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Melanoma: HELP
Articles from Melanoma Institute Australia
Based on 466 articles published since 2010
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These are the 466 published articles about Melanoma that originated from Melanoma Institute Australia during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19
1 Guideline Data set for pathology reporting of cutaneous invasive melanoma: recommendations from the international collaboration on cancer reporting (ICCR). 2013

Scolyer, Richard A / Judge, Meagan J / Evans, Alan / Frishberg, David P / Prieto, Victor G / Thompson, John F / Trotter, Martin J / Walsh, Maureen Y / Walsh, Noreen M G / Ellis, David W / Anonymous3270770. ·*Melanoma Institute Australia Disciplines of †Pathology **Surgery, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney Departments of ‡Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology ††Melanoma and Surgical Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital §Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia, Sydney, NSW ¶¶Royal Adelaide Hospital and Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia ∥Department of Pathology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, Scotland ¶Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA #Departments of Pathology and Dermatology, University of Texas-MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX ‡‡Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB ∥∥Department of Pathology, Capital District Health Authority and Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada §§Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, UK. ·Am J Surg Pathol · Pubmed #24061524.

ABSTRACT: An accurate and complete pathology report is critical for the optimal management of cutaneous melanoma patients. Protocols for the pathologic reporting of melanoma have been independently developed by the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA), Royal College of Pathologists (United Kingdom) (RCPath), and College of American Pathologists (CAP). In this study, data sets, checklists, and structured reporting protocols for pathologic examination and reporting of cutaneous melanoma were analyzed by an international panel of melanoma pathologists and clinicians with the aim of developing a common, internationally agreed upon, evidence-based data set. The International Collaboration on Cancer Reporting cutaneous melanoma expert review panel analyzed the existing RCPA, RCPath, and CAP data sets to develop a protocol containing "required" (mandatory/core) and "recommended" (nonmandatory/noncore) elements. Required elements were defined as those that had agreed evidentiary support at National Health and Medical Research Council level III-2 level of evidence or above and that were unanimously agreed upon by the review panel to be essential for the clinical management, staging, or assessment of the prognosis of melanoma or fundamental for pathologic diagnosis. Recommended elements were those considered to be clinically important and recommended for good practice but with lesser degrees of supportive evidence. Sixteen core/required data elements for cutaneous melanoma pathology reports were defined (with an additional 4 core/required elements for specimens received with lymph nodes). Eighteen additional data elements with a lesser level of evidentiary support were included in the recommended data set. Consensus response values (permitted responses) were formulated for each data item. Development and agreement of this evidence-based protocol at an international level was accomplished in a timely and efficient manner, and the processes described herein may facilitate the development of protocols for other tumor types. Widespread utilization of an internationally agreed upon, structured pathology data set for melanoma will lead not only to improved patient management but is a prerequisite for research and for international benchmarking in health care.

2 Editorial Diagnosing melanoma: the method matters. 2019

Rtshiladze, Michael A / Stretch, Jonathan R / Scolyer, Richard A / Guitera, Pascale. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, NSW. · Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW. · Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW. ·Med J Aust · Pubmed #31414490.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Isolated Limb Infusion and Isolated Limb Perfusion for Melanoma: Can the Outcomes of these Procedures be Compared? 2019

Kroon, Hidde M / Thompson, John F. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, North Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Department of General Surgery, The University of Adelaide, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA, Australia. · Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, North Sydney, NSW, Australia. John.Thompson@melanoma.org.au. · Discipline of Surgery, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. John.Thompson@melanoma.org.au. · Department of Melanoma and Surgical Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. John.Thompson@melanoma.org.au. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #30465218.

ABSTRACT:

4 Editorial Continuing and new roles for surgery in the management of patients with stage IV melanoma. 2018

Friedman, Erica B / Thompson, John F. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney NSW, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney NSW, Australia. ·Melanoma Manag · Pubmed #30190929.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Reinvigorating tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes from checkpoint inhibitor resistant melanomas. 2018

Silva, Inês Pires da / Batten, Marcel / Long, Georgina V. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Georgina.Long@melanoma.org.au. · Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Georgina.Long@melanoma.org.au. · Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Georgina.Long@melanoma.org.au. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #30131552.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial When is surgery for metastatic melanoma still the most appropriate treatment option? 2018

