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Melanoma: HELP
Articles from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
Based on 666 articles published since 2008
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These are the 666 published articles about Melanoma that originated from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Guidelines of care for the management of primary cutaneous melanoma. 2019

Swetter, Susan M / Tsao, Hensin / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Elder, David E / Gershenwald, Jeffrey E / Guild, Valerie / Grant-Kels, Jane M / Halpern, Allan C / Johnson, Timothy M / Sober, Arthur J / Thompson, John A / Wisco, Oliver J / Wyatt, Samantha / Hu, Shasa / Lamina, Toyin. ·Department of Dermatology, Stanford University Medical Center and Cancer Institute, Stanford, California; Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. Electronic address: sswetter@stanford.edu. · Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Division of Dermatology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona; University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, Arizona. · Department of Dermatology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Department of Pathology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas; Department of Cancer Biology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · AIM at Melanoma Foundation, Plano, Texas. · Department of Dermatology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut; Department of Pathology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut; Department of Pediatrics, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut. · Department of Dermatology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Dermatology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon. · Decatur Dermatology, Decatur, Alabama. · Department of Dermatology, University of Miami Health System, Miami, Florida. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30392755.

ABSTRACT: The incidence of primary cutaneous melanoma continues to increase each year. Melanoma accounts for the majority of skin cancer-related deaths, but treatment is usually curative following early detection of disease. In this American Academy of Dermatology clinical practice guideline, updated treatment recommendations are provided for patients with primary cutaneous melanoma (American Joint Committee on Cancer stages 0-IIC and pathologic stage III by virtue of a positive sentinel lymph node biopsy). Biopsy techniques for a lesion that is clinically suggestive of melanoma are reviewed, as are recommendations for the histopathologic interpretation of cutaneous melanoma. The use of laboratory, molecular, and imaging tests is examined in the initial work-up of patients with newly diagnosed melanoma and for follow-up of asymptomatic patients. With regard to treatment of primary cutaneous melanoma, recommendations for surgical margins and the concepts of staged excision (including Mohs micrographic surgery) and nonsurgical treatments for melanoma in situ, lentigo maligna type (including topical imiquimod and radiation therapy), are updated. The role of sentinel lymph node biopsy as a staging technique for cutaneous melanoma is described, with recommendations for its use in clinical practice. Finally, current data regarding pregnancy and melanoma, genetic testing for familial melanoma, and management of dermatologic toxicities related to novel targeted agents and immunotherapies for patients with advanced disease are summarized.

2 Guideline Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy and Management of Regional Lymph Nodes in Melanoma: American Society of Clinical Oncology and Society of Surgical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update. 2018

Wong, Sandra L / Faries, Mark B / Kennedy, Erin B / Agarwala, Sanjiv S / Akhurst, Timothy J / Ariyan, Charlotte / Balch, Charles M / Berman, Barry S / Cochran, Alistair / Delman, Keith A / Gorman, Mark / Kirkwood, John M / Moncrieff, Marc D / Zager, Jonathan S / Lyman, Gary H. ·Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH, USA. · The Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Santa Monica, CA, USA. · American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA, USA. guidelines@asco.org. · St Luke's Cancer Center, Easton, PA, USA. · Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Broward Health, Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA. · Los Angeles Center for Health Services, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. · , Silver Spring, MD, USA. · University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norwich, UK. · H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA. · Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #29236202.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To update the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)-Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO) guideline for sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy in melanoma. METHODS: An ASCO-SSO panel was formed, and a systematic review of the literature was conducted regarding SLN biopsy and completion lymph node dissection (CLND) after a positive sentinel node in patients with melanoma. RESULTS: Nine new observational studies, two systematic reviews and an updated randomized controlled trial (RCT) of SLN biopsy, as well as two randomized controlled trials of CLND after positive SLN biopsy, were included. RECOMMENDATIONS: Routine SLN biopsy is not recommended for patients with thin melanomas that are T1a (non-ulcerated lesions < 0.8 mm in Breslow thickness). SLN biopsy may be considered for thin melanomas that are T1b (0.8 to 1.0 mm Breslow thickness or <0.8 mm Breslow thickness with ulceration) after a thorough discussion with the patient of the potential benefits and risk of harms associated with the procedure. SLN biopsy is recommended for patients with intermediate-thickness melanomas (T2 or T3; Breslow thickness of >1.0 to 4.0 mm). SLN biopsy may be recommended for patients with thick melanomas (T4; > 4.0 mm in Breslow thickness), after a discussion of the potential benefits and risks of harm. In the case of a positive SLN biopsy, CLND or careful observation are options for patients with low-risk micrometastatic disease, with due consideration of clinicopathological factors. For higher risk patients, careful observation may be considered only after a thorough discussion with patients about the potential risks and benefits of foregoing CLND. Important qualifying statements outlining relevant clinicopathological factors, and details of the reference patient populations are included within the guideline.

