Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Melanoma: HELP
Articles from Brussels
Based on 254 articles published since 2010
||||

These are the 254 published articles about Melanoma that originated from Brussels during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11
1 Guideline French updated recommendations in Stage I to III melanoma treatment and management. 2017

Guillot, B / Dalac, S / Denis, M G / Dupuy, A / Emile, J F / De La Fouchardiere, A / Hindie, E / Jouary, T / Lassau, N / Mirabel, X / Piperno Neumann, S / De Raucourt, S / Vanwijck, R. ·Dermatology Department, CHU Montpellier. · Dermatology Department, CHU Dijon. · Laboratory of Biochemistry, CHU Nantes. · Dermatology Department, CHU Rennes. · Laboratory of Pathology, AP-HP Ambroise Paré Hospital, Boulogne, France. · Laboratory of Pathology, Centre Léon Bérard Lyon. · Department of Nuclear medicine, CHU Bordeaux. · Dermatology Department, CH Pau. · Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave Roussy Villejuif. · Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Oscar Lambret Lille. · Institut Curie, Paris, France. · 1 Avenue du 6 Juin, 1945, 14000 Caen, France. · Louvain Catholic University, Brussels, Belgium. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #28120528.

ABSTRACT: As knowledge continues to develop, regular updates are necessary concerning recommendations for practice. The recommendations for the management of melanoma stages I to III were drawn up in 2005. At the request of the Société Française de Dermatologie, they have now been updated using the methodology for recommendations proposed by the Haute Autorité de Santé in France. In practice, the principal recommendations are as follows: for staging, it is recommended that the 7th edition of AJCC be used. The maximum excision margins have been reduced to 2 cm. Regarding adjuvant therapy, the place of interferon has been reduced and no validated emerging medication has yet been identified. Radiotherapy may be considered for patients in Stage III at high risk of relapse. The sentinel lymph node technique remains an option. Initial examination includes routine ultrasound as of Stage II, with other examinations being optional in stages IIC and III. A shorter strict follow-up period (3 years) is recommended for patients, but with greater emphasis on imaging.

2 Guideline [Update to the recommendations for management of melanoma stages I to III]. 2016

Guillot, B / Dalac, S / Denis, M G / Dupuy, A / Emile, J-F / De La Fouchardière, A / Hindie, E / Jouary, T / Lassau, N / Mirabel, X / Piperno Neumann, S / De Raucourt, S / Vanwijck, R. ·Département de dermatologie, hôpital Saint-Éloi, CHU de Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier cedex 5, France. Electronic address: b-guillot@chu-montpellier.fr. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital du Bocage sud, CHU de Dijon, BP 1542, 21079 Dijon cedex, France. · Laboratoire de biochimie, institut de biologie, 9, quai Moncousu, 44093 Nantes cedex, France. · Service de dermatologie, CHU de Rennes, Rennes, France. · Service d'anatomie pathologique, CHU Ambroise-Paré-Boulogne, 92104 Boulogne cedex, France. · Centre anticancéreux Léon-Bérard, 28, rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon, France. · Service de médecine nucléire Sud et Pellegrin, CHU de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. · Service de médecine, centre hospitalier de Pau, 64000 Pau, France. · Service d'imagerie médicale, institut Gustave-Roussy, 94800 Villejuif, France. · Centre Oscar-Lambret, 3, rue Fréderic-Combemale, 59000 Lille, France. · Institut Curie, 26, rue d'Ulm, 75005 Paris, France. · 1, avenue du 6-Juin, 14000 Caen, France. · Université catholique de Louvain, 10, avenue Hippocrate, 1200 Bruxelles, Belgique. ·Ann Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #27527567.

ABSTRACT: As knowledge continues to develop, regular updates are necessary concerning recommendations for practice. The recommendations for the management of melanoma stages I to III were drawn up in 2005. At the request of the Société Française de Dermatologie, they have now been updated using the methodology for recommendations proposed by the Haute Autorité de Santé. In practice, the principal recommendations are as follows: for staging, it is recommended that the 7th edition of AJCC be used. The maximum excision margins have been reduced to 2cm. Regarding adjuvant therapy, the place of interferon has been reduced and no validated emerging medication has yet been identified. Radiotherapy may be considered for patients in stage III at high risk of relapse. The sentinel lymph node technique remains an option. Initial examination includes routine ultrasound as of stage II, with other examinations being optional in stages IIC and III. A shorter strict follow-up period (3years) is recommended for patients, but with greater emphasis on imaging.

3 Guideline [Guidelines for stage I to III melanoma]. 2016

Guillot, Bernard / Dalac, Sophie / Denis, Marc / Dupuy, Alain / Emile, Jean François / De La Fouchardiere, Arnaud / Hindie, Elif / Jouary, Thomas / Lassau, Nathalie / Mirabel, Xavier / Piperno Neumann, Sophie / De Raucourt, Sixtine / Vanwijck, Romain. ·Département de dermatologie, hôpital Saint-Eloi, CHU de Montpellier, 34295 Montpellier cedex 5, France. Electronic address: b-guillot@chu-montpellier.fr. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital du Bocage sud, CHU de Dijon, BP 1542, 21079 Dijon cedex, France. · Laboratoire de biochimie, institut de biologie, 9, quai Moncousu, 44093 Nantes cedex, France. · Service de dermatologie, CHU de Rennes, Rennes, France. · Service d'anatomie pathologique, CHU Ambroise-Paré Boulogne, 92104 Boulogne cedex, France. · Centre anticancéreux Léon-Bérard, 28, rue Laennec, 69008 Lyon, France. · Service de médecine nucléire sud et pellegrin, CHU de Bordeaux, Bordeaux, France. · Service de médecine, CH de Pau, 64000 Pau, France. · Service d'imagerie médicale, institut Gustave-Roussy, 94800 Villejuif, France. · Centre Oscar-Lambret, 3, rue Fréderic-Combemale, 59000 Lille, France. · Institut Curie, 26, rue d'Ulm, 75005 Paris, France. · Sixtine, 1, avenue du 6 juin, 14000 Caen, France. · Université catholique de Louvain, avenue Hippocrate, 10 B-1200 Bruxelles, Belgique. ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #27456259.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Sunbed use in Europe: Time for information. 2019

Del Marmol, V / Stratigos, A / Calzavara-Pinton, P / Augustin, M. ·Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Erasme, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. · First Department of Dermatology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, School of Medicine, Andreas Sygros Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Dermatology Department, University of Brescia, ASST Spedali Civili di Brescia, Brescia, Italy. · Institute for Health Services Research in Dermatology and Nursing (IVDP), University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE), Hamburg, Germany. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #30811687.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial The Euromelanoma campaign. 2016

