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Migraine Disorders: HELP
Articles from Asia
Based on 1,285 articles published since 2008
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These are the 1285 published articles about Migraine Disorders that originated from Asia during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20
1 Guideline Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo: Diagnostic criteria Consensus document of the Committee for the Classification of Vestibular Disorders of the Bárány Society. 2017

von Brevern, Michael / Bertholon, Pierre / Brandt, Thomas / Fife, Terry / Imai, Takao / Nuti, Daniele / Newman-Toker, David. ·Department of Neurology, Park-Klinik Weissensee, Berlín, Alemania. Electronic address: von.brevern@park-klinik.com. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Bellvue Hospital, Saint-Etienne, Francia. · Institute of Clinical Neuroscience, Ludwig-Maximilian University, Múnich, Alemania. · Barrow Neurological Institute, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Phoenix, EE. UU. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka, Japón. · Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University of Siena, Siena, Italia. · Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, EE. UU. ·Acta Otorrinolaringol Esp · Pubmed #29056234.

ABSTRACT: This article presents operational diagnostic criteria for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), formulated by the Committee for Classification of Vestibular Disorders of the Bárány Society. The classification reflects current knowledge of clinical aspects and pathomechanisms of BPPV and includes both established and emerging syndromes of BPPV. It is anticipated that growing understanding of the disease will lead to further development of this classification.

2 Editorial Naratriptan May Become an Alternative Prophylactic Option for Patients with Cluster Headache. 2017

Kikui, Shoji / Takeshima, Takao. ·Department of Neurology and Headache Center, Tominaga Hospital, Japan. ·Intern Med · Pubmed #28883259.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Novel clinical and therapeutic aspects in autoimmunity. 2017

Amital, Howard / Watad, Abdulla / Szekanecz, Zoltán. ·Department of Medicine 'B', Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Hashomer, Israel. howard.amital@sheba.health.gov.il. · Department of Medicine 'B', Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Zabludowicz Center for Autoimmune Diseases, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Hashomer, Israel. · Department of Rheumatology, Department of Medicine, University of Debrecen, Medical and Health Sciences Center, Debrecen, Hungary. ·Immunol Res · Pubmed #27665457.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Is there a relationship between non-obstructive coronary artery disease or cardiac syndrome X and migraine? An integrated multi-disciplinary approach. 2016

Nemati, Reza / Nabipour, Iraj / Akbarzadeh, Mehdi / Assadi, Majid. ·Department of Neurology, Bushehr University Medical Hospital, Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Bushehr, Iran. assadipoya@yahoo.com. ·Hell J Nucl Med · Pubmed #27999825.

ABSTRACT: Non-obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) which is mostly called cardiac syndrome X (CSX) is noted in about 30% of men and 40%-60% of women and seems to be incremental. In addition, frequent myocardial perfusion defects with various levels of severity are often seen in this disease. Recently, we noticed that the frequency of migraine in patients with CSX was noticeably higher than in healthy people and in CAD patients. This may support the evolving story that CSX is related to migraine and to chest pain and that CSX and migraine may have a similar pathophysiology. Hence, myocardial perfusion imaging could be used as a complement any diagnostic test to support the relation between CSX and migraine.

5 Editorial Prophylaxis of migraine in children. 2013

Aneja, Satinder. ·Department of Pediatrics, Lady Hardinge Medical College, and Kalawati Saran Children's Hospital, New Delhi, 110001, India, drsaneja@gmail.com. ·Indian J Pediatr · Pubmed #24132629.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Review CGRP/CGRP Receptor Antibodies: Potential Adverse Effects Due to Blockade of Neovascularization? 2019

Majima, Masataka / Ito, Yoshiya / Hosono, Kanako / Amano, Hideki. ·Department of Pharmacology, Kitasato University School of Medicine and Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Kitasato University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-0374, Japan. Electronic address: mmajima@med.kitasato-u.ac.jp. · Department of Pharmacology, Kitasato University School of Medicine and Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Kitasato University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-0374, Japan. ·Trends Pharmacol Sci · Pubmed #30502971.