3 Guideline NCCN Guidelines Insights: Melanoma, Version 3.2016. 2016

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Algazi, Alain / Andtbacka, Robert / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / DiMaio, Dominick / Fields, Ryan C / Fleming, Martin D / Gastman, Brian / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Johnson, Douglas / Joseph, Richard W / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Materin, Miguel A / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ott, Patrick / Gupta, Aparna Priyanath / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April K / Skitzki, Joseph / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Torres-Roca, Javier F / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Engh, Anita. ·From Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine; The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute; University of Colorado Cancer Center; Aim at Melanoma; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital; Fox Chase Cancer Center; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; Duke Cancer Institute; Roswell Park Cancer Institute; Stanford Cancer Institute; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; Moffitt Cancer Center; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; and National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #27496110.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma have been significantly revised over the past few years in response to emerging data on a number of novel agents and treatment regimens. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the data and rationale supporting extensive changes to the recommendations for systemic therapy in patients with metastatic or unresectable melanoma.

4 Guideline Melanoma, version 4.2014. 2014

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / Daud, Adil / Dimaio, Dominick / Fleming, Martin D / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole R / Ho, Maria / Anonymous5170793. ·From 1Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; 2Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; 3Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; 4University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; 5The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; 6UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; 7UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; 8Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center; 9St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; 10University of Colorado Cancer Center; 11Aim at Melanoma; 12Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; 13Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; 14Roswell Park Cancer Institute; 15Moffitt Cancer Center; 16The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; 17Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; 18Fox Chase Cancer Center; 19The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; 20Duke Cancer Institute; 21Stanford Cancer Institute; 22Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; 23City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; 24University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; and 25National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #24812131.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma provide multidisciplinary recommendations for the management of patients with melanoma. These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight notable recent updates. Dabrafenib and trametinib, either as monotherapy (category 1) or combination therapy, have been added as systemic options for patients with unresectable metastatic melanoma harboring BRAF V600 mutations. Controversy continues regarding the value of adjuvant radiation for patients at high risk of nodal relapse. This is reflected in the category 2B designation to consider adjuvant radiation following lymphadenectomy for stage III melanoma with clinically positive nodes or recurrent disease.

5 Guideline Melanoma, version 2.2013: featured updates to the NCCN guidelines. 2013

Coit, Daniel G / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daud, Adil / Dimaio, Dominick / Fleming, Martin D / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Lind, Anne / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Pruitt, Scott K / Ross, Merrick I / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Thompson, John A / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Ho, Maria / Anonymous4310755. ·Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #23584343.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma provide multidisciplinary recommendations on the clinical management of patients with melanoma. This NCCN Guidelines Insights report highlights notable recent updates. Foremost of these is the exciting addition of the novel agents ipilimumab and vemurafenib for treatment of advanced melanoma. The NCCN panel also included imatinib as a treatment for KIT-mutated tumors and pegylated interferon alfa-2b as an option for adjuvant therapy. Also important are revisions to the initial stratification of early-stage lesions based on the risk of sentinel lymph node metastases, and revised recommendations on the use of sentinel lymph node biopsy for low-risk groups. Finally, the NCCN panel reached clinical consensus on clarifying the role of imaging in the workup of patients with melanoma.