Del Marmol, V. ·Department dermatology, Hôpital Erasme-Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium. Electronic address: Veronique.Del.Marmol@erasme.ulb.ac.be. ·Actas Dermosifiliogr · Pubmed #27143599.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Groundwork for the prevention of melanoma in Europe. 2015

del Marmol, V / Ortonne, J-P. ·Department of Dermatology, Hôpital Erasme-Université Libre de Bruxelles, Bruxelles, Belgium. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #25639924.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Review Wnt Signaling Pathways in Keratinocyte Carcinomas. 2019

Lang, Christopher M R / Chan, Chim Kei / Veltri, Anthony / Lien, Wen-Hui. ·de Duve Institute, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels 1200, Belgium. · de Duve Institute, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels 1200, Belgium. wen-hui.lien@uclouvain.be. ·Cancers (Basel) · Pubmed #31438551.

ABSTRACT: The skin functions as a barrier between the organism and the surrounding environment. Direct exposure to external stimuli and the accumulation of genetic mutations may lead to abnormal cell growth, irreversible tissue damage and potentially favor skin malignancy. Skin homeostasis is coordinated by an intricate signaling network, and its dysregulation has been implicated in the development of skin cancers. Wnt signaling is one such regulatory pathway orchestrating skin development, homeostasis, and stem cell activation. Aberrant regulation of Wnt signaling cascades not only gives rise to tumor initiation, progression and invasion, but also maintains cancer stem cells which contribute to tumor recurrence. In this review, we summarize recent studies highlighting functional evidence of Wnt-related oncology in keratinocyte carcinomas, as well as discussing preclinical and clinical approaches that target oncogenic Wnt signaling to treat cancers. Our review provides valuable insight into the significance of Wnt signaling for future interventions against keratinocyte carcinomas.

8 Review Role of Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) in Melanoma. 2019

Soumoy, Laura / Kindt, Nadège / Ghanem, Ghanem / Saussez, Sven / Journe, Fabrice. ·Department of Human Anatomy and Experimental Oncology, Université de Mons (UMons), Research Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, 7000 Mons, Belgium. laura.soumoy@umons.ac.be. · Department of Human Anatomy and Experimental Oncology, Université de Mons (UMons), Research Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, 7000 Mons, Belgium. nadege.kindt@umons.ac.be. · Laboratory of Oncology and Experimental Surgery, Institut Jules Bordet, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), 1000 Brussels, Belgium. gghanem@ulb.ac.be. · Department of Human Anatomy and Experimental Oncology, Université de Mons (UMons), Research Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, 7000 Mons, Belgium. sven.saussez@umons.ac.be. · Department of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), CHU Saint-Pierre, 1000 Brussels, Belgium. sven.saussez@umons.ac.be. · Department of Human Anatomy and Experimental Oncology, Université de Mons (UMons), Research Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, 7000 Mons, Belgium. fabrice.journe@umons.ac.be. · Laboratory of Oncology and Experimental Surgery, Institut Jules Bordet, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), 1000 Brussels, Belgium. fabrice.journe@umons.ac.be. ·Cancers (Basel) · Pubmed #31013837.

ABSTRACT: Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an inflammatory cytokine involved in the carcinogenesis of many cancer types. Here, we review the published experimental and clinical data for MIF and its involvement in melanoma. All reported data show that MIF is overexpressed in melanoma cells, especially in case of metastatic disease. Clinical studies also indicate that high MIF expression is positively associated with aggressiveness of the disease. Some data also highlight the implication of MIF in angiogenesis, immunity and metastasis in melanoma cell lines, as well as the availability of different therapeutic options targeting MIF for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Indeed, the main problem in metastatic melanoma is the lack of long-term effective treatment. This is linked to the capacity of melanoma cells to mutate very quickly and/or activate alternative signaling pathways. Thus, MIF targeting therapies could provide a new effective way of treating melanoma. Moreover, cell sensitivity to MIF depletion does not correlate with the BRAF mutational status. Regarding the fact that many melanoma patients carry a BRAF mutation, and that they develop resistance to BRAF inhibitors, this observation is very interesting as MIF inhibitors could be used to treat many patients in relapse after treatment with an inhibitor of the mutant BRAF protein.

9 Review Programmed Cell Death-1 Inhibitor-Induced Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus. 2018

Clotman, Katrien / Janssens, Katleen / Specenier, Pol / Weets, Ilse / De Block, Christophe E M. ·Department of Endocrinology, Diabetology & Metabolism, Antwerp University Hospital, Edegem, Belgium. · Department of Endocrinology-Nephrology, Algemeen Ziekenhuis Klina Hospital, Brasschaat, Belgium. · Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp, Belgium. · Department of Oncology, Antwerp University Hospital, Edegem, Belgium. · Diabetes Research Center, Brussels Free University, Brussels, Belgium. ·J Clin Endocrinol Metab · Pubmed #29955867.

ABSTRACT: Context: Pembrolizumab (Keytruda; Merck Sharp & Dohme) is a humanized IgG4 monoclonal antibody used in cancer immunotherapy. It targets the programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) receptor, which is important in maintaining self-tolerance. However, immune checkpoint blockade is associated with a risk for immune-related adverse events (irAEs) potentially affecting the endocrine organs. Type 1 diabetes mellitus is a rare irAE of PD-1 inhibitors, occurring in 0.2% of cases. Evidence Acquisition: Systematic search of four databases (MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library) using the search terms "diabetes" or "ketoacidosis" and "pembrolizumab," "nivolumab," "PD-1 inhibitor," or "immunotherapy." Included were articles published in English between 1 January 2012 and 1 January 2018. The search was supplemented by bibliographic searches of the complete reference lists of all included papers. Evidence Synthesis: We provide an overview of all published cases (n = 42) of PD-1 inhibitor-induced type 1 diabetes mellitus to date, including a well-characterized case of islet cell antibody and glutamic acid decarboxylase antibody-positive diabetes mellitus, in a patient with a diabetes-prone HLA genotype. She presented with diabetic ketoacidosis during pembrolizumab therapy for a metastatic uveal melanoma. Furthermore, we discuss potential pathogenic mechanisms, clinical presentation, prognostic markers (β-cell antibodies and HLA type), treatment, and a screening protocol. Conclusions: Because the use of immunotherapy will increase, it is essential that all clinicians are aware of diabetic ketoacidosis as a rare and life-threatening side effect of immunotherapy. Blood glucose monitoring during anti-PD-1 therapy is necessary.

