Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: HELP
Articles by Natalia Blanco
Based on 2 articles published since 2008
||||

Between 2008 and 2019, Natalia Blanco wrote the following 2 articles about Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Effect of meteorological factors and geographic location on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant enterococci colonization in the US. 2017

Blanco, Natalia / Perencevich, Eli / Li, Shan Shan / Morgan, Daniel J / Pineles, Lisa / Johnson, J Kristie / Robinson, Gwen / Anderson, Deverick J / Jacob, Jesse T / Maragakis, Lisa L / Harris, Anthony D / Anonymous410986. ·Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, United States of America. · Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa College of Medicine, Iowa City, United States of America. · Department of Biostatistics, Indiana University Fairbanks School of Public Health, Indianapolis, United States of America. · VA Maryland Healthcare System, Baltimore, United States of America. · Department of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, United States of America. · Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, United States of America. · Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, United States of America. · Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #28558010.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Little is known about the effect of meteorological conditions and geographical location on bacterial colonization rates particularly of antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive bacteria. We aimed to evaluate the effect of season, meteorological factors, and geographic location on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) colonization. METHODS: The prospective cohort included all adults admitted to 20 geographically-dispersed ICUs across the US from September 1, 2011 to October 4, 2012. Nasal and perianal swabs were collected at admission and tested for MRSA and VRE colonization respectively. Poisson regression models using monthly aggregated colonization counts as the outcome and mean temperature, relative humidity, total precipitation, season, and/or latitude as predictors were constructed for each pathogen. RESULTS: A total of 24,704 ICU-admitted patients were tested for MRSA and 24,468 for VRE. On admission, 10% of patients were colonized with MRSA and 12% with VRE. For MRSA and VRE, a 10% increase in relative humidity was associated with approximately a 9% increase in prevalence rate. Southerly latitudes in the US were associated with higher MRSA colonization, while northerly latitudes were associated with higher VRE colonization. In contrast to MRSA, the association between VRE colonization and latitude was observed only after adjusting for relative humidity, which demonstrates how this effect is highly driven by this meteorological factor. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, we are the first to study the effect of meteorological factors and geographical location/latitude on MRSA and VRE colonization in adults. Increasing humidity was associated with greater MRSA and VRE colonization. Southerly latitudes in the US were associated with greater MRSA and less VRE. The effect of these factors on MRSA and VRE rates has the potential not only to inform patient management and treatment, but also infection prevention interventions.

2 Article Transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus to health care worker gowns and gloves during care of residents in Veterans Affairs nursing homes. 2017

Pineles, Lisa / Morgan, Daniel J / Lydecker, Alison / Johnson, J Kristie / Sorkin, John D / Langenberg, Patricia / Blanco, Natalia / Lesse, Alan / Sellick, John / Gupta, Kalpana / Leykum, Luci / Cadena, Jose / Lepcha, Nickie / Roghmann, Mary-Claire. ·Veterans Affairs Maryland Health Care System, Baltimore, MD; University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Veterans Affairs Western New York Health Care System, Buffalo, NY. · Veterans Affairs Boston Health Care System, Boston, MA. · South Texas Veterans Health Care System, San Antonio, TX; University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX. · Washington DC Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Washington, DC. · Veterans Affairs Maryland Health Care System, Baltimore, MD; University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Electronic address: mroghman@epi.umaryland.edu. ·Am J Infect Control · Pubmed #28431853.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: This was an observational study designed to estimate the frequency of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) transmission to gowns and gloves worn by health care workers (HCWs) interacting with Veterans Affairs Community Living Center (VA nursing home) residents to inform MRSA prevention policies. METHODS: Participants included residents and HCWs from 7 VA nursing homes in 4 states and Washington, DC. Residents were cultured for MRSA at the anterior nares, perianal skin, and wound (if present). HCWs wore gowns and gloves during usual care activities. After each activity, a research coordinator swabbed the HCW's gown and gloves. Swabs were cultured for MRSA. RESULTS: There were 200 residents enrolled; 94 (46%) were MRSA colonized. Glove contamination was higher than gown contamination (20% vs 11%, respectively; P < .01). Transmission varied greatly by type of care from 0%-19% for gowns and 7%-37% for gloves. High-risk care activities (odds ratio [OR] > 1.0, P < .05) for gown contamination included changing dressings (eg, wound), dressing, providing hygiene (eg, brushing teeth), and bathing. Low-risk care activities (OR < 1.0, P < .05 or no transmission) for gown contamination included glucose monitoring, giving medications, and feeding. CONCLUSIONS: MRSA transmission from colonized residents to gloves was higher than transmission to gowns. Transmission to gloves varies by type of care, but all care had a risk of contamination, demonstrating the importance of hand hygiene after all care. Transmission to gowns was significantly higher with certain types of care. Optimizing gown and glove use by targeting high-risk care activities could improve resident-centered care for MRSA-colonized residents by promoting a home-like environment.