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Melanoma: HELP
Articles by Yong Zhou
Based on 8 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Yong Zhou wrote the following 8 articles about Melanoma.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article The in vitro and in vivo anti-melanoma effects of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles: influences of material factors. 2019

Wu, Hongfeng / Li, Zhongtao / Tang, Jiaoqing / Yang, Xiao / Zhou, Yong / Guo, Bo / Wang, Lin / Zhu, Xiangdong / Tu, Chongqi / Zhang, Xingdong. ·National Engineering Research Center for Biomaterials, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064, China, zhu_xd1973@scu.edu.cn. · Department of Dermatology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China. · Department of Orthopaedics, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China. · Department of Ophthalmology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China, guobohx@163.com. ·Int J Nanomedicine · Pubmed #30863053.

ABSTRACT: Background: Treatment for melanoma is a challenging clinical problem, and some new strategies are worth exploring. Purpose: The objective of this study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo anti-melanoma effects of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (HANPs) and discuss the involved material factors. Materials and methods: Five types of HANPs, ie, HA-A, HA-B, HA-C, HA-D, and HA-E, were prepared by wet chemical method combining with polymer template and appropriate post-treatments. The in vitro effects of the as-prepared five HANPs on inhibiting the viability of A375 melanoma cells and inducing the apoptosis of the cells were evaluated by Cell Counting Kit-8 analysis, cell nucleus morphology observation, flow cytometer, and PCR analysis. The in vivo anti-melanoma effects of HANPs were studied in the tumor model of nude mice. Results: The five HANPs had different physicochemical properties, including morphology, size, specific surface area (SSA), crystallinity, and so on. By the in vitro cell study, it was found that the material factors played important roles in the anti-melanoma effect of HANPs. Among the as-prepared five HANPs, HA-A with granular shape, smaller size, higher SSA, and lower crystallinity exhibited best effect on inhibiting the viability of A375 cells. At the concentration of 200 μg/mL, HA-A resulted in the lowest cell viability (34.90%) at day 3. All the HANPs could induce the apoptosis of A375 cells, and the relatively higher apoptosis rates of the cells were found in HA-A (20.10%) and HA-B (19.41%) at day 3. However, all the HANPs showed no inhibitory effect on the viability of the normal human epidermal fibroblasts. The preliminary in vivo evaluation showed that both HA-A and HA-C could delay the formation and growth speed of melanoma tissue significantly. Likely, HA-A exhibited better effect on inhibiting the growth of melanoma tissue than HA-C. The inhibition rate of HA-A for tumor tissue growth reached 49.1% at day 23. Conclusion: The current study confirmed the anti-melanoma effect of HANPs and provided a new idea for the clinical treatment of melanoma.

2 Article Multiregional Sequencing Reveals Genomic Alterations and Clonal Dynamics in Primary Malignant Melanoma of the Esophagus. 2018

Li, Jingjing / Yan, Shi / Liu, Zhen / Zhou, Yong / Pan, Yaqi / Yuan, WenQin / Liu, Mengfei / Tan, Qin / Tian, Geng / Dong, Bin / Cai, Hong / Wu, Nan / Ke, Yang. ·Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education/Beijing), Laboratory of Genetics, Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing, China. · Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education/Beijing), Department of Thoracic Surgery II, Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing, China. · Geneis Co. Ltd., Beijing, China. · Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education/Beijing), Central Lab, Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing, China. · Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education/Beijing), Department of Thoracic Surgery II, Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing, China. keyang@bjmu.edu.cn nanwu@bjmu.edu.cn. · Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education/Beijing), Laboratory of Genetics, Peking University Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing, China. keyang@bjmu.edu.cn nanwu@bjmu.edu.cn. ·Cancer Res · Pubmed #28972077.

ABSTRACT: Primary malignant melanoma of the esophagus (PMME) is a rare and aggressive disease with high tendency of metastasis. To characterize the genetic basis and intratumor heterogeneity of PMME, we performed multiregion exome sequencing and whole genome SNP array genotyping of 12 samples obtained from a patient with PMME. High intratumor heterogeneity was observed in both somatic mutation and copy-number alteration levels. Nine geographically separate samples including two normal samples were clonally related and followed a branched evolution model. Most putative oncogenic drivers such as

3 Article Noninvasive Determination of Melanoma Depth using a Handheld Photoacoustic Probe. 2017

Zhou, Yong / Tripathi, Shivani V / Rosman, Ilana / Ma, Jun / Hai, Pengfei / Linette, Gerald P / Council, M Laurin / Fields, Ryan C / Wang, Lihong V / Cornelius, Lynn A. ·Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Optical Imaging Laboratory, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. · Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. · Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri, USA; Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Pathology and Immunology, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. · Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri, USA; Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Division of Oncology, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. · Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri, USA; Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. · Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Optical Imaging Laboratory, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. Electronic address: lhwang@wustl.edu. · Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, St. Louis, Missouri, USA. Electronic address: cornelil@wustl.edu. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #28163070.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Article Label-free high-throughput detection and quantification of circulating melanoma tumor cell clusters by linear-array-based photoacoustic tomography. 2017

Hai, Pengfei / Zhou, Yong / Zhang, Ruiying / Ma, Jun / Li, Yang / Shao, Jin-Yu / Wang, Lihong V. ·Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Optical Imaging Laboratory, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63130, United States. ·J Biomed Opt · Pubmed #27832253.