10 Review Dose-response in choroidal melanoma. 2018

De Caluwé, Alex / Termote, Karolien / Van Gestel, Dirk / Van Limbergen, Erik. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet - Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels, Belgium. Electronic address: alex.decaluwe@bordet.be. · Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital of Brussels (UZ Brussel), Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet - Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Leuven (UZ Leuven), Leuven, Belgium. ·Radiother Oncol · Pubmed #29680322.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: In choroidal melanoma the radiation threshold dose for local control remains largely unknown. The present study examined a group of patients that received a wide range of minimum tumor dose in order to investigate a dose-response relationship. A literature review is performed to compare our results with available evidence in brachytherapy and charged particle external beam radiotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted on all choroidal melanomas treated with Strontium-90 (Sr-90) at the University Hospital of Leuven between 1983 and 2012. Local failure was defined as primary endpoint and was estimated according to the competing risk method. RESULTS: In 135 patients, the minimum tumor dose (Dmin) ranged from 0 Gy to 287 Gy (median: 27.6 Gy). Multivariable analysis revealed Dmin ≥ 65 Gy (p = 0.04; HR = 0.09) and tumor distant from the optic disc (p < 0.001, HR = 0.09) to be independent variables favoring local control. The scleral dose, the tumor diameter and tumor height did not significantly affect local failure in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSION: This is the first study to examine a group of patients treated with a Dmin ranging from 0 Gy to >250 Gy. Treatment with a Dmin of 65 Gy is necessary to achieve durable tumor response. The dose-response data provided by our study could be used for the design of future trials examining the ideal dose for the treatment of choroidal melanoma with brachytherapy or charged particle external beam radiotherapy.

11 Review ECCO essential requirements for quality cancer care: Melanoma. 2018

Wouters, Michel W / Michielin, Olivier / Bastiaannet, Esther / Beishon, Marc / Catalano, Orlando / Del Marmol, Veronique / Delgado-Bolton, Roberto / Dendale, Rémi / Trill, Maria Die / Ferrari, Andrea / Forsea, Ana-Maria / Kreckel, Hannelore / Lövey, József / Luyten, Gre / Massi, Daniela / Mohr, Peter / Oberst, Simon / Pereira, Philippe / Prata, João Paulo Paiva / Rutkowski, Piotr / Saarto, Tiina / Sheth, Sapna / Spurrier-Bernard, Gilly / Vuoristo, Meri-Sisko / Costa, Alberto / Naredi, Peter. ·European Society of Surgical Oncology (ESSO); Department of Surgery, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO); Department of Oncology, CHUV, University Hospital of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland. · International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG); Department of Surgery/Department of Medical Oncology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. · European School of Oncology (ESO), Milan, Italy. · European Society of Radiology (ESR); Department of Radiology, National Cancer Institute Fondazione Pascale, Naples, Italy. · Association of European Cancer Leagues (ECL); Euromelanoma, European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology (EADV); Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Erasme Hospital, ULB, Brussels, Belgium. · European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM); Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Radiology) and Nuclear Medicine, San Pedro Hospital and Centre for Biomedical Research of La Rioja (CIBIR), University of La Rioja, Logroño, La Rioja, Spain. · European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO); Radiation Oncology Department, Institut Curie, Paris, France. · International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS); ATRIUM: Psycho-Oncology & Clinical Psychology, Madrid, Spain. · European Society for Paediatric Oncology (SIOPE); Pediatric Oncology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy. · European Association of Dermato Oncology (EADO); Dermatology Department, Elias University Hospital, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania. · European Society of Oncology Pharmacy (ESOP); Pharmacy Department, University Hospital Giessen and Marburg, Giessen, Germany. · Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI); National Institute of Oncology, Budapest, Hungary. · Ocular Oncology Group (OOG); Department of Ophthalmology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · European Society of Pathology (ESP); Division of Pathological Anatomy, Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy. · European Society of Skin Cancer Prevention (EUROSKIN); Elbe-Klinikum Buxtehude, Buxtehude, Germany. · Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI); Cambridge Cancer Centre, Cambridge, UK. · Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiological Society of Europe (CIRSE); Clinic for Radiology, Minimally-Invasive Therapies and Nuclear Medicine, SLK-Clinics Heilbronn, Karl-Ruprecht-University of Heidelberg, Heilbronn, Germany. · European Oncology Nursing Society (EONS); Instituto Português de Oncologia de Lisboa Francisco Gentil, Lisbon, Portugal. · European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC); Maria Sklodowska-Curie Institute - Oncology Center, Warsaw, Poland. · European Association for Palliative Care (EAPC); Comprehensive Cancer Center, Department of Palliative Care, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. · European CanCer Organisation, Brussels, Belgium. · European CanCer Organisation (ECCO) Patient Advisory Committee; Melanoma Patient Network Europe; Paris, France. · Association of European Cancer Leagues (ECL); Pirkanmaa Cancer Society, Tampere, Finland. · European CanCer Organisation (ECCO); Department of Surgery, Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: peter.naredi@gu.se. ·Crit Rev Oncol Hematol · Pubmed #29458785.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: ECCO essential requirements for quality cancer care (ERQCC) are explanations and descriptions of challenges, organisation and actions that are necessary to give high-quality care to patients who have a specific type of cancer. They are written by European experts representing all disciplines involved in cancer care. ERQCC papers give oncology teams, patients, policymakers and managers an overview of the elements needed in any healthcare system to provide high quality of care throughout the patient journey. References are made to clinical guidelines and other resources where appropriate, and the focus is on care in Europe. MELANOMA: ESSENTIAL REQUIREMENTS FOR QUALITY CARE: CONCLUSION: Taken together, the information presented in this paper provides a comprehensive description of the essential requirements for establishing a high-quality service for melanoma. The ERQCC expert group is aware that it is not possible to propose a 'one size fits all' system for all countries, but urges that access to multidisciplinary teams and specialised treatments is guaranteed to all patients with melanoma.

