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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Richard L. White
Based on 14 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, R. L. White wrote the following 14 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review High-dose interleukin-2: is it still indicated for melanoma and RCC in an era of targeted therapies? 2013

Amin, Asim / White, Richard L. · ·Oncology (Williston Park) · Pubmed #23977763.

ABSTRACT: Immunotherapy with interleukin-2 (IL-2) has been the mainstay of systemic therapy for advanced kidney cancer and melanoma. Although IL-2 treatment is limited to healthy patients, a select group of these patients have derived substantial, durable benefit from it-in some translating into cures with no ongoing therapy or chronic toxicity. Over the past 10 years, insights into the biology of renal cell carcinoma and into key signaling mechanisms in melanoma, and growth in our understanding of immune checkpoints, have led to the development and approval of targeted and immune-modulatory therapeutic options with clinically relevant benefit. Our improved understanding of the relationship between the host environment, immune system, and malignancy has helped identify compounds and therapies that are changing the way we think about cancer and our approach to cancer therapeutics. While the newer options may be applicable to most patients, durable responses measured in years are rare. In this review, we examine the currently approved options available for these disease processes, including the newer agents and selected combinatorial approaches under investigation, and we attempt to identify the role of high-dose IL-2 in the context of current clinical practice.

2 Review Surgical management of solitary metastatic melanoma. 2009

Komorowski, A L / Wysocki, W M / White, R L. ·Servicio de Cirugia General y del Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Juan Grande, Jerez de la Frontera, Spain. alkomorowski@wp.pl ·Acta Chir Belg · Pubmed #19499673.

ABSTRACT: The results of non-surgical treatment of advanced stage melanoma are disappointing. Carefully selected stage IV melanoma patients can profit from an aggressive surgical approach. The possibilities of surgical treatment of solitary and single-organ metastasis of melanoma are discussed for most common metastatic sites.

3 Clinical Trial Immune Correlates of GM-CSF and Melanoma Peptide Vaccination in a Randomized Trial for the Adjuvant Therapy of Resected High-Risk Melanoma (E4697). 2017

Butterfield, Lisa H / Zhao, Fengmin / Lee, Sandra / Tarhini, Ahmad A / Margolin, Kim A / White, Richard L / Atkins, Michael B / Cohen, Gary I / Whiteside, Theresa L / Kirkwood, John M / Lawson, David H. ·University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. butterfieldl@upmc.edu. · Dana Farber Cancer Institute - ECOG-ACRIN Biostatistics Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, Washington. · Levine Cancer Institute, Carolinas Healthcare System, Charlotte, North Carolina. · Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts. · Greater Baltimore Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland. · Winship Cancer institute of Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. ·Clin Cancer Res · Pubmed #28536308.

ABSTRACT:

4 Clinical Trial Sequential immune monitoring in patients with melanoma and renal cell carcinoma treated with high-dose interleukin-2: immune patterns and correlation with outcome. 2014

Foureau, David M / Amin, Asim / White, Richard L / Anderson, William / Jones, Chase P / Sarantou, Terry / McKillop, Iain H / Salo, Jonathan C. ·Department of General Surgery, Carolinas Healthcare System, Charlotte, NC, 28203, USA, david.foureau@carolinas.org. ·Cancer Immunol Immunother · Pubmed #25205170.

ABSTRACT: Interleukin-2 (IL-2) therapy leads to clinically relevant responses in 10-16 % of patients with metastatic melanoma (MMEL) or 10-30 % of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (MRCC). To date, no biomarkers have been validated to identify patients who are likely to respond. We hypothesized that changes in T cell subset distribution in patients undergoing IL-2 therapy may correlate with treatment outcomes. Immune profiles of 64 patients (27-MMEL, 37-MRCC) were evaluated using flow cytometry at baseline, during (≥three doses) and at the end of treatment cycle (30 ± 6 h after last dose), through two courses of IL-2 therapy. Changes in distribution and phenotype of circulating CD4 and CD8 lymphocyte subsets were compared (1) based on cancer types and (2) intra-patient during the course of the IL-2 therapy. Exploratory analysis of immunologic profiles was also performed based on treatment outcome. Independent of cancer type, IL-2 led to a transient decrease of circulating effector lymphocytes, while regulatory T cells gradually increased. Interleukin-2 differentially affected a subset of CD8 T cell expressing Foxp3, depending on malignancy type. In MMEL patients, IL-2 gradually expanded circulating CD8 Foxp3+ cells; in MRCC patients, IL-2 transiently increased expression of CD103 and CCR4 homing markers. Monitoring of adaptive immune variables early on and during the course of IL-2 therapy revealed transient alterations in immune profiles, specific to MMEL and MRCC patients, related to immune balance (and ultimately response to IL-2 therapy) or T cell egress from the circulation.

