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Melanoma: HELP
Articles from Texas
Based on 1,175 articles published since 2008
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These are the 1175 published articles about Melanoma that originated from Texas during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Guidelines of care for the management of primary cutaneous melanoma. 2019

Swetter, Susan M / Tsao, Hensin / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara / Elder, David E / Gershenwald, Jeffrey E / Guild, Valerie / Grant-Kels, Jane M / Halpern, Allan C / Johnson, Timothy M / Sober, Arthur J / Thompson, John A / Wisco, Oliver J / Wyatt, Samantha / Hu, Shasa / Lamina, Toyin. ·Department of Dermatology, Stanford University Medical Center and Cancer Institute, Stanford, California; Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California. Electronic address: sswetter@stanford.edu. · Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Division of Dermatology, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona; University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, Arizona. · Department of Dermatology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Department of Pathology, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas; Department of Cancer Biology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · AIM at Melanoma Foundation, Plano, Texas. · Department of Dermatology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut; Department of Pathology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut; Department of Pediatrics, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut. · Department of Dermatology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Department of Dermatology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Division of Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington; Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Dermatology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon. · Decatur Dermatology, Decatur, Alabama. · Department of Dermatology, University of Miami Health System, Miami, Florida. · American Academy of Dermatology, Rosemont, Illinois. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #30392755.

ABSTRACT: The incidence of primary cutaneous melanoma continues to increase each year. Melanoma accounts for the majority of skin cancer-related deaths, but treatment is usually curative following early detection of disease. In this American Academy of Dermatology clinical practice guideline, updated treatment recommendations are provided for patients with primary cutaneous melanoma (American Joint Committee on Cancer stages 0-IIC and pathologic stage III by virtue of a positive sentinel lymph node biopsy). Biopsy techniques for a lesion that is clinically suggestive of melanoma are reviewed, as are recommendations for the histopathologic interpretation of cutaneous melanoma. The use of laboratory, molecular, and imaging tests is examined in the initial work-up of patients with newly diagnosed melanoma and for follow-up of asymptomatic patients. With regard to treatment of primary cutaneous melanoma, recommendations for surgical margins and the concepts of staged excision (including Mohs micrographic surgery) and nonsurgical treatments for melanoma in situ, lentigo maligna type (including topical imiquimod and radiation therapy), are updated. The role of sentinel lymph node biopsy as a staging technique for cutaneous melanoma is described, with recommendations for its use in clinical practice. Finally, current data regarding pregnancy and melanoma, genetic testing for familial melanoma, and management of dermatologic toxicities related to novel targeted agents and immunotherapies for patients with advanced disease are summarized.

2 Guideline Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy and Management of Regional Lymph Nodes in Melanoma: American Society of Clinical Oncology and Society of Surgical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update. 2018

Wong, Sandra L / Faries, Mark B / Kennedy, Erin B / Agarwala, Sanjiv S / Akhurst, Timothy J / Ariyan, Charlotte / Balch, Charles M / Berman, Barry S / Cochran, Alistair / Delman, Keith A / Gorman, Mark / Kirkwood, John M / Moncrieff, Marc D / Zager, Jonathan S / Lyman, Gary H. ·Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH, USA. · The Angeles Clinic and Research Institute, Santa Monica, CA, USA. · American Society of Clinical Oncology, Alexandria, VA, USA. guidelines@asco.org. · St Luke's Cancer Center, Easton, PA, USA. · Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Broward Health, Fort Lauderdale, FL, USA. · Los Angeles Center for Health Services, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. · , Silver Spring, MD, USA. · University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norwich, UK. · H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, USA. · Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #29236202.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To update the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)-Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO) guideline for sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy in melanoma. METHODS: An ASCO-SSO panel was formed, and a systematic review of the literature was conducted regarding SLN biopsy and completion lymph node dissection (CLND) after a positive sentinel node in patients with melanoma. RESULTS: Nine new observational studies, two systematic reviews and an updated randomized controlled trial (RCT) of SLN biopsy, as well as two randomized controlled trials of CLND after positive SLN biopsy, were included. RECOMMENDATIONS: Routine SLN biopsy is not recommended for patients with thin melanomas that are T1a (non-ulcerated lesions < 0.8 mm in Breslow thickness). SLN biopsy may be considered for thin melanomas that are T1b (0.8 to 1.0 mm Breslow thickness or <0.8 mm Breslow thickness with ulceration) after a thorough discussion with the patient of the potential benefits and risk of harms associated with the procedure. SLN biopsy is recommended for patients with intermediate-thickness melanomas (T2 or T3; Breslow thickness of >1.0 to 4.0 mm). SLN biopsy may be recommended for patients with thick melanomas (T4; > 4.0 mm in Breslow thickness), after a discussion of the potential benefits and risks of harm. In the case of a positive SLN biopsy, CLND or careful observation are options for patients with low-risk micrometastatic disease, with due consideration of clinicopathological factors. For higher risk patients, careful observation may be considered only after a thorough discussion with patients about the potential risks and benefits of foregoing CLND. Important qualifying statements outlining relevant clinicopathological factors, and details of the reference patient populations are included within the guideline.