12 Review Relapse-Free Survival as a Surrogate for Overall Survival in the Evaluation of Stage II-III Melanoma Adjuvant Therapy. 2018

Suciu, Stefan / Eggermont, Alexander M M / Lorigan, Paul / Kirkwood, John M / Markovic, Svetomir N / Garbe, Claus / Cameron, David / Kotapati, Srividya / Chen, Tai-Tsang / Wheatley, Keith / Ives, Natalie / de Schaetzen, Gaetan / Efendi, Achmad / Buyse, Marc. ·European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Headquarters, Brussels, Belgium; Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus Grand Paris, Villejuif, France; The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK; University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA; Mayo Clinic Rochester, Rochester, MN; University of Tubingen, Tubingen, Germany; University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh, UK; Bristol-Myers Squibb, Wallingford, CT; Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK; Birmingham Clinical Trials Unit, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK; Universitas Brawijaya, Malang, Indonesia; IDDI, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium. ·J Natl Cancer Inst · Pubmed #28922786.

ABSTRACT: Background: We assessed whether relapse-free survival (RFS; time until recurrence/death) is a valid surrogate for overall survival (OS) among resected stage II-III melanoma patients through a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Methods: Individual patient data (IPD) on RFS and OS were collected from 5826 patients enrolled in 11 randomized adjuvant trials comparing interferon (IFN) to observation. In addition, IPD from two studies comparing IFN and vaccination in 989 patients were included. A two-level modeling approach was used for assessing Spearman's patient-level correlation (rho) of RFS and OS and the trial-level coefficient of determination (R²) of the treatment effects on RFS and on OS. The results were validated externally in 13 adjuvant studies without available IPD. We then tested the results on the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) 18071 double-blind trial comparing ipilimumab 10 mg/kg with placebo, which showed a statistically significant impact of the checkpoint inhibitor on RFS and OS. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: With a median follow-up of seven years, 12 of 13 trials showed a consistency between the IFN vs No IFN differences regarding RFS (hazard ratio [HR]RFS = 0.88) and OS (HROS = 0.91), but the small trial, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 2696, was an outlier (HRRFS = 0.72 vs HROS = 1.11). Therefore, even if rho was high, R² was low and could not reliably be estimated. Based on the 12 trials, rho remained high (0.89), and the hazard ratios for RFS and OS were strongly correlated (R² = 0.91). The surrogate threshold effect for RFS was estimated to be 0.77. For the EORTC 18071 trial, the hazard ratio for RFS was 0.75, predicting an effect of ipilimumab on OS. This was subsequently confirmed (HROS = 0.72, 95.1% confidence interval = 0.58 to 0.88, P = .001). Conclusions: In high-risk stage II-III melanoma, RFS appeared to be a valid surrogate end point for OS for adjuvant randomized studies assessing interferon or a checkpoint inhibitor. In future similar adjuvant studies, a hazard ratio for RFS of 0.77 or less would predict a treatment impact on OS.

13 Review New Drug Combination Strategies in Melanoma: Current Status and Future Directions. 2017

Najem, Ahmad / Krayem, Mohammad / Perdrix, Anne / Kerger, Joseph / Awada, Ahmad / Journe, Fabrice / Ghanem, Ghanem. ·Laboratory of Oncology and Experimental Surgery Institute Jules Bordet, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Biopathology and INSERM U1245, Centre Henri Becquerel, Rouen, France. · Department of Medical Oncology, Institute Jules Bordet, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. · Department of human anatomy and experimental oncology, University de Mons, Mons, Belgium. · Laboratory of Oncology and Experimental Surgery Institute Jules Bordet, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium gghanem@ulb.ac.be. ·Anticancer Res · Pubmed #29061773.

ABSTRACT: Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and one of the most difficult cancers to treat. Overall, melanomas have more mutations than any other cancer type. Oncogenic mutations in c-KIT, NRAS and BRAF components of the MAPK pathway have been identified in nearly 90% of cutaneous melanoma and this information has been used to develop small molecules that inhibit their activity. Highly selective BRAF and MEK inhibitors have demonstrated impressive clinical results. However, the short duration of response, the acquired resistance in most cases and the toxicity issues support the rationale for drug combination approaches to improve the outcome of MAPK inhibitors, increase their efficacy, prevent and/or overcome resistance. This review discusses several promising rational combinatorial strategies investigated or could be investigated in clinical studies.

14 Review Assessing Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes in Solid Tumors: A Practical Review for Pathologists and Proposal for a Standardized Method from the International Immuno-Oncology Biomarkers Working Group: Part 2: TILs in Melanoma, Gastrointestinal Tract Carcinomas, Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma and Mesothelioma, Endometrial and Ovarian Carcinomas, Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck, Genitourinary Carcinomas, and Primary Brain Tumors. 2017

