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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Marshall M. Urist
Based on 16 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Marshall M. Urist wrote the following 16 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline NCCN Guidelines Insights: Melanoma, Version 3.2016. 2016

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Algazi, Alain / Andtbacka, Robert / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / DiMaio, Dominick / Fields, Ryan C / Fleming, Martin D / Gastman, Brian / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Johnson, Douglas / Joseph, Richard W / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Materin, Miguel A / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ott, Patrick / Gupta, Aparna Priyanath / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April K / Skitzki, Joseph / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Torres-Roca, Javier F / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Engh, Anita. ·From Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine; The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute; University of Colorado Cancer Center; Aim at Melanoma; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital; Fox Chase Cancer Center; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; Duke Cancer Institute; Roswell Park Cancer Institute; Stanford Cancer Institute; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; Moffitt Cancer Center; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; and National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #27496110.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma have been significantly revised over the past few years in response to emerging data on a number of novel agents and treatment regimens. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the data and rationale supporting extensive changes to the recommendations for systemic therapy in patients with metastatic or unresectable melanoma.

2 Guideline Melanoma, Version 2.2016, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology. 2016

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Algazi, Alain / Andtbacka, Robert / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / DiMaio, Dominick / Ernstoff, Marc / Fields, Ryan C / Fleming, Martin D / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Joseph, Richard W / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Materin, Miguel A / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April K / Skitzki, Joseph / Sosman, Jeff / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Torres-Roca, Javier F / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Engh, Anita. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #27059193.

ABSTRACT: This selection from the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines) for Melanoma focuses on adjuvant therapy and treatment of in-transit disease, because substantial changes were made to the recommendations for the 2016 update. Depending on the stage of the disease, options for adjuvant therapy now include biochemotherapy and high-dose ipilimumab. Treatment options for in-transit disease now include intralesional injection with talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC), a new immunotherapy. These additions prompted re-assessment of the data supporting older recommended treatment options for adjuvant therapy and in-transit disease, resulting in extensive revisions to the supporting discussion sections.

3 Guideline Melanoma, version 4.2014. 2014

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / Daud, Adil / Dimaio, Dominick / Fleming, Martin D / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole R / Ho, Maria / Anonymous5170793. ·From 1Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; 2Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; 3Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; 4University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; 5The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; 6UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; 7UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; 8Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center; 9St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; 10University of Colorado Cancer Center; 11Aim at Melanoma; 12Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; 13Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; 14Roswell Park Cancer Institute; 15Moffitt Cancer Center; 16The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; 17Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; 18Fox Chase Cancer Center; 19The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; 20Duke Cancer Institute; 21Stanford Cancer Institute; 22Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; 23City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; 24University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; and 25National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #24812131.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma provide multidisciplinary recommendations for the management of patients with melanoma. These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight notable recent updates. Dabrafenib and trametinib, either as monotherapy (category 1) or combination therapy, have been added as systemic options for patients with unresectable metastatic melanoma harboring BRAF V600 mutations. Controversy continues regarding the value of adjuvant radiation for patients at high risk of nodal relapse. This is reflected in the category 2B designation to consider adjuvant radiation following lymphadenectomy for stage III melanoma with clinically positive nodes or recurrent disease.

4 Guideline Melanoma, version 2.2013: featured updates to the NCCN guidelines. 2013

Coit, Daniel G / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daud, Adil / Dimaio, Dominick / Fleming, Martin D / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Lind, Anne / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Pruitt, Scott K / Ross, Merrick I / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Thompson, John A / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Ho, Maria / Anonymous4310755. ·Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #23584343.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma provide multidisciplinary recommendations on the clinical management of patients with melanoma. This NCCN Guidelines Insights report highlights notable recent updates. Foremost of these is the exciting addition of the novel agents ipilimumab and vemurafenib for treatment of advanced melanoma. The NCCN panel also included imatinib as a treatment for KIT-mutated tumors and pegylated interferon alfa-2b as an option for adjuvant therapy. Also important are revisions to the initial stratification of early-stage lesions based on the risk of sentinel lymph node metastases, and revised recommendations on the use of sentinel lymph node biopsy for low-risk groups. Finally, the NCCN panel reached clinical consensus on clarifying the role of imaging in the workup of patients with melanoma.

