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Melanoma: HELP
Articles from Finland
Based on 133 articles published since 2008
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These are the 133 published articles about Melanoma that originated from Finland during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6
1 Review Solar Radiation Exposure and Outdoor Work: An Underestimated Occupational Risk. 2018

Modenese, Alberto / Korpinen, Leena / Gobba, Fabriziomaria. ·Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, University of Modena & Reggio Emilia, 41124 Modena, Italy. alberto.modenese@unimore.it. · Clinical Physiology and Neurophysiology Unit, The North Karelia Central Hospital, 80210 Joensuu, Finland. leenakorpinen@gmail.com. · Department of Biomedical, Metabolic and Neural Sciences, University of Modena & Reggio Emilia, 41124 Modena, Italy. fabriziomaria.gobba@unimore.it. ·Int J Environ Res Public Health · Pubmed #30241306.

ABSTRACT: A considerably high number of outdoor workers worldwide are constantly exposed for the majority of their working life to solar radiation (SR); this exposure is known to induce various adverse health effects, mainly related to its ultraviolet (UV) component. The skin and the eye are the principal target organs for both acute and long-term exposure. Actinic keratosis, non-melanoma skin cancers, and malignant melanoma are the main long-term adverse skin effects, whereas in the eye pterygium, cataracts, and according to an increasing body of evidence, macular degeneration may be induced. Despite this, SR exposure risk is currently undervalued, if not neglected, as an occupational risk factor for outdoor workers. SR exposure is influenced by various environmental and individual factors, and occupation is one of the most relevant. For a better understanding of this risk and for the development of more effective prevention strategies, one of the main problems is the lack of available and adequate methods to estimate SR worker exposure, especially long-term exposure. The main aims of this review were to provide a comprehensive overview of SR exposure risk of outdoor workers, including the UV exposure levels and the main methods recently proposed for short-term and cumulative exposure, and to provide an update of knowledge on the main adverse eye and skin effects. Finally, we also outline here preventive interventions to reduce occupational risk.

2 Review ECCO essential requirements for quality cancer care: Melanoma. 2018

Wouters, Michel W / Michielin, Olivier / Bastiaannet, Esther / Beishon, Marc / Catalano, Orlando / Del Marmol, Veronique / Delgado-Bolton, Roberto / Dendale, Rémi / Trill, Maria Die / Ferrari, Andrea / Forsea, Ana-Maria / Kreckel, Hannelore / Lövey, József / Luyten, Gre / Massi, Daniela / Mohr, Peter / Oberst, Simon / Pereira, Philippe / Prata, João Paulo Paiva / Rutkowski, Piotr / Saarto, Tiina / Sheth, Sapna / Spurrier-Bernard, Gilly / Vuoristo, Meri-Sisko / Costa, Alberto / Naredi, Peter. ·European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO); Department of Surgery, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO); Department of Oncology, CHUV, University Hospital of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. · International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG); Department of Surgery/Department of Medical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. · European School of Oncology (ESO), Milan, Italy. · European Society of Radiology (ESR); Department of Radiology, National Cancer Institute Fondazione Pascale, Naples, Italy. · Association of European Cancer Leagues (ECL); Euromelanoma, European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (EADV); Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Erasme Hospital, ULB, Brussels, Belgium. · European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM); Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Radiology) and Nuclear Medicine, San Pedro Hospital and Centre for Biomedical Research of La Rioja (CIBIR), University of La Rioja, Logroño, La Rioja, Spain. · European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO); Radiation Oncology Department, Institut Curie, Paris, France. · International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS); ATRIUM: Psycho-Oncology & Clinical Psychology, Madrid, Spain. · European Society for Paediatric Oncology (SIOPE); Pediatric Oncology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy. · European Association of Dermato Oncology (EADO); Dermatology Department, Elias University Hospital, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania. · European Society of Oncology Pharmacy (ESOP); Pharmacy Department, University Hospital Giessen and Marburg, Giessen, Germany. · Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI); National Institute of Oncology, Budapest, Hungary. · Ocular Oncology Group (OOG); Department of Ophthalmology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · European Society of Pathology (ESP); Division of Pathological Anatomy, Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · European Society of Skin Cancer Prevention (EUROSKIN); Elbe-Klinikum Buxtehude, Buxtehude, Germany. · Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI); Cambridge Cancer Centre, Cambridge, UK. · Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); Clinic for Radiology, Minimally-Invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine, SLK-Clinics Heilbronn, Karl-Ruprecht-University of Heidelberg, Heilbronn, Germany. · European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS); Instituto Português de Oncologia de Lisboa Francisco Gentil, Lisbon, Portugal. · European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC); Maria Sklodowska-Curie Institute - Oncology Center, Warsaw, Poland. · European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC); Comprehensive Cancer Center, Department of Palliative Care, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. · European CanCer Organisation, Brussels, Belgium. · European CanCer Organisation (ECCO) Patient Advisory Committee; Melanoma Patient Network Europe; Paris, France. · Association of European Cancer Leagues (ECL); Pirkanmaa Cancer Society, Tampere, Finland. · European CanCer Organisation (ECCO); Department of Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: peter.naredi@gu.se. ·Crit Rev Oncol Hematol · Pubmed #29458785.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: ECCO essential requirements for quality cancer care (ERQCC) are explanations and descriptions of challenges, organisation and actions that are necessary to give high-quality care to patients who have a specific type of cancer. They are written by European experts representing all disciplines involved in cancer care. ERQCC papers give oncology teams, patients, policymakers and managers an overview of the elements needed in any healthcare system to provide high quality of care throughout the patient journey. References are made to clinical guidelines and other resources where appropriate, and the focus is on care in Europe. MELANOMA: ESSENTIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR QUALITY CARE: CONCLUSION: Taken together, the information presented in this paper provides a comprehensive description of the essential requirements for establishing a high-quality service for melanoma. The ERQCC expert group is aware that it is not possible to propose a 'one size fits all' system for all countries, but urges that access to multidisciplinary teams and specialised treatments is guaranteed to all patients with melanoma.