5 Clinical Trial gp100 peptide vaccine and interleukin-2 in patients with advanced melanoma. 2011

Schwartzentruber, Douglas J / Lawson, David H / Richards, Jon M / Conry, Robert M / Miller, Donald M / Treisman, Jonathan / Gailani, Fawaz / Riley, Lee / Conlon, Kevin / Pockaj, Barbara / Kendra, Kari L / White, Richard L / Gonzalez, Rene / Kuzel, Timothy M / Curti, Brendan / Leming, Phillip D / Whitman, Eric D / Balkissoon, Jai / Reintgen, Douglas S / Kaufman, Howard / Marincola, Francesco M / Merino, Maria J / Rosenberg, Steven A / Choyke, Peter / Vena, Don / Hwu, Patrick. ·Indiana University Health Goshen Center for Cancer Care, Goshen, IN 46526, USA. dschwart@iuhealth.org ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #21631324.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Stimulating an immune response against cancer with the use of vaccines remains a challenge. We hypothesized that combining a melanoma vaccine with interleukin-2, an immune activating agent, could improve outcomes. In a previous phase 2 study, patients with metastatic melanoma receiving high-dose interleukin-2 plus the gp100:209-217(210M) peptide vaccine had a higher rate of response than the rate that is expected among patients who are treated with interleukin-2 alone. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, phase 3 trial involving 185 patients at 21 centers. Eligibility criteria included stage IV or locally advanced stage III cutaneous melanoma, expression of HLA*A0201, an absence of brain metastases, and suitability for high-dose interleukin-2 therapy. Patients were randomly assigned to receive interleukin-2 alone (720,000 IU per kilogram of body weight per dose) or gp100:209-217(210M) plus incomplete Freund's adjuvant (Montanide ISA-51) once per cycle, followed by interleukin-2. The primary end point was clinical response. Secondary end points included toxic effects and progression-free survival. RESULTS: The treatment groups were well balanced with respect to baseline characteristics and received a similar amount of interleukin-2 per cycle. The toxic effects were consistent with those expected with interleukin-2 therapy. The vaccine-interleukin-2 group, as compared with the interleukin-2-only group, had a significant improvement in centrally verified overall clinical response (16% vs. 6%, P=0.03), as well as longer progression-free survival (2.2 months; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7 to 3.9 vs. 1.6 months; 95% CI, 1.5 to 1.8; P=0.008). The median overall survival was also longer in the vaccine-interleukin-2 group than in the interleukin-2-only group (17.8 months; 95% CI, 11.9 to 25.8 vs. 11.1 months; 95% CI, 8.7 to 16.3; P=0.06). CONCLUSIONS: In patients with advanced melanoma, the response rate was higher and progression-free survival longer with vaccine and interleukin-2 than with interleukin-2 alone. (Funded by the National Cancer Institute and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00019682.).