3 Guideline NCCN Guidelines Insights: Melanoma, Version 3.2016. 2016

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Algazi, Alain / Andtbacka, Robert / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / DiMaio, Dominick / Fields, Ryan C / Fleming, Martin D / Gastman, Brian / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Johnson, Douglas / Joseph, Richard W / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Materin, Miguel A / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ott, Patrick / Gupta, Aparna Priyanath / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April K / Skitzki, Joseph / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Torres-Roca, Javier F / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole / Engh, Anita. ·From Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine; The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute; University of Colorado Cancer Center; Aim at Melanoma; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital; Fox Chase Cancer Center; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; Duke Cancer Institute; Roswell Park Cancer Institute; Stanford Cancer Institute; Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; Moffitt Cancer Center; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; and National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #27496110.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma have been significantly revised over the past few years in response to emerging data on a number of novel agents and treatment regimens. These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize the data and rationale supporting extensive changes to the recommendations for systemic therapy in patients with metastatic or unresectable melanoma.

4 Guideline Screening for Skin Cancer: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. 2016

Anonymous2770876 / Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten / Grossman, David C / Curry, Susan J / Davidson, Karina W / Ebell, Mark / Epling, John W / García, Francisco A R / Gillman, Matthew W / Kemper, Alex R / Krist, Alex H / Kurth, Ann E / Landefeld, C Seth / Mangione, Carol M / Phillips, William R / Phipps, Maureen G / Pignone, Michael P / Siu, Albert L. ·University of California, San Francisco. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington. · University of Iowa, Iowa City. · Columbia University, New York, New York. · University of Georgia, Athens. · State University of New York Upstate Medical University, Syracuse. · Pima County Department of Health, Tucson, Arizona. · Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. · Duke University, Durham, North Carolina. · Fairfax Family Practice Residency, Fairfax, Virginia11Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. · Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut. · University of Alabama at Birmingham. · University of California, Los Angeles. · University of Washington, Seattle. · Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. · University of Texas at Austin. · Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York19James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Bronx, New York. ·JAMA · Pubmed #27458948.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: Basal and squamous cell carcinoma are the most common types of cancer in the United States and represent the vast majority of all cases of skin cancer; however, they rarely result in death or substantial morbidity, whereas melanoma skin cancer has notably higher mortality rates. In 2016, an estimated 76,400 US men and women will develop melanoma and 10,100 will die from the disease. OBJECTIVE: To update the 2009 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for skin cancer. EVIDENCE REVIEW: The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the effectiveness of screening for skin cancer with a clinical visual skin examination in reducing skin cancer morbidity and mortality and death from any cause; its potential harms, including any harms resulting from associated diagnostic follow-up; its test characteristics when performed by a primary care clinician vs a dermatologist; and whether its use leads to earlier detection of skin cancer compared with usual care. FINDINGS: Evidence to assess the net benefit of screening for skin cancer with a clinical visual skin examination is limited. Direct evidence on the effectiveness of screening in reducing melanoma morbidity and mortality is limited to a single fair-quality ecologic study with important methodological limitations. Information on harms is similarly sparse. The potential for harm clearly exists, including a high rate of unnecessary biopsies, possibly resulting in cosmetic or, more rarely, functional adverse effects, and the risk of overdiagnosis and overtreatment. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATION: The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of visual skin examination by a clinician to screen for skin cancer in adults (I statement).

