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Migraine Disorders: HELP
Articles by Sandro M. Krieg
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, S. Krieg wrote the following 4 articles about Migraine Disorders.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review [Migraine in children and adolescents-brain and muscle? : Another example of why children are not small adults]. 2017

Landgraf, M N / König, H / Hannibal, I / Langhagen, T / Bonfert, M V / Klose, B / Rahmsdorf, B / Giese, R M / Straube, A / von Kries, R / Albers, L / Ebinger, F / Ertl-Wagner, B / Kammer, B / Körte, I / Sollmann, N / Krieg, S / Heinen, F. ·Abteilung für Pädiatrische Neurologie und Entwicklungsneurologie, LMU Zentrum - iSPZ Hauner, Kinderklinik und Kinderpoliklinik im Dr. von Haunerschen Kinderspital, Universität München, Lindwurmstr. 4, 80337, München, Deutschland. mirjam.landgraf@med.uni-muenchen.de. · Abteilung für Pädiatrische Neurologie und Entwicklungsneurologie, LMU Zentrum - iSPZ Hauner, Kinderklinik und Kinderpoliklinik im Dr. von Haunerschen Kinderspital, Universität München, Lindwurmstr. 4, 80337, München, Deutschland. · Deutsches Schwindel- und Gleichgewichtszentrum (DSGZ), Campus Großhadern, Klinikum der Universität München, München, Deutschland. · Neurologische Klinik und Poliklinik, Campus Großhadern, Klinikum der Universität München, München, Deutschland. · Institut für Soziale Pädiatrie und Jugendmedizin, Klinikum der Universität München, München, Deutschland. · Klinik für Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, St. Vincenz-Krankenhaus, Paderborn, Deutschland. · Klinik und Poliklinik für Radiologie, Campus Großhadern, Klinikum der Universität München, München, Deutschland. · Abteilung für Kinderradiologie, Klinik und Poliklinik für Radiologie, Kinderklinik und Kinderpoliklinik im Dr. von Haunerschen Kinderspital, Universität München, München, Deutschland. · Klinik für Kinder- und Jugendpsychiatrie, Psychosomatik und Psychotherapie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, München, Deutschland. · Psychiatry Neuroimaging Laboratory, Department of Psychiatry, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Abteilung für diagnostische und interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, München, Deutschland. · TUM-Neuroimaging Center und Klinik für Neurochirurgie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, München, Deutschland. · Abteilung für Pädiatrische Neurologie und Entwicklungsneurologie, LMU Zentrum - iSPZ Hauner, Kinderklinik und Kinderpoliklinik im Dr. von Haunerschen Kinderspital, Universität München, Lindwurmstr. 4, 80337, München, Deutschland. florian.heinen@med.lmu.de. · Deutsches Schwindel- und Gleichgewichtszentrum (DSGZ), Campus Großhadern, Klinikum der Universität München, München, Deutschland. florian.heinen@med.lmu.de. ·Nervenarzt · Pubmed #28956079.

ABSTRACT: Migraine as primary headache is a life-long disease which is relevant for the quality of life and is based on complex genetics. It often starts in childhood with symptoms typical for the specific age. These show different nuances compared to the migraine symptoms in adults, for example, regarding (bilateral/unilateral) localization of the acute migraine headache. Only over the course of years-during adolescence and young adulthood-do the more specific symptoms as defined by the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD 3 beta) develop. In this article we focus on the clinical specifics of children and adolescents with migraine. We elaborately refer to the trigeminocervical complex (TCC) because it forms a conceptual bridge for the understanding of migraine, for psychoeducation, and for therapeutic options. We pragmatically discuss options and limits of treatments.

2 Article Repetitive Peripheral Magnetic Stimulation (rPMS) in Subjects With Migraine-Setup Presentation and Effects on Skeletal Musculature. 2019

Renner, Tabea / Sollmann, Nico / Trepte-Freisleder, Florian / Albers, Lucia / Mathonia, Nina M / Bonfert, Michaela V / König, Helene / Klose, Birgit / Krieg, Sandro M / Heinen, Florian / Gerstl, Lucia / Landgraf, Mirjam N. ·Department of Pediatric Neurology and Developmental Medicine, LMU Center for Children With Medical Complexity, Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital, LMU-University Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich, Germany. · Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · TUM-Neuroimaging Center, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. ·Front Neurol · Pubmed #31379706.

ABSTRACT:

3 Article Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of the upper trapezius muscles - assessment of myofascial trigger points in patients with migraine. 2019