5 Guideline Melanoma. 2012

Coit, Daniel G / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daud, Adil / Dilawari, Raza A / Dimaio, Dominick / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Lind, Anne / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Pruitt, Scott K / Ross, Merrick I / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Thompson, John A / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / Anonymous590720. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #22393197.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Guideline Melanoma. 2009

Coit, Daniel G / Andtbacka, Robert / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Dilawari, Raza A / Dimaio, Dominick / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed / Lange, Julie R / Lind, Anne / Martin, Lainie / Martini, Mary C / Pruitt, Scott K / Ross, Merrick I / Sener, Stephen F / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Thompson, John A / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / Weber, Jeffrey / Wong, Michael K / Anonymous5080627. · ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #19401060.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Clinical Trial Final Results of the Sunbelt Melanoma Trial: A Multi-Institutional Prospective Randomized Phase III Study Evaluating the Role of Adjuvant High-Dose Interferon Alfa-2b and Completion Lymph Node Dissection for Patients Staged by Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy. 2016

McMasters, Kelly M / Egger, Michael E / Edwards, Michael J / Ross, Merrick I / Reintgen, Douglas S / Noyes, R Dirk / Martin, Robert C G / Goydos, James S / Beitsch, Peter D / Urist, Marshall M / Ariyan, Stephan / Sussman, Jeffrey J / Davidson, B Scott / Gershenwald, Jeffrey E / Hagendoorn, Lee J / Stromberg, Arnold J / Scoggins, Charles R. ·Kelly M. McMasters, Michael E. Egger, Robert C.G. Martin II, and Charles R. Scoggins, University of Louisville, James Graham Brown Cancer Center · Arnold J. Stromberg, University of Kentucky · and Lee J. Hagendoorn, Advertek Louisville, KY · Michael J. Edwards and Jeffrey J. Sussman, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH · Merrick I. Ross and Jeffrey E. Gershenwald, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston · Peter D. Beitsch, Dallas Surgical Group, Dallas, TX · Douglas S. Reintgen, University of South Florida School of Medicine, Tampa, FL · R. Dirk Noyes, LDS Hospital, Salt Lake City, UT · James S. Goydos, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ · Marshall M. Urist, University of Alabama School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL · Stephan Ariyan, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT · and B. Scott Davidson, Northside Hospital Cancer Institute, Melanoma and Sarcoma Specialists of Georgia, Atlanta, GA. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #26858331.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The Sunbelt Melanoma Trial is a prospective randomized trial evaluating the role of high-dose interferon alfa-2b therapy (HDI) or completion lymph node dissection (CLND) for patients with melanoma staged by sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients were eligible if they were age 18 to 70 years with primary cutaneous melanoma ≥ 1.0 mm Breslow thickness and underwent SLN biopsy. In Protocol A, patients with a single tumor-positive lymph node after SLN biopsy underwent CLND and were randomly assigned to observation versus HDI. In Protocol B, patients with tumor-negative SLN by standard histopathology and immunohistochemistry underwent molecular staging by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Patients positive by RT-PCR were randomly assigned to observation versus CLND versus CLND+HDI. Primary end points were disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). RESULTS: In the Protocol A intention-to-treat analysis, there were no significant differences in DFS (hazard ratio, 0.82; P = .45) or OS (hazard ratio, 1.10; P = .68) for patients randomly assigned to HDI versus observation. In the Protocol B intention-to-treat analysis, there were no significant differences in overall DFS (P = .069) or OS (P = .77) across the three randomized treatment arms. Similarly, efficacy analysis (excluding patients who did not receive the assigned treatment) did not demonstrate significant differences in DFS or OS in Protocol A or Protocol B. Median follow-up time was 71 months. CONCLUSION: No survival benefit for adjuvant HDI in patients with a single positive SLN was found. Among patients with tumor-negative SLN by conventional pathology but with melanoma detected in the SLN by RT-PCR, there was no OS benefit for CLND or CLND+HDI.