6 Editorial MelMART Trial: It's Now or Never. 2018

Coit, Daniel / Ariyan, Charlotte. ·Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA. ariyanc@mskcc.org. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #29946999.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial The Enigma of Regional Lymph Nodes in Melanoma. 2017

Coit, Daniel. ·From the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York. ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #28591534.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial An Evolving Approach to the Detection of Melanoma and Other Skin Cancers Using In Vivo Reflectance Confocal Microscopy. 2016

Scope, Alon / Marchetti, Michael A. ·Department of Dermatology, Sheba Medical Center and Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel2Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #27580064.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Genomic Rearrangements in Unusual and Atypical Melanocytic Neoplasms. 2016

Wiesner, Thomas. ·Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Human Oncology and Pathogenesis Program, New York City, New York2Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #26677060.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Hyperactivated endolysosomal trafficking in melanoma. 2015

Alonso-Curbelo, Direna / Soengas, Maria S. ·Memorial Sloan, Kettering Cancer Center, NY 10065, USA. · Melanoma Laboratory, Molecular Oncology Programme, Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncológicas (CNIO), Madrid 28029, Spain. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #25682879.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Worry about developing melanoma in the pigmented lesion clinic: does it warrant a solution? 2015

Hay, Jennifer L. ·Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #25390041.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Health-related quality of life in skin cancer patients. 2014

Hibler, Brian / Rossi, Anthony M. ·RossiA@mskcc.org. ·Cutis · Pubmed #25474447.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Sentinel lymph node biopsy for melanoma: a plea to let the data speak. 2014

Coit, Daniel. ·Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA, coitd@mskcc.org. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #25059791.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Melanoma surveillance in "high-risk" individuals. 2014

Halpern, Allan C / Marchetti, Michael A / Marghoob, Ashfaq A. ·Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #24965763.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Is pediatric melanoma always malignant? 2013

Coit, Daniel G / Ernstoff, Marc S / Busam, Klaus J. ·Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. ·Cancer · Pubmed #24022827.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Another option in our KIT of effective therapies for advanced melanoma. 2013

Carvajal, Richard D. ·Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #23940226.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial The ever-evolving landscape for detection of early melanoma: challenges and promises. 2013

Geller, Alan C / Halpern, Allan C. ·Department of Society, Human Development, and Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Electronic address: ageller@hsph.harvard.edu. · Dermatology Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. ·J Invest Dermatol · Pubmed #23399817.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Review Clinical implications of the eighth edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer melanoma staging. 2019

Crompton, Joseph G / Gilbert, Elizabeth / Brady, Mary S. ·Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York. ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #30575031.

ABSTRACT: The new edition of the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system for melanoma builds on the foundation of prior editions but has several important improvements. The availability of regional nodal staging using sentinel lymph node biopsy (with subsequent follow-up) has resulted in more accurate prognostication for patients and clinicians. This facilitates identification of those at higher risk for recurrence, and allows for the appropriate selection of patients for new adjuvant therapy and clinical trials. Although more complex than previous editions, the eighth edition will provide granularity to outcome analysis based on more precise risk stratification.

19 Review Indications for the surgical resection of stage IV disease. 2019

Bello, Danielle M. ·Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #30561079.

ABSTRACT: Tumor biology and careful patient selection weigh heavily in determining the appropriate role of surgical resection in stage IV melanoma. Historically, surgical resection for highly selected patients with metastatic melanoma was the only treatment modality associated with improved long-term survival and the ability to provide palliation. With the new age of effective systemic therapies, the treatment of metastatic melanoma has become more intricate and future work is needed to better define the role for surgery within the current treatment paradigm.

20 Review Current management of regional lymph nodes in patients with melanoma. 2019

Bartlett, Edmund K. ·Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #30481384.

ABSTRACT: The publication of recent randomized trials has prompted a significant shift in both our understanding and the management of patients with melanoma. Here, the current management of the regional lymph nodes in patients with melanoma is discussed. This review focuses on selection for sentinel lymph node biopsy, management of the positive sentinel node, management of the clinically positive node, and the controversy over the therapeutic value of early nodal intervention.