Sollmann, Nico / Mathonia, Nina / Weidlich, Dominik / Bonfert, Michaela / Schroeder, Sebastian A / Badura, Katharina A / Renner, Tabea / Trepte-Freisleder, Florian / Ganter, Carl / Krieg, Sandro M / Zimmer, Claus / Rummeny, Ernst J / Karampinos, Dimitrios C / Baum, Thomas / Landgraf, Mirjam N / Heinen, Florian. ·Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675, Munich, Germany. Nico.Sollmann@tum.de. · TUM-Neuroimaging Center, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. Nico.Sollmann@tum.de. · Department of Pediatric Neurology and Developmental Medicine and LMU Center for Children with Medical Complexity, Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital, LMU - University Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Lindwurmstr. 4, 80337, Munich, Germany. · Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675, Munich, Germany. · TUM-Neuroimaging Center, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675, Munich, Germany. · Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675, Munich, Germany. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #30658563.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Research in migraine points towards central-peripheral complexity with a widespread pattern of structures involved. Migraine-associated neck and shoulder muscle pain has clinically been conceptualized as myofascial trigger points (mTrPs). However, concepts remain controversial, and the identification of mTrPs is mostly restricted to manual palpation in clinical routine. This study investigates a more objective, quantitative assessment of mTrPs by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with T2 mapping. METHODS: Ten subjects (nine females, 25.6 ± 5.2 years) with a diagnosis of migraine according to ICHD-3 underwent bilateral manual palpation of the upper trapezius muscles to localize mTrPs. Capsules were attached to the skin adjacent to the palpated mTrPs for marking. MRI of the neck and shoulder region was performed at 3 T, including a T2-prepared, three-dimensional (3D) turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence. The T2-prepared 3D TSE sequence was used to generate T2 maps, followed by manual placement of regions of interest (ROIs) covering the trapezius muscles of both sides and signal alterations attributable to mTrPs. RESULTS: The trapezius muscles showed an average T2 value of 27.7 ± 1.4 ms for the right and an average T2 value of 28.7 ± 1.0 ms for the left side (p = 0.1055). Concerning signal alterations in T2 maps attributed to mTrPs, nine values were obtained for the right (32.3 ± 2.5 ms) and left side (33.0 ± 1.5 ms), respectively (p = 0.0781). When comparing the T2 values of the trapezius muscles to the T2 values extracted from the signal alterations attributed to the mTrPs of the ipsilateral side, we observed a statistically significant difference (p = 0.0039). T2 hyperintensities according to visual image inspection were only reported in four subjects for the right and in two subjects for the left side. CONCLUSIONS: Our approach enables the identification of mTrPs and their quantification in terms of T2 mapping even in the absence of qualitative signal alterations. Thus, it (1) might potentially challenge the current gold-standard method of physical examination of mTrPs, (2) could allow for more targeted and objectively verifiable interventions, and (3) could add valuable models to understand better central-peripheral mechanisms in migraine.

4 Article Magnetic stimulation of the upper trapezius muscles in patients with migraine - A pilot study. 2016

Sollmann, Nico / Trepte-Freisleder, Florian / Albers, Lucia / Jung, Nikolai H / Mall, Volker / Meyer, Bernhard / Heinen, Florian / Krieg, Sandro M / Landgraf, Mirjam N. ·Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 Munich, Germany; TUM-Neuroimaging Center, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. Electronic address: Nico.Sollmann@tum.de. · Department of Pediatric Neurology and Developmental Medicine, Integrated Social Pediatric Center, iSPZ Hauner, Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Lindwurmstr. 4, 80337 Munich, Germany. Electronic address: F.Trepte-Freisleder@tum.de. · Institute of Social Pediatrics and Adolescents Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Haydnstr. 5, 80367 Munich, Germany. Electronic address: Lucia.Albers@med.uni-muenchen.de. · kbo-Kinderzentrum München, Social Pediatrics, Technische Universität München, Heiglhofstr. 63, 81377 Munich, Germany. Electronic address: Nikolai.Jung@tum.de. · kbo-Kinderzentrum München, Social Pediatrics, Technische Universität München, Heiglhofstr. 63, 81377 Munich, Germany. Electronic address: Volker.Mall@tum.de. · Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 Munich, Germany. Electronic address: Bernhard.Meyer@tum.de. · Department of Pediatric Neurology and Developmental Medicine, Integrated Social Pediatric Center, iSPZ Hauner, Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Lindwurmstr. 4, 80337 Munich, Germany; German Center for Vertigo and Balance Disorders, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich, Germany. Electronic address: Florian.Heinen@med.uni-muenchen.de. · Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Ismaninger Str. 22, 81675 Munich, Germany; TUM-Neuroimaging Center, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. Electronic address: Sandro.Krieg@tum.de. · Department of Pediatric Neurology and Developmental Medicine, Integrated Social Pediatric Center, iSPZ Hauner, Dr. von Hauner Children's Hospital, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Lindwurmstr. 4, 80337 Munich, Germany; German Center for Vertigo and Balance Disorders, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Munich, Germany. Electronic address: Mirjam.Landgraf@med.uni-muenchen.de. ·Eur J Paediatr Neurol · Pubmed #27528122.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Repetitive peripheral magnetic stimulation (rPMS) has been applied to musculoskeletal pain conditions. Since recent data show that migraine and tension-type headache (TTH) might be closely related to peripheral muscular pain in the neck and shoulder region (supporting the concept of the trigemino-cervical complex (TCC)), this pilot study explores the acceptance of rPMS to the upper trapezius muscles in migraine (partly in combination with TTH). METHODS: We used rPMS to stimulate active myofascial trigger points (aTrPs) of the upper trapezius muscles in 20 young adults suffering from migraine. Acceptance was assessed by a standardized questionnaire, whereas self-rated effectiveness was evaluated by headache calendars and the Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS). Algometry was performed to explore the local effect of rPMS on the muscles. RESULTS: Acceptance of rPMS was shown in all subjects without any adverse events, and rPMS had a statistically significant impact on almost every parameter of the headache calendar and MIDAS. Among others, the number of migraine attacks (p < 0.001) and migraine intensity (p = 0.001) significantly decreased regarding pre- and post-stimulation assessments. Accordingly, 100.0% of subjects would repeat the stimulation, while 90.0% would recommend rPMS as a treatment option for migraine. CONCLUSIONS: rPMS might represent a promising tool to alleviate migraine symptoms within the context of myofascial pain. This might be due to stimulation-dependent modulation of the peripheral sensory effect within the TCC in migraine. However, sham-controlled studies with larger and more homogeneous cohorts are needed to prove a potential beneficial effect. Ethics Committee Registration Numbers: 356-14 and 447/14.