6 Article Microsatellitosis in Patients with Melanoma. 2019

Karakousis, Giorgos C / Gimotty, Phyllis A / Leong, Stanley P / Pockaj, Barbara A / White, Richard L / O'Donoghue, Cristina / Sinnamon, Andrew J / Bartlett, Edmund K / Dueck, Amylou C / Gould Rothberg, Bonnie E / Messina, Jane L / Vetto, John T / Sondak, Vernon K / Schneebaum, Schlomo / Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed / Han, Dale / Faries, Mark B / Zager, Jonathan S / Anonymous2571200. ·Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. giorgos.karakousis@uphs.upenn.edu. · Department of Biostatistics, Epidemiology and Informatics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · California Pacific Medical Center and Research Institute, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, AZ, USA. · Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC, USA. · Department of Surgery, Rush Medical College, Chicago, IL, USA. · Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. · Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA. · Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USA. · Ichilov Hospital, Tel Aviv, Israel. · Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA, USA. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #30421045.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Microsatellitosis (mS) in melanoma has been considered a marker of unfavorable tumor biology, leading to the current American Joint Committee on Cancer staging of IIIB/C/D disease, despite few investigative studies of this entity limited by the small sample sizes and incomplete nodal microstaging. We sought to better characterize outcomes and prognostic factors in a multi-institutional cohort of patients with mS and nodal microstaging. METHODS: The Sentinel Lymph Node Working Group cohort included 414 mS patients who underwent sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy. Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate the prognostic significance of established clinicopathologic characteristics. Melanoma-specific survival (MSS) of patients with mS was compared with 3002 similarly staged patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program registry. RESULTS: The median age of the mS cohort was 64.9 years; 39.6% were female. Median thickness was 3 mm, 40.6% of cases were ulcerated, and the SLN positivity rate was 46.7%. Increasing thickness, male sex, and SLN positivity were significantly associated with poorer MSS. Stage IIIB/C/D 5-year MSS rates were 86.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 79.4-93.3%), 54.1% (95% CI 45.4-59.7%), and 44.2% (95% CI 25.4-63.0%), respectively. MSS survival for the stage IIIB mS cohort was significantly better than a similarly staged SEER cohort (5-year MSS of 70.1%, 95% CI 66.0-74.2%), while no significant difference was observed for the stage IIIC or D cohorts. CONCLUSIONS: SLN metastases are common and are a significant prognostic factor in patients with mS. Survival in stage IIIB patients with mS was considerably more favorable than their stage would otherwise suggest, which has important implications for decisions regarding adjuvant therapy for patients with mS.

7 Article Stratifying SLN incidence in intermediate thickness melanoma patients. 2018

Chang, James M / Kosiorek, Heidi E / Dueck, Amylou C / Leong, Stanley P L / Vetto, John T / White, Richard L / Avisar, Eli / Sondak, Vernon K / Messina, Jane L / Zager, Jonathan S / Garberoglio, Carlos / Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed / Pockaj, Barbara A. ·Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ, USA. · Section of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ, USA. · Center for Melanoma Research and Treatment, Department of Surgery, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Department of Surgery, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA. · Department of Surgery, Levine Cancer Institute, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC, USA. · Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA. · Departments of Cutaneous Oncology and Sarcoma, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA. · Department of Surgery, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA, USA. · Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ, USA. Electronic address: pockaj.barbara@mayo.edu. ·Am J Surg · Pubmed #29502857.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Guidelines for melanoma recommend sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in patients with melanomas ≥1 mm thickness. Recent single institution studies have found tumors <1.5 mm a low-risk group for positive SLNB. METHODS: A retrospective review of the Sentinel Lymph Node Working Group multicenter database identified patients with intermediate thickness melanoma (1.01-4.00 mm) who had SLNB, and assessed predictors for positive SLNB. RESULTS: 3460 patients were analyzed, 584 (17%) had a positive SLNB. Univariate factors associated with a positive SLNB included age <60 (p < .001), tumor on the trunk/lower extremity (p < .001), Breslow depth ≥2 mm (p < .001), ulceration (p < .001), mitotic rate ≥1/mm CONCLUSIONS: Intermediate thickness melanoma has significant heterogeneity of SLNB positivity. Low-risk subgroups can be found among older patients in the absence of high-risk features.