Friedman, Erica B / Ferguson, Peter M / Thompson, John F. ·a Melanoma Institute Australia , The University of Sydney , North Sydney , Australia. · b Department of Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology , Royal Prince Alfred Hospital , Camperdown , Australia. · d The Faculty of Medicine and Health , The University of Sydney , Sydney , NSW , Australia. · c Department of Melanoma and Surgical Oncology , Royal Prince Alfred Hospital , Camperdown , NSW , Australia. ·Expert Rev Anticancer Ther · Pubmed #30071762.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Melanoma Staging: American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) 8th Edition and Beyond. 2018

Gershenwald, Jeffrey E / Scolyer, Richard A. ·Departments of Surgical Oncology and Cancer Biology, Unit 1484, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. jgershen@mdanderson.org. · Melanoma and Skin Center, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. jgershen@mdanderson.org. · Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Department of Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #29850954.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Prognostic features for acral lentiginous melanoma. 2018

Cust, A E. ·Sydney School of Public Health and Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Australia. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #29441559.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Has the melanoma information tsunami become a maelstrom? 2017

Thompson, John F / Menzies, Alexander M. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 20160, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney NSW, Australia. ·Melanoma Manag · Pubmed #30190924.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Advantages of whole-genome sequencing for identification of tumor etiology and clinically actionable genomic aberrations: lessons from the Australian Melanoma Genome Project. 2017

Wilmott, James S / Hayward, Nicholas K / Mann, Graham J / Scolyer, Richard A. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Discipline of Pathology, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · Centre for Cancer Research, Westmead Institute for Medical Research, University of Sydney, Westmead, NSW, Australia. · Tissue Pathology & Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW, Australia. ·Melanoma Manag · Pubmed #30190918.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Advances in melanoma: revolutionary progress delivering improved patient management and outcomes. 2016

Scolyer, Richard A / Vilain, Ricardo E / Mihm, Martin C. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, North Sydney, Australia; Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: richard.scolyer@sswahs.nsw.gov.au. · School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia; Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA), Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, Australia; Division of Anatomical Pathology, Pathology North (Hunter), New Lambton Heights, NSW, Australia. · Harvard Skin Disease Research Center, Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States. ·Pathology · Pubmed #27020382.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Synergistic effects of MAPK and immune checkpoint inhibitors in melanoma: what is the best combination strategy? 2015

Wilmott, James S / Hersey, Peter / Long, Georgina V / Scolyer, Richard A. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Tissue Pathology & Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Missenden Road, Camperdown, Sydney, New South Wales, 2050, Australia. ·Melanoma Manag · Pubmed #30190826.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Is chemotherapy still an option in the treatment of melanoma? 2015

Carlino, M S / Long, G V. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney The Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney Department of Medical Oncology, Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead Hospital, Sydney. · Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney The Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney The Mater Hospital, North Sydney, Australia georgina.long@sydney.edu.au. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #26374287.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial From dismal prognosis to rising star: melanoma leading the way with new generation cancer therapies. 2015

Long, Georgina V. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Georgina.Long@sydney.edu.au. ·Med J Aust · Pubmed #25669459.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Sentinel lymph node biopsy for melanoma: a plea to let the data be heard. 2014

Thompson, John F / Faries, Mark B / Cochran, Alistair J. ·Melanoma Institute Australia and the University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia, john.thompson@melanoma.org.au. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #25103536.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Local and regional therapies for melanoma: many arrows in the quiver. 2014

Thompson, John F. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, North Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #24419862.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Review A Review of Key Biological and Molecular Events Underpinning Transformation of Melanocytes to Primary and Metastatic Melanoma. 2019

Jackett, Louise A / Scolyer, Richard A. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, 2065 Sydney, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, 2050 Sydney, Australia. · Department of Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, 2050 Sydney, Australia. · Department of Anatomical Pathology, Austin Hospital, 3084 Melbourne, Australia. ·Cancers (Basel) · Pubmed #31861163.

ABSTRACT: Melanoma is a major public health concern that is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality, particularly in countries such as New Zealand and Australia where it is the commonest cause of cancer death in young adults. Until recently, there were no effective drug therapies for patients with advanced melanoma however significant advances in our understanding of the biological and molecular basis of melanoma in recent decades have led to the development of revolutionary treatments, including targeted molecular therapy and immunotherapy. This review summarizes our current understanding of the key events in the pathway of melanomagenesis and discusses the role of genomic analysis as a potential tool for improved diagnostic evaluation, prognostication and treatment strategies. Ultimately, it is hoped that a continued deeper understanding of the mechanisms of melanomagenesis will lead to the development of even more effective treatments that continue to provide better outcomes for patients with melanoma.