5 Guideline Melanoma, version 4.2014. 2014

Coit, Daniel G / Thompson, John A / Andtbacka, Robert / Anker, Christopher J / Bichakjian, Christopher K / Carson, William E / Daniels, Gregory A / Daud, Adil / Dimaio, Dominick / Fleming, Martin D / Gonzalez, Rene / Guild, Valerie / Halpern, Allan C / Hodi, F Stephen / Kelley, Mark C / Khushalani, Nikhil I / Kudchadkar, Ragini R / Lange, Julie R / Martini, Mary C / Olszanski, Anthony J / Ross, Merrick I / Salama, April / Swetter, Susan M / Tanabe, Kenneth K / Trisal, Vijay / Urist, Marshall M / McMillian, Nicole R / Ho, Maria / Anonymous5170793. ·From 1Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center; 2Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance; 3Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah; 4University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center; 5The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute; 6UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center; 7UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center; 8Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center at The Nebraska Medical Center; 9St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center; 10University of Colorado Cancer Center; 11Aim at Melanoma; 12Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center; 13Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center; 14Roswell Park Cancer Institute; 15Moffitt Cancer Center; 16The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins; 17Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University; 18Fox Chase Cancer Center; 19The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; 20Duke Cancer Institute; 21Stanford Cancer Institute; 22Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center; 23City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center; 24University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center; and 25National Comprehensive Cancer Network. ·J Natl Compr Canc Netw · Pubmed #24812131.

ABSTRACT: The NCCN Guidelines for Melanoma provide multidisciplinary recommendations for the management of patients with melanoma. These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight notable recent updates. Dabrafenib and trametinib, either as monotherapy (category 1) or combination therapy, have been added as systemic options for patients with unresectable metastatic melanoma harboring BRAF V600 mutations. Controversy continues regarding the value of adjuvant radiation for patients at high risk of nodal relapse. This is reflected in the category 2B designation to consider adjuvant radiation following lymphadenectomy for stage III melanoma with clinically positive nodes or recurrent disease.

6 Guideline Data set for pathology reporting of cutaneous invasive melanoma: recommendations from the international collaboration on cancer reporting (ICCR). 2013

Scolyer, Richard A / Judge, Meagan J / Evans, Alan / Frishberg, David P / Prieto, Victor G / Thompson, John F / Trotter, Martin J / Walsh, Maureen Y / Walsh, Noreen M G / Ellis, David W / Anonymous3190770. ·*Melanoma Institute Australia Disciplines of †Pathology **Surgery, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney Departments of ‡Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology ††Melanoma and Surgical Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital §Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia, Sydney, NSW ¶¶Royal Adelaide Hospital and Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia ∥Department of Pathology, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, Dundee, Scotland ¶Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA #Departments of Pathology and Dermatology, University of Texas-MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX ‡‡Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB ∥∥Department of Pathology, Capital District Health Authority and Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada §§Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, UK. ·Am J Surg Pathol · Pubmed #24061524.

