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Melanoma: HELP
Articles from University of Sydney
Based on 664 articles published since 2010
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These are the 664 published articles about Melanoma that originated from University of Sydney during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Data set for pathology reporting of cutaneous invasive melanoma: recommendations from the international collaboration on cancer reporting (ICCR). 2013

Scolyer, Richard A / Judge, Meagan J / Evans, Alan / Frishberg, David P / Prieto, Victor G / Thompson, John F / Trotter, Martin J / Walsh, Maureen Y / Walsh, Noreen M G / Ellis, David W / Anonymous3270770. ·*Melanoma Institute Australia Disciplines of †Pathology **Surgery, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney Departments of ‡Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology ††Melanoma and Surgical Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital §Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia, Sydney, NSW ¶¶Royal Adelaide Hospital and Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia ∥Department of Pathology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, Scotland ¶Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA #Departments of Pathology and Dermatology, University of Texas-MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX ‡‡Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB ∥∥Department of Pathology, Capital District Health Authority and Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada §§Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, UK. ·Am J Surg Pathol · Pubmed #24061524.

ABSTRACT: An accurate and complete pathology report is critical for the optimal management of cutaneous melanoma patients. Protocols for the pathologic reporting of melanoma have been independently developed by the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA), Royal College of Pathologists (United Kingdom) (RCPath), and College of American Pathologists (CAP). In this study, data sets, checklists, and structured reporting protocols for pathologic examination and reporting of cutaneous melanoma were analyzed by an international panel of melanoma pathologists and clinicians with the aim of developing a common, internationally agreed upon, evidence-based data set. The International Collaboration on Cancer Reporting cutaneous melanoma expert review panel analyzed the existing RCPA, RCPath, and CAP data sets to develop a protocol containing "required" (mandatory/core) and "recommended" (nonmandatory/noncore) elements. Required elements were defined as those that had agreed evidentiary support at National Health and Medical Research Council level III-2 level of evidence or above and that were unanimously agreed upon by the review panel to be essential for the clinical management, staging, or assessment of the prognosis of melanoma or fundamental for pathologic diagnosis. Recommended elements were those considered to be clinically important and recommended for good practice but with lesser degrees of supportive evidence. Sixteen core/required data elements for cutaneous melanoma pathology reports were defined (with an additional 4 core/required elements for specimens received with lymph nodes). Eighteen additional data elements with a lesser level of evidentiary support were included in the recommended data set. Consensus response values (permitted responses) were formulated for each data item. Development and agreement of this evidence-based protocol at an international level was accomplished in a timely and efficient manner, and the processes described herein may facilitate the development of protocols for other tumor types. Widespread utilization of an internationally agreed upon, structured pathology data set for melanoma will lead not only to improved patient management but is a prerequisite for research and for international benchmarking in health care.

2 Editorial Diagnosing melanoma: the method matters. 2019

Rtshiladze, Michael A / Stretch, Jonathan R / Scolyer, Richard A / Guitera, Pascale. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, NSW. · Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW. · Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW. ·Med J Aust · Pubmed #31414490.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Isolated Limb Infusion and Isolated Limb Perfusion for Melanoma: Can the Outcomes of these Procedures be Compared? 2019

Kroon, Hidde M / Thompson, John F. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, North Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Department of General Surgery, The University of Adelaide, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA, Australia. · Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, North Sydney, NSW, Australia. John.Thompson@melanoma.org.au. · Discipline of Surgery, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. John.Thompson@melanoma.org.au. · Department of Melanoma and Surgical Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. John.Thompson@melanoma.org.au. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #30465218.

ABSTRACT:

4 Editorial Continuing and new roles for surgery in the management of patients with stage IV melanoma. 2018

Friedman, Erica B / Thompson, John F. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney NSW, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney NSW, Australia. ·Melanoma Manag · Pubmed #30190929.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Reinvigorating tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes from checkpoint inhibitor resistant melanomas. 2018

Silva, Inês Pires da / Batten, Marcel / Long, Georgina V. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Georgina.Long@melanoma.org.au. · Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Georgina.Long@melanoma.org.au. · Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Georgina.Long@melanoma.org.au. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #30131552.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Coned Radial Forearm Free Flap for Improved Retention of Orbital Prosthesis following Orbital Exenteration. 2018