8 Article Is pelvic sentinel node biopsy necessary for lower extremity and trunk melanomas? 2017

Schuitevoerder, Darryl / Leong, Stanley P L / Zager, Jonathan S / White, Richard L / Avisar, Eli / Kosiorek, Heidi / Dueck, Amylou / Fortino, Jeanine / Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed / Hart, Kyle / Vetto, John T. ·Department of Surgery, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA. Electronic address: schuitev@ohsu.edu. · Center for Melanoma Research and Treatment, Department of Surgery, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Departments of Cutaneous Oncology and Sarcoma, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL, USA. · Department of Surgery, Levine Cancer Institute, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC, USA. · Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA. · Section of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ, USA. · Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA. · Department of Surgery, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR, USA. ·Am J Surg · Pubmed #28411863.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: There is currently no consensus regarding how to address pelvic sentinel lymph nodes (PSLNs) in melanoma. Thus, our objectives were to identify the incidence and clinical impact of PSLNs. METHODS: Retrospective review of a prospectively collected multi-institutional melanoma database. RESULTS: Of 2476 cases of lower extremity and trunk melanomas, 227 (9%) drained to PSLNs (181 to both PSLNs and superficial (inguinal or femoral) sentinel lymph nodes (SSLN) and 46 to PSLNs alone). Seventeen (7.5%) of 227 PSLN cases were positive for nodal metastasis, 8 of which drained to PSLNs only while 9 drained to both PSLNs and SSLNs. Complication rates between PSLN and SSLN biopsy were similar (15% vs. 14% respectively). In 181 cases with drainage to both SSLNs and PSLNs, PSLN biopsy upstaged one patient (0.6%), and completion dissection based on a positive PSLN did not upstage any. CONCLUSIONS: PSLN biopsy is safe, however in the setting of negative SSLNs there is minimal clinical impact. We therefore recommend PSLN biopsy when the SSLNs are positive or when the tumor drains to PSLNs alone.

9 Article Reporting of mitotic rate in cutaneous melanoma: A study using the national cancer data base. 2017

Lorimer, Patrick D / Benham, Emily C / Walsh, Kendall / Han, Yimei / Forster, Meghan R / Sarantou, Terry / White, Richard L / Hill, Joshua S. ·Department of Surgery, Carolinas Medical Center, Levine Cancer Institute, Charlotte, North Carolina. · Department of Biostatistics, Carolinas Healthcare System, Levine Cancer Institute, Charlotte, North Carolina. ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #28335082.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The seventh edition of the American Joint Commission on Cancer staging manual (AJCC7, published 2009), updated thin cutaneous melanoma staging protocols with the incorporation of mitotic rate (MR). In these patients, higher MR is associated with decreased survival. This study utilizes the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) to evaluate MR reporting since AJCC7. METHODS: The NCDB was queried for patients with primary cutaneous melanoma from 1998 to 2013. Because MR reporting was infrequent prior to implementing AJCC7, records from 2010 to 2013 were analyzed. Categorical variables were compared with chi-square tests; univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were constructed to determine the effects of covariates on MR reporting. RESULTS: A total of 107,134 patients met inclusion criteria. From 2010 to 2013, MR reporting increased dramatically (64.3-80.9%). On multivariate analysis, factors significantly related to increased MR reporting include later diagnosis year, T-classification (T1a and b vs. T1), facility type (academic vs. other specified types of cancer programs), facility volume, patient income, level of education, and county population (metropolitan vs. urban and rural). CONCLUSIONS: MR reporting increased dramatically after the introduction of AJCC7; however, disparities in reporting remain across facility types. Further investigation of procedures performed in academic settings that may influence reporting of MR is warranted. J. Surg. Oncol. 2017;115:281-286. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

10 Article Pediatric and Adolescent Melanoma: A National Cancer Data Base Update. 2016

Lorimer, Patrick D / White, Richard L / Walsh, Kendall / Han, Yimei / Kirks, Russell C / Symanowski, James / Forster, Meghan R / Sarantou, Terry / Salo, Jonathan C / Hill, Joshua S. ·Department of Surgery, Carolinas Medical Center, Levine Cancer Institute, Charlotte, NC, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Carolinas Medical Center, Levine Cancer Institute, Charlotte, NC, USA. · Department of Surgery, Carolinas Medical Center, Levine Cancer Institute, Charlotte, NC, USA. joshua.hill@carolinas.org. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #27364504.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Studies suggest that the biology of pediatric and adolescent melanoma differs from that of adult disease. We report the largest series to date examining the natural history of pediatric and adolescent melanoma. We aim to elucidate the natural history of pediatric and adolescent melanoma and to examine the appropriateness of diagnostic and therapeutic modalities developed for adults and that are currently being used in children. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted of patients with an index diagnosis of cutaneous non-metastatic melanoma from 1998 to 2011 using the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB; n = 420,416). Three age-based cohorts were analyzed: 1-10 years (pediatric), 11-20 years (adolescent), and ≥21 years (adult). Multivariate analyses were used to identify factors associated with overall survival (OS). RESULTS: Pediatric melanoma patients have longer OS than their adolescent (hazard ratio [HR] 0.50, 95 % CI 0.25-0.98) and adult counterparts (HR 0.11, 95 % CI 0.06-0.21). Adolescents have longer OS than adults. No difference was found in OS in pediatric patients who are node-positive versus node-negative. In pediatric patients, sentinel lymph node biopsy and completion lymph node dissection are not associated with increased OS. In adolescents, nodal positivity is a significant negative prognostic indicator (HR 4.82, 95 % CI 3.38-6.87). CONCLUSIONS: Age-based differences in melanoma outcomes warrant different considerations for diagnostic and therapeutic approaches in each group in order to maximize quality of life while minimizing complications and costs. Prospective, multicenter studies should evaluate the role of diagnostic procedures for pediatric patients.