ABSTRACT: Migraine is a severe neurological disorder in which calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a key molecule in pathophysiology. Neuronal system-derived CGRP enhances neovascularization in several important pathological conditions and sends a cue to the vascular system. In 2018, the FDA approved erenumab and fremanezumab, antibodies against CGRP receptor and CGRP, as the first new class of drugs for migraine. Treatment of migraine with these antibodies requires great care because neovascularization-related adverse effects may be induced in some patients. Here, we focus on enhancement of neovascularization by CGRP and discuss possible adverse effects resulting from blocking neovascularization. We also suggest that CGRP antibodies may also be used as novel antitumor agents by suppressing tumor-associated angiogenesis.

7 Review Prevalence of restless legs syndrome in individuals with migraine: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. 2018

Yang, Xinglong / Liu, Bin / Yang, Baiyuan / Li, Shimei / Wang, Fang / Li, Kelu / Hu, Fayun / Ren, Hui / Xu, Zhong. ·Department of Geriatric Neurology, First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming, 650032, Yunnan, People's Republic of China. · Department of Neurology, The Seventh People's Hospital of Chengdu, Chengdu, 650041, Sichuan, People's Republic of China. · Department of Anesthesia, Kunming Xishan District People's Hospital, Kunming, 650100, Yunnan, People's Republic of China. · Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, SCU, Chengdu, 650041, Sichuan, People's Republic of China. · Department of Geriatric Neurology, First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming, 650032, Yunnan, People's Republic of China. rh-3338@163.com. · Department of Geriatric Neurology, First Affiliated Hospital of Kunming Medical University, Kunming, 650032, Yunnan, People's Republic of China. xz0702@126.com. ·Neurol Sci · Pubmed #30116981.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Recent studies have shown an association between migraine and restless legs syndrome (RLS), but RLS prevalence among individuals with migraine differs substantially across studies. The present work aimed to comprehensively assess available evidence to estimate RLS prevalence among individuals with migraine and non-migraine controls. METHOD: Web of Science, PubMed, Embase, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang, and SinoMed databases were searched for observational and case-control studies of RLS prevalence among individuals with migraine. Eligible studies were meta-analyzed using Stata 12.0 software. RESULTS: Pooled RLS prevalence in migraine was 19%, and the prevalence was lower in Asia (16%) than outside Asia (21%). Pooled RLS prevalence was 18.8% among individuals with migraine with aura, and 18.5% among individuals with migraine without aura; the RLS prevalence in migraine with aura (MA) was higher than that of migraine without aura (MO) (OR 1.17, 95%CI 1.01-1.34; p = 0.037). Pooled RLS prevalence in a case-control study was significantly higher among individuals with migraine (17.9%) than among non-migraine controls (7.1%) (OR 2.65, 95%CI 2.26-3.10; p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Our meta-analysis provides the first reliable pooled estimate of RLS prevalence among individuals with migraine, and it provides strong evidence that RLS risk is higher among individuals with migraine than among controls.

8 Review Migraine as a risk factor for primary open angle glaucoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2018

Xu, Chang / Li, Jingjing / Li, Zhi / Mao, Xiaochun. ·Department of Ophthalmology, Xiangyang Central Hospital, Xiangyang, Hubei, P.R. China. ·Medicine (Baltimore) · Pubmed #29995778.

ABSTRACT: Migraine is increasingly being reported as a risk factor for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). However, studies aimed to investigate this association yielded conflicting results. To assess the consistency of the data on the topic, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis. A systematic literature search from Embase, Web of Science, and PubMed was performed to identify relevant studies on the relationship between migraine and POAG. Random effects models were used to estimate the pooled relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) in this meta-analysis. A total of 11 studies meeting the inclusion criteria were included in this meta-analysis. Our findings showed an RR of developing POAG of 1.24 (95% CI = 1.12-1.37) in migraine patients. No evidence of significant heterogeneity was detected across studies (P = .071; I = 41.7%). This association was not modified by the glaucoma type of the included patients. A significant association was observed in case-control design studies, but not in cohort design studies. Little evidence of publication bias was found. The findings of this meta-analysis suggest that migraine can significantly increase the risk of the development of POAG. However, the cohort study design failed to identify this association. Whether migraines can significantly increase the risk of developing POAG is still controversial.