Zhou, Kiane / Luong, Jason K / Clark, Jonathan R / Ch'ng, Sydney. ·Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Westmead Clinical School, Westmead and, Institute of Academic Surgery, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, University of Sydney Institute of Academic Surgery, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, University of Sydney and Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Chris O'Brien Lifehouse Cancer Centre Institute of Academic Surgery, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, University of Sydney, Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Chris O'Brien Lifehouse Cancer Centre, and Department of Plastic Surgery, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. ·Plast Reconstr Surg · Pubmed #30119127.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial When is surgery for metastatic melanoma still the most appropriate treatment option? 2018

Friedman, Erica B / Ferguson, Peter M / Thompson, John F. ·a Melanoma Institute Australia , The University of Sydney , North Sydney , Australia. · b Department of Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology , Royal Prince Alfred Hospital , Camperdown , Australia. · d The Faculty of Medicine and Health , The University of Sydney , Sydney , NSW , Australia. · c Department of Melanoma and Surgical Oncology , Royal Prince Alfred Hospital , Camperdown , NSW , Australia. ·Expert Rev Anticancer Ther · Pubmed #30071762.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Melanoma Staging: American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) 8th Edition and Beyond. 2018

Gershenwald, Jeffrey E / Scolyer, Richard A. ·Departments of Surgical Oncology and Cancer Biology, Unit 1484, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. jgershen@mdanderson.org. · Melanoma and Skin Center, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. jgershen@mdanderson.org. · Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Department of Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #29850954.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Prognostic features for acral lentiginous melanoma. 2018

Cust, A E. ·Sydney School of Public Health and Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Australia. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #29441559.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Beyond country-specific incidence and mortality: the global burden of melanoma. 2018

Bell, K J L / Cust, A E. ·School of Public Health, The University of Sydney, Rm 333, Edward Ford Building A27, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia. ·Br J Dermatol · Pubmed #29441534.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial Has the melanoma information tsunami become a maelstrom? 2017

Thompson, John F / Menzies, Alexander M. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney NSW 20160, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney NSW, Australia. ·Melanoma Manag · Pubmed #30190924.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Advantages of whole-genome sequencing for identification of tumor etiology and clinically actionable genomic aberrations: lessons from the Australian Melanoma Genome Project. 2017

Wilmott, James S / Hayward, Nicholas K / Mann, Graham J / Scolyer, Richard A. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Discipline of Pathology, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. · Centre for Cancer Research, Westmead Institute for Medical Research, University of Sydney, Westmead, NSW, Australia. · Tissue Pathology & Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW, Australia. ·Melanoma Manag · Pubmed #30190918.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Safety and Efficacy Implications of Discontinuing Combination Ipilimumab and Nivolumab in Advanced Melanoma. 2017

Carlino, Matteo S / Sandhu, Shahneen. ·Matteo S. Carlino, Westmead and Blacktown Hospitals and University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia · and Shahneen Sandhu, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #29048973.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Advances in melanoma: revolutionary progress delivering improved patient management and outcomes. 2016

Scolyer, Richard A / Vilain, Ricardo E / Mihm, Martin C. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, North Sydney, Australia; Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: richard.scolyer@sswahs.nsw.gov.au. · School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia; Hunter Cancer Research Alliance (HCRA), Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, Australia; Division of Anatomical Pathology, Pathology North (Hunter), New Lambton Heights, NSW, Australia. · Harvard Skin Disease Research Center, Department of Dermatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States. ·Pathology · Pubmed #27020382.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Synergistic effects of MAPK and immune checkpoint inhibitors in melanoma: what is the best combination strategy? 2015

Wilmott, James S / Hersey, Peter / Long, Georgina V / Scolyer, Richard A. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Tissue Pathology & Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Missenden Road, Camperdown, Sydney, New South Wales, 2050, Australia. ·Melanoma Manag · Pubmed #30190826.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Is chemotherapy still an option in the treatment of melanoma? 2015

Carlino, M S / Long, G V. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney The Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney Department of Medical Oncology, Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead Hospital, Sydney. · Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney The Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney The Mater Hospital, North Sydney, Australia georgina.long@sydney.edu.au. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #26374287.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial From dismal prognosis to rising star: melanoma leading the way with new generation cancer therapies. 2015

Long, Georgina V. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Georgina.Long@sydney.edu.au. ·Med J Aust · Pubmed #25669459.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Editorial Sentinel lymph node biopsy for melanoma: a plea to let the data be heard. 2014