3 Review Pembrolizumab's non-cross resistance mechanism of action successfully overthrown ipilimumab. 2017

Wahid, Mohd / Akhter, Naseem / Jawed, Arshad / Dar, Sajad A / Mandal, Raju K / Lohani, Mohtashim / Areeshi, Mohammed Y / Khan, Saif / Haque, Shafiul. ·Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Basic Sciences, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi 110025, India; Research and Scientific Studies Unit, College of Nursing and Allied Health Sciences, Jazan University, Jazan 45142, Saudi Arabia. · Hewitt Laboratory of the Ola B. Williams Glaucoma Center, Department of Ophthalmology, Storm Eye Institute, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA. · Research and Scientific Studies Unit, College of Nursing and Allied Health Sciences, Jazan University, Jazan 45142, Saudi Arabia; GE Healthcare, Sector-43, Gurgaon 122002, Haryana, India. · Division of Gynecology Oncology, Women's Health Services, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI 48202, USA. · Research and Scientific Studies Unit, College of Nursing and Allied Health Sciences, Jazan University, Jazan 45142, Saudi Arabia; Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Raibareli Road, Lucknow 226014, UP, India. · Department of Biosciences, Integral University, Lucknow 226026, UP, India. · Research and Scientific Studies Unit, College of Nursing and Allied Health Sciences, Jazan University, Jazan 45142, Saudi Arabia. · Research and Scientific Studies Unit, College of Nursing and Allied Health Sciences, Jazan University, Jazan 45142, Saudi Arabia; Department of Biosciences, Jamia Millia Islamia (A Central University), New Delhi 110025, India; Centre for Drug Research, Faculty of Pharmacy, Viikki Biocentre-2, University of Helsinki, Helsinki FI-00014, Finland. Electronic address: shafiul.haque@hotmail.com. ·Crit Rev Oncol Hematol · Pubmed #28259284.

ABSTRACT: The incidences of melanomas are increasing by leaps and bounds across the globe despite early detection and intervention. The numbers of patients dying from metastatic melanoma have been continually increased over the past thirty years. It has been considered as one of the most therapy-resistant malignancies due to the cross-resistant mechanism developed by the metastatic cells. With time, many new therapies came and they failed miserably. Ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody that works to activate the immune system by targeting CTLA-4 proved to be a boon for advance melanoma very recently. But it could not stand firmly against the resistant metastatic skin cancer cells. Now, the new skin cancer drug named pembrolizumab proved as a new miraculous molecule. It's a humanized monoclonal antibody that blocks a biological pathway called programmed cell death-1 (PD-1), which melanoma cells activate to suppress the immune system. This antibody has surpassed ipilimumab at all the stages of clinical trials because of its non-cross resistant mechanism to malignant cells. The present review critically analyses the reasons of efficacy success of pembrolizumab over ipilizumab shown at various stages of clinical trials.

4 Review Ring melanoma of the anterior chamber angle as a mimicker of pigmentary glaucoma. 2017

Stadigh, Anni / Puska, Päivi / Vesti, Eija / Ristimäki, Ari / Turunen, Joni A / Kivelä, Tero T. ·Glaucoma Service, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: anni.stadigh@hus.fi. · Glaucoma Service, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Ophthalmology, University of Turku, Turku University Central Hospital, Turku, Finland. · Department of Pathology, HUSLAB, Research Programs Unit, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Ophthalmology, Ocular Oncology Service and Ophthalmic Pathology Laboratory, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. ·Surv Ophthalmol · Pubmed #28159633.

ABSTRACT: A 19-year-old man noticed blurred vision in his right eye. He had an intraocular pressure of 60 versus 12 mmHg in the fellow eye. He was initially diagnosed with an atypical, advanced pigmentary glaucoma. The intraocular pressure did not respond to maximal medication, deep sclerectomy, goniopuncture, and 2 cyclophotocoagulations. Sixteen months after presentation, malignancy was first suspected, and the eye was enucleated. A ring melanoma of the anterior chamber angle was confirmed by the histopathologic examination. Normal nuclear staining for breast cancer 1 gene (BRCA1)-associated protein 1 suggested that the tumor was likely of disomy 3 type with a favorable prognosis. No local or systemic recurrence has developed within 4 years. A literature review of this rare type of minimal volume diffuse uveal melanoma identified 18 additional patients. The initial diagnosis in 18 of the 19 patients with a ring melanoma of the anterior chamber angle was unilateral glaucoma with a median intraocular pressure of 40 mmHg and an age range of 16-76 years. Liver metastasis developed in 5 of 12 patients older than 45 years. This rare subtype is estimated to account for 0.05%-0.16% of all uveal melanomas.

5 Review Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) gene: Beyond café au lait spots and dermal neurofibromas. 2017

Peltonen, Sirkku / Kallionpää, Roope A / Peltonen, Juha. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Turku, and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. · Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Institute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. ·Exp Dermatol · Pubmed #27622733.

ABSTRACT: Neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1) occurs in 1:2000 births. The main diagnostic signs are visible on the skin, and this opens several interesting aspects for dermatological point of view. The NF1 syndrome is caused by mutations in the NF1 gene which encodes the tumor suppressor protein neurofibromin. Neurofibromin functions as a Ras-GTPase-activating protein (RasGAP), and NF1 mutations lead to overactivation of the Ras signalling pathway. The NF1 gene and neurofibromin have intriguing functions in keratinocytes and melanocytes. Neurofibromin regulates melanin synthesis and keratinocyte differentiation in a currently unknown manner. The NF1 gene has also an important but poorly understood role in tumorigenesis and cancer. Compared to the general population, NF1 patients have a fivefold risk for cancer and a more than 2000-fold risk for neurogenic malignancies. Mutations of the NF1 gene are common in numerous cancer types in patients without NF1, and this suggests a more general role for the NF1 gene in oncogenesis. In melanoma, NF1 mutations seem to drive tumorigenesis and contribute to drug resistance. In this article, we review the literature on neurofibromin with special attention to keratinocytes, melanocytes, NF1-related tumors and melanoma.

6 Review Prognostication in eye cancer: the latest tumor, node, metastasis classification and beyond. 2013

Kivelä, T / Kujala, E. ·Department of Ophthalmology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. tero.kivela@helsinki.fi ·Eye (Lond) · Pubmed #23258307.