9 Review Animal Models of Chronic Migraine. 2018

Chou, Tse-Ming / Chen, Shih-Pin. ·Institute of Neuroscience, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Interdisciplinary Neuroscience Program, Taiwan International Graduate Program, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan. · Institute of Neuroscience, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. chensp1977@gmail.com. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. chensp1977@gmail.com. · Division of Translational Research, Department of Medical Research, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. chensp1977@gmail.com. · Department of Neurology, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. chensp1977@gmail.com. · Brain Research Center, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. chensp1977@gmail.com. ·Curr Pain Headache Rep · Pubmed #29779126.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Chronic migraine (CM) is a recalcitrant subtype of migraine which causes high degrees of disability, poor treatment responses, and frequent recurrences in sufferers. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the development and chronification of migraine attacks remain incompletely understood. A validated animal model could help to decipher the pathogenic mechanism of the disease, facilitating the development of possible therapeutic strategies for CM. In this review, we aimed to summarize current animal models of CM and discuss the validity of these models. RECENT FINDINGS: Several methods have been available to induce recurrent headache-like behaviors or biochemical changes in rodents, including repeated dural application of inflammatory soup, chronic systemic infusion of nitroglycerin, repeated administration of acute migraine abortive treatment to simulate medication overuse headache, or genetic modification. These models exhibit some features that are believed to be associated with migraine; however, none of the model can recapitulate all the clinical phenotypes found in humans and each has its own weakness. The complex features of CM increase the difficulty of constructing a proper animal model. Nonetheless, currently available models are valid to certain degrees. Future directions might consider simulating the spontaneity and chronicity of migraine by combining known genetic substrates and allostatic loads into the same model.

10 Review Obesity and Migraine in Childhood. 2018

Eidlitz Markus, Tal / Toldo, Irene. ·Pediatric Headache Clinic, Day Hospitalization Department, Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel, 4920235, Petach Tikva, Israel. eidlitz@post.tau.ac.il. · Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. eidlitz@post.tau.ac.il. · Juvenile Headache Centre, Department of Woman's and Child's Health, University Hospital of Padua, Padua, Italy. ·Curr Pain Headache Rep · Pubmed #29725875.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The purpose of this work was to review the current literature on the epidemiology and pathophysiology of pediatric obesity and migraine, underlying pathogenic mechanisms that may explain the association between the two disorders, and the effects of treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: In children and adolescents, the bulk of the available data support an association between obesity and headache disorders in general, though a small number of studies contradict these findings. Relative to the adult population, however, few studies have focused specifically on migraine, and no wide-ranging meta-analyses have been conducted to date. It seems that the pathophysiology of obesity and migraine in adults holds true for the pediatric population as well. The association between obesity and migraine in the pediatric population is likely to be multifactorial and to involve both central and peripheral mechanisms. More attention is currently being addressed to the role of the hypothalamus and the bioactive neurotransmitters and neuropeptides that modulate energy homeostasis, namely serotonin, orexin, and the adiponectins, in migraine. A few innovative studies have demonstrated some benefit for migraine from weight reduction treatments such as exercise and lifestyle management. Many open questions remain regarding the modifiable nature of the obesity-migraine relationship and its implications in clinical practice. Further studies of these issues are needed.

11 Review Chronic migraine: A process of dysmodulation and sensitization. 2018

Su, Min / Yu, Shengyuan. ·1 Department of Neurology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, China. · 2 School of Medicine, Nankai University, Tianjin, China. ·Mol Pain · Pubmed #29642749.