8 Article Diversity of stage III melanoma in the era of sentinel lymph node biopsy. 2013

Egger, Michael E / Callender, Glenda G / McMasters, Kelly M / Ross, Merrick I / Martin, Robert C G / Edwards, Michael J / Urist, Marshall M / Noyes, R Dirk / Sussman, Jeffrey J / Reintgen, Douglas S / Stromberg, Arnold J / Scoggins, Charles R. ·Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #23064795.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy for melanoma often detects minimal nodal tumor burden. Although all node-positive patients are considered stage III, there is controversy regarding the necessity of adjuvant therapy for all patients with tumor-positive SLN. METHODS: Post hoc analysis was performed of a prospective multi-institutional study of patients with melanoma ≥ 1.0 mm Breslow thickness. All patients underwent SLN biopsy; completion lymphadenectomy was performed for patients with SLN metastasis. Kaplan-Meier analysis of disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) was performed. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were performed. Classification and regression tree (CART) analysis also was performed. RESULTS: A total of 509 patients with tumor-positive SLN were evaluated. Independent risk factors for worse OS included thickness, age, gender, presence of ulceration, and tumor-positive non-SLN (nodal metastasis found on completion lymphadenectomy). As the number of tumor-positive SLN and the total number of tumor-positive nodes (SLN and non-SLN) increased, DFS and OS worsened on Kaplan-Meier analysis. On CART analysis, the 5-year OS rates ranged from 84.9% (women with thickness < 2.1 mm, age < 59 years, no ulceration, and tumor-negative non-SLN) to 14.3% (men with thickness ≥ 2.1 mm, age ≥ 59 years, ulceration present, and tumor-positive non-SLN). Six distinct subgroups were identified with 5-year OS in excess of 70%. CONCLUSIONS: Stage III melanoma in the era of SLN is associated with a very wide range of prognosis. CART analysis of prognostic factors allows discrimination of low-risk subgroups for which adjuvant therapy may not be warranted.

9 Article A novel and accurate computer model of melanoma prognosis for patients staged by sentinel lymph node biopsy: comparison with the American Joint Committee on Cancer model. 2012

Callender, Glenda G / Gershenwald, Jeffrey E / Egger, Michael E / Scoggins, Charles R / Martin, Robert C G / Schacherer, Christopher W / Edwards, Michael J / Urist, Marshall M / Ross, Merrick I / Stromberg, Arnold J / McMasters, Kelly M. ·Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202, USA. ·J Am Coll Surg · Pubmed #22342785.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: We found that a computer model developed by the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) melanoma staging committee had limitations for predicting prognosis of patients staged by sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy. We sought to develop a model that more accurately predicts prognosis in this population. STUDY DESIGN: Using a data set obtained from a prospective multi-institutional study of 2,507 patients with clinically node-negative melanomas ≥1.0 mm Breslow thickness, we developed a prognostic model using a Cox regression formula incorporating a number of significant clinicopathologic factors. The AJCC model and our model were used to predict 5-year survival from this test data set. The concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) was determined and chi-square tests were performed. Our new prognostic model was validated using an independent data set of 1,001 patients. RESULTS: Using the test data set, the CCC for the AJCC model was 0.875; chi-square tests demonstrated statistically significant differences between observed and predicted survivals for numerous clinicopathologic factors. The CCC for our model was 0.976 and none of the chi-square tests was statistically significant. Our model performed similarly well in SLN-negative patients (CCC 0.929) and SLN-positive patients (CCC 0.889). The AJCC model performed well in SLN-negative patients (CCC 0.854), but not in SLN-positive patients (CCC 0.626). Using the validation data set, similar findings were obtained. CONCLUSIONS: Our prognostic model provides superior survival estimates compared with the AJCC model for patients undergoing SLN biopsy. This online tool is available at www.melanomacalculator.com, and will provide important information that can be used to guide adjuvant therapy decisions and stratification in clinical trials.