ABSTRACT: The tumour, node, metastasis (TNM) classification is a universal cancer staging system, which has been used for five decades. The current seventh edition became effective in 2010 and covers six ophthalmic sites: eyelids, conjunctiva, uvea, retina, orbit, and lacrimal gland; and five cancer types: carcinoma, sarcoma, melanoma, retinoblastoma, and lymphoma. The TNM categories are based on the anatomic extent of the primary tumour (T), regional lymph node metastases (N), and systemic metastases (M). The T categories of ophthalmic cancers are based on the size of the primary tumour and any invasion of periocular structures. The anatomic category is used to determine the TNM stage that correlates with survival. Such staging is currently implemented only for carcinoma of the eyelid and melanoma of the uvea. The classification of ciliary body and choroidal melanoma is the only one based on clinical evidence so far: a database of 7369 patients analysed by the European Ophthalmic Oncology Group. It spans a prognosis from 96% 5-year survival for stage I to 97% 5-year mortality for stage IV. The most accurate criterion for prognostication in uveal melanoma is, however, analysis of chromosomal alterations and gene expression. When such data are available, the TNM stage may be used for further stratification. Prognosis in retinoblastoma is frequently assigned by using an international classification, which predicts conservation of the eye and vision, and an international staging separate from the TNM system, which predicts survival. The TNM cancer staging manual is a useful tool for all ophthalmologists managing eye cancer.

7 Review Tattoos, inks, and cancer. 2012

Kluger, Nicolas / Koljonen, Virve. ·Department of Dermatology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Helsinki, Skin and Allergies Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. nicolaskluger@yahoo.fr ·Lancet Oncol · Pubmed #22469126.

ABSTRACT: The introduction in the dermis of exogenous pigments and dyes to obtain a permanent design (tattooing) represents a unique in-vivo situation, where a large amount of metallic salts and organic dyes remain in the skin for the lifetime of the bearer. The potential local and systemic carcinogenic effects of tattoos and tattoo inks remain unclear. Several studies have shed light on the presence of potential carcinogenic or procarcinogenic products in tattoo inks. We extensively reviewed the literature and found 50 cases of skin cancer on tattoos: 23 cases of squamous-cell carcinoma and keratoacanthoma, 16 cases of melanoma, and 11 cases of basal-cell carcinoma. The number of skin cancers arising in tattoos is seemingly low, and this association has to be considered thus far as coincidental.

8 Review Diagnosis of uveal melanoma. 2012

Kivelä, Tero. ·Ocular Oncology Service, Department of Ophthalmology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. tero.kivela@helsinki.fi ·Dev Ophthalmol · Pubmed #22042009.

ABSTRACT: The diagnosis of uveal melanoma is based on clinical examination with the slit lamp and indirect ophthalmoscope together with ultrasonography of the eye. Large to medium-sized melanomas are reliably diagnosed using these methods. The challenge lies in early detection. Small melanomas are more difficult to tell from presumed naevi. A useful mnemonic 'to find small ocular melanomas' reminds the general ophthalmologist to look for tumour thickness of more than 2 mm, subretinal fluid, visual symptoms, orange pigment and location of the tumour margin at the optic disc. Optical coherence tomography and fundus autofluorescence imaging help in identifying subretinal fluid and orange pigment and in measuring the thickness of thin choroidal tumours. Each of the risk characteristics roughly doubles the likelihood of growth so that the risk for growth is about 30 times higher when all five characteristics are present as compared to their absence. In addition, a low acoustic profile, the absence of a halo around the tumour and the absence of drusen over it increase the likelihood of growth. Patients with a choroidal melanocytic tumour with at least one risk characteristic benefit from referral to an ocular oncologist. We recommend that the rest of the patients be made aware of their presumed naevus and that they should be observed periodically. The patients should also be told to return immediately if they develop new visual symptoms. Finally, the trend is toward taking a biopsy of suspicious small choroidal tumours as an alternative to documenting growth before treating them as melanomas.