21 Review Usefulness of dermoscopy to improve the clinical and histopathologic diagnosis of skin cancers. 2019

Yélamos, Oriol / Braun, Ralph P / Liopyris, Konstantinos / Wolner, Zachary J / Kerl, Katrin / Gerami, Pedram / Marghoob, Ashfaq A. ·Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York; Dermatology Department, Hospital Clínic, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: oyelamos@gmail.com. · Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland. · Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, The Robert H. Lurie Cancer Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois. · Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York; Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Hauppauge, New York. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30321580.

ABSTRACT: Multiple studies have shown that dermoscopy increases the sensitivity and specificity for the detection of skin cancers compared with examination by the naked eye. Dermoscopy can also lead to the detection of thinner and smaller cancers. In addition, dermoscopy leads to the more precise selection of lesions requiring excision. In essence, dermoscopy helps clinicians differentiate benign from malignant lesions through the presence or absence of specific dermoscopic structures. Therefore, because most dermoscopic structures have direct histopathologic correlates, dermoscopy can allow the prediction of certain histologic findings present in skin cancers, thus helping select management and treatment options for select types of skin cancers. Visualizing dermoscopic structures in the ex vivo specimens can also be beneficial. It can improve the histologic diagnostic accuracy by targeted step-sectioning in areas of concern, which can be marked by the clinician before sending the specimen to the pathologist, or by the pathologist on the excised specimen in the laboratory. In addition, ex vivo dermoscopy can also be used to select tumor areas with genetic importance because some dermoscopic structures have been related to mutations with theragnostic relevance. In the second article in this continuing medical education series, we review the impact of dermoscopy on the diagnostic accuracy of skin cancer, how dermoscopy can affect the histopathologic examination, and which dermoscopic features may be more relevant in terms of histologic and genetic prediction.

22 Review Malignancy Risk and Recurrence with Psoriasis and its Treatments: A Concise Update. 2018

Geller, Shamir / Xu, Haoming / Lebwohl, Mark / Nardone, Beatrice / Lacouture, Mario E / Kheterpal, Meenal. ·Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 16 East 60th Street, New York, NY, 10022, USA. gellers@mskcc.org. · Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 16 East 60th Street, New York, NY, 10022, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Dermatology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA. ·Am J Clin Dermatol · Pubmed #29260411.

ABSTRACT: Psoriasis is a common inflammatory cutaneous disease that affects approximately 120 million people worldwide. Systemic treatments have significantly improved disease burden, but concerns persist regarding their association with increased risk of malignancy. Patients with psoriasis have a slightly elevated baseline risk of lymphoproliferative diseases. Studies on methotrexate and cyclosporine, as well as older biological agents such as tumor necrosis factor inhibitors, have found no increased risk of non-cutaneous solid tumors; however, positive associations between cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas and certain therapies have been found. There is conflicting evidence regarding the risk of lymphoma and melanoma. Further studies are needed to determine the long-term safety of newer psoriasis treatments (interleukin [IL]-12/23, IL-17, Janus kinase 1/3, and phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors), specifically their safety in patients with a history of cancer. This review summarizes the most recent studies on malignancy risk from psoriasis, and its treatments in patients and cancer survivors, with the highest available level of evidence.

23 Review Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Sun Safety. 2018

Geller, Alan C / Jablonski, Nina G / Pagoto, Sherry L / Hay, Jennifer L / Hillhouse, Joel / Buller, David B / Kenney, W Larry / Robinson, June K / Weller, Richard B / Moreno, Megan A / Gilchrest, Barbara A / Sinclair, Craig / Arndt, Jamie / Taber, Jennifer M / Morris, Kasey L / Dwyer, Laura A / Perna, Frank M / Klein, William M P / Suls, Jerry. ·Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Anthropology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park. · Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester. · Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Community and Behavioral Health, East Tennessee State University, Johnson City. · Klein Buendel, Golden, Colorado. · Department of Kinesiology, The Pennsylvania State University. · Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois. · Chief Editor. · MRC Centre for Inflammation Research, Queens Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, Scotland. · Division of General Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle. · Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. · Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Australia. · Department of Psychological Sciences, University of Missouri, Columbia. · Department of Psychological Sciences, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio. · National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland. ·JAMA Dermatol · Pubmed #29117315.