10 Article Surveillance after surgical treatment of melanoma: futility of routine chest radiography. 2010

Brown, Russell E / Stromberg, Arnold J / Hagendoorn, Lee J / Hulsewede, Deborah Y / Ross, Merrick I / Noyes, R Dirk / Goydos, James S / Urist, Marshall M / Edwards, Michael J / Scoggins, Charles R / McMasters, Kelly M / Martin, Robert C G. ·Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, James Graham Brown Cancer Center and Center for Advanced Surgical Technologies of Norton Hospital Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA. ·Surgery · Pubmed #20800862.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Current recommendations by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network and other groups suggest that follow-up of cutaneous melanoma may include chest radiography (CXR) at 6- to 12-month intervals. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical efficacy of routine CXR for recurrence surveillance in melanoma. METHODS: Post hoc analysis was performed on data from a prospective, randomized, multi-institutional study on melanoma ≥1.0 mm in Breslow thickness. All patients underwent excision of the primary melanoma and sentinel node biopsy with completion lymphadenectomy for positive sentinel nodes. Yearly CXR and clinical assessments were obtained during follow-up. Results of routine CXR were compared with clinical disease states over the course of the study. RESULTS: A total of 1,235 patients were included in the analysis over a median follow-up of 74 months (range, 12-138). Overall, 210 patients (17.0%) had a recurrence, most commonly local or in-transit. Review of CXR results showed that 4,218 CXR were obtained in 1,235 patients either before, or in the absence of, initial recurrence. To date, 88% (n = 3,722) CXR are associated with no evidence of recurrence. Of CXR associated with recurrence, only 7.7% (n = 38) of surveillance CXR were read as "abnormal." Overall, 99% (n = 4,180) of CXR were read as either "normal" or found to be falsely positive (read as "abnormal," but without evidence of recurrence on investigation). Only 0.9% (n = 38) of all CXR obtained were true positives ("abnormal" CXR, with confirmed first known recurrence). Among these 38 patients with true positive CXR, 35 revealed widely disseminated disease (multiorgan or bilateral pulmonary metastases); only 3 (0.2%) had isolated pulmonary metastases amenable to resection. Sensitivity and specificity for surveillance CXR in detecting initial recurrence were 7.7% and 96.5%, respectively. CONCLUSION: The routine use of surveillance CXR provides no clinically useful information in the follow-up of patients with melanoma. CXR does not detect recurrence at levels sufficient to justify its routine use and, therefore, cannot be recommended as part of the standard surveillance regimen for these patients.

11 Article Ulceration as a predictive marker for response to adjuvant interferon therapy in melanoma. 2010

McMasters, Kelly M / Edwards, Michael J / Ross, Merrick I / Reintgen, Douglas S / Martin, Robert C G / Urist, Marshall M / Noyes, R Dirk / Sussman, Jeffrey J / Stromberg, Arnold J / Scoggins, Charles R. ·Department of Surgery, J. Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA. mcmasters@louisville.edu ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #20739846.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This analysis was performed to investigate the hypothesis that ulceration predicts improved response to adjuvant interferon (IFN) therapy. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Several studies have demonstrated that adjuvant therapy for high-risk melanoma patients with IFN alfa-2b improves disease-free survival (DFS), although the impact on overall survival (OS) is controversial. Recent data have suggested that IFN therapy may preferentially benefit patients with ulcerated primary melanomas. METHODS: Post hoc analysis was performed by a prospective multi-institutional randomized study of observation versus adjuvant IFN therapy for melanoma. All patients underwent sentinel lymph node biopsy; completion lymphadenectomy was performed for patients with sentinel lymph node metastasis. Patients were stratified by Breslow thickness, ulceration, and nodal status. Kaplan-Meier analysis of DFS and OS was performed and included univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS: A total of 1769 patients were analyzed (1311 without ulceration, 458 with ulceration) with a median follow-up of 71 months. Ulceration was associated with significantly worse DFS and OS in both node-negative and node-positive patients. Kaplan-Meier analysis of node-negative and node-positive patients by ulceration status revealed that the only significant impact of interferon was improved DFS in the ulcerated node-positive patients (P = 0.0169). IFN therapy had no significant impact on OS regardless of ulceration status, however. On multivariate analysis, IFN treatment was a significant independent predictor of DFS among ulcerated patients (odds ratio, 0.51; 95% confidence interval, 0.30-0.83; P = 0.0053), but not among patients without ulceration. CONCLUSIONS: These data support the conclusion that ulceration is a predictive marker for response to adjuvant IFN therapy. Future studies to evaluate specifically the differential effect of IFN on patients with ulcerated melanomas may allow us to focus this therapy on patients most likely to benefit from it.