ABSTRACT: An accurate and complete pathology report is critical for the optimal management of cutaneous melanoma patients. Protocols for the pathologic reporting of melanoma have been independently developed by the Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia (RCPA), Royal College of Pathologists (United Kingdom) (RCPath), and College of American Pathologists (CAP). In this study, data sets, checklists, and structured reporting protocols for pathologic examination and reporting of cutaneous melanoma were analyzed by an international panel of melanoma pathologists and clinicians with the aim of developing a common, internationally agreed upon, evidence-based data set. The International Collaboration on Cancer Reporting cutaneous melanoma expert review panel analyzed the existing RCPA, RCPath, and CAP data sets to develop a protocol containing "required" (mandatory/core) and "recommended" (nonmandatory/noncore) elements. Required elements were defined as those that had agreed evidentiary support at National Health and Medical Research Council level III-2 level of evidence or above and that were unanimously agreed upon by the review panel to be essential for the clinical management, staging, or assessment of the prognosis of melanoma or fundamental for pathologic diagnosis. Recommended elements were those considered to be clinically important and recommended for good practice but with lesser degrees of supportive evidence. Sixteen core/required data elements for cutaneous melanoma pathology reports were defined (with an additional 4 core/required elements for specimens received with lymph nodes). Eighteen additional data elements with a lesser level of evidentiary support were included in the recommended data set. Consensus response values (permitted responses) were formulated for each data item. Development and agreement of this evidence-based protocol at an international level was accomplished in a timely and efficient manner, and the processes described herein may facilitate the development of protocols for other tumor types. Widespread utilization of an internationally agreed upon, structured pathology data set for melanoma will lead not only to improved patient management but is a prerequisite for research and for international benchmarking in health care.

7 Editorial Melanoma Staging: American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) 8th Edition and Beyond. 2018

Gershenwald, Jeffrey E / Scolyer, Richard A. ·Departments of Surgical Oncology and Cancer Biology, Unit 1484, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. jgershen@mdanderson.org. · Melanoma and Skin Center, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. jgershen@mdanderson.org. · Melanoma Institute Australia, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Department of Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, NSW, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #29850954.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial SPECT/CT: Looking Beyond Sentinel Lymph Node Identification for Improving Patient Outcomes. 2018

Sibley, Robert / Subramaniam, Rathan M. ·Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA. · Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA. rathan.subramaniam@UTsouthwestern.edu. · Harold Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Texax Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA. rathan.subramaniam@UTsouthwestern.edu. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #29218428.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Immunotherapy resistance: the answers lie ahead - not in front - of us. 2017

Andrews, Miles C / Wargo, Jennifer A. ·Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1400 Pressler Street, Unit Number 1484, Houston, TX 77030 USA. · Department of Genomic Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1400 Pressler Street, Unit Number 1484, Houston, TX 77030 USA. ·J Immunother Cancer · Pubmed #28239464.

ABSTRACT: Mechanisms of innate and adaptive resistance to checkpoint blockade immunotherapy are under intense investigation with a view to broadening the therapeutic potential of this form of treatment. In a recent manuscript by Zaretsky and colleagues, mutational events were identified that effectively crippled ongoing immunotherapy responses in patients treated with anti-PD-1 therapy. These results are discussed in the light of other recent and ongoing research efforts exploring both mutational and non-mutational resistance mechanisms, highlighting the critical translational importance of longitudinal tumor sampling.

10 Editorial Optimizing Follow-up Assessment of Patients with Cutaneous Melanoma. 2017

Bhutiani, Neal / Egger, Michael E / McMasters, Kelly M. ·Division of Surgical Oncology, The Hiram C. Polk, Jr., MD Department of Surgery, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY, USA. · Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Division of Surgical Oncology, The Hiram C. Polk, Jr., MD Department of Surgery, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY, USA. mcmasters@louisville.edu. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #28120134.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial What is the OPTiMal Way to Manage In-Transit Disease? 2016

Olino, Kelly / Tyler, Douglas S. ·Department of Surgery, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA. · Department of Surgery, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA. dstyler@utmb.edu. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #27380046.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial Stemming the Rising Incidence of Melanoma: Calling Prevention to Action. 2016

Gershenwald, Jeffrey E / Guy, Gery P. ·Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia jgershen@mdanderson.org. ·J Natl Cancer Inst · Pubmed #26563358.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Excision Margins of Melanoma Make a Difference: New Data Support an Old Paradigm. 2016

Ross, Merrick I / Balch, Charles M. ·Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA. charles.balch@UTSouthwestern.edu. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #26561402.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Counterpoint: The "dysplastic" nevus: What I do and do not believe. 2015