9 Clinical Trial Completion Dissection or Observation for Sentinel-Node Metastasis in Melanoma. 2017

Faries, Mark B / Thompson, John F / Cochran, Alistair J / Andtbacka, Robert H / Mozzillo, Nicola / Zager, Jonathan S / Jahkola, Tiina / Bowles, Tawnya L / Testori, Alessandro / Beitsch, Peter D / Hoekstra, Harald J / Moncrieff, Marc / Ingvar, Christian / Wouters, Michel W J M / Sabel, Michael S / Levine, Edward A / Agnese, Doreen / Henderson, Michael / Dummer, Reinhard / Rossi, Carlo R / Neves, Rogerio I / Trocha, Steven D / Wright, Frances / Byrd, David R / Matter, Maurice / Hsueh, Eddy / MacKenzie-Ross, Alastair / Johnson, Douglas B / Terheyden, Patrick / Berger, Adam C / Huston, Tara L / Wayne, Jeffrey D / Smithers, B Mark / Neuman, Heather B / Schneebaum, Schlomo / Gershenwald, Jeffrey E / Ariyan, Charlotte E / Desai, Darius C / Jacobs, Lisa / McMasters, Kelly M / Gesierich, Anja / Hersey, Peter / Bines, Steven D / Kane, John M / Barth, Richard J / McKinnon, Gregory / Farma, Jeffrey M / Schultz, Erwin / Vidal-Sicart, Sergi / Hoefer, Richard A / Lewis, James M / Scheri, Randall / Kelley, Mark C / Nieweg, Omgo E / Noyes, R Dirk / Hoon, Dave S B / Wang, He-Jing / Elashoff, David A / Elashoff, Robert M. ·From the John Wayne Cancer Institute at Saint John's Health Center, Santa Monica (M.B.F., D.S.B.H.), and the Departments of Pathology (A.J.C.), Biomathematics (H.-J.W., D.A.E., R.M.E.), and Medicine (D.A.E.), University of California, Los Angeles - both in California · Melanoma Institute Australia and the University of Sydney, Sydney (J.F.T., O.E.N.), Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, VIC (M.H.), Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD (B.M.S.), and Newcastle Melanoma Unit, Waratah, NSW (P.H.) - all in Australia · Huntsman Cancer Institute, Salt Lake City (R.H.A., R.D.N.), and Intermountain Healthcare Cancer Services-Intermountain Medical Center, Murray (T.L.B.) - both in Utah · Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori Napoli, Naples (N.M.), Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, Milan (A.T.), and Istituto Oncologico Veneto-University of Padua, Padua (C.R.R.) - all in Italy · H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (J.S.Z.) · Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki (T.J.) · Dallas Surgical Group, Dallas (P.D.B.) · Universitair Medisch Centrum Groningen, Groningen (H.J.H.), and Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (M.W.J.M.W.) - both in the Netherlands · Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norwich (M. Moncrieff), and Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (A.M.-R.) - both in the United Kingdom · Swedish Melanoma Study Group-University Hospital Lund, Lund, Sweden (C.I.) · University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (M.S.S.) · Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem (E.A.L.), and Duke University, Durham (R.S.) - both in North Carolina · Ohio State University, Columbus (D.A.) · University of Zurich, Zurich (R.D.), and Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (M. Matter) - both in Switzerland · Penn State Hershey Cancer Institute, Hershey (R.I.N.), Thomas Jefferson University (A.C.B.) and Fox Chase Cancer Center (J.M.F.), Philadelphia, and St. Luke's University Health Network, Bethlehem (D.C.D.) - all in Pennsylvania · Greenville Health System Cancer Center, Greenville, SC (S.D.T.) · Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto (F.W.), and Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, AB (G.M.) - both in Canada · University of Washington, Seattle (D.R.B.) · Saint Louis University, St. Louis (E.H.) · Vanderbilt University (D.B.J., M.C.K.), Nashville, and University of Tennessee, Knoxville (J.M.L.) - both in Tennessee · University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein-Campus Lübeck, Lübeck (P.T.), University Hospital of Würzburg, Würzburg (A.G.), and City Hospital of Nürnberg, Nuremberg (E.S.) - all in Germany · SUNY at Stony Brook Hospital Medical Center, Stony Brook (T.L.H.), Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (C.E.A.), and Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo (J.M.K.) - all in New York · Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine (J.D.W.) and Rush University Medical Center (S.D.B.), Chicago · University of Wisconsin, Madison (H.B.N.) · Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel (S.S.) · M.D. Anderson Medical Center, Houston (J.E.G.) · Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore (L.J.) · University of Louisville, Louisville, KY (K.M.M.) · Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH (R.J.B.) · Hospital Clinic Barcelona, Barcelona (S.V.-S.) · and Sentara CarePlex Hospital, Hampton, VA (R.A.H.). ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #28591523.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Sentinel-lymph-node biopsy is associated with increased melanoma-specific survival (i.e., survival until death from melanoma) among patients with node-positive intermediate-thickness melanomas (1.2 to 3.5 mm). The value of completion lymph-node dissection for patients with sentinel-node metastases is not clear. METHODS: In an international trial, we randomly assigned patients with sentinel-node metastases detected by means of standard pathological assessment or a multimarker molecular assay to immediate completion lymph-node dissection (dissection group) or nodal observation with ultrasonography (observation group). The primary end point was melanoma-specific survival. Secondary end points included disease-free survival and the cumulative rate of nonsentinel-node metastasis. RESULTS: Immediate completion lymph-node dissection was not associated with increased melanoma-specific survival among 1934 patients with data that could be evaluated in an intention-to-treat analysis or among 1755 patients in the per-protocol analysis. In the per-protocol analysis, the mean (±SE) 3-year rate of melanoma-specific survival was similar in the dissection group and the observation group (86±1.3% and 86±1.2%, respectively; P=0.42 by the log-rank test) at a median follow-up of 43 months. The rate of disease-free survival was slightly higher in the dissection group than in the observation group (68±1.7% and 63±1.7%, respectively; P=0.05 by the log-rank test) at 3 years, based on an increased rate of disease control in the regional nodes at 3 years (92±1.0% vs. 77±1.5%; P<0.001 by the log-rank test); these results must be interpreted with caution. Nonsentinel-node metastases, identified in 11.5% of the patients in the dissection group, were a strong, independent prognostic factor for recurrence (hazard ratio, 1.78; P=0.005). Lymphedema was observed in 24.1% of the patients in the dissection group and in 6.3% of those in the observation group. CONCLUSIONS: Immediate completion lymph-node dissection increased the rate of regional disease control and provided prognostic information but did not increase melanoma-specific survival among patients with melanoma and sentinel-node metastases. (Funded by the National Cancer Institute and others; MSLT-II ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00297895 .).

10 Clinical Trial Improved Survival in Male Melanoma Patients in the Era of Sentinel Node Biopsy. 2017

Koskivuo, I / Vihinen, P / Mäki, M / Talve, L / Vahlberg, T / Suominen, E. ·1 Department of Plastic and General Surgery, Turku University Hospital and University of Turku, Turku, Finland. · 2 Department of Oncology, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. · 3 Department of Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. · 4 Department of Pathology, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. · 5 Department of Biostatistics, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. ·Scand J Surg · Pubmed #26929285.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Sentinel node biopsy is a standard method for nodal staging in patients with clinically localized cutaneous melanoma, but the survival advantage of sentinel node biopsy remains unsolved. The aim of this case-control study was to investigate the survival benefit of sentinel node biopsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 305 prospective melanoma patients undergoing sentinel node biopsy were compared with 616 retrospective control patients with clinically localized melanoma whom have not undergone sentinel node biopsy. Survival differences were calculated with the median follow-up time of 71 months in sentinel node biopsy patients and 74 months in control patients. Analyses were calculated overall and separately in males and females. RESULTS: Overall, there were no differences in relapse-free survival or cancer-specific survival between sentinel node biopsy patients and control patients. Male sentinel node biopsy patients had significantly higher relapse-free survival ( P = 0.021) and cancer-specific survival ( P = 0.024) than control patients. In females, no differences were found. Cancer-specific survival rates at 5 years were 87.8% in sentinel node biopsy patients and 85.2% in controls overall with 88.3% in male sentinel node biopsy patients and 80.6% in male controls and 87.3% in female sentinel node biopsy patients and 89.8% in female controls. CONCLUSION: Sentinel node biopsy did not improve survival in melanoma patients overall. While females had no differences in survival, males had significantly improved relapse-free survival and cancer-specific survival following sentinel node biopsy.

11 Clinical Trial Whole body PET/CT in the follow-up of asymptomatic patients with stage IIB-IIIB cutaneous melanoma 2016

Koskivuo, I / Kemppainen, J / Giordano, S / Seppänen, M / Veräjänkorva, E / Vihinen, P / Minn, H. ·a Department of Plastic and General Surgery , Turku University Hospital and University of Turku , Turku , Finland. · b Turku PET Centre, Turku University Hospital and University of Turku , Turku , Finland. · c Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine , Turku University Hospital and University of Turku , Turku , Finland. · d Department of Oncology , Turku University Hospital and University of Turku , Turku , Finland. ·Acta Oncol · Pubmed #27553064.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Whole body positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is a sensitive imaging technique in patients with metastatic melanoma, but its role in the follow-up of asymptomatic high-risk patients is unclear. The aim was to study the role of PET/CT as a routine surveillance imaging tool in asymptomatic high-risk patients at the early stage of follow-up combined with a sufficient follow-up over several years. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 110 asymptomatic patients with clinically local American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage IIB-IIIB melanoma underwent routine whole body PET/CT scanning after a mean interval of seven months after initial surgery. Clinical data were retrospectively analyzed after a median follow-up time of 4.6 years. RESULTS: Recurrent melanoma was detected in 45 patients (41%) and 36 (33%) died of melanoma. In 11 asymptomatic patients (10%) occult disease was detected with a single PET/CT. In seven of these patients (64%), positive PET/CT finding had major influence in treatment decisions. Four patients underwent surgical metastasectomy and two of them remained disease-free. In 34 patients (31%) PET/CT revealed no disease, but recurrence was detected at a median time of 19 months after negative PET/CT scan. In 50 patients (45%) PET/CT finding was true negative. In 15 patients (14%) scan was false positive leading to additional management or repetitive imagings. CONCLUSION: A single PET/CT could detect 24% of all recurrences in asymptomatic melanoma patients at the early stage of follow-up, but an earlier detection of occult metastases did not improve survival.