ABSTRACT: Chronic migraine is a common chronic daily headache featured by frequent headache attacks with at least 15 headache days per month, which brings great disease burden to both the sufferers and the society. Transformed from episodic migraine, the pathophysiology of chronic migraine is not fully understood, even though several risk factors have been associated with migraine progression. Recent studies have identified both structural and functional alterations in some brain regions of chronic migraine patients indicating that maladaptation of the top-down pain modulation and subsequent sensitization of trigeminal system may be important in the pathogenesis of chronic migraine. Moreover, biochemical analysis has confirmed several molecules related to chronic migraine, which may serve as biomarkers and potential therapeutic targets. Chronic migraine is undertreated because of its poor treatment response and limited therapy options. In this article, we reviewed the latest data to outline the clinical feature, pathophysiological mechanism, and management of chronic migraine, in the expectation to provide direction for future research and finally to take good care of chronic migraine patients.

12 Review The role of nutrients in the pathogenesis and treatment of migraine headaches: Review. 2018

Nattagh-Eshtivani, Elyas / Sani, Mahmood Alizadeh / Dahri, Monireh / Ghalichi, Faezeh / Ghavami, Abed / Arjang, Pishva / Tarighat-Esfanjani, Ali. ·Student Research Committee, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. Electronic address: nattaghe@tbzmed.ac.ir. · Department of Food Sciences and Technology, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. Electronic address: alizadehma@tbzmed.ac.ir. · Student Research Committee, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. Electronic address: Dahrim@tbzmed.ac.ir. · Student Research Committee, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. · Student Research Committee, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. Electronic address: ghavamia@tbzmed.ac.ir. · Nutrition Research Center, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran. Electronic address: tarighata@tbzmed.ac.ir. ·Biomed Pharmacother · Pubmed #29571016.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Migraine as a disabling neurovascular disease affects 6% of men and 18% of women worldwide. The deficiency of many nutrients including magnesium, niacin, riboflavin, cobalamin, coenzymes Q10, carnitine, α-lipoic acid and vitamin D is associated with migraine. Some researchers postulate that mitochondrial dysfunction and impaired antioxidant status can cause migraine. Also increase in homocysteine level can lead to migraine attacks; therefore, some Nutraceuticals play a vital role in migraine prevention. Thus, the aim of the current study was to review randomized controlled trials (RCT) assessing the effect of nutritional supplements on migraine patients. METHODS: English articles in the following databases were searched: MEDLINE, AMED, EMBASE and Cochrane Library. In this manuscript, RCTs published during 1990-2017 were reviewed. RESULTS: Evidences indicate that supplementation with magnesium, carnitine, riboflavin, niacin, CoQ10, vitamin D, Vitamin B CONCLUSION: Due to the possible side effects of pharmacological drugs and drug addictions, the use of nutrient compounds alone or in combination with routine cures have been proposed. However, further constructive studies are required.

13 Review [Triptan-responsive migraine-like headache caused by cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula in a 69-year-old woman with a history of migraine without aura]. 2018

Saiki, Mika / Suzuki, Keisuke / Takekawa, Hidehiro / Kanaya, Hideaki / Kawamoto, Shunsuke / Nakamura, Toshiki / Hirata, Koichi. ·Department of Neurology, Dokkyo Medical University. · Center of Medical Ultrasonics, Dokkyo Medical University Hospital. · Department of Neurosurgery, Dokkyo Medical University. · Department of Neurology, Rehabilitation Amakusa Hospital. ·Rinsho Shinkeigaku · Pubmed #29491334.