Cockerell, Clay J. ·Department of Dermatology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and Cockerell Dermatopathology, Dallas, Texas. Electronic address: ccockerell@dermpath.com. ·J Am Acad Dermatol · Pubmed #26282799.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Editorial Uncertainties in the management of melanoma nodal metastasis. 2015

Zoras, O / Lasithiotakis, K / Balch, C M. ·Department of Surgical Oncology, University Hospital of Crete, Voutes, 71100, Greece. Electronic address: ozoras@med.uoc.gr. · Department of General Surgery, York Teaching Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, The York Hospital Wigginton Road, York, North Yorkshire, YO31 8HE, UK. Electronic address: kwstaslasith@yahoo.gr. · Division of Surgical Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd., Mail Code 8548, Dallas, TX, 75390-8548, USA. Electronic address: charles.balch@utsouthwestern.edu. ·Eur J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #25980747.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Editorial Decreased Survival Rates of Older-Aged Patients with Melanoma: Biological Differences or Undertreatment? 2015

Balch, Charles M. ·University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA, Charles.balch@utsouthwestern.edu. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #25840561.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Editorial Counterphobia and poor sun protection practices in first-degree relatives of melanoma patients. 2014

Klimas, Natasha K / Turrentine, Jake E / Cayce, Rachael L. ·University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX 75390, USA. rachael.cayce@utsouthwestern.edu. ·Cutis · Pubmed #24738091.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Editorial Clinical value of the sentinel-node biopsy in primary cutaneous melanoma. 2014

Balch, Charles M / Gershenwald, Jeffrey E. ·From the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas (C.M.B.) · and the Department of Surgical Oncology, Melanoma and Skin Center, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston (J.E.G.). ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #24521113.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Editorial Controlling melanoma at local and systemic levels: is a combination of ablative therapy and immunotherapy the way forward? 2014

Almeida, Joao Paulo Mattos / Drezek, Rebekah A / Foster, Aaron E. ·Department of Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, TX, USA. ·Immunotherapy · Pubmed #24491082.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Editorial Bortezomib: a therapeutic resource for the veterinary oncologist? 2013

Reisman, Scott A. ·Reata Pharmaceuticals, 2801 Gateway Dr. Ste 150, Irving, TX 75063, USA. Electronic address: scott.reisman@reatapharma.com. ·Vet J · Pubmed #24210275.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Review Identification of risk in cutaneous melanoma patients: Prognostic and predictive markers. 2019

Hyams, David M / Cook, Robert W / Buzaid, Antonio C. ·Desert Surgical Oncology, Eisenhower Medical Center, Rancho Mirage, California. · R&D and Medical Affairs, Castle Biosciences, Inc, Friendswood, Texas. · Oncology Center, Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, Brazil. · Centro Oncológico Antonio Ermírio de Moraes, Beneficência Portuguesa de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #30548543.

ABSTRACT: New therapeutic modalities for melanoma promise benefit in selected individuals. Efficacy appears greater in patients with lower tumor burden, suggesting an important role for risk-stratified surveillance. Robust predictive markers might permit optimization of agent to patient, while low-risk prognostic markers might guide more conservative management. This review evaluates protein, gene, and multiplexed marker panels that may contribute to better risk assessment and improved management of patients with cutaneous melanoma.

22 Review Update on eighth edition American Joint Committee on Cancer classification for cutaneous melanoma and overview of potential pitfalls in histological examination of staging parameters. 2019

Trinidad, Celestine M / Torres-Cabala, Carlos A / Curry, Jonathan L / Prieto, Victor G / Aung, Phyu P. ·Dermatopathology Section, Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Dermatopathology Section, Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA paung@mdanderson.org vprieto@mdanderson.org. ·J Clin Pathol · Pubmed #30275100.