Hendry, Shona / Salgado, Roberto / Gevaert, Thomas / Russell, Prudence A / John, Tom / Thapa, Bibhusal / Christie, Michael / van de Vijver, Koen / Estrada, M V / Gonzalez-Ericsson, Paula I / Sanders, Melinda / Solomon, Benjamin / Solinas, Cinzia / Van den Eynden, Gert G G M / Allory, Yves / Preusser, Matthias / Hainfellner, Johannes / Pruneri, Giancarlo / Vingiani, Andrea / Demaria, Sandra / Symmans, Fraser / Nuciforo, Paolo / Comerma, Laura / Thompson, E A / Lakhani, Sunil / Kim, Seong-Rim / Schnitt, Stuart / Colpaert, Cecile / Sotiriou, Christos / Scherer, Stefan J / Ignatiadis, Michail / Badve, Sunil / Pierce, Robert H / Viale, Giuseppe / Sirtaine, Nicolas / Penault-Llorca, Frederique / Sugie, Tomohagu / Fineberg, Susan / Paik, Soonmyung / Srinivasan, Ashok / Richardson, Andrea / Wang, Yihong / Chmielik, Ewa / Brock, Jane / Johnson, Douglas B / Balko, Justin / Wienert, Stephan / Bossuyt, Veerle / Michiels, Stefan / Ternes, Nils / Burchardi, Nicole / Luen, Stephen J / Savas, Peter / Klauschen, Frederick / Watson, Peter H / Nelson, Brad H / Criscitiello, Carmen / O'Toole, Sandra / Larsimont, Denis / de Wind, Roland / Curigliano, Giuseppe / André, Fabrice / Lacroix-Triki, Magali / van de Vijver, Mark / Rojo, Federico / Floris, Giuseppe / Bedri, Shahinaz / Sparano, Joseph / Rimm, David / Nielsen, Torsten / Kos, Zuzana / Hewitt, Stephen / Singh, Baljit / Farshid, Gelareh / Loibl, Sibylle / Allison, Kimberly H / Tung, Nadine / Adams, Sylvia / Willard-Gallo, Karen / Horlings, Hugo M / Gandhi, Leena / Moreira, Andre / Hirsch, Fred / Dieci, Maria V / Urbanowicz, Maria / Brcic, Iva / Korski, Konstanty / Gaire, Fabien / Koeppen, Hartmut / Lo, Amy / Giltnane, Jennifer / Rebelatto, Marlon C / Steele, Keith E / Zha, Jiping / Emancipator, Kenneth / Juco, Jonathan W / Denkert, Carsten / Reis-Filho, Jorge / Loi, Sherene / Fox, Stephen B. ·Departments of *Pathology §§§Medical Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne †The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology Departments of **Pathology ∥∥Medicine, University of Melbourne ¶¶Department of Anatomical Pathology, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville #Department of Anatomical Pathology, St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne, Fitzroy ††Department of Medical Oncology, Austin Health ‡‡Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute, Heidelberg §§School of Cancer Medicine, La Trobe University, Bundoora §§§§§Centre for Clinical Research and School of Medicine, The University of Queensland ∥∥∥∥∥Pathology Queensland, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane §§§§§§§§§§The Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst ∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥Australian Clinical Labs, Bella Vista ‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡Directorate of Surgical Pathology, SA Pathology §§§§§§§§§§§§Discipline of Medicine, Adelaide University, Adelaide, Australia ***********Department of Surgical Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute †††††††††††††Department of Pathology ##Divisions of Diagnostic Oncology & Molecular Pathology, Netherlands Cancer Institute-Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, Amsterdam, The Netherlands ###Université Paris-Est ****INSERM, UMR 955 ††††Département de pathologie, APHP, Hôpital Henri-Mondor, Créteil ∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥Service de Biostatistique et d'Epidémiologie, Gustave Roussy, CESP, Inserm U1018, Université-Paris Sud, Université Paris-Saclay ¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶INSERM Unit U981, and Department of Medical Oncology, Gustave Roussy, Villejuif ##########Faculté de Médecine, Université Paris Sud, Kremlin-Bicêtre †††††††Department of Surgical Pathology and Biopathology, Jean Perrin Comprehensive Cancer Centre ‡‡‡‡‡‡‡University of Auvergne UMR1240, Clermont-Ferrand, France ‡‡‡‡Department of Medicine, Clinical Division of Oncology §§§§Institute of Neurology, Comprehensive Cancer Centre Vienna, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna ††††††††††††††Institute of Pathology, Medical University of Graz, Austria ∥∥∥∥European Institute of Oncology ¶¶¶¶School of Medicine ######Department of Pathology, Istituto Europeo di Oncologia, University of Milan, Milan ¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology, University of Padova #############Medical Oncology 2, Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, Padua, Italy †††††Molecular Oncology Group, Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology, Barcelona †††††††††††Pathology Department, IIS-Fundacion Jimenez Diaz, UAM, Madrid, Spain §Department of Pathology and TCRU, GZA ¶¶¶Department of Pathology, GZA Ziekenhuizen, Antwerp ∥Laboratory of Experimental Urology, Department of Development and Regeneration, KU Leuven ‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡Department of Pathology, University Hospital Leuven, Leuven, Belgium ¶Department of Pathology, AZ Klina, Brasschaat ††††††Department of Pathology, GZA Ziekenhuizen, Sint-Augustinus, Wilrijk ∥∥∥Molecular Immunology Unit ‡‡‡‡‡‡Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Jules Bordet, Université Libre de Bruxelles ‡Breast Cancer Translational Research Laboratory/Breast International Group, Institut Jules Bordet **************European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Headquarters *******Department of Pathology, Institut Jules Bordet, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium §§§§§§§Department of Surgery, Kansai Medical School, Hirakata, Japan #######Severance Biomedical Science Institute and Department of Medical Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea ∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥Tumor Pathology Department, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center ¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Gliwice, Poland ‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡Pathology and Tissue Analytics, Roche Innovation Centre Munich, Penzberg †††††††††Institute of Pathology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin ‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡VMscope GmbH, Berlin ¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶German Breast Group GmbH, Neu-Isenburg, Germany **********Trev & Joyce Deeley Research Centre, British Columbia Cancer Agency ††††††††††Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Victoria, Victoria Departments of ‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡Medical Genetics #########Pathology and Laboratory Medicine ¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Genetic Pathology Evaluation Centre, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC ###########Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada §§§§§§§§§§§Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, Doha, Qatar ‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Rhode Island Hospital and Lifespan Medical Center §§§§§§§§Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence ¶¶¶¶¶National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project Operations Center/NRG Oncology, Pittsburgh, PA †††Breast Cancer Research Program, Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Departments of ‡‡‡Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology ########Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Centre *********Vanderbilt Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville §§§§§§§§§Department of Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven ∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥Department of Oncology, Montefiore Medical Centre, Albert Einstein College of Medicine ∥∥∥∥∥∥∥Montefiore Medical Center ¶¶¶¶¶¶¶The Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY ********Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital #####Cancer Research Institute and Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Cancer Center ******Harvard Medical School ¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶Division of Hematology-Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center ††††††††Department of Cancer Biology ‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡‡Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA ∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥Department of Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO ‡‡‡‡‡Department of Cancer Biology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL ∥∥∥∥∥∥Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN ¶¶¶¶¶¶Cancer Immunotherapy Trials Network, Central Laboratory and Program in Immunology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA ††††††††††††Department of Pathology, New York University Langone Medical Centre ############New York University Medical School *************Perlmutter Cancer Center §§§§§§§§§§§§§Pulmonary Pathology, New York University Center for Biospecimen Research and Development, New York University ***************Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center ####Departments of Radiation Oncology and Pathology, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY *****Department of Pathology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX ∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥Pathology Department, Stanford University Medical Centre, Stanford ∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥∥Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Palo Alto ***Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, University of California, San Diego §§§§§§§§§§§§§§Research Pathology, Genentech Inc., South San Francisco, CA *************Laboratory of Pathology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda ¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶¶Translational Sciences, MedImmune, Gaithersberg, MD §§§§§§Academic Medical Innovation, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover ##############Translational Medicine, Merck & Co. Inc., Kenilworth, NJ. ·Adv Anat Pathol · Pubmed #28777143.