Thompson, John F / Faries, Mark B / Cochran, Alistair J. ·Melanoma Institute Australia and the University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia, john.thompson@melanoma.org.au. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #25103536.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Editorial Molecular biomarkers of prognosis in melanoma: how far are we from the clinic? 2013

Schramm, Sarah-Jane / Menzies, Alexander M / Mann, Graham J. ·aThe University of Sydney at Westmead Millennium Institute for Medical Research bMelanoma Institute Australia, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·Melanoma Res · Pubmed #24165033.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Review A Review of Key Biological and Molecular Events Underpinning Transformation of Melanocytes to Primary and Metastatic Melanoma. 2019

Jackett, Louise A / Scolyer, Richard A. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, 2065 Sydney, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, 2050 Sydney, Australia. · Department of Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, 2050 Sydney, Australia. · Department of Anatomical Pathology, Austin Hospital, 3084 Melbourne, Australia. ·Cancers (Basel) · Pubmed #31861163.

ABSTRACT: Melanoma is a major public health concern that is responsible for significant morbidity and mortality, particularly in countries such as New Zealand and Australia where it is the commonest cause of cancer death in young adults. Until recently, there were no effective drug therapies for patients with advanced melanoma however significant advances in our understanding of the biological and molecular basis of melanoma in recent decades have led to the development of revolutionary treatments, including targeted molecular therapy and immunotherapy. This review summarizes our current understanding of the key events in the pathway of melanomagenesis and discusses the role of genomic analysis as a potential tool for improved diagnostic evaluation, prognostication and treatment strategies. Ultimately, it is hoped that a continued deeper understanding of the mechanisms of melanomagenesis will lead to the development of even more effective treatments that continue to provide better outcomes for patients with melanoma.

21 Review Conjunctival Melanoma in Childhood and Adolescence: A Systematic Review. 2019

Balzer, Ben W R / Cherepanoff, Svetlana / Joshua, Anthony M / Giblin, Michael / Conway, Robert Max / Anazodo, Antoinette C. ·Sydney Children's Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia. · School of Women's and Children's Health, University of New South Wales, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia. · St. Vincent's Hospital, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. · Save Sight Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Sydney Eye Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Kid's Cancer Centre, Sydney Children's Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia. · Nelune Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia. ·Ocul Oncol Pathol · Pubmed #31768361.

ABSTRACT: Background: Conjunctival melanoma is rare in adults and rarer in children. We systematically reviewed the presentation, diagnostic and management strategies as well as outcomes for conjunctival melanoma in children and adolescents. Methods: The following databases were searched: Medline, Embase, Web of Science and Scopus for cases of conjunctival melanoma occurring in children and adolescents < 18 years of age. Results: Seventeen studies with 32 patients (18 males) were identified. The median age at presentation was 11 years (range 4-18 years). Most patients were white. Most patients presented with a conjunctival mass or naevus with a recent history of growth or change. Excision biopsy provided diagnosis and management for all cases. Adjuvant chemotherapy and radiotherapy were also used. One patient had metastatic disease at diagnosis and 3 developed metastatic disease (range 1-10 months). Two patients died from disease and one was alive with metastatic disease. Two patients had disease recurrence. Outcomes were observed to be better where diagnosis was made earlier and "no-touch" excision biopsy was performed in an appropriate specialist setting. Conclusions: Conjunctival melanoma occurs rarely in children and adolescents. Surgery is the mainstay of management. The prognosis is guarded in metastatic disease due to the small sample size and limited follow-up.

22 Review Managing in-transit melanoma metastases in the new era of effective systemic therapies for melanoma. 2019

Read, Rebecca L / Thompson, John F. ·Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Department of General Surgery, Calvary Health Care, Canberra, Australia. · School of Medicine, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia. · Department of Melanoma and Surgical Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, Australia. · Discipline of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. ·Expert Rev Clin Pharmacol · Pubmed #31687857.