12 Article Second primary melanomas: incidence and outcome. 2010

Bower, Matthew R / Scoggins, Charles R / Martin, Robert C G / Mays, Michael P / Edwards, Michael J / Reintgen, Douglas S / Ross, Merrick I / Urist, Marshall M / Noyes, R Dirk / Sussman, Jeffrey J / Hagendoorn, Lee J / Stromberg, Arnold J / McMasters, Kelly. ·Surgical Oncology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky 40202, USA. matt.bower@louisville.edu ·Am Surg · Pubmed #20698369.

ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of multiple primary melanomas (MPM) and other cancers types among patients with melanoma. Factors associated with development of MPM were assessed in a post hoc analysis of the database from a multi-institutional prospective randomized trial of patients with melanoma aged 18 to 70 years with Breslow thickness 1 mm or greater. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Forty-eight (1.9%) of 2506 patients with melanoma developed additional primary melanomas. Median follow-up was 66 months. Except in one patient, the subsequent melanomas were thinner (median, 0.32 mm vs. 1.50 mm; P < 0.0001). Compared with patients without MPM, patients with MPM were more likely to be older (median age, 54.5 vs. 51.0 years; P = 0.048), to have superficially spreading melanomas (SSM) (P = 0.025), to have negative sentinel lymph nodes (P = 0.021), or to lack lymphovascular invasion (LVI) (P = 0.008) with the initial tumor. On multivariate analysis, age (P = 0.028), LVI (P = 0.010), and SSM subtype of the original melanoma (P = 0.024) were associated with MPM. Patients with MPM and patients with single primary melanoma had similar DFS (5-year DFS 88.7 vs. 81.3%, P = 0.380), but patients with MPM had better OS (5-year OS 95.3 vs. 80.0%, P = 0.005). Nonmelanoma malignancies occurred in 152 patients (6.1%). Ongoing surveillance of patients with melanoma is important given that a significant number will develop additional melanoma and nonmelanoma tumors. With close follow-up, second primary melanomas are usually detected at an early stage.

13 Article Prognostic information from sentinel lymph node biopsy in patients with thick melanoma. 2010

Scoggins, Charles R / Bowen, Adrianne L / Martin, Robert C / Edwards, Michael J / Reintgen, Douglas S / Ross, Merrick I / Urist, Marshall M / Stromberg, Arnold J / Hagendoorn, Lee / McMasters, Kelly M. ·Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, 315 E Broadway, Louisville, KY 40202, USA. charles.scoggins@louisville.edu ·Arch Surg · Pubmed #20644123.