ABSTRACT: Assessment of the immune response to tumors is growing in importance as the prognostic implications of this response are increasingly recognized, and as immunotherapies are evaluated and implemented in different tumor types. However, many different approaches can be used to assess and describe the immune response, which limits efforts at implementation as a routine clinical biomarker. In part 1 of this review, we have proposed a standardized methodology to assess tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in solid tumors, based on the International Immuno-Oncology Biomarkers Working Group guidelines for invasive breast carcinoma. In part 2 of this review, we discuss the available evidence for the prognostic and predictive value of TILs in common solid tumors, including carcinomas of the lung, gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary system, gynecologic system, and head and neck, as well as primary brain tumors, mesothelioma and melanoma. The particularities and different emphases in TIL assessment in different tumor types are discussed. The standardized methodology we propose can be adapted to different tumor types and may be used as a standard against which other approaches can be compared. Standardization of TIL assessment will help clinicians, researchers and pathologists to conclusively evaluate the utility of this simple biomarker in the current era of immunotherapy.

15 Review Adjuvant interferon-α for the treatment of high-risk melanoma: An individual patient data meta-analysis. 2017

Ives, Natalie J / Suciu, Stefan / Eggermont, Alexander M M / Kirkwood, John / Lorigan, Paul / Markovic, Svetomir N / Garbe, Claus / Wheatley, Keith / Anonymous2250912. ·Birmingham Clinical Trials Unit, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, Public Health Building, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK. · EORTC Headquarters, Avenue Emmanuel Mounier 83/11, 1200 Brussels, Belgium. · Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus Grand Paris, 114 Rue Edouard Vaillant, 94800, Villejuif, France. · University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute and School of Medicine, 5117 Centre Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA, 15213, USA. · The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, 550 Wilmslow Road, Manchester, M20 4BX, UK. · Mayo Clinic Rochester, 200 First St. SW, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA. · University of Tubingen, Liebermeisterstraße 25, 72076, Tübingen, Germany. · Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit, College of Medical and Dental Sciences, Robert Aitken Institute, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK. Electronic address: k.wheatley@bham.ac.uk. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #28692949.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Many randomised trials assessing interferon-α (IFN-α) as adjuvant therapy for high-risk malignant melanoma have been undertaken. To better assess the role of IFN-α, an individual patient data (IPD) meta-analysis of these trials was undertaken. METHODS: IPD was sought from all randomised trials of adjuvant IFN-α versus no IFN-α for high-risk melanoma. Primary outcomes were event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS). Standard methods for quantitative IPD meta-analysis were used. Subgroup analyses by dose, duration of treatment and various patient and disease-specific parameters were performed. FINDINGS: Fifteen trials were included in the analysis (eleven with IPD). EFS was significantly improved with IFN-α (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.86, CI 0.81-0.91; P < 0.00001), as was OS (HR = 0.90, CI 0.85-0.97; P = 0.003). The absolute differences in EFS at 5 and 10 years were 3.5% and 2.7%, and for OS were 3.0% and 2.8% respectively in favour of IFN-α. There was no evidence that the benefit of IFN-α differed depending on dose or duration of treatment, or by age, gender, site of primary tumour, disease stage, Breslow thickness, or presence of clinical nodes. Only for ulceration was there evidence of an interaction (test for heterogeneity: P = 0.04 for EFS; P = 0.002 for OS); only patients with ulcerated tumours appeared to obtain benefit from IFN-α. CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis provides clear evidence that adjuvant IFN-α significantly reduces the risk of relapse and improves survival and shows no benefit for higher doses compared to lower doses. The increased benefit in patients with ulcerated tumours, and lack of benefit in patients without ulceration, needs further investigation.

16 Review Checkpoint inhibitors in the treatment of brain metastases of non-small-cell lung cancer and melanoma. 2017

Kourie, Hampig Raphael / Kanaan, Hassan / Awada, Gil / Awada, Ahmad Hussein. ·Oncology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Saint Joseph University, Beirut, Lebanon. · Medical Oncology Clinic, Jules Bordet Institute, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. ·Future Oncol · Pubmed #28326837.

ABSTRACT: Brain metastases (BMs) are representing a new challenge for the oncologist; their incidence is increasing due to the better overall survival and systemic disease control in many malignancies, consequent to new potent cytotoxic and targeted therapies. In the era of immunotherapies, checkpoint inhibitors are representing a new therapeutic option in different solid tumors and settings; preliminary results showed potential activity of these agents in patients with BM, when administered as single agent or in combination with radiation therapy. After presenting the arguments in favor of this new strategy, we reported the preliminary results of the trials evaluating these agents in BM, we described the ongoing trials and we discussed the potential role of these agents in the BM treatment.

17 Review Is there still a role for cytotoxic chemotherapy after targeted therapy and immunotherapy in metastatic melanoma? A case report and literature review. 2017

Simon, Aurélien / Kourie, Hampig Raphael / Kerger, Joseph. ·Jules Bordet Institute, Free University of Brussels, Brussels, Belgium. · Jules Bordet Institute, Free University of Brussels, Brussels, Belgium. Hampig.kourie@hotmail.com. ·Chin J Cancer · Pubmed #28086948.

ABSTRACT: Metastatic melanoma has long been considered to have a very poor prognosis and to be chemo-resistant. However, a subgroup of patients with metastatic melanoma presents remarkable responses to chemotherapeutic agents, even in the absence of a response to modern targeted therapies and immunotherapies; accordingly, determining predictive biomarkers of the response to chemotherapies for metastatic melanoma remains a priority to guide treatment in these patients. We report a case study of a patient with B-Raf proto-oncogene serine/threonine kinase-mutated metastatic melanoma harbouring many genetic mutations. The patient did not respond to prior targeted therapies or immunotherapies but experienced a dramatic objective radiological and clinical response to subsequent dacarbazine-based chemotherapy. In the era of targeted therapies and immunotherapies for metastatic melanoma, cytotoxic chemotherapies may still represent an interesting therapeutic weapon in a well-defined subgroup of patients presenting with specific genetic and molecular features.

18 Review A systematic review examining factors influencing health related quality of life among melanoma cancer survivors. 2016

Hamel, Jean-Francois / Pe, Madeline / Coens, Corneel / Martinelli, Francesca / Eggermont, Alexander M M / Brandberg, Yvonne / Bottomley, Andrew. ·European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Headquarters, Brussels, Belgium; Biostatistics and Methodology Department, Angers University Hospital, Angers, France. Electronic address: jeanfrancois.hamel@chu-angers.fr. · European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Headquarters, Brussels, Belgium. · Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus Grand Paris, Villejuif, France. · Oncology and Pathology Department, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #27838512.