ABSTRACT: Overexposure to the sun is associated with an increased risk of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer, but indications of improvements in sun protection behavior are poor. Attempts to identify emerging themes in skin cancer control have largely been driven by groups of experts from a single field. In December 2016, 19 experts from various disciplines convened for Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Skin Cancer, a 2-day meeting hosted by the National Academy of Sciences. The group discussed knowledge gaps, perspectives on sun exposure, implications for skin cancer risk and other health outcomes, and new directions. Five themes emerged from the discussion: (1) The definition of risk must be expanded, and categories for skin physiology must be refined to incorporate population diversities. (2) Risky sun exposure often co-occurs with other health-related behaviors. (3) Messages must be nuanced to target at-risk populations. (4) Persons at risk for tanning disorder must be recognized and treated. (5) Sun safety interventions must be scalable. Efficient use of technologies will be required to sharpen messages to specific populations and to integrate them within multilevel interventions. Further interdisciplinary research should address these emerging themes to build effective and sustainable approaches to large-scale behavior change.

24 Review Atypical Melanocytic Proliferations: A Review of the Literature. 2018

Ensslin, Courtney J / Hibler, Brian P / Lee, Erica H / Nehal, Kishwer S / Busam, Klaus J / Rossi, Anthony M. ·Department of Dermatology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Medicine, Dermatology Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York. · Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. ·Dermatol Surg · Pubmed #29059147.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Ambiguous histopathologic diagnoses represent a challenge for clinicians because of a lack of definitive diagnosis and related uncertainty about management. OBJECTIVE: To review the literature on atypical melanocytic proliferations and detail synonymous terms, epidemiology, diagnostic work-up, histopathology, treatment, and prognosis. METHODS: Databases from PubMed and Web of Science were searched for articles related to atypical melanocytic proliferations. RESULTS: Intraepidermal melanocytic proliferations with features worrisome for possible melanoma in situ (MIS) are generally excised as for MIS. Reported rates of upstaging of such cases to invasive melanoma on review of the excision are very low. Because invasion, lymph node spread, and metastasis can occur in atypical melanocytic lesions with a thick intradermal component, these are often treated as for malignant melanoma. CONCLUSION: Because the diagnosis dictates treatment, it is incumbent to establish a diagnosis as definitive as possible, obtaining second or third opinions and using ancillary studies when appropriate. When the diagnosis remains uncertain, it is difficult to provide guidelines for treatment. Clinical care decisions for patients with an uncertain diagnosis are best done on a case-by-case basis weighing probabilities of adverse outcomes against potential benefits and risks from various treatment options.

25 Review Treatment of advanced melanoma - A changing landscape. 2017

Hepner, Adriana / Salgues, Alessandra / Anjos, Carlos A Dos / Sahade, Marina / Camargo, Veridiana P / Garicochea, Bernardo / Shoushtari, Alexander N / Postow, Michael A / Fernandes, Gustavo S / Munhoz, Rodrigo R. ·Oncology Center, Hospital Sírio-Libanês, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. ·Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992) · Pubmed #29239458.

ABSTRACT: Following decades of relative ostracism, advances in the treatment of melanoma have brought a new reality for patients, physicians and researchers. While antibodies targeting molecules involved in the modulation of the interaction between melanoma and immune cells changed the meaning of the term "cancer immunotherapy," a better characterization of the molecular aberrations involved in melanoma carcinogenesis prompted the development of inhibitors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (MAPK) that also led to significant improvements both in response rates and survival. As a result, new drugs have been approved for clinical use in the United States and Europe, including the immune-checkpoint blockers ipilmumab, pembrolizumab and nivolumab, the oncolytic herpesvirus talimogene laherparepvec, and the targeted-agents vemurafenib, dabrafenib, cobimetinib and trametinib. In this article, we review the results of studies that brought new approaches to the bedside and discuss how these developments are being incorporated into the care of patients in Brazil.

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