12 Clinical Trial A phase II trial of bevacizumab with dacarbazine and daily low-dose interferon-alpha2a as first line treatment in metastatic melanoma. 2010

Vihinen, Pia P / Hernberg, Micaela / Vuoristo, Meri-Sisko / Tyynelä, Kristiina / Laukka, Marjut / Lundin, Johan / Ivaska, Johanna / Pyrhönen, Seppo. ·Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. pia.vihinen@tyks.fi ·Melanoma Res · Pubmed #20375744.

ABSTRACT: Metastatic melanomas are hypervascular tumours with poor prognosis. We hypothesized that treatment of metastatic melanoma with a combination of bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody against vascular endothelial growth factor, dacarbazine (DTIC) and low-dose interferon alpha-2a (IFN-alpha2a) might lead to a synergistic inhibition of angiogenesis and regression of tumours. Patients with metastatic melanoma were treated with bevacizumab (5 mg/kg every 2 weeks), DTIC (200 mg/m days 1-5 every 4 weeks) and IFN-alpha2a (three MIU subcutaneously daily from day 15 onwards). Patients exhibiting response or stable disease after 6 months were treated with bevacizumab+/-IFN-alpha2a until disease progression. The primary study objectives were progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival and safety. Twenty-six patients were accrued. Response rate was 23% (two complete responses, four partial responses), and six patients showed stable disease. The median PFS for all patients was 2.3 months and for responders 8.1 months. The median overall survival for all patients was 11.5 months. Four life-threatening adverse events were seen: two pulmonary thromboembolisms, an intracerebral haemorrhage, and one grade 4 hypertension. One of the pulmonary emboli and the intracerebral haemorrhage were observed > or =3 months after the last bevacizumab-DTIC dose. Serum matrix metalloproteinase-9 and vascular endothelial growth factor levels changed during therapy. There was a trend towards favourable PFS among patients with only minimal or moderate change in these marker expression levels. The present regimen was active in this patient group but was also associated with remarkable vascular events.

13 Article Long-Term Quality of Life of Melanoma Survivors Is Comparable to that of the General Population. 2019

Heino, Pia J / Mylläri, Pia H / Jahkola, Tiina A / Sintonen, Harri / Luoma, Minna-Liisa / Räsänen, Pirjo / Roine, Risto P. ·Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland pia.heino@helsinki.fi. · Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. · Ageing, Disability and Functioning Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. · Hospital District of Helsinki and Uusimaa, Helsinki, Finland. · University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, and University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. ·Anticancer Res · Pubmed #31092462.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND/AIM: There is a growing need for information regarding the Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) of cancer survivors. This study aimed to assess the HRQoL of patients treated for cutaneous malignant melanoma between 1980 and 2004 in the Helsinki and Uusimaa Hospital district and compare the results to the general population. MATERIALS AND METHODS: HRQoL of 981 cutaneous melanoma patients (aged 13 to 97 years, 56.1% female) was assessed using the generic 15D instrument and compared to the general population. The association between demographic and clinical factors and HRQoL was analyzed using oneway ANOVA, student's t-test and multivariate regression. RESULTS: The mean 15D score of melanoma patients was slightly lower (0.904) than that of the general population (0.911, p=0.027), but the difference was not statistically significant. HRQoL deteriorates with age and metastatic disease and improves with time. CONCLUSION: No evidence was found that long-term HRQoL of melanoma survivors was worse than the general population.

14 Article Circulating insulin-like growth factor I in relation to melanoma risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition. 2019

Bradbury, Kathryn E / Appleby, Paul N / Tipper, Sarah J / Travis, Ruth C / Allen, Naomi E / Kvaskoff, Marina / Overvad, Kim / Tjønneland, Anne / Halkjaer, Jytte / Cervenka, Iris / Mahamat-Saleh, Yahya / Bonnet, Fabrice / Kaaks, Rudolf / Fortner, Renée T / Boeing, Heiner / Trichopoulou, Antonia / La Vecchia, Carlo / Stratigos, Alexander J / Palli, Domenico / Grioni, Sara / Matullo, Giuseppe / Panico, Salvatore / Tumino, Rosario / Peeters, Petra H / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Ghiasvand, Reza / Veierød, Marit B / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Bonet, Catalina / Molina, Elena / Huerta, José M / Larrañaga, Nerea / Barricarte, Aurelio / Merino, Susana / Isaksson, Karolin / Stocks, Tanja / Ljuslinder, Ingrid / Hemmingsson, Oskar / Wareham, Nick / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Gunter, Marc J / Rinaldi, Sabina / Tsilidis, Konstantinos K / Aune, Dagfinn / Riboli, Elio / Key, Timothy J. ·Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · National Institute for Health Innovation, School of Population Health, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. · Clinical Trial Service Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · CESP, Fac. de médecine - Univ. Paris-Sud, Fac. de médecine - UVSQ, INSERM, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif, France. · Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. · Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. · CHU Rennes, Université de Rennes 1, Rennes, France. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke (DIfE), Nuthetal, Germany. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. · 1st Department of Dermatology and Venereology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens School of Medicine, Andreas Sygros Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology Unit, Institute for Cancer Research, Prevention and Clinical Network, ISPRO, Florence, Italy. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Department of Medical Sciences, University of Torino, Torino, Italy. · Italian Institute for Genomic Medicine (IIGM/fka HuGeF), Torino, Italy. · Dipartmento di Medicina Clinica E Chirurgia, Federico II University, Naples, Italy. · Cancer Registry and Histopathology Department, "Civic - M.P. Arezzo" Hospital, ASP, Ragusa, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, W2 1PG, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Oslo Centre for Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Department of Biostatistics, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Norway. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center and Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology-IDIBELL, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. · Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs, GRANADA, Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain. · CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, Murcia, Spain. · Basque Regional Health Department, Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa-BIODONOSTIA, San Sebastián, Spain. · Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Department of Clinical Sciences Surgery, Breast and Melanoma Unit, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Sweden. · Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology, Norrlands University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Surgical and perioperative Sciences/Surgery, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, Lyon, France. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece. · Department of Nutrition, Bjørknes University College, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Endocrinology, Morbid Obesity and Preventive Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #30191956.