ABSTRACT: Eighty percent of melanomas are diagnosed at a localised stage, when they are highly curable. Their survival rate induces long follow-up periods, transforming melanoma into a chronic disease and patients' health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Understanding which patient characteristics are associated with poor HRQoL should allow a more personalised management of their HRQoL. Hence, we propose a systematic review for this purpose. Systematic literature searches were performed in three different electronic databases: PubMed, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library. Only studies published in English after 2005 until June 2016 and exploring HRQoL over a period of at least one year were considered. 10 articles were identified from seven different studies, representing a total of 4246 patients. All were observational: six were cross-sectional and only one was prospective. Several patient characteristics associated with HRQoL were identified. Women tend to have lower psychological HRQoL than men. Age was generally associated with variations in HRQoL levels, but there was no consistency across studies. Positive associations between marital status or social interactions and psychological subscales were highlighted by a few studies. Finally, the stage related severity of prognosis at initial diagnosis was systematically associated with worse HRQoL levels (either psychological, physical or global). Several patient characteristics could be identified in melanoma studies that were associated with HRQoL levels. However, these relations were not consistent across studies. Such findings highlight the current lack of empirical data available. Further evidence is needed on HRQoL factors in melanoma survivors.

19 Review Skin Cancer Incidence and Mortality in Spain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. 2016

Tejera-Vaquerizo, A / Descalzo-Gallego, M A / Otero-Rivas, M M / Posada-García, C / Rodríguez-Pazos, L / Pastushenko, I / Marcos-Gragera, R / García-Doval, I. ·Servicio de Dermatología, Instituto Dermatológico GlobalDerm, Palma del Río, Córdoba, España. Electronic address: antoniotejera@aedv.es. · Unidad de Investigación, Fundación AEDV, Madrid, España. · Servicio de Dermatología, Hospital Universitario Lucus Augusti, Lugo, España. · Servicio de Dermatología, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo, Vigo, España. · Interdisciplinary Research Institute, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Bruselas, Bélgica. · Institut Català d'Oncologia, Pla Director d'Oncologia, Unitat d'Epidemiologia i Registre de Càncer de Girona (UERCG), Institut d'Investigació Biomèdica de Girona (IdIBGi), Universitat de Girona, Girona, España. · Unidad de Investigación, Fundación AEDV, Madrid, España; Servicio de Dermatología, Complexo Hospitalario Universitario de Vigo, Vigo, España. ·Actas Dermosifiliogr · Pubmed #26852370.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this systematic review was to describe the incidence and mortality of basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, melanoma, and Merkel cell carcinoma in Spain. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We performed a search of the MEDLINE and Embase databases and reviewed articles from the Spanish Network of Cancer Registries (REDECAN) and the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). The methodological quality of the studies was evaluated and statistical heterogeneity was measured using the I(2) index. A random-effects model was used to perform the meta-analysis because of the heterogeneity of the data. RESULTS: Thirty-two papers were included in the systematic review. The crude incidence rate for basal cell carcinoma was 113.05 (95% CI, 89.03-137.08) cases per 100 000 person-years for the studies based on the registration methodology normally used by registries (in which only 1 tumor with histological confirmation is counted per person). However, the same incidence rate calculated on the basis of clinical and histologic criteria and counting tumors rather than individual patients was 253.23 (95% CI, 273.01-269.45) cases per 100 000 person-years. The incidence was 38.16 (95% CI, 31.72-39.97) cases per 100 000 person-years for squamous cell carcinoma, 8.76 (95% CI, 7.50-10.02) cases per 100 000 person-years for melanoma, and 0.28 (95% CI, 0.15-0.40) cases per 100 000 person-years for Merkel cell carcinoma. CONCLUSIONS: The registration methodology normally used by cancer registries probably underestimates the incidence rates of basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma in Spain. The incidence rates of cutaneous melanoma and Merkel cell carcinoma are lower in Spain than in other European countries.

20 Review Hyperintense perilesional edema in the brain on T1-weighted images: Cavernous malformation or metastatic melanoma? Three case reports and literature review. 2016

Sarbu, Nicolae / Pujol, Teresa / Oleaga, Laura. ·Clinique de Neuroradiologie, Erasme University Hospital, Cliniques Universitaires de Bruxelles, ULB, Belgium Nicolae.Sarbu@erasme.ulb.ac.be. · Neuroradiology Department, Hospital Clínic Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Spain. ·Neuroradiol J · Pubmed #26838172.

ABSTRACT: Hyperintense perilesional edema in brain masses on T1-weighted images (T1WI) is an unusual radiological finding. We report three cases showing this particular type of edema, one representing cerebral hemorrhagic cavernous malformation (CCM, cavernoma) and the other two, metastases of melanoma. The association between this sign and cavernoma was recently recognized. On the other hand, in melanotic lesions, the relationship with T1WI-hyperintense perilesional edema has not yet been described. Despite being an infrequent sign, it can considerably narrow the differential diagnosis, which gives it a high value for clinical practice. Moreover, given the high prevalence of the entities that manifest this imaging feature, it can be occasionally noticed.

21 Review [High-definition optical coherence tomography: Presentation of the technique and applications in dermatology]. 2015

Marneffe, A / Suppa, M / Miyamoto, M / Del Marmol, V / Boone, M. ·Service de dermatologie, hôpital Erasme, université Libre de Bruxelles, route de Lennik 808, 1070 Bruxelles, Belgique. · Service de dermatologie, hôpital Erasme, université Libre de Bruxelles, route de Lennik 808, 1070 Bruxelles, Belgique. Electronic address: dr.marianosuppa@gmail.com. ·Ann Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #25934214.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Review Vitamin D and melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer risk and prognosis: a comprehensive review and meta-analysis. 2014

Caini, Saverio / Boniol, Mathieu / Tosti, Giulio / Magi, Serena / Medri, Matelda / Stanganelli, Ignazio / Palli, Domenico / Assedi, Melania / Marmol, Veronique Del / Gandini, Sara. ·Unit of Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute for Cancer Research and Prevention, Florence, Italy. Electronic address: s.caini@ispo.toscana.it. · International Prevention Research Institute, Lyon, France. · Division of Dermatoncological Surgery, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Scientific Institute of Romagna for the Study and Treatment of Cancer, Meldola, Italy. · Unit of Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute for Cancer Research and Prevention, Florence, Italy. · Department of Dermatology. Hopital Erasme. Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. · Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #25087185.