ABSTRACT: Circulating tumor cell (CTC) clusters, arising from multicellular groupings in a primary tumor, greatly elevate the metastatic potential of cancer compared with single CTCs. High-throughput detection and quantification of CTC clusters are important for understanding the tumor metastatic process and improving cancer therapy. Here, we applied a linear-array-based photoacoustic tomography (LA-PAT) system and improved the image reconstruction for label-free high-throughput CTC cluster detection and quantification The results demonstrated the capability of LA-PAT to detect and quantify melanoma CTC clusters

5 Article VPS35 binds farnesylated N-Ras in the cytosol to regulate N-Ras trafficking. 2016

Zhou, Mo / Wiener, Heidi / Su, Wenjuan / Zhou, Yong / Liot, Caroline / Ahearn, Ian / Hancock, John F / Philips, Mark R. ·Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016. · Department of Integrative Biology and Pharmacology, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX 77030. · Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016 philim01@nyumc.org. ·J Cell Biol · Pubmed #27502489.

ABSTRACT: Ras guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) regulate signaling pathways only when associated with cellular membranes through their C-terminal prenylated regions. Ras proteins move between membrane compartments in part via diffusion-limited, fluid phase transfer through the cytosol, suggesting that chaperones sequester the polyisoprene lipid from the aqueous environment. In this study, we analyze the nature of the pool of endogenous Ras proteins found in the cytosol. The majority of the pool consists of farnesylated, but not palmitoylated, N-Ras that is associated with a high molecular weight (HMW) complex. Affinity purification and mass spectrographic identification revealed that among the proteins found in the HMW fraction is VPS35, a latent cytosolic component of the retromer coat. VPS35 bound to N-Ras in a farnesyl-dependent, but neither palmitoyl- nor guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-dependent, fashion. Silencing VPS35 increased N-Ras's association with cytoplasmic vesicles, diminished GTP loading of Ras, and inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and growth of N-Ras-dependent melanoma cells.

6 Article Handheld photoacoustic probe to detect both melanoma depth and volume at high speed in vivo. 2015

Zhou, Yong / Li, Guo / Zhu, Liren / Li, Chiye / Cornelius, Lynn A / Wang, Lihong V. ·Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Optical Imaging Laboratory, 1 Brookings Drive, Campus Box 1097, St. Louis, Missouri 63130. · Washington University School of Medicine, Division of Dermatology, 660 S. Euclid, Campus Box 8123, St. Louis, Missouri 63110. ·J Biophotonics · Pubmed #25676898.

ABSTRACT: We applied a linear-array-based photoacoustic probe to detect melanin-containing melanoma tumor depth and volume in nude mice in vivo. This system can image melanomas at five frames per second (fps), which is much faster than our previous handheld single transducer system (0.1 fps). We first theoretically show that, in addition to the higher frame rate, almost the entire boundary of the melanoma can be detected by the linear-array-based probe, while only the horizontal boundary could be detected by the previous system. Then we demonstrate the ability of this linear-array-based system in measuring both the depth and volume of melanoma through phantom, ex vivo, and in vivo experiments. The volume detection ability also enables us to accurately calculate the rate of growth of the tumor, which is an important parameter in quantifying the tumor activity. Our results show that this system can be used for clinical melanoma diagnosis and treatment in humans at the bedside. Linear-array-based PA images of melanoma acquired in vivo on day 3 (a) and day 6 (b).

7 Article Handheld photoacoustic microscopy to detect melanoma depth in vivo. 2014

Zhou, Yong / Xing, Wenxin / Maslov, Konstantin I / Cornelius, Lynn A / Wang, Lihong V. · ·Opt Lett · Pubmed #25121860.

ABSTRACT: We developed handheld photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) to detect melanoma and determine tumor depth in nude mice in vivo. Compared to our previous PAM system for melanoma imaging, a new light delivery mechanism is introduced to improve light penetration. We show that melanomas with 4.1 and 3.7 mm thicknesses can be successfully detected in phantom and in in vivo experiments, respectively. With its deep melanoma imaging ability and handheld design, this system can be tested for clinical melanoma diagnosis, prognosis, and surgical planning for patients at the bedside.

8 Article [Effect of all-trans retinoic acid on the proliferation of and Fas protein expression in human malignant melanoma A375 cells]. 2010

Zhou, Yong / Yang, Jie / Zhao, Hua / Li, Heng-Jin. ·Department of Dermatology, General Hospital of PLA, Beijing 100853, China. ·Sichuan Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban · Pubmed #20629322.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of all-trans retinoic acid on the proliferation of and Fas protein expression in malignant melanoma A375 cells in vitro. METHODS: Malignant melanoma A375 cells cultured under different doses of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and solvent controls. The effect of ATRA on cell proliferation was observed. The growth rate of the cells was detected by MTT assay. The Fas protein expression was detected by Western blotting. RESULTS: ATRA inhibited the proliferation of A375 cells under 1-100 micromol/L of concentrations. The peak effect occurred after 72 hours of ATRA treatment, ATRA inhibited the growth of A375 cells in a dose and time-dependent manner. The level of Fas protein was up-regulated after exposure to 10 micromol/L of ATRA. CONCLUSION: ATRA inhibits A375 cell proliferation perhaps through Fas death receptor pathway which induces A375 cell apoptosis.