ABSTRACT: Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) regulates cell proliferation and apoptosis, and is thought to play a role in tumour development. Previous prospective studies have shown that higher circulating concentrations of IGF-I are associated with a higher risk of cancers at specific sites, including breast and prostate. No prospective study has examined the association between circulating IGF-I concentrations and melanoma risk. A nested case-control study of 1,221 melanoma cases and 1,221 controls was performed in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort, a prospective cohort of 520,000 participants recruited from 10 European countries. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for incident melanoma in relation to circulating IGF-I concentrations, measured by immunoassay. Analyses were conditioned on the matching factors and further adjusted for age at blood collection, education, height, BMI, smoking status, alcohol intake, marital status, physical activity and in women only, use of menopausal hormone therapy. There was no significant association between circulating IGF-I concentration and melanoma risk (OR for highest vs lowest fifth = 0.93 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.71 to 1.22]). There was no significant heterogeneity in the association between IGF-I concentrations and melanoma risk when subdivided by gender, age at blood collection, BMI, height, age at diagnosis, time between blood collection and diagnosis, or by anatomical site or histological subtype of the tumour (Pheterogeneity≥0.078). We found no evidence for an association between circulating concentrations of IGF-I measured in adulthood and the risk of melanoma.

15 Article Long-term Survival of Stage IV Melanoma Patients Treated with BOLD Combination Chemotherapy and Intermediate-dose Subcutaneous Interferon-alpha. 2018

Mattila, Kalle / Raanta, Pirita / Lahtela, Valtteri / Pyrhönen, Seppo / Koskivuo, Ilkka / Vihinen, Pia. ·Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital and FICAN West Cancer Centre, Turku, Finland kalle.mattila@tyks.fi. · Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital and FICAN West Cancer Centre, Turku, Finland. · Plastic Surgery, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital and FICAN West Cancer Centre, Turku, Finland. ·Anticancer Res · Pubmed #30396963.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Immune checkpoint and serine/threonine-protein kinase inhibitors have become a standard of care for advanced cutaneous melanoma, but dacarbazine-based chemotherapies are occasionally used. This study assessed the long-term efficacy of chemoimmunotherapy (bleomycin, vincristine, lomustine and dacarbazine with/without subcutaneous interferon-alpha: BOLD-INF-α) as real-world data in patients with metastatic melanoma not eligible for clinical trials. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Medical data of 146 patients with stage IV melanoma who had received BOLD/BOLD-INFα regimen during 1991-2010 were analyzed. RESULTS: The median overall survival was 8.9 months (95% confidence intervaI=7.5-10.4 months). The 1-year survival rate was 36%, 2-year 18%, and 5-year 13%. The 5-year survival rates in the M1a, M1b and M1c subgroups were 28%, 10% and 6%, respectively. Overall, 7% (n=11) of the patients were alive at the end of the follow-up. CONCLUSION: Our study showed similar overall survival among patients with stage IV cutaneous melanoma treated with BOLD/BOLD-INFα as noted previously with chemotherapy.

16 Article Selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) as treatment for hepatic metastases of uveal melanoma: a Finnish nation-wide retrospective experience. 2018

Tulokas, Sanni / Mäenpää, Hanna / Peltola, Erno / Kivelä, Tero / Vihinen, Pia / Virta, Aku / Mäkelä, Siru / Kallio, Raija / Hernberg, Micaela. ·a Department of Oncology , Comprehensive Cancer Centre, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital , Helsinki , Finland. · b Department of Radiology, HUS Medical Imaging Centre , University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital , Helsinki , Finland. · c Department of Ophthalmology , University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital , Helsinki , Finland. · d Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy , Turku University Hospital , Turku , Finland. · e Department of Oncology and Haematology , Oulu University Hospital , Oulu , Finland. ·Acta Oncol · Pubmed #29683787.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In Finland, selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) is at present the preferred first-line loco-regional therapy for uveal melanoma patients with hepatic metastases not suitable for surgery. We retrospectively evaluate the outcome and safety of SIRT in this group of patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Yttrium-90 microspheres were delivered via the hepatic artery into the circulation of metastases from uveal melanoma in 18 patients with a predicted life expectancy of more than three months in three Finnish tertiary referral centers between November 2010 and December 2015. Progression-free survival (PFS), toxicity and overall survival (OS) were evaluated. Patients with historical uveal melanoma without extrahepatic metastases, who had received systemic chemotherapy as first-line treatment for their hepatic metastases at the Helsinki University Hospital between January 2006 and May 2010, were used as a historical control group. RESULTS: Partial response and stable disease were observed in three (17%) and eight (44%) patients, respectively; one patient was not evaluable for response. Median PFS after SIRT was 5.6 (range, 1.3-40.8) months. Median OS after SIRT was 13.5 (range, 3.6-44.8) months compared with 10.5 (range, 3.0-16.5; p = .047) months for the historical chemotherapy group. Among patients who received SIRT as first-line treatment, the median OS was 18.7 (range, 8.2-44.8) months, significantly longer than that of the chemotherapy group (10.5 months, p = .017). There were no treatment-related deaths. Toxicity was mainly WHO grade 1-2 and self-limited. CONCLUSION: SIRT is a feasible and safe treatment for liver metastases in patients with uveal melanoma.

17 Article SP174 Antibody Lacks Specificity for NRAS Q61R and Cross-Reacts With HRAS and KRAS Q61R Mutant Proteins in Malignant Melanoma. 2018

Felisiak-Goląbek, Anna / Inaguma, Shingo / Kowalik, Artur / Wasąg, Bartosz / Wang, Zeng-Feng / Zięba, Sebastian / Pięciak, Liliana / Ryś, Janusz / Kopczynski, Janusz / Sarlomo-Rikala, Maarit / Góźdź, Stanislaw / Lasota, Jerzy / Miettinen, Markku. ·Laboratory of Pathology, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD. · Department of Pathology, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Nagakute, Japan. · Departments of Molecular Diagnostics. · Department of Biology and Genetics, Medical University of Gdansk. · Department of Tumor Pathology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Institute, Krakow, Poland. · Surgical Pathology. · HUSLab/Pathology and University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. · Clinical Oncology, Holycross Cancer Center. · Faculty of Health Sciences, The Jan Kochanowski University, Kielce. ·Appl Immunohistochem Mol Morphol · Pubmed #29206715.

