillo, Nicola / Nieweg, Omgo E / Scolyer, Richard A / Starz, Hans / Thompson, John F / Trifirò, Giuseppe / Viale, Giuseppe / Vidal-Sicart, Sergi / Uren, Roger / Waddington, Wendy / Chiti, Arturo / Spatz, Alain / Testori, Alessandro / Anonymous1200637. ·Department of Plastic Surgery and Burns Unit, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. annette.hougaard.chakera@live.dk ·Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging · Pubmed #19714329.

ABSTRACT: The accurate diagnosis of a sentinel node in melanoma includes a sequence of procedures from different medical specialities (nuclear medicine, surgery, oncology, and pathology). The items covered are presented in 11 sections and a reference list: (1) definition of a sentinel node, (2) clinical indications, (3) radiopharmaceuticals and activity injected, (4) dosimetry, (5) injection technique, (6) image acquisition and interpretation, (7) report and display, (8) use of dye, (9) gamma probe detection, (10) surgical techniques in sentinel node biopsy, and (11) pathological evaluation of melanoma-draining sentinel lymph nodes. If specific recommendations given cannot be based on evidence from original, scientific studies, referral is given to "general consensus" and similar expressions. The recommendations are designed to assist in the practice of referral to, performance, interpretation and reporting of all steps of the sentinel node procedure in the hope of setting state-of-the-art standards for good-quality evaluation of possible spread to the lymphatic system in intermediate-to-high risk melanoma without clinical signs of dissemination.

4 Editorial Isolated Limb Infusion and Isolated Limb Perfusion for Melanoma: Can the Outcomes of these Procedures be Compared? 2019

Kroon, Hidde M / Thompson, John F. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, North Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Department of General Surgery, The University of Adelaide, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA, Australia. · Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, North Sydney, NSW, Australia. John.Thompson@melanoma.org.au. · Discipline of Surgery, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. John.Thompson@melanoma.org.au. · Department of Melanoma and Surgical Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. John.Thompson@melanoma.org.au. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #30465218.

ABSTRACT:

5 Editorial When is surgery for metastatic melanoma still the most appropriate treatment option? 2018

Friedman, Erica B / Ferguson, Peter M / Thompson, John F. ·a Melanoma Institute Australia , The University of Sydney , North Sydney , Australia. · b Department of Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology , Royal Prince Alfred Hospital , Camperdown , Australia. · d The Faculty of Medicine and Health , The University of Sydney , Sydney , NSW , Australia. · c Department of Melanoma and Surgical Oncology , Royal Prince Alfred Hospital , Camperdown , NSW , Australia. ·Expert Rev Anticancer Ther · Pubmed #30071762.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Sentinel lymph node biopsy for melanoma: a plea to let the data be heard. 2014

Thompson, John F / Faries, Mark B / Cochran, Alistair J. ·Melanoma Institute Australia and the University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia, john.thompson@melanoma.org.au. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #25103536.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Local and regional therapies for melanoma: many arrows in the quiver. 2014

Thompson, John F. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, North Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #24419862.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial The challenge of defining guidelines for sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with thin primary cutaneous melanomas. 2012

Gershenwald, Jeffrey E / Coit, Daniel G / Sondak, Vernon K / Thompson, John F. · ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #22868918.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Can we better identify thin cutaneous melanomas that are likely to metastasize and cause death? 2012

Murali, Rajmohan / Scolyer, Richard A / Thompson, John F. · ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #22777079.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Publication and interpretation of clinical trial results: the need for caution. 2012

Thompson, J F / Hong, A / Fogarty, G. · ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #22476820.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Lymph node ratio in melanoma: A marker of variation in surgical quality? 2009

Spillane, Andrew J / Winstanley, Julie / Thompson, John F. · ·Cancer · Pubmed #19306419.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Review Impact of genomics on the surgical management of melanoma. 2018

Ferguson, P M / Long, G V / Scolyer, R A / Thompson, J F. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Medical Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Melanoma and Surgical Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·Br J Surg · Pubmed #29341162.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Although surgery for early-stage melanoma offers the best chance of cure, recent advances in molecular medicine have revolutionized the management of late-stage melanoma, leading to significant improvements in clinical outcomes. Research into the genomic drivers of disease and cancer immunology has not only ushered in a new era of targeted and immune-based therapies for patients with metastatic melanoma, but has also provided new tools for monitoring disease recurrence and selecting therapeutic strategies. These advances present new opportunities and challenges to the surgeon treating patients with melanoma. METHODS: The literature was reviewed to evaluate diagnostic and therapeutic advances in the management of cutaneous melanoma, and to highlight the impact of these advances on surgical decision-making. RESULTS: Genomic testing is not required in the surgical management of primary melanoma, although it can provide useful information in some situations. Circulating nucleic acids from melanoma cells can be detected in peripheral blood to predict disease recurrence before it manifests clinically, but validation is required before routine clinical application. BRAF mutation testing is the standard of care for all patients with advanced disease to guide therapy, including the planning of surgery in adjuvant and neoadjuvant settings. CONCLUSION: Surgery remains central for managing primary melanoma, and is an important element of integrated multidisciplinary care in advanced disease, particularly for patients with resectable metastases. The field will undergo further change as clinical trials address the relationships between surgery, radiotherapy and systemic therapy for patients with high-risk, early-stage and advanced melanoma.

13 Review When is a sentinel node biopsy indicated for patients with primary melanoma? An update of the 'Australian guidelines for the management of cutaneous melanoma'. 2017

Gyorki, David E / Barbour, Andrew / Hanikeri, Mark / Mar, Victoria / Sandhu, Shahneen / Thompson, John F. ·Division of Cancer Surgery, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Surgery, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Upper Gastrointestinal and Soft Tissue Unit, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Surgical Oncology Laboratory, Discipline of Surgery, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Western Australia Melanoma Advisory Service, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. · Victorian Melanoma Service, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Skin and Cancer Foundation Inc., Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Division of Cancer Medicine, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Melanoma Institute Australia, Poche Centre, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Discipline of Surgery, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Melanoma and Surgical Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·Australas J Dermatol · Pubmed #28718222.

ABSTRACT: A sentinel lymph node biopsy is a surgical staging procedure performed for patients with primary cutaneous melanoma who are clinically lymph-node negative to determine whether there is low volume nodal metastasis in the draining lymph node field. A systematic review was recently performed to update the Australian clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of melanoma, addressing the question, 'When is a sentinel lymph node biopsy indicated?' This article discusses the findings of the systematic review and the evidence base for the updated guidelines.

14 Review Role of sentinel lymph node biopsy as a staging procedure in patients with melanoma: A critical appraisal. 2017

Nieweg, Omgo E / Cooper, Alan / Thompson, John F. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Melanoma and Surgical Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Dermatology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Sydney Medical School - Northern, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·Australas J Dermatol · Pubmed #28707391.

ABSTRACT: Worldwide, sentinel node (SN) biopsy for accurate staging is now part of the standard work-up of patients with melanomas ≥1.0 mm Breslow thickness, as it is for staging patients with breast cancer. Nuclear medicine imaging and surgical techniques have evolved to such a degree that a SN can be identified and removed in virtually every patient. Nevertheless, some opposition to a routine SN biopsy remains, perhaps due to a failure to appreciate the serious implications of incomplete or inaccurate staging. Guided by a critical appraisal of the available evidence, this review elucidates the definition of an SN, discusses the sensitivity and specificity of the information it provides, emphasises that it is a minor staging procedure that can lead to improved survival when followed by appropriate therapy, and explains the necessarily unconventional and complex design of the only randomised trial that addresses this subject. It also describes other benefits and risks of an SN biopsy and outlines its role in current melanoma management.

15 Review Melanoma patient imaging in the era of effective systemic therapies. 2017

Stodell, M / Thompson, J F / Emmett, L / Uren, R F / Kapoor, R / Saw, R P M. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Discipline of Surgery, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Division of Surgery, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW, Australia. · Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Discipline of Medicine, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Alfred Nuclear Medicine and Ultrasound, Newtown, NSW, Australia. · Mater Imaging, The Mater Hospital Sydney, North Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Discipline of Surgery, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Division of Surgery, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: robyn.saw@melanoma.org.au. ·Eur J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #28625798.

ABSTRACT: Imaging plays a critical role in the current multi-disciplinary management of patients with melanoma. It is used for primary disease staging, surgical planning, and surveillance in high-risk patients, and for monitoring the effects of systemic or loco-regional therapies. Several different imaging modalities have been utilised in the past. Contemporary imaging practises vary geographically depending on clinical guidelines, physician preferences, availability and cost. Targeted therapies and immunotherapies have revolutionised the treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma over the last few years. With this have come new patterns of disease that were not observed after conventional therapies, and new criteria to assess therapeutic responses. In this article we review the role of imaging for patients with melanoma in the era of effective systemic therapies and discuss likely future developments.

16 Review Identification, Review, and Systematic Cross-Validation of microRNA Prognostic Signatures in Metastatic Melanoma. 2016

Jayawardana, Kaushala / Schramm, Sarah-Jane / Tembe, Varsha / Mueller, Samuel / Thompson, John F / Scolyer, Richard A / Mann, Graham J / Yang, Jean. ·School of Mathematics and Statistics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · The Westmead Millennium Institute for Medical Research, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: sarah-jane.schramm@sydney.edu.au. · The Westmead Millennium Institute for Medical Research, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Discipline of Surgery, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Discipline of Pathology, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #26763444.

ABSTRACT: In metastatic melanoma, it is vital to identify and validate biomarkers of prognosis. Previous studies have systematically evaluated protein biomarkers or mRNA-based expression signatures. No such analyses have been applied to microRNA (miRNA)-based prognostic signatures. As a first step, we identified two prognostic miRNA signatures from publicly available data sets (Gene Expression Omnibus/The Cancer Genome Atlas) of global miRNA expression profiling information. A 12-miRNA signature predicted longer survival after surgery for resection of American Joint Committee on Cancer stage III disease (>4 years, no sign of relapse) and outperformed American Joint Committee on Cancer standard-of-care prognostic markers in leave-one-out cross-validation analysis (error rates 34% and 38%, respectively). A similar 15-miRNA biomarker derived from The Cancer Genome Atlas miRNA-seq data performed slightly worse (39%) than these current biomarkers. Both signatures were then assessed for replication in two independent data sets and subjected to systematic cross-validation together with the three other miRNA-based prognostic signatures proposed in the literature to date. Five miRNAs (miR-142-5p, miR-150-5p, miR-342-3p, miR-155-5p, and miR-146b-5p) were reproducibly associated with patient outcome and have the greatest potential for application in the clinic. Our extensive validation approach highlighted among multiple independent cohorts the translational potential and limitations of miRNA signatures, and pointed to future directions in the analysis of this emerging class of markers.

17 Review Isolated limb infusion with melphalan and actinomycin D for melanoma: a systematic review. 2014

Kroon, Hidde M / Huismans, Anna M / Kam, Peter C A / Thompson, John F. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia. ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #24522939.

ABSTRACT: Isolated limb infusion (ILI) was developed as a simplified and minimally invasive alternative to isolated limb perfusion (ILP) to treat unresectable limb melanoma. A number of centers around the world have reported their results using this procedure. In this study a systematic review of reported ILI experiences was undertaken. A literature search was conducted according to the guidelines for systematic reviews in order to select eligible papers reporting limb toxicity and response rates following ILI using melphalan and actinomycin D to treat limb melanoma. A total of 576 patients from seven publications were included. Regional toxicity following ILI was low: no visible effect of the treatment or slight erythema or edema was observed in 79% of the patients, while considerable erythema and/or edema with blistering was experienced by 19%. In 2% there was a threatened or actual compartment syndrome. No procedure-related amputation was reported. Complete response occurred in 33% of the patients and partial response in 40%, an overall response rate of 73%. Stable disease and progressive disease were achieved in 14% and 13% of the patients, respectively. This first systematic review of ILI procedures using melphalan and actinomycin D indicates that regional toxicity was generally low, with satisfactory response rates. When comparing ILI and ILP, it must be borne in mind that ILI is often performed in significantly older patients and in patients with higher stages of disease, which decreases the likelihood of a favorable response.

18 Review Topical immunotherapy with diphencyprone for in transit and cutaneously metastatic melanoma. 2014

Damian, Diona L / Saw, Robyn P M / Thompson, John F. ·Department of Dermatology, Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia; The University of Sydney at Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Melanoma Institute Australia, North Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #24522938.

ABSTRACT: Topical diphencyprone (DPCP) can be used to treat in transit and cutaneously metastastatic melanoma. To date, 50 patients have received DPCP therapy for at least 1 month at our institution, with complete clearance of cutaneous disease in 46% and partial response in a further 38% of patients. Topical immunotherapy with DPCP is inexpensive and well-tolerated and should be considered in patients with skin metastases unsuitable for or refractory to other forms of therapy.

19 Review Genetic alterations and personalized medicine in melanoma: progress and future prospects. 2014

Griewank, Klaus G / Scolyer, Richard A / Thompson, John F / Flaherty, Keith T / Schadendorf, Dirk / Murali, Rajmohan. ·Affiliations of authors: Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany (KGG, DS) · Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW, Australia (RAS) · University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia (RAS, JFT) · Melanoma Institute Australia, North Sydney, NSW, Australia (RAS, JFT) · Center for Melanoma, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA (KTF) · Department of Pathology, and Center for Molecular Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (RM). ·J Natl Cancer Inst · Pubmed #24511108.

ABSTRACT: High-throughput sequencing technologies are providing new insights into the genetic alterations involved in melanomagenesis. It appears likely that most genetic events important in the pathogenesis of melanoma will be discovered over the next few years. Genetic analysis is also increasingly being used to direct patient care. In parallel with the discovery of new genes and the elucidation of molecular pathways important in the development of melanoma, therapies targeting these pathways are becoming available. In other words, the age of personalized medicine has arrived, characterized by molecular profiling of melanoma to identify the relevant genetic alterations and the abnormal signaling mechanisms involved, followed by selection of optimal, individualized therapies. In this review, we summarize the key genetic alterations in melanoma and the development of targeted agents against melanomas bearing specific mutations. These developments in melanoma serve as a model for the implementation of personalized medicine for patients with all cancers.

20 Review Radiofrequency ablation in metastatic melanoma. 2014

Shashank, Arridh / Shehata, Mena / Morris, David L / Thompson, John F. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, North Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #24375239.

ABSTRACT: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive therapy that has, until recently, received limited attention in the management of metastatic melanoma. RFA is well described in the management of primary malignancies of the liver, however limited data are available on its application to metastatic deposits of melanoma occurring in the lung, liver, or adrenal glands. This article explores the basic principles of RFA, its safety, efficacy, and application to metastatic malignancies of the lung, liver and adrenal glands, with particular emphasis on melanoma. Previously published results are reviewed, and we report a small additional series of patients with liver and lung metastases treated in Sydney using RFA.

21 Review Isolated limb infusion: technical aspects. 2014

Kroon, Hidde M / Huismans, Annemarleen / Waugh, Richard C / Kam, Peter C A / Thompson, John F. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia. ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #24374797.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To describe the technique of isolated limb infusion (ILI) for regional high dose chemotherapy in patients with advanced malignancies confined to a limb, as currently practiced at Melanoma Institute Australia (MIA). BACKGROUND: ILI is progressively being used around the world but to date the reported response rates are generally lower than those reported by MIA. DISCUSSION: This description of the ILI protocol at MIA provides details that may allow other surgeons to improve results.

22 Review Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and their significance in melanoma prognosis. 2014

Schatton, Tobias / Scolyer, Richard A / Thompson, John F / Mihm, Martin C. ·Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Transplantation Research Center, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. ·Methods Mol Biol · Pubmed #24258985.

ABSTRACT: The role of the tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) and its relationship to prognosis has been most extensively studied in malignant melanoma. The purpose of this chapter is to discuss in depth the immunobiology and molecular aspects of lymphocyte function in general and particularly TIL function in the context of antimelanoma immunity. Emphasis is placed upon the role of these inflammatory mediators in the enhancement and impairment of progression of this often fatal human cancer. In addition, the analysis of TILs in melanoma and their direct relationship to prognosis as well as their effect on the positivity of the sentinel lymph node will be discussed. Furthermore, details of lymph node responses to metastatic melanomas and their prognostic significance will be clarified. Finally, the importance of TILs for the evaluation of therapeutic response and how TIL immunobiology could critically inform the design of novel melanoma immunotherapeutic protocols will be elucidated.

23 Review Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on the use of sentinel lymph node biopsy in melanoma. 2013

Sondak, Vernon K / Wong, Sandra L / Gershenwald, Jeffrey E / Thompson, John F. ·From the Department of Cutaneous Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, and Departments of Oncologic Sciences and Surgery, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL; Department of Surgery, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, MI; Departments of Surgical Oncology and Cancer Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; Melanoma Institute Australia and the University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. ·Am Soc Clin Oncol Educ Book · Pubmed #23714536.

ABSTRACT: Sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) was introduced in 1992 to allow histopathologic evaluation of the "sentinel" node, that is, the first node along the lymphatic drainage pathway from the primary melanoma. This procedure has less risk of complications than a complete lymphadenectomy, and if the sentinel node is uninvolved by tumor the likelihood a complete lymphadenectomy would find metastatic disease in that nodal basin is very low. SLNB is now widely used worldwide in the staging of melanoma as well as breast and Merkel cell carcinomas. SLNB provides safe, reliable staging for patients with clinically node-negative melanomas 1 mm or greater in thickness, with an acceptably low rate of failure in the sentinel node-negative basin. Evidence-based guidelines jointly produced by ASCO and the Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO) recommend SLNB for patients with intermediate-thickness melanomas and also state that SLNB may be recommended for patients with thick melanomas. Major remaining areas of uncertainty include the indications for SLNB in patients with thin melanomas, pediatric patients, and patients with atypical melanocytic neoplasms; the optimal radiotracers and dyes for lymphatic mapping; and the necessity of complete lymphadenectomy in all sentinel node-positive patients.

24 Review Lymphatic biomarkers in primary melanomas as predictors of regional lymph node metastasis and patient outcomes. 2013

Pasquali, Sandro / van der Ploeg, Augustinus P T / Mocellin, Simone / Stretch, Jonathan R / Thompson, John F / Scolyer, Richard A. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. sandro.pasquali@unipd.it ·Pigment Cell Melanoma Res · Pubmed #23298266.

ABSTRACT: Recently developed lymphatic-specific immunohistochemical markers can now be utilized to assess intratumoral and/or peritumoral lymphatic vessel density (LVD), to detect lymphatic vessel invasion (LVI) by melanoma cells and to identify lymphatic marker expression in melanoma cells themselves. We systematically reviewed the available evidence for the expression of lymphatic markers as predictors of regional node metastasis and survival in melanoma patients. The currently available evidence suggests that LVD (particularly in a peritumoral location) and LVI are predictors of sentinel node metastasis and poorer survival. Nevertheless, adherence to international guidelines in the conduct and reporting of the studies was generally poor, with wide methodologic variations and heterogeneous findings. Larger, carefully conducted and well-reported studies that confirm these preliminary findings are required before it would be appropriate to recommend the routine application of costly and time-consuming immunohistochemistry for lymphatic markers in the routine clinical assessment of primary cutaneous melanomas.

25 Review Treatment of melanoma metastases in a limb by isolated limb perfusion and isolated limb infusion. 2011

Testori, Alessandro / Verhoef, Cornelis / Kroon, Hidde M / Pennacchioli, E / Faries, Mark B / Eggermont, Alexander M M / Thompson, John F. ·Melanoma and Sarcoma Division, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. alessandro.testori@ieo.it. ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #21858835.

ABSTRACT: In-transit melanoma metastases are often confined to a limb. In this circumstance, treatment by isolated limb perfusion or isolated limb infusion can be a remarkably effective regional treatment option.

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