ABSTRACT: A 69-year-old woman with a previous history of migraine without aura developed throbbing headache in the right frontal region accompanied by nausea, lasting more than 4 hours a day. The headache intensity was more severe than that of usual her migraine headaches. Administration of eletriptan in the previous hospital improved her headaches. However, one month later the patient experienced more intense headaches in the same region and then was referred to our hospital. MR angiography showed abnormal signal intensities in the cavernous sinus. Cerebral angiography revealed blood reflux to the cavernous sinus, leading to diagnosis of cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula. Transvenous embolization of cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula was performed, which resulted in resolution of the patient's headache. We should be aware that patients with cavernous sinus dural arteriovenous fistula can manifest migraine-like headaches without being accompanied by cranial nerve palsies.

14 Review Targeted Orexin and Hypothalamic Neuropeptides for Migraine. 2018

Strother, Lauren C / Srikiatkhachorn, Anan / Supronsinchai, Weera. ·Headache Group, Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. lauren.strother@kcl.ac.uk. · International Medical College, King Mongkut's Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok, Thailand. · Department of Physiology, Faculty of Dentistry, Chulalongkorn University, Pathumwan, Bangkok, Thailand. weera.su@chula.ac.th. ·Neurotherapeutics · Pubmed #29442286.

ABSTRACT: The hypothalamus is involved in the regulation of homeostatic mechanisms and migraine-related trigeminal nociception and as such has been hypothesized to play a central role in the migraine syndrome from the earliest stages of the attack. The hypothalamus hosts many key neuropeptide systems that have been postulated to play a role in this pathophysiology. Such neuropeptides include but are not exclusive too orexins, oxytocin, neuropeptide Y, and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating protein, which will be the focus of this review. Each of these peptides has its own unique physiological role and as such many preclinical studies have been conducted targeting these peptide systems with evidence supporting their role in migraine pathophysiology. Preclinical studies have also begun to explore potential therapeutic compounds targeting these systems with some success in all cases. Clinical efficacy of dual orexin receptor antagonists and intranasal oxytocin have been tested; however, both have yet to demonstrate clinical effect. Despite this, there were limitations in these cases and strong arguments can be made for the further development of intranasal oxytocin for migraine prophylaxis. Regarding neuropeptide Y, work has yet to begun in a clinical setting, and clinical trials for pituitary adenylate cyclase activating protein are just beginning to be established with much optimism. Regardless, it is becoming increasingly clear the prominent role that the hypothalamus and its peptide systems have in migraine pathophysiology. Much work is required to better understand this system and the early stages of the attack to develop more targeted and effective therapies aimed at reducing attack susceptibility with the potential to prevent the attack all together.

15 Review Migraine and the Hippocampus. 2018

Liu, Hung-Yu / Chou, Kun-Hsien / Chen, Wei-Ta. ·Department of Neurology, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, No. 201, Sec. 2 Shih-Pai Rd, Taipei, Taiwan. christie393@yahoo.com.tw. · School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. christie393@yahoo.com.tw. · Institute of Neuroscience, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Brain Research Center, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Neurology, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, No. 201, Sec. 2 Shih-Pai Rd, Taipei, Taiwan. · School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Institute of Brain Science, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. ·Curr Pain Headache Rep · Pubmed #29404714.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The hippocampus is involved in pain processing, pain-related attention and anxiety, and stress response. The present review compiles the present knowledge of hippocampal volume, activity, and connectivity regarding migraine. RECENT FINDINGS: For hippocampal volume, a longitudinal study discovered decreased volume in newly diagnosed migraine patients after 1 year. Two cross-sectional studies suggested an adaptive increase of volume at low headache frequency and a maladaptive decrease of volume at higher headache frequency. Patients who carried a COMT Val homozygous were found to have larger hippocampi on both sides compared with healthy controls with the same polymorphism. For hippocampal activation, one study showed greater nociceptive activation in patients with migraine compared to healthy controls, with the activity correlated to headache frequency. Another study showed greater deactivation and higher functional connectivity linked to other pain-processing regions in low frequency compared to high-frequency migraineurs. At resting state, intraregional functional connectivity of hippocampus was demonstrated to be lower, and connectivity of the hippocampus with other brain regions was different in patients carrying specific genetic variants. For structural connectivity, two studies suggest a stronger connectivity between the hippocampus and other corticolimbic regions, and the altered connectivities are responsible for migraine-associated allodynia or placebo effect of migraine. Factors including headache frequency, accumulative number of migraine attacks, anxiety score, depression score, and genetic variants are related to hippocampal morphology and functional changes in people with migraine. Future studies should select participants precisely and appropriately control for genetic variants to investigate the complex relationship between the hippocampus and migraine.

16 Review Recent Advances in Pharmacotherapy for Migraine Prevention: From Pathophysiology to New Drugs. 2018

Ong, Jonathan Jia Yuan / Wei, Diana Yi-Ting / Goadsby, Peter J. ·Headache Group, Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. · NIHR-Wellcome Trust King's Clinical Research Facility, King's College Hospital, Wellcome Foundation Building, London, SE5 9PJ, UK. · Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, National University Health System, University Medicine Cluster, Singapore, Singapore. · Headache Group, Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. peter.goadsby@kcl.ac.uk. · NIHR-Wellcome Trust King's Clinical Research Facility, King's College Hospital, Wellcome Foundation Building, London, SE5 9PJ, UK. peter.goadsby@kcl.ac.uk. ·Drugs · Pubmed #29396834.

ABSTRACT: Migraine is a common and disabling neurological disorder, with a significant socioeconomic burden. Its pathophysiology involves abnormalities in complex neuronal networks, interacting at different levels of the central and peripheral nervous system, resulting in the constellation of symptoms characteristic of a migraine attack. Management of migraine is individualised and often necessitates the commencement of preventive medication. Recent advancements in the understanding of the neurobiology of migraine have begun to account for some parts of the symptomatology, which has led to the development of novel target-based therapies that may revolutionise how migraine is treated in the future. This review will explore recent advances in the understanding of migraine pathophysiology, and pharmacotherapeutic developments for migraine prevention, with particular emphasis on novel treatments targeted at the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) pathway.

17 Review Migraine Treatment: Current Acute Medications and Their Potential Mechanisms of Action. 2018

Ong, Jonathan Jia Yuan / De Felice, Milena. ·Headache Group, Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, Kings College London, London, UK. jonathan_ong@nuhs.edu.sg. · NIHR-Wellcome Trust King's Clinical Research Facility, Kings College Hospital, London, UK. jonathan_ong@nuhs.edu.sg. · Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology, National University Health System, University Medicine Cluster, Singapore, Singapore. jonathan_ong@nuhs.edu.sg. · School of Clinical Dentistry, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK. ·Neurotherapeutics · Pubmed #29235068.

ABSTRACT: Migraine is a common and disabling primary headache disorder with a significant socioeconomic burden. The management of migraine is multifaceted and is generally dichotomized into acute and preventive strategies, with several treatment modalities. The aims of acute pharmacological treatment are to rapidly restore function with minimal recurrence, with the avoidance of side effects. The choice of pharmacological treatment is individualized, and is based on the consideration of the characteristics of the migraine attack, the patient's concomitant medical problems, and treatment preferences. Notwithstanding, a good understanding of the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of the various drug options is essential to guide therapy. The current approach and concepts relevant to the acute pharmacological treatment of migraine will be explored in this review.

18 Review Intranasal sumatriptan for acute migraine attacks: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2018

Menshawy, Amr / Ahmed, Hussien / Ismail, Ammar / Abushouk, Abdelrahman Ibrahim / Ghanem, Esraa / Pallanti, Ravikishore / Negida, Ahmed. ·Faculty of Medicine, Al-Azhar University, Cairo, Egypt. · Medical Research Group of Egypt, Cairo, Egypt. · Al-Azhar Medical Students' Association (AMSA), Cairo, Egypt. · Faculty of Medicine, Zagazig University, El Sharkia, Egypt. · Student Research Unit, Zagazig University, El Sharkia, Egypt. · NovaMed Medical Research Association, Cairo, Egypt. · Medical Research Group of Egypt, Cairo, Egypt. Abdelrahman.Abushouk@med.asu.edu.eg. · NovaMed Medical Research Association, Cairo, Egypt. Abdelrahman.Abushouk@med.asu.edu.eg. · Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Ramsis St, Cairo, 11591, Egypt. Abdelrahman.Abushouk@med.asu.edu.eg. · Osmania College of Medicine, Hyderabad, India. ·Neurol Sci · Pubmed #28942578.

ABSTRACT: We performed this systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the tolerability and efficacy of intranasal sumatriptan, a selective serotonin agonist, compared to placebo or other migraine therapeutics for the treatment of acute migraine attacks. We searched PubMed, SCOPUS, Embase, and Cochrane CENTRAL for relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Data were extracted from eligible studies and pooled as risk ratios (RR), using RevMan software. We performed subgroup and meta-regression analyses for different doses and treatment endpoints. Sixteen RCTs (n = 5925 patients) matched our inclusion criteria. The overall effect-estimate showed that intranasal sumatriptan was superior to placebo in terms of pain relief (RR = 1.70, 95% CI [1.31, 2.21], p < 0.0001) and headache relief (RR = 1.58, 95% CI [1.35, 1.84], p < 0.00001) at 2 h. Although sumatriptan was superior to placebo in terms of headache relief at 30 min (RR = 1.31, 95% CI [1.08, 1.59], p = 0.005), no significant difference was found between both groups in terms of the frequency of pain-free participants at 30 min (RR = 1.18, 95% CI [0.49, 2.88], p = 0.71). Subgroup analysis and meta-regression models showed that increasing the dose of sumatriptan reduced the time needed for headache relief; however, this clinical improvement with higher doses was associated with more frequent adverse events in comparison to smaller doses. In conclusion, intranasal sumatriptan is effective for the treatment of acute migraine attacks. However, it was associated with a six-fold increase in the risk of taste disturbance, compared to the placebo. Future RCTs are recommended to provide head-to-head comparison of different administration routes and drug formulations of sumatriptan.

19 Review Child with Headache. 2018

Lakshmikantha, Keshavamurthy Mysore / Nallasamy, Karthi. ·Advanced Pediatric Centre, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, 160012, India. · Advanced Pediatric Centre, Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, 160012, India. ny.karthi@gmail.com. ·Indian J Pediatr · Pubmed #28852973.

ABSTRACT: Headache is a common complaint for which parents seek pediatrician's consult. Headaches are seen in increasing frequency from 3 y of age onwards with peaks in older children and adolescents. In children, secondary headaches due to underlying etiologies are far more common than primary headaches due to migraine. Recognition of temporal pattern of headache along with focused neurological examination will help in narrowing down the etiology. The key goal in urgent care assessment is to identify children with underlying serious illnesses that require stabilization and urgent referral. For benign causes, symptomatic treatment with analgesics like paracetamol or ibuprofen would suffice initially, while identification of the underlying condition would lead to further appropriate management, particularly in primary headaches.

20 Review Neurophysiological symptoms and aspartame: What is the connection? 2018

Choudhary, Arbind Kumar / Lee, Yeong Yeh. ·a School of Medical Sciences , Universiti Sains Malaysia , Malaysia. ·Nutr Neurosci · Pubmed #28198207.

ABSTRACT: Aspartame (α-aspartyl-l-phenylalanine-o-methyl ester), an artificial sweetener, has been linked to behavioral and cognitive problems. Possible neurophysiological symptoms include learning problems, headache, seizure, migraines, irritable moods, anxiety, depression, and insomnia. The consumption of aspartame, unlike dietary protein, can elevate the levels of phenylalanine and aspartic acid in the brain. These compounds can inhibit the synthesis and release of neurotransmitters, dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin, which are known regulators of neurophysiological activity. Aspartame acts as a chemical stressor by elevating plasma cortisol levels and causing the