ABSTRACT: HRAS, KRAS, and NRAS, highly homologous proteins, are often mutationally activated in cancer. Usually, mutations cluster in codons 12, 13, and 61 and are detected by molecular genetic testing of tumor DNA. Recently, immunohistochemistry with SP174 antibody has been introduced to detect NRAS Q61R-mutant protein. Studies on malignant melanomas showed that such an approach could be a viable alternative to molecular genetic testing. This investigation was undertaken to evaluate the value of SP174 immunohistochemistry for detection of NRAS Q61R-mutant isoform. Two hundred ninety-two malignant melanomas were evaluated using Leica Bond-Max automated immunostainer. Twenty-nine tumors (10%) showed positive immunoreactivity. NRAS codon 61 was polymerase chain reaction amplified and sequenced in 24 positive and 92 negative cases using Sanger sequencing, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and next-generation sequencing approaches. A c.182A>G substitution leading to NRAS Q61R mutation was identified in 22 tumors. Two NRAS wild-type tumors revealed c.182A>G substitutions in HRAS and KRAS codon 61, respectively. Both mutations were detected by next-generation sequencing and independently confirmed by Sanger sequencing. None of 85 NRAS codon 61 wild-type tumors and 7 NRAS mutants other than Q61R showed immunoreactivity with SP174 antibody. Thus, SP174 antibody was 100% sensitive in detecting NRAS Q61R-mutant isoform in malignant melanoma, but not fully specific as it cross-reacted with HRAS and KRAS Q61R-mutant proteins. Therefore, molecular testing is needed to determine which RAS gene is mutated. The rarity of HRAS and KRAS Q61R mutants in malignant melanoma let previous investigations erroneously conclude that SP174 is specific for NRAS Q61R-mutant protein.

18 Article Second primary cancer after major salivary gland carcinoma. 2018

Hirvonen, Karoliina / Rantanen, Matti / Haapaniemi, Aaro / Pitkäniemi, Janne / Malila, Nea / Mäkitie, Antti A. ·Department of Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. · Finnish Cancer Registry, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. · Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. · Division of Ear, Nose, and Throat Diseases, Department of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. ·Head Neck · Pubmed #28960648.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: We investigated the risk of second primary cancers after major salivary gland carcinoma in Finland, with a population of 5.5 million. METHODS: Nationwide cancer registry data were used to identify patients with major salivary gland carcinoma diagnosed between 1953 and 2014. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were estimated to compare their second primary cancer risk with the respective site-specific cancer risk in the general population. RESULTS: There were 1727 patients with major salivary gland carcinomas and 222 second primary cancers had been diagnosed in these patients (SIR 1.43). The risk was increased for cancers of the thyroid (SIR 5.12), breast (SIR 1.63), respiratory organs (SIR 1.63), male genital organs (SIR 1.48), melanoma of the skin (SIR 3.35), and nonmelanoma skin cancer (SIR 2.50). The risk was high during the first 5 years and after 20 years of diagnosis. CONCLUSION: Second primary cancers can occur among patients with major salivary gland carcinoma even after a long time period. This needs to be recognized in the follow-up of these patients.

19 Article The first description of the complete natural history of uveal melanoma by two Scottish surgeons, Allan Burns and James Wardrop. 2018

Kivelä, Tero T. ·Ocular Oncology Service and Ophthalmic Pathology Laboratory, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. ·Acta Ophthalmol · Pubmed #28834323.

ABSTRACT: James Wardrop (1782-1869), a young Scottish surgeon and an early ophthalmologist in Edinburgh, is credited for describing in 1809 retinoblastoma as an entity in his treatise 'Observations on Fungus Haematodes or Soft Cancer'. His treatise also reveals that Allan Burns (1781-1813), another young Scottish surgeon and anatomist, had invited Wardrop to assist in enucleating an eye from a 41-year-old Glasgow woman who, in retrospect, had a uveal melanoma. Her eye had become blind 4 months after symptoms of exudative retinal detachment had appeared, and it had become painful after a further 2-4 months. The tumour eventually perforated the sclera, and she died within a year thereafter of hepatic metastases. Burns and Wardrop went on to publish detailed parallel accounts of the symptoms, signs, ophthalmic pathology and post-mortem findings regarding the primary, recurrent and metastatic tumour. Burns may have performed the post-mortem after exhuming the body, a common occurrence in early 19th Century Scotland, a thriving hub for teaching morbid anatomy to young surgeons at the time.

20 Article Mechanistic principles underlying regulation of the actin cytoskeleton by phosphoinositides. 2017

Senju, Yosuke / Kalimeri, Maria / Koskela, Essi V / Somerharju, Pentti / Zhao, Hongxia / Vattulainen, Ilpo / Lappalainen, Pekka. ·Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Physics, Tampere University of Technology, FI-33101 Tampere, Finland. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland. · Institute of Biotechnology, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland; pekka.lappalainen@helsinki.fi. ·Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A · Pubmed #29073094.

ABSTRACT: The actin cytoskeleton powers membrane deformation during many cellular processes, such as migration, morphogenesis, and endocytosis. Membrane phosphoinositides, especially phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P

21 Article The authors reply 2017

Ghiasvand, Reza / Rueegg, Corina S / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Green, Adele C / Lund, Eiliv / Veierød, Marit B. ·Oslo Center for Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. · Cancer and Population Studies Group, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia. · CRUK Manchester Institute, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. ·Am J Epidemiol · Pubmed #28938717.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Article Midkine and Melanoma Metastasis: A Malevolent Mix. 2017

Karaman, Sinem / Alitalo, Kari. ·Wihuri Research Institute and Translational Cancer Biology Program, Biomedicum Helsinki, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. · Wihuri Research Institute and Translational Cancer Biology Program, Biomedicum Helsinki, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: kari.alitalo@helsinki.fi. ·Dev Cell · Pubmed #28787586.

ABSTRACT: Using an in vivo reporter for lymphangiogenesis, a recent study in Nature from Olmeda et al. (2017) describes a new subset of melanomas that induce systemic pre-conditioning of distant organs for formation of tumor metastatic niches, and identifies the responsible factor as the pleiotropic cytokine midkine.