ABSTRACT: Cutaneous melanoma causes most of the skin cancer deaths in the USA. Melanoma is the fifth most common cancer among men and the sixth most common cancer among women. The incidence of melanoma has risen sharply over the past three decades. In this review, which is informed by our extensive experience at a large cancer centre, we outline the key differences between the tumour, node and metastases staging criteria for cutaneous melanoma in the seventh and eighth editions of the

23 Review Detection and Treatment of Primary Prostatic Melanoma. 2019

Li, Roger / Zhang, Miao / Duplisea, Jonathan J / Troncoso, Patricia / Ward, John F. ·Department of Urology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. Electronic address: rl8402@gmail.com. · Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. · Department of Urology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. · Department of Urology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. Electronic address: jfward@mdanderson.org. ·Urology · Pubmed #30195014.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To describe a case of primary melanoma of the prostate gland, then review the published literature of similar cases. METHODS: Presentation of the clinical course of a 42-year-old man diagnosed with primary melanoma of the prostate after presenting with gross hematuria. Review of published literature. RESULTS: Primary melanoma of the genitourinary tract is a very rare disease, representing less than 1% of all melanomas in men. Only 6 cases of primary melanomas have been previously reported in the English literature. CONCLUSION: The current report emphasizes the importance of a multidisciplinary approach and adherence to treatment principles in cutaneous melanoma. With complete surgical extirpation (including extended pelvic lymphadenectomy as needed), close surveillance using 18F-FDG PET/CT, and aggressive systemic treatment in patients with good performance status, cure can be achieved.

24 Review Hypercalcemia and cancer: Differential diagnosis and treatment. 2018

Zagzag, Jonathan / Hu, Mimi I / Fisher, Sarah B / Perrier, Nancy D. ·Fellow, Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. · Associate Professor, Department of Endocrine Neoplasia and Hormonal Disorders, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. · Professor, Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. ·CA Cancer J Clin · Pubmed #30240520.

ABSTRACT: Incidentally detected hypercalcemia usually presents in an indolent manner and is most likely caused by primary hyperparathyroidism. In contrast, hypercalcemia in the patient with a history of cancer presents in a wide range of clinical settings and may be severe enough to warrant hospitalization. This form of hypercalcemia is usually secondary to hypercalcemia of malignancy and can be fatal. Hypercalcemia of malignancy is most commonly mediated by tumoral production of parathyroid hormone-related protein or by cytokines activating osteoclast degradation of bone. The initial workup, differential diagnoses, confirmatory laboratory testing, imaging, and medical and surgical management of hypercalcemia are described in the patient with cancer.

25 Review New Era in the Management of Melanoma Brain Metastases. 2018

Tawbi, Hussein A / Boutros, Celine / Kok, David / Robert, Caroline / McArthur, Grant. ·From The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; Institut Gustave Roussy, Paris, France; Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia. ·Am Soc Clin Oncol Educ Book · Pubmed #30231345.

ABSTRACT: The remarkable advances in the systemic therapy of metastatic melanoma have now extended the 1-year overall survival rate from 25% to nearing 85%. Systemic treatment in the form of BRAF-targeted therapy and immunotherapy is slowly but surely proving its efficacy in the treatment of metatstatic brain metastases (MBM). Single-agent BRAF inhibitors provide an intracranial response rate of 25% to 40%, whereas the combination of BRAFi/MEKi leads to responses in up to 58%. However, the durability of responses induced by BRAFi/MEKi seems to be even shorter than in extracranial disease. On the other hand, single-agent ipilimumab provides comparable clinical benefit in MBMs as it does in extracranial metastases. Single-agent PD-1 anitbodies induce response rates of approximately 20%, and those responses appear durable. Similarly the combination of CTLA-4+ PD-1 antibodies induces durable responses at an impressive rate of 55% and is safe to administer. Although the local treatment approaches with radiation and surgery remain important and are critically needed in the management of MBM, systemic therapy offers a new dimension that can augment the impact of those therapies and come at a potentially lower cost of neurocognitive impairment. Considerations for combining those modalities are direly needed, in addition to considering novel systemic combinations that target mechanisms specific to MBM. In this report, we will discuss the underlying biology of melanoma brain metastases, the clinical outcomes from recent clinical trials of targeted and immunotherapy, and their impact on clinical practice in the context of existing local therapeutic modalities.

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