ABSTRACT: HYPOTHESIS: Sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy provides valuable prognostic information for patients with thick (T4) melanoma. DESIGN: Post hoc analysis of data from a prospective, randomized trial. SETTING: Academic and private hospitals. PATIENTS: Data of 240 patients with melanoma thicker than 4 mm were analyzed. Patients with tumor-positive SLNs underwent completion lymphadenectomy. Disease-free and overall survival were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate factors predictive of tumor-positive SLNs and disease-free and overall survival. RESULTS: Median thickness of melanoma was 5.6 mm, and patients were followed up for a median of 50 months. The SLNs were tumor positive in 100 patients (41.7%); 18% of these had additional positive nodes on completion lymphadenectomy. Extremity tumor location (risk ratio, 1.66; 95% confidence interval, 1.24-2.24; P = .001), Clark level (1.95; 1.33-2.87; P = .02), and lymphovascular invasion (1.57; 1.13-2.17; P = .01) were associated with a greater risk of tumor-positive SLNs. The patients with tumor-negative SLNs had significantly better median disease-free survival (46.5 vs 31.0 months; P = .04) and overall survival (55.5 vs 43.0 months; P = .004) compared with patients with tumor-positive SLNs. On multivariate analysis, male sex (risk ratio, 1.59; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-2.50; P = .02), increasing Breslow thickness (1.58; 1.10- 2.30; P = .03), ulceration (1.73; 1.18-2.59; P = .02), and tumor-positive SLNs (1.68; 1.17-2.43; P = .009) were associated with worse overall survival. CONCLUSION: The SLN biopsy provides useful prognostic information for patients with T4 melanoma.

14 Article Should all patients with melanoma between 1 and 2 mm Breslow thickness undergo sentinel lymph node biopsy? 2010

Mays, Michael P / Martin, Robert C G / Burton, Alison / Ginter, Brooke / Edwards, Michael J / Reintgen, Douglas S / Ross, Merrick I / Urist, Marshall M / Stromberg, Arnold J / McMasters, Kelly M / Scoggins, Charles R. ·Department of Surgery, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky, USA. ·Cancer · Pubmed #20108306.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy generally is recommended for patients who have melanoma with a Breslow thickness > or = 1 mm. Most patients with melanoma between 1 mm and 2 mm thick have tumor-negative SLNs and an excellent long-term prognosis. The objective of the current study was to evaluate prognostic factors in this subset of patients and determine whether all such patients require SLN biopsy. METHODS: Patients with melanoma between 1 mm and 2 mm in Breslow thickness were evaluated from a prospective multi-institutional study of SLN biopsy for melanoma. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis to compare patients with melanoma that measured from 1.0 mm to 1.59 mm (Group A) versus patients with melanoma that measured from > or = 1.6 mm to 2.0 mm thick (Group B). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to evaluate factors predictive of tumor-positive SLN status, DFS, and OS. RESULTS: The current analysis included 1110 patients with a median follow-up of 69 months. SLN status was tumor-positive in 133 of 1110 patients (12%) including 66 of 762 patients (8.7%) in Group A and 67 of 348 patients (19.3%) in Group B (P < .0001). On multivariate analysis, age, Breslow thickness, and lymphovascular invasion were independently predictive of a tumor-positive SLN (P < .05). DFS (P < .0001) and OS (P = .0001) were significantly better for Group A than for Group B. When tumor thickness was treated as either a continuous variable (P < 0.0001) or a categorical variable (P < .0001), it was significantly predictive of DFS and OS. On multivariate analysis, Breslow thickness, age, ulceration, histologic subtype, regression, Clark level, and SLN status were significant factors predicting DFS; and Breslow thickness, age, primary tumor location, sex, ulceration, and SLN status were significant factors predicting OS (P < .05). A subgroup of patients who had tumors <1.6 mm in Breslow thickness, had no lymphovascular invasion, and were aged > or = 59 years had a low risk (5%) of tumor-positive SLN. CONCLUSIONS: The current findings indicated that there is significant diversity in the biologic behavior of melanoma between 1 mm and 2 mm in Breslow thickness. SLN biopsy is recommended for all such patients to identify those with lymph node metastasis who are at the greatest risk of recurrence and mortality.

15 Article Factors associated with false-negative sentinel lymph node biopsy in melanoma patients. 2010

Scoggins, Charles R / Martin, Robert C G / Ross, Merrick I / Edwards, Michael J / Reintgen, Douglas S / Urist, Marshall M / Gershenwald, Jeffrey E / Sussman, Jeffrey J / Dirk Noyes, R / Goydos, James S / Beitsch, Peter D / Ariyan, Stephan / Stromberg, Arnold J / Hagendoorn, Lee J / McMasters, Kelly M. ·Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY, USA. charles.scoggins@nortonhealthcare.org ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #19967459.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Some melanoma patients who undergo sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy will have false-negative (FN) results. We sought to determine the factors and outcomes associated with FN SLN biopsy. METHODS: Analysis was performed of a prospective multi-institutional study that included patients with melanoma of thickness > 1.0 mm who underwent SLN biopsy. FN results were defined as the proportion of node-positive patients who had a tumor-negative sentinel node biopsy. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. RESULTS: This analysis included 2,451 patients with median follow-up of 61 months. FN, true-positive (TP), and true-negative (TN) SLN results were found in 59 (10.8%), 486 (19.8%), and 1,906 (77.8%) patients, respectively. On univariate analysis comparing the FN with TP groups, respectively, the following factors were significantly different: age (52.6 vs. 47.6 years, p = 0.004), thickness (mean 2.1 vs. 3.1 mm, p = 0.003), lymphovascular invasion (LVI; 3.7 vs. 13.7%, p = 0.037), and local/in-transit recurrence (LITR; 32.2 vs. 12.4%, p < 0.0001); these factors remained significant on multivariate analysis. Overall 5-year survival was greater in the TN group (86.7%) compared with the TP (62.3%) and FN (51.3%) groups (p < 0.0001); however, there was no significant difference in overall survival comparing the TP and FN groups (p = 0.32). CONCLUSIONS: This is the largest study to evaluate FN SLN results in melanoma, with a FN rate of 10.8%. FN results are associated with greater patient age, lower mean thickness, less frequent LVI, and greater risk of LITR. However, survival of patients with FN SLN is not statistically worse than that of patients with TP SLN.

16 Article Effect of multiple-nodal basin drainage on cutaneous melanoma. 2008

Federico, Andrea C / Chagpar, Anees B / Ross, Merrick I / Martin, Robert C G / Noyes, R Dirk / Goydos, James S / Beitsch, Peter D / Urist, Marshall M / Ariyan, Stephan / Sussman, Jeffrey J / McMasters, Kelly M / Scoggins, Charles R / Anonymous990604. ·Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40292. charles.scoggins@louisville.edu. ·Arch Surg · Pubmed #18645103.

ABSTRACT: HYPOTHESIS: The number of nodal basins draining a primary cutaneous melanoma is not an independent predictor of outcome. DESIGN: Post hoc analysis of patients entered into a randomized, prospective study. SETTING: Multi-institutional academic and community medical centers. PATIENTS: Patients aged 18 to 70 years with melanoma 1.0 mm or greater Breslow thickness. INTERVENTIONS: Wide local excision and sentinel lymph node biopsy were performed on all patients; patients with sentinel lymph node metastases underwent completion lymphadenectomy. Patients with multiple-nodal basin drainage were compared with those with single-nodal basin drainage. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Sentinel lymph node status, locoregional recurrence-free survival, disease-free survival, and overall survival. RESULTS: A total of 2060 patients with single-nodal basin drainage (n = 1709 [83% of cohort]) were included in the analysis, with a median follow-up of 50 months. On univariate analysis, the group with multiple-nodal basin drainage (n = 351) was associated with female sex and primary tumor regression (P < .001). In addition, multiple-nodal basin drainage was associated with truncal primary tumor location (73.2%), while single-nodal basin drainage was more common for extremity tumors (50.9%; P < .001). On multivariate analysis, there were no differences in the rate of sentinel lymph node metastasis, disease-free survival, or overall survival between the groups. Interestingly, locoregional recurrence was significantly worse in the single-nodal basin drainage group (P = .003). CONCLUSIONS: Multiple-nodal basin drainage does not confer a worse prognosis for patients with cutaneous melanoma. In fact, single-nodal basin drainage appears to be associated with a greater risk of locoregional recurrence.