11 Article Clinicopathologic predictors of sentinel lymph node metastasis in thin melanoma. 2013

Han, Dale / Zager, Jonathan S / Shyr, Yu / Chen, Heidi / Berry, Lynne D / Iyengar, Sanjana / Djulbegovic, Mia / Weber, Jaimie L / Marzban, Suroosh S / Sondak, Vernon K / Messina, Jane L / Vetto, John T / White, Richard L / Pockaj, Barbara / Mozzillo, Nicola / Charney, Kim James / Avisar, Eli / Krouse, Robert / Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed / Leong, Stanley P. ·Dale Han, Jonathan S. Zager, Sanjana Iyengar, Mia Djulbegovic, Jaimie L. Weber, Suroosh S. Marzban, Vernon K. Sondak, and Jane L. Messina, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa · Eli Avisar, University of Miami, Miami, FL · Yu Shyr, Heidi Chen, and Lynne D. Berry, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN · John T. Vetto, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR · Richard L. White, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC · Barbara Pockaj, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale · Robert Krouse, Southern Arizona Veterans Administration Health Care System, Tucson, AZ · Nicola Mozzillo, Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori-Fondazione Pascale, Naples, Italy · Kim James Charney, St Joseph Hospital, Orange · and Mohammed Kashani-Sabet and Stanley P. Leong, California Pacific Medical Center and Research Institute, San Francisco, CA. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #24190111.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Indications for sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) for thin melanoma are continually evolving. We present a large multi-institutional study to determine factors predictive of sentinel lymph node (SLN) metastasis in thin melanoma. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Retrospective review of the Sentinel Lymph Node Working Group database from 1994 to 2012 identified 1,250 patients who had an SLNB and thin melanomas (≤ 1 mm). Clinicopathologic characteristics were correlated with SLN status and outcome. RESULTS: SLN metastases were detected in 65 (5.2%) of 1,250 patients. On univariable analysis, rates of Breslow thickness ≥ 0.75 mm, Clark level ≥ IV, ulceration, and absence of regression differed significantly between positive and negative SLN groups (all P < .05). These four variables and mitotic rate were used in multivariable analysis, which demonstrated that Breslow thickness ≥ 0.75 mm (P = .03), Clark level ≥ IV (P = .05), and ulceration (P = .01) significantly predicted SLN metastasis with 6.3%, 7.0%, and 11.6% of the patients with these respective characteristics having SLN disease. Melanomas < 0.75 mm had positive SLN rates of < 5% regardless of Clark level and ulceration status. Median follow-up was 2.6 years. Melanoma-specific survival was significantly worse for patients with positive versus negative SLNs (P = .001). CONCLUSION: Breslow thickness ≥ 0.75 mm, Clark level ≥ IV, and ulceration significantly predict SLN disease in thin melanoma. Most SLN metastases (86.2%) occur in melanomas ≥ 0.75 mm, with 6.3% of these patients having SLN disease, whereas in melanomas < 0.75 mm, SLN metastasis rates are < 5%. By using a 5% metastasis risk threshold, SLNB is indicated for melanomas ≥ 0.75 mm, but further study is needed to define indications for SLNB in melanomas < 0.75 mm.