23 Article Menopausal hormone therapy and risk of melanoma: Do estrogens and progestins have a different role? 2017

Botteri, Edoardo / Støer, Nathalie C / Sakshaug, Solveig / Graff-Iversen, Sidsel / Vangen, Siri / Hofvind, Solveig / Ursin, Giske / Weiderpass, Elisabete. ·National Advisory Unit for Women's Health, Women's Clinic, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Bowel Cancer Screening, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Pharmacoepidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Non-Communicable Diseases, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Health Science, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Mammography Screening, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Nutrition, Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA. · Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Genetic Epidemiology, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #28685818.

ABSTRACT: The association between use of menopausal hormone therapy (HT) and occurrence of skin malignant melanoma (SMM) is controversial. We investigated the issue in a nationwide cohort of 684,696 Norwegian women, aged 45-79 years, followed from 2004 to 2008. The study was based on linkage between Norwegian population registries. Multivariable Poisson regression models were used to estimate the effect of HT use, different HT types, routes of administration and doses of estrogen and progestin on the risk of SMM. During the median follow-up of 4.8 years, 178,307 (26%) women used HT, and 1,476 incident SMM cases were identified. Current use of HT was associated with increased risk of SMM (rate ratios (RR) = 1.19; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.37). Plain estrogen therapy was associated with an increased risk of SMM (RR 1.45; 95% CI 1.21-1.73), both for oral (RR 1.45; 95% CI 1.09-1.93) and vaginal (RR 1.44; 95% CI 1.14-1.84) formulations, while combined estrogen and progestin therapy (EPT) was not (RR 0.91; 95% CI 0.70-1.19). We performed a dose-response analysis of estrogen and progestin in women using tablets, and found that use of estrogens was associated with increased risk (RR 1.24; 95% CI 1.00-1.53 per 1 mg/day) and use of progestins with decreased risk (RR 0.71; 95% CI 0.57-0.89 per 10 mg/month) of SMM. In conclusion, estrogens were associated with increased risk of SMM, while combinations of estrogens and progestins were not. Our results suggest that estrogens and progestins might affect the risk of SMM in opposite ways.

24 Article Multiple Isoforms of ANRIL in Melanoma Cells: Structural Complexity Suggests Variations in Processing. 2017

Sarkar, Debina / Oghabian, Ali / Bodiyabadu, Pasani K / Joseph, Wayne R / Leung, Euphemia Y / Finlay, Graeme J / Baguley, Bruce C / Askarian-Amiri, Marjan E. ·Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, University of Auckland, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, 85 Park Rd. Grafton, 1023 Auckland, New Zealand. d.sarkar@auckland.ac.nz. · Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, 85 Park Rd. Grafton, 1023 Auckland, New Zealand. d.sarkar@auckland.ac.nz. · Institute of Biotechnology, P.O. Box 56 (Viikinkaari 5), University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki, Finland. ali.oghabian@helsinki.fi. · Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, University of Auckland, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, 85 Park Rd. Grafton, 1023 Auckland, New Zealand. pbod004@aucklanduni.ac.nz. · Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, 85 Park Rd. Grafton, 1023 Auckland, New Zealand. pbod004@aucklanduni.ac.nz. · Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, University of Auckland, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, 85 Park Rd. Grafton, 1023 Auckland, New Zealand. w.joseph@auckland.ac.nz. · Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, University of Auckland, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, 85 Park Rd. Grafton, 1023 Auckland, New Zealand. e.leung@auckland.ac.nz. · Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, 85 Park Rd. Grafton, 1023 Auckland, New Zealand. e.leung@auckland.ac.nz. · Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, University of Auckland, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, 85 Park Rd. Grafton, 1023 Auckland, New Zealand. g.finlay@auckland.ac.nz. · Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, 85 Park Rd. Grafton, 1023 Auckland, New Zealand. g.finlay@auckland.ac.nz. · Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, University of Auckland, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, 85 Park Rd. Grafton, 1023 Auckland, New Zealand. b.baguley@auckland.ac.nz. · Auckland Cancer Society Research Centre, University of Auckland, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, 85 Park Rd. Grafton, 1023 Auckland, New Zealand. m.askarian-amiri@auckland.ac.nz. · Department of Molecular Medicine and Pathology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, 85 Park Rd. Grafton, 1023 Auckland, New Zealand. m.askarian-amiri@auckland.ac.nz. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #28653984.

ABSTRACT: The long non-coding RNA

25 Article Adenoviral production of interleukin-2 at the tumor site removes the need for systemic postconditioning in adoptive cell therapy. 2017

Santos, Joao Manuel / Havunen, Riikka / Siurala, Mikko / Cervera-Carrascon, Víctor / Tähtinen, Siri / Sorsa, Suvi / Anttila, Marjukka / Karell, Pauliina / Kanerva, Anna / Hemminki, Akseli. ·TILT Biotherapeutics Ltd, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Cancer Gene Therapy Group, University of Helsinki, Finland. · Pathology Unit, Finnish Food Safety Authority (EVIRA), Helsinki, Finland. · Institute for Molecular Medicine Finland (FIMM), University of Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Helsinki University Hospital, Finland. · Helsinki University Hospital Comprehensive Cancer Center, Helsinki, Finland. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #28614908.

ABSTRACT: Systemic high dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) postconditioning has long been utilized in boosting the efficacy of T cells in adoptive cell therapy (ACT) of solid tumors. The resulting severe off-target toxicity of these regimens renders local production at the tumor an attractive concept with possible safety gains. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of intratumorally administered IL-2-coding adenoviruses in combination with tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte therapy in syngeneic Syrian hamsters bearing HapT1 pancreatic tumors and with T cell receptor transgenic ACT in B16.OVA melanoma bearing C57BL/6 mice. The models are complementary: hamsters are semi-permissive for human oncolytic adenovirus, whereas detailed immunological analyses are possible in mice. In both models, local production of IL-2 successfully replaced the need for systemic recombinant IL-2 (rIL-2) administration and increased the efficacy of the cell therapy. Furthermore, vectored delivery of IL-2 significantly enhanced the infiltration of CD8+ T cells, M1-like macrophages, and B-cells while systemic rIL-2 increased CD25 + FoxP3+ T cells at the tumor. In contrast with vectored delivery, histopathological analysis of systemic rIL-2-treated animals revealed significant changes in lungs, livers, hearts, spleens, and kidneys. In summary, local IL-2 production results in efficacy and safety gains in the context of ACT. These preclinical assessments provide the rationale for ongoing clinical translation.

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