ABSTRACT:

23 Review Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Patients with Lentigo Maligna. 2019

Robinson, Mitchell / Primiero, Clare / Guitera, Pascale / Hong, Angela / Scolyer, Richard A / Stretch, Jonathan R / Strutton, Geoffrey / Thompson, John F / Soyer, H Peter. ·Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Department of Dermatology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Cancer Council Australia Melanoma Guidelines Working Party, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Melanoma and Surgical Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Anatomical Pathology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Dermatology Research Centre, The University of Queensland Diamantina Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, p.soyer@uq.edu.au. · Department of Dermatology, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, p.soyer@uq.edu.au. · Cancer Council Australia Melanoma Guidelines Working Party, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, p.soyer@uq.edu.au. ·Dermatology · Pubmed #31639788.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Lentigo maligna (LM) is a subtype of melanoma in situ that usually occurs in sun-damaged skin and is characterised by an atypical proliferation of melanocytes within the basal epidermis. If left untreated, LM can develop into invasive melanoma, termed lentigo maligna melanoma, which shares the same prognosis as other types of invasive melanoma. The incidence rates of LM are steadily increasing worldwide, in parallel with increases in the incidence rates of invasive melanoma, and establishing appropriate guidelines for the management of LM is therefore of great importance. METHODS: A multidisciplinary working party established by Cancer Council Australia has recently produced up-to-date, evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for the management of melanoma and LM. Following selection of the most relevant clinical questions, a comprehensive literature search for relevant studies was conducted, followed by systematic review of these studies. Data were summarised and the evidence was assessed, leading to the development of recommendations. After public consultation and approval by the full guidelines working party, these recommendations were published on the Cancer Council Australia wiki platform (https://wiki.cancer.org.au/australia/Clinical_question:Effective_interventions_to_improve_outcomes_in_lentigo_maligna%3F). Main Recommendations: Surgical removal of LM remains the standard treatment, with 5- to 10-mm clinical margins when possible. While yet to be fully validated, the use of peri-operative reflectance confocal microscopy to assess margins should be considered where available. There is a lack of high-quality evidence to infer the most effective non-surgical treatment. When surgical removal of LM is not possible or refused, radiotherapy is recommended. When both surgery and radiotherapy are not appropriate or refused, topical imiquimod is the recommended treatment. Cryotherapy and laser therapy are not recommended for the treatment of LM.

24 Review Assessment of kidney transplant suitability for patients with prior cancers: is it time for a rethink? 2019

Lim, Wai H / Au, Eric / Krishnan, Anoushka / Wong, Germaine. ·Department of Renal Medicine, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA, Australia. · School of Medicine, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia. · Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Centre for Transplant and Renal Research, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Centre for Kidney Research, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Sydney, NSW, Australia. ·Transpl Int · Pubmed #31385629.

ABSTRACT: Kidney transplant recipients have up to a 100-fold greater risk of incident cancer compared with the age/sex-matched general population, attributed largely to chronic immunosuppression. In patients with a prior history of treated cancers, the type, stage and the potential for cancer recurrence post-transplant of prior cancers are important factors when determining transplant suitability. Consequently, one of the predicaments facing transplant clinicians is to determine whether patients with prior cancers are eligible for transplantation, balancing between the accelerated risk of death on dialysis, the projected survival benefit and quality of life gains with transplantation, and the premature mortality associated with the potential risk of cancer recurrence post-transplant. The guidelines informing transplant eligibility or screening and preventive strategies against cancer recurrence for patients with prior cancers are inconsistent, underpinned by uncertain evidence on the estimates of the incidence of cancer recurrence and the lack of stage-specific outcomes data, particularly among those with multiple myeloma or immune-driven malignancies such as melanomas. With the advent of newer anti-cancer treatment options, it is unclear whether the current guidelines for those with prior cancers remain appropriate. This review will summarize the uncertainties of evidence informing the current recommendations regarding transplant eligibility of patients with prior cancers.

25 Review The role of radiotherapy in the management of non-melanoma skin cancer. 2019

Garbutcheon-Singh, Kieran B / Veness, Michael J. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·Australas J Dermatol · Pubmed #30931531.

ABSTRACT: The global incidence of non-melanoma skin cancer continues to increase as the global population ages with the highest incidence in the world occurring in Australian and New Zealand patients. There are numerous treatment options available for non-melanoma skin cancer patients of which radiotherapy is an efficacious and versatile tissue preserving non-surgical (or medical) option. In patients where excision may not be an option (medically/technically inoperable) or considered less ideal (e.g. cosmetic outcome), radiotherapy offers an excellent option. Following surgery, adjuvant radiotherapy in patients with unfavourable pathology can decrease the risk of recurrence and associated morbidity. Elderly and co-morbid patients with poor performance status can benefit from short-course hypofractionated radiotherapy in the setting where surgery is not an option. As with any modality, radiotherapy has advantages and disadvantages and it is therefore important for clinicians to appreciate these. We aim to present an update for clinicians that manage patients with non-melanoma skin cancer on the role of radiotherapy.

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