12 Article Factors predictive of the status of sentinel lymph nodes in melanoma patients from a large multicenter database. 2011

White, Richard L / Ayers, Gregory D / Stell, Virginia H / Ding, Shouluan / Gershenwald, Jeffrey E / Salo, Jonathan C / Pockaj, Barbara A / Essner, Richard / Faries, Mark / Charney, Kim James / Avisar, Eli / Hauschild, Axel / Egberts, Friederike / Averbook, Bruce J / Garberoglio, Carlos A / Vetto, John T / Ross, Merrick I / Chu, David / Trisal, Vijay / Hoekstra, Harald / Whitman, Eric / Wanebo, Harold J / Debonis, Daniel / Vezeridis, Michael / Chevinsky, Aaron / Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed / Shyr, Yu / Berry, Lynne / Zhao, Zhiguo / Soong, Seng-Jaw / Leong, Stanley P L / Anonymous5680696. ·Department of General Surgery, Division of Surgical Oncology, Blumenthal Cancer Center, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC, USA. Richard.white@carolinashealthcare.org ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #21647761.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Numerous predictive factors for cutaneous melanoma metastases to sentinel lymph nodes have been identified; however, few have been found to be reproducibly significant. This study investigated the significance of factors for predicting regional nodal disease in cutaneous melanoma using a large multicenter database. METHODS: Seventeen institutions submitted retrospective and prospective data on 3463 patients undergoing sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy for primary melanoma. Multiple demographic and tumor factors were analyzed for correlation with a positive SLN. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were performed. RESULTS: Of 3445 analyzable patients, 561 (16.3%) had a positive SLN biopsy. In multivariate analysis of 1526 patients with complete records for 10 variables, increasing Breslow thickness, lymphovascular invasion, ulceration, younger age, the absence of regression, and tumor location on the trunk were statistically significant predictors of a positive SLN. CONCLUSIONS: These results confirm the predictive significance of the well-established variables of Breslow thickness, ulceration, age, and location, as well as consistently reported but less well-established variables such as lymphovascular invasion. In addition, the presence of regression was associated with a lower likelihood of a positive SLN. Consideration of multiple tumor parameters should influence the decision for SLN biopsy and the estimation of nodal metastatic disease risk.

13 Article Skin tumor responsiveness to interleukin-2 treatment and CD8 Foxp3+ T cell expansion in an immunocompetent mouse model. 2011

Foureau, David M / McKillop, Iain H / Jones, Chase P / Amin, Asim / White, Richard L / Salo, Jonathan C. ·Department of General Surgery, Carolinas Medical Center, 1000 Blythe Boulevard, Charlotte, NC 28203, USA. ·Cancer Immunol Immunother · Pubmed #21638127.

ABSTRACT: Recombinant human interleukin-2 (rhIL-2) therapy is approved for treating patients with advanced melanoma yet significant responses are observed in only 10-15% of patients. Interleukin-2 induces Foxp3 expression in activated human CD8 T cells in vitro and expands circulating CD8 Foxp3+ T cells in melanoma patients. Employing IL-2 responsive (B16-F1, B16-BL6, JB/MS, MCA-205) and nonresponsive (JB/RH, B16-F10) subcutaneous tumor mouse models, we evaluated CD8 Foxp3+ T cell distribution and changes in response to rhIL-2 (50,000 U, i.p. or s.q., twice daily for 5 days). In tumor-free mice and subcutaneous tumor-bearing mouse models, CD8 Foxp3+ T cells were a rare but naturally occurring cell subset. Primarily located in skin-draining lymph nodes, CD8 Foxp3+ T cells expressed both activated T cell (CD28(+), CD44(+)) and Treg (CTLA4(+), PD1(lo/var), NKG2A(+/var)) markers. Following treatment with rhIL-2, a dramatic increase in CD8 Foxp3+ T cell prevalence was observed in the circulation and tumor-draining lymph nodes (TD.LNs) of animals bearing IL-2 nonresponsive tumors, while no significant changes were observed in the circulation and TD.LNs of animals bearing IL-2 responsive tumors. These findings suggest expansion of CD8 Foxp3+ T cell population in response to rhIL-2 treatment may serve as an early marker for tumor responsiveness to immunotherapy in an immune competent model. Additionally, these data may provide insight to predict response in patients with melanoma undergoing rhIL-2 treatment.

14 Minor Letter response: Reporting of mitotic rate in cutaneous melanoma. 2017

Lorimer, Patrick D / Benham, Emily / Walsh, Kendall / Han, Yimei / Forster, Meghan R / Sarantou, Terry / White, Richard L / Hill, Joshua S. ·Department of Surgery, Levine Cancer Institute, Carolinas Medical Center, Charlotte, NC. · Department of Biostatistics, Levine Cancer Institute, Carolinas Healthcare System, Charlotte, NC. ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #29194672.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --