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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Pablo Uribe
Based on 6 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Pablo Uribe wrote the following 6 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review [Understanding current therapies in metastatic melanoma]. 2016

Rodríguez, Rocío / Parra, Angela / González, Sergio / Molgó, Montserrat / Droppelmann, Nicolás / Acevedo, Francisco / Peña, José / Uribe, Pablo. ·Unidad de Melanoma y Cáncer de Piel UC, Departamento de Anatomía Patológica, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile. ·Rev Med Chil · Pubmed #28394962.

ABSTRACT: Cutaneous melanoma is a highly aggressive tumor developing from melanocytes, its incidence is increasing, and prognosis in advanced stages is daunting. New therapies have been approved during the recent years with unprecedented results, including inhibitors of MAPK/ERK pathway and immune checkpoint blockade (anti-cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) as ipilimumab, anti-programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-L1) as pembrolizumab and anti-programmed cell death protein 1 ligand (PD-L1), among many others). The aim of this paper is to review currently available metastatic melanoma therapies focusing mainly on new therapies that have demonstrated effectiveness, after several decades of little progress in the treatment of this disease.

2 Article In Vivo Reflectance Confocal Microscopy for the Diagnosis of Melanoma and Melanotic Macules of the Lip. 2017

Uribe, Pablo / Collgros, Helena / Scolyer, Richard A / Menzies, Scott W / Guitera, Pascale. ·Department of Dermatology, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile. · Sydney Melanoma Diagnostic Centre, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Australia. · Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Australia. · The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #28467525.

ABSTRACT: Importance: Benign melanotic macules (MAC) are the most frequent cause of lip pigmentation and sometimes difficult to differentiate from lip melanoma (MEL). Objectives: To report in vivo reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) features of normal lips of different phototypes and to identify features that assist in distinguishing MEL from MAC using dermoscopy and RCM. Design, Setting, and Participants: For this retrospective observational study, 2 groups of patients from 2 tertiary referral centers for melanoma (Sydney Melanoma Diagnostic Centre and Melanoma Institute Australia) were recruited between June 2007 and January 2015. Group 1 included patients with normal lips and different phototypes, and Group 2 consisted of patients with MAC and MEL; RCM and dermoscopy were used for lips analysis. Main Outcomes and Measures: Overall, 92 RCM features were correlated with clinical history, dermoscopic images, and histopathology in all patients with MEL and 5 patients with MAC. Results: Images from the vermillion and/or mucosal part of the lip were recorded from 10 patients with clinically normal lips (mean [SD] age, 34.5 [6.1] years), 16 patients with MAC (mean [SD] age, 49.6 [17.9] years), and 5 patients with 6 cases of MEL (1 patient had a recurrent lesion; mean [SD] age, 56.2 [15.5] years). In normal lips, the draped pattern-a previously described MAC RCM feature-was identified in all cases. In MEL, the following findings were frequent and significantly different from MAC: epidermal disarray; pagetoid infiltration of dendritic and/or round cells; a nonspecific architectural pattern at the dermoepidermal junction (DEJ); nonhomogenously distributed papillae; continuous (lentiginous) proliferation of cells with marked atypia at the DEJ, especially in interpapillary spaces; a higher number of dendritic cells (especially roundish); and atypical round cells at the DEJ. The cellular body area of dendritic cells was about the double in MEL compared with MAC. An RCM lip algorithm was developed that provided 100% sensitivity and 88% specificity for the diagnosis of MEL of the vermillion and mucosal part of the lip. With dermoscopy, MAC were correctly classified as benign in 13 of 16 cases (81%) and MEL were classified as equivocal or malignant in 5 of 6 cases (83%). Conclusions and Relevance: Reflectance confocal microscopy can assist in the differential diagnosis of lip MEL and MAC. An RCM Lip Score that we developed based on study results is proposed and needs to be validated on an independent data set.

3 Article Diffuse melanosis cutis in the setting of BRAF(V600E) mutant melanoma and treatment with targeted therapies. 2015

Minocha, Rashi / Kefford, Richard / Uribe, Pablo / Sebaratnam, Deshan F / Fernández-Peñas, Pablo. ·Department of Dermatology, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia. ·Australas J Dermatol · Pubmed #25159853.

ABSTRACT: Diffuse melanosis cutis (DMC) is a rare presentation of metastatic melanoma associated with a particularly guarded prognosis. We report a case of a 35-year-old man with BRAF(V600E) metastatic melanoma treated with dabrafenib (as well as ipilimumab and whole brain radiotherapy), who is alive, 25 months after the onset of his DMC. This is significantly longer than the reported mean survival of 4 months, highlighting the importance of BRAF mutation testing and the promising survival advantage of using targeted therapies compared with conventional chemotherapeutic regimens.

4 Article Acneiform eruption in a patient with metastatic melanoma after ceasing combination dabrafenib/trametinib therapy. 2014

Uribe, Pablo / Anforth, Rachael M / Kefford, Richard F / Fernandez-Peñas, Pablo. ·Departments of aDermatology bMedical Oncology, Westmead Hospital cSydney Medical School, The University of Sydney dMelanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia eDepartment of Dermatology, School of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile. ·Melanoma Res · Pubmed #24922191.

ABSTRACT: BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) and MEK inhibitors (MEKi) increase survival in BRAF mutant metastatic melanoma patients; however, they induce a well-known spectrum of cutaneous side effects during treatment. Whereas the BRAFi dabrafenib induces cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas and verrucal keratosis, the MEKi trametinib frequently induces acneiform eruptions that are reversible after drug discontinuation. Furthermore, when dabrafenib and trametinib are used in combination, there are fewer cutaneous toxicities. We report a patient with BRAF mutant metastatic melanoma treated with the BRAFi/MEKi combination therapy who developed an acneiform eruption after treatment discontinuation rather than during active therapy. Moreover, the eruption resolved when the combination treatment was reintroduced and recurred after increasing the dose of trametinib. The eruption may be explained by the longer half-life of trametinib (4.5 days) compared with dabrafenib (5.2 h). This is the first case reported with this particular side effect induced after stopping the treatment and could become more frequent as the BRAFi/MEKi combination of drugs is more frequently prescribed.

5 Article Acneiform eruptions: a common cutaneous toxicity of the MEK inhibitor trametinib. 2014

Anforth, Rachael / Liu, Michael / Nguyen, Bao / Uribe, Pablo / Kefford, Richard / Clements, Arthur / Long, Georgina V / Fernandez-Peñas, Pablo. ·Department of Dermatology, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·Australas J Dermatol · Pubmed #24313958.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The MEK inhibitor trametinib is currently undergoing clinical trials as the treatment of metastatic melanoma both alone and in combination with the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib. One of the most frequent side-effects associated with its use as a single agent is the development of acneiform eruptions. These eruptions seem to be reduced when dosed in combination with dabrafenib. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the prevalence of acneiform eruptions in patients taking the MEK inhibitor trametinib, both alone and in combination with dabrafenib. METHODS: All patients enrolled in the trametinib alone (n = 13) or trametinib and dabrafenib combination (n = 30) clinical trials at a single site underwent a retrospective file review. The development and management of acne or acneiform eruptions was noted. RESULTS: In total, 77% of the trametinib group developed an acneiform eruption on the trial, while only 10% developed acneiform lesions in the combination trial. The patients were treated with oral doxycycline, topical antibiotics or topical antiseptic washes, with a good response. However the condition recurred if these treatments were ceased and the patient was still on trametinib therapy. CONCLUSIONS: The MEK inhibitor trametinib is associated with the development of acneiform eruptions. When combined with dabrafenib the frequency of this side-effect is reduced.

6 Minor Circulating vitamin D-binding protein and free 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in patients with melanoma: A case-control study. 2017

Navarrete-Dechent, Cristián / Del Puerto, Constanza / Molgó, Montserrat / González, Sergio / Pérez-Mateluna, Guillermo / Uribe, Pablo / Camargo, Carlos A / Borzutzky, Arturo. ·Department of Dermatology, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile; Melanoma and Skin Cancer Unit, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile. · Department of Dermatology, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile. · Melanoma and Skin Cancer Unit, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile; Department of Pathology, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile. · Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile. · Department of Emergency Medicine and Division of Rheumatology, Allergy, and Immunology, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases and Immunology, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile; Millennium Institute on Immunology and Immunotherapy, Facultad de Medicina, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Santiago, Chile. Electronic address: arturobor@med.puc.cl. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #28807113.

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