ABSTRACT: Vitamin D is formed mainly in the skin upon exposure to sunlight and can as well be taken orally with food or through supplements. While sun exposure is a known risk factor for skin cancer development, vitamin D exerts anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on melanocytes and keratinocytes in vitro. To clarify the role of vitamin D in skin carcinogenesis, we performed a review of the literature and meta-analysis to evaluate the association of vitamin D serum levels and dietary intake with cutaneous melanoma (CM) and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) risk and melanoma prognostic factors. Twenty papers were included for an overall 1420 CM and 2317 NMSC. The summary relative risks (SRRs) from random effects models for the association of highest versus lowest vitamin D serum levels was 1.46 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.60-3.53) and 1.64 (95% CI 1.02-2.65) for CM and NMSC, respectively. The SRR for the highest versus lowest quintile of vitamin D intake was 0.86 (95% CI 0.63-1.13) for CM and 1.03 (95% CI 0.95-1.13) for NMSC. Data were suggestive of an inverse association between vitamin D blood levels and CM thickness at diagnosis. Further research is needed to investigate the effect of vitamin D on skin cancer risk in populations with different exposure to sunlight and dietary habits, and to evaluate whether vitamin D supplementation is effective in improving CM survival.

23 Review Optimized dendritic cell-based immunotherapy for melanoma: the TriMix-formula. 2014

Van Lint, Sandra / Wilgenhof, Sofie / Heirman, Carlo / Corthals, Jurgen / Breckpot, Karine / Bonehill, Aude / Neyns, Bart / Thielemans, Kris. ·Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Therapy & Dendritic Cell-bank, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Laarbeeklaan 103E, 1090, Brussels, Belgium, sandra.van.lint@vub.ac.be. ·Cancer Immunol Immunother · Pubmed #24878889.

ABSTRACT: Since decades, the main goal of tumor immunologists has been to increase the capacity of the immune system to mediate tumor regression. In this regard, one of the major focuses of cancer immunotherapy has been the design of vaccines promoting strong tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses in cancer patients. Here, dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role as they are regarded as nature's adjuvant and as such have become the natural agents for antigen delivery in order to finally elicit strong T cell responses (Villadangos and Schnorrer in Nat Rev Immunol 7:543-555, 2007; Melief in Immunity 29:372-383, 2008; Palucka and Banchereau in Nat Rev Cancer 12:265-277, 2012; Vacchelli et al. in Oncoimmunology 2:e25771, 2013; Galluzzi et al. in Oncoimmunology 1:1111-1134, 2012). Therefore, many investigators are actively pursuing the use of DCs as an efficient way of inducing anticancer immune responses. Nowadays, DCs can be generated at a large scale in closed systems, yielding sufficient numbers of cells for clinical application. In addition, with the identification of tumor-associated antigens, which are either selectively or preferentially expressed by tumors, a whole range of strategies using DCs for immunotherapy have been designed and tested in clinical studies. Despite the evidence that DCs loaded with tumor-associated antigens can elicit immune responses in vivo, clinical responses remained disappointingly low. Therefore, optimization of the cellular product and route of administration was urgently needed. Here, we review the path we have followed in the development of TriMixDC-MEL, a potent DC-based cellular therapy, discussing its development as well as further modifications and applications.

24 Review The risk of developing a second primary cancer in melanoma patients: a comprehensive review of the literature and meta-analysis. 2014

Caini, Saverio / Boniol, Mathieu / Botteri, Edoardo / Tosti, Giulio / Bazolli, Barbara / Russell-Edu, William / Giusti, Francesco / Testori, Alessandro / Gandini, Sara. ·Unit of Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute for Cancer Research and Prevention, Via delle Oblate 2, 50139 Florence, Italy. Electronic address: s.caini@ispo.toscana.it. · International Prevention Research Institute, Lyon, France. · Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Division of Melanoma and Muscolocutaneous sarcoma, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Library, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC), Brussels, Belgium. ·J Dermatol Sci · Pubmed #24680127.

ABSTRACT: The number of cutaneous melanoma survivors has been increasing for years due to improvements in early diagnosis and subsequent prolonged survival. These patients are at increased risk of developing a second melanoma and a second primary malignancy (SPM) at other sites as well. We performed a review of scientific literature and meta-analysis to evaluate the risk of developing a SPM (other than melanoma) among melanoma patients. Twenty-three independent papers and over 350,000 melanoma patients were included. Risk of cancer among melanoma survivors was increased overall (1.57, 95% CI 1.29-1.90) and at several sites: bone (2.09, 95% CI 1.08-4.05), non-melanoma skin cancer (4.01, 95% CI 1.81-8.87), soft tissue (6.80, 95% CI 1.29-35.98), colon-rectum (1.12, 95% CI 1.00-1.25), female breast (1.14, 95% CI 1.07-1.22), kidney (1.34, 95% CI 1.23-1.45), prostate (1.25, 95% CI 1.13-1.37) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (1.37, 95% CI 1.22-1.54). The overall risk of SPM showed a tendency to decrease as the time from melanoma diagnosis lengthened. Most of our findings may be explained by the tendency of some exposures, which are risk factors for different tumors, to occur simultaneously in the same individuals. These results suggest primary and secondary cancer prevention counselling for melanoma survivors.

25 Review Management of in situ melanoma of the nail apparatus with functional surgery: report of 11 cases and review of the literature. 2014

Neczyporenko, F / André, J / Torosian, K / Theunis, A / Richert, B. ·Department of Dermatology, Saint Pierre, Brugmann and Children's University Hospitals, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Brussels, Belgium. ·J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol · Pubmed #23480439.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Nail apparatus melanoma (NAM) is a rare melanocytic neoplasm with pejorative prognosis often related to late diagnosis. Early diagnosis at in situ stage (NAMis) is difficult, but essential to improve prognosis. NAMis management is not well established yet. Removal of the whole nail unit has been advocated in several small series as a potential treatment for NAMis. OBJECTIVE: To report and assess 'functional' or 'conservative' surgery for NAMis and evaluate its long-term oncologic safety. METHODS: Retrospective study of cases diagnosed in the University Hospital Saint-Pierre collected over a 13 year period and compared with the published data. RESULTS: Eleven cases of NAMis were identified: 73% concerned females. Thumb and first toe were the most affected digits (63% of total). Monodactylic longitudinal melanonychia (LM) was the most frequent presentation (92%). Mean diagnosis delay was 5 years. Diagnosis was suspected on the basis of clinical and dermatoscopic signs and was confirmed by pathological examination. All patients underwent complete nail unit removal with 6 mm security margins around the anatomic boundaries of the nail. Two late local recurrences were observed at 7 and 11 years follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Our series, the largest up to now, demonstrates that 'functional surgery' is a rational approach for NAMis with an excellent oncologic safety at 5 years. However, this study suggests that a very long-term follow-up is mandatory, as recurrences may appear late.

Next