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Migraine Disorders: HELP
Articles by Francesca Cortese
Based on 4 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Francesca Cortese wrote the following 4 articles about Migraine Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Migraine and cluster headache - the common link. 2018

Vollesen, Anne Luise / Benemei, Silvia / Cortese, Francesca / Labastida-Ramírez, Alejandro / Marchese, Francesca / Pellesi, Lanfranco / Romoli, Michele / Ashina, Messoud / Lampl, Christian / Anonymous5040974. ·Danish Headache Center and Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet Glostrup, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Health Sciences Department, University of Florence and Headache Centre, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy. · Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Sapienza, University of Rome, Polo Pontino, Latina, Italy. · Dep Internal Medicine, Division of Vascular Pharmacology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Child Neuropsichiatry Unit, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy. · Medical Toxicology, Headache and Drug Abuse Center, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy. · Neurology Clinic, University of Perugia - S.M. Misericordiae Hospital, Perugia, Italy. · Department of Neurogeriatric Medicine, Headache Medical Center Linz, Ordensklinikum Linz Barmherzige Schwestern, Seilerstaette 4, 4010, Linz, Austria. christian.lampl@ordensklinikum.at. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #30242519.

ABSTRACT: Although clinically distinguishable, migraine and cluster headache share prominent features such as unilateral pain, common pharmacological triggers such glyceryl trinitrate, histamine, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and response to triptans and neuromodulation. Recent data also suggest efficacy of anti CGRP monoclonal antibodies in both migraine and cluster headache. While exact mechanisms behind both disorders remain to be fully understood, the trigeminovascular system represents one possible common pathophysiological pathway and network of both disorders. Here, we review past and current literature shedding light on similarities and differences in phenotype, heritability, pathophysiology, imaging findings and treatment options of migraine and cluster headache. A continued focus on their shared pathophysiological pathways may be important in paving future treatment avenues that could benefit both migraine and cluster headache patients.

2 Review Triptans and CGRP blockade - impact on the cranial vasculature. 2017

Benemei, Silvia / Cortese, Francesca / Labastida-Ramírez, Alejandro / Marchese, Francesca / Pellesi, Lanfranco / Romoli, Michele / Vollesen, Anne Luise / Lampl, Christian / Ashina, Messoud / Anonymous10660923. ·Health Sciences Department, University of Florence, and Headache Centre, Careggi University Hospital, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50134, Florence, Italy. silvia.benemei@unifi.it. · Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Sapienza University of Rome, Polo Pontino, Latina, Italy. · Dept Internal Medicine, Division of Vascular Pharmacology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Child Neuropsichiatry Unit, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy. · Medical Toxicology Headache and Drug Abuse Center, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy. · Neurology Clinic, University Hospital of Perugia, Perugia, Italy. · Danish Headache Center and Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet Glostrup, Faculty of Health and Medicl Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Neurogeriatric Medicine, Headache Medical Center Linz, Linz, Austria. · Danish Headache Center and Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet Glostrup, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #29019093.

ABSTRACT: The trigeminovascular system plays a key role in the pathophysiology of migraine. The activation of the trigeminovascular system causes release of various neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, including serotonin and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which modulate pain transmission and vascular tone. Thirty years after discovery of agonists for serotonin 5-HT

3 Article Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation over the left temporal pole restores normal visual evoked potential habituation in interictal migraineurs. 2017

Cortese, Francesca / Pierelli, Francesco / Bove, Ilaria / Di Lorenzo, Cherubino / Evangelista, Maurizio / Perrotta, Armando / Serrao, Mariano / Parisi, Vincenzo / Coppola, Gianluca. ·Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Sapienza University of Rome Polo Pontino, Corso della Repubblica, 79 - 04100, Latina, Italy. francesca.cortese05@libero.it. · Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Sapienza University of Rome Polo Pontino, Corso della Repubblica, 79 - 04100, Latina, Italy. · INM Neuromed IRCCS, Pozzilli (IS), Italy. · Don Carlo Gnocchi, Onlus Foundation, Milan, Italy. · Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore/CIC, Istituto di Anestesiologia, Rianimazione e Terapia del Dolore, Rome, Italy. · G. B. Bietti Foundation IRCCS, Research Unit of Neurophysiology of Vision and Neuro-Ophthalmology, Rome, Italy. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #28726157.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Neuroimaging data has implicated the temporal pole (TP) in migraine pathophysiology; the density and functional activity of the TP were reported to fluctuate in accordance with the migraine cycle. Yet, the exact link between TP morpho-functional abnormalities and migraine is unknown. Here, we examined whether non-invasive anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) ameliorates abnormal interictal multimodal sensory processing in patients with migraine. METHODS: We examined the habituation of visual evoked potentials and median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) before and immediately after 20-min anodal tDCS (2 mA) or sham stimulation delivered over the left TP in interictal migraineurs. RESULTS: Prior to tDCS, interictal migraineurs did not exhibit habituation in response to repetitive visual or somatosensory stimulation. After anodal tDCS but not sham stimulation, migraineurs exhibited normal habituation responses to visual stimulation; however, tDCS had no effect on SSEP habituation in migraineurs. CONCLUSION: Our study shows for the first time that enhancing excitability of the TP with anodal tDCS normalizes abnormal interictal visual information processing in migraineurs. This finding has implications for the role of the TP in migraine, and specifically highlights the ventral stream of the visual pathway as a pathophysiological neural substrate for abnormal visual processing in migraine.

4 Article Excitability of the motor cortex in patients with migraine changes with the time elapsed from the last attack. 2017

Cortese, Francesca / Coppola, Gianluca / Di Lenola, Davide / Serrao, Mariano / Di Lorenzo, Cherubino / Parisi, Vincenzo / Pierelli, Francesco. ·Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, 'Sapienza' University of Rome Polo Pontino, Corso della Repubblica 79, 04100, Latina, Italy. francesca.cortese05@libero.it. · G. B. Bietti Foundation IRCCS, Research Unit of Neurophysiology of Vision and Neuro-Ophthalmology, Rome, Italy. · Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, 'Sapienza' University of Rome Polo Pontino, Corso della Repubblica 79, 04100, Latina, Italy. · Don Carlo Gnocchi, Onlus Foundation, Milan, Italy. · INM Neuromed IRCCS, Pozzilli, (IS), Italy. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #28063106.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) produced by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex can be an objective measure of cortical excitability. Previously, MEP thresholds were found to be normal, increased, or even reduced in patients with migraine. In the present study, we determined whether the level of cortical excitability changes with the time interval from the last migraine attack, thereby accounting for the inconsistencies in previous reports. METHODS: Twenty-six patients with untreated migraine without aura (MO) underwent a MEP study between attacks. Their data were then compared to the MEP data collected from a group of 24 healthy volunteers (HVs). During the experiment, the TMS figure-of-eight coil was positioned over the left motor area. After identifying the resting motor threshold (RMT), we delivered 10 single TMS pulses (rate: 0.1 Hz, intensity: 120% of the RMT) and averaged the resulting MEP amplitudes. RESULTS: The mean RMTs and MEP amplitudes were not significantly different between the MO and HV groups. In patients with MO, the RMTs were negatively correlated with the number of days elapsed since the last migraine attack (rho = -0.404, p = 0.04). CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the threshold for evoking MEPs is influenced by the proximity of an attack; specifically, the threshold is lower when a long time interval has passed after an attack, and is higher (within the range of normative values) when measured close to an attack. These dynamic RMT variations resemble those we reported previously for visual and somatosensory evoked potentials and may represent time-dependent plastic changes in brain excitability in relation to the migraine cycle.