18 Review Managing in-transit melanoma metastases in the new era of effective systemic therapies for melanoma. 2019

Read, Rebecca L / Thompson, John F. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Department of General Surgery, Calvary Health Care, Canberra, Australia. · School of Medicine, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia. · Department of Melanoma and Surgical Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Australia. · Discipline of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. ·Expert Rev Clin Pharmacol · Pubmed #31687857.

ABSTRACT:

19 Review Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Patients with Lentigo Maligna. 2019

Robinson, Mitchell / Primiero, Clare / Guitera, Pascale / Hong, Angela / Scolyer, Richard A / Stretch, Jonathan R / Strutton, Geoffrey / Thompson, John F / Soyer, H Peter. ·Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Department of Dermatology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Cancer Council Australia Melanoma Guidelines Working Party, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Melanoma and Surgical Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Anatomical Pathology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, p.soyer@uq.edu.au. · Department of Dermatology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, p.soyer@uq.edu.au. · Cancer Council Australia Melanoma Guidelines Working Party, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, p.soyer@uq.edu.au. ·Dermatology · Pubmed #31639788.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Lentigo maligna (LM) is a subtype of melanoma in situ that usually occurs in sun-damaged skin and is characterised by an atypical proliferation of melanocytes within the basal epidermis. If left untreated, LM can develop into invasive melanoma, termed lentigo maligna melanoma, which shares the same prognosis as other types of invasive melanoma. The incidence rates of LM are steadily increasing worldwide, in parallel with increases in the incidence rates of invasive melanoma, and establishing appropriate guidelines for the management of LM is therefore of great importance. METHODS: A multidisciplinary working party established by Cancer Council Australia has recently produced up-to-date, evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the management of melanoma and LM. Following selection of the most relevant clinical questions, a comprehensive literature search for relevant studies was conducted, followed by systematic review of these studies. Data were summarised and the evidence was assessed, leading to the development of recommendations. After public consultation and approval by the full guidelines working party, these recommendations were published on the Cancer Council Australia wiki platform (https://wiki.cancer.org.au/australia/Clinical_question:Effective_interventions_to_improve_outcomes_in_lentigo_maligna%3F). Main Recommendations: Surgical removal of LM remains the standard treatment, with 5- to 10-mm clinical margins when possible. While yet to be fully validated, the use of peri-operative reflectance confocal microscopy to assess margins should be considered where available. There is a lack of high-quality evidence to infer the most effective non-surgical treatment. When surgical removal of LM is not possible or refused, radiotherapy is recommended. When both surgery and radiotherapy are not appropriate or refused, topical imiquimod is the recommended treatment. Cryotherapy and laser therapy are not recommended for the treatment of LM.

20 Review Nicotinamide for photoprotection and skin cancer chemoprevention: A review of efficacy and safety. 2019

Snaidr, Victoria A / Damian, Diona L / Halliday, Gary M. ·Discipline of Dermatology, Bosch Institute, University of Sydney and Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia. ·Exp Dermatol · Pubmed #30698874.

ABSTRACT: Nicotinamide is a water-soluble vitamin B3 derivative that has many roles in medicine. This review examines the role of nicotinamide in dermatology and its actions in preventing photoageing and skin cancers in humans. Nicotinamide prevents ultraviolet radiation (UV) from reducing ATP levels and inhibiting glycolysis, thus preventing the UV radiation-induced energy crisis. This enhances DNA repair and reduces UV-induced suppression of immunity. Randomised controlled clinical trials have also shown that nicotinamide reduces transepidermal water loss and the development of new non-melanoma skin cancers in high-risk humans. This review also examines nicotinamide's safety profile.

21 Review Re-examining the role of adjuvant radiation therapy. 2019

Spillane, Andrew / Hong, Angela / Fogarty, Gerald. ·Surgical Oncology, Northern Clinical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, Australia. · Melanoma Unit, Mater Hospital, Sydney, Australia. · Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia. · Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Australia. · Radiation Oncology, GenesisCare, Mater Radiation Oncology, Sydney, Australia. · Radiation Oncology, St Vincents Hospital, Sydney, Australia. ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #30554414.

ABSTRACT: Previously important roles for adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) in melanoma patients included improved regional control after resection of high-risk nodal disease, to reduce local recurrence for desmoplastic, and other subtypes of melanoma with neurotropism, reducing in-brain relapse of brain metastases after surgery and other situations on a case-by-case basis. This review evaluates the integration of adjuvant RT into clinical practice at this time of rapidly evolving knowledge and improving outcomes from effective systemic therapy.

22 Review Melanoma subtypes: genomic profiles, prognostic molecular markers and therapeutic possibilities. 2019

Rabbie, Roy / Ferguson, Peter / Molina-Aguilar, Christian / Adams, David J / Robles-Espinoza, Carla D. ·Experimental Cancer Genetics, The Wellcome Sanger Institute, Hinxton, UK. · Cambridge Cancer Centre, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK. · Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Australia. · Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Laboratorio Internacional de Investigación sobre el Genoma Humano, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Santiago de Querétaro, Mexico. ·J Pathol · Pubmed #30511391.

ABSTRACT: Melanoma is characterised by its ability to metastasise at early stages of tumour development. Current clinico-pathologic staging based on the American Joint Committee on Cancer criteria is used to guide surveillance and management in early-stage disease, but its ability to predict clinical outcome has limitations. Herein we review the genomics of melanoma subtypes including cutaneous, acral, uveal and mucosal, with a focus on the prognostic and predictive significance of key molecular aberrations. © 2018 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

23 Review Monitoring Melanoma Using Circulating Free DNA. 2019

Diefenbach, Russell J / Lee, Jenny H / Rizos, Helen. ·Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, 2109, Australia. russell.diefenbach@mq.edu.au. · Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, NSW, 2065, Australia. russell.diefenbach@mq.edu.au. · Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW, 2109, Australia. · Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, NSW, 2065, Australia. ·Am J Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #30374893.

ABSTRACT: Genetic material derived from tumours is constantly shed into the circulation of cancer patients both in the form of circulating free nucleic acids and within circulating cells or extracellular vesicles. Monitoring cancer-specific genomic alterations, particularly mutant allele frequencies, in circulating nucleic acids allows for a non-invasive liquid biopsy for detecting residual disease and response to therapy. The advent of molecular targeted treatments and immunotherapies with increasing effectiveness requires corresponding effective molecular biology methods for the detection of biomarkers such as circulating nucleic acid to monitor and ultimately personalise therapy. The use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods, such as droplet digital PCR, allows for a very sensitive analysis of circulating tumour DNA, but typically only a limited number of gene mutations can be detected in parallel. In contrast, next-generation sequencing allows for parallel analysis of multiple mutations in many genes. The development of targeted next-generation sequencing cancer gene panels optimised for the detection of circulating free DNA now provides both the flexibility of multiple mutation analysis coupled with a sensitivity that approaches or even matches droplet digital PCR. In this review, we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these current molecular technologies in conjunction with how this field is evolving in the context of melanoma diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring of response to therapy.

24 Review Advances in the use of reflectance confocal microscopy in melanoma. 2018

Waddell, Andréanne / Star, Phoebe / Guitera, Pascale. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, The Poche Centre, North Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Medicine/Division of Dermatology, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada. · Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney Medical School, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Sydney Melanoma Diagnostic Centre, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. ·Melanoma Manag · Pubmed #30190930.

ABSTRACT:

25 Review Oncogenic signaling in uveal melanoma. 2018

Park, John J / Diefenbach, Russell J / Joshua, Anthony M / Kefford, Richard F / Carlino, Matteo S / Rizos, Helen. ·Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Kinghorn Cancer Centre, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Medical Oncology, Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead and Blacktown Hospitals, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·Pigment Cell Melanoma Res · Pubmed #29738114.

ABSTRACT: Uveal melanoma is the most common primary cancer of the eye, and despite rapidly emerging insights into the molecular profile of this disease, prognosis of patients with metastatic uveal melanoma remains poor with mortality rates unchanged in over 35 years. Early genetic events activate G protein-coupled receptor signaling in nearly all uveal tumors via mutually exclusive mutations in the GNAQ, GNA11, CYSLTR2, or PLCB4 genes. A multitude of signaling cascades downstream of G protein activation, including protein kinase C and mitogen-activated protein kinase activity, are actionable, and many ongoing clinical trials are targeting these pathways. Additional cytogenetic and genetic changes, however, including chromosome 3 monosomy, mutations in the BAP1 tumor suppressor gene, alterations in the splicing factors SRSF2/SF3B1, and mutations in the translation initiation factor EIF1AX, modulate signaling output in uveal tumors and modify the risk of metastases. Here, we review the complex interactions between genetic, molecular signaling, and prognostic profiles in uveal melanoma; the clinical implications of these interactions; and the latest potential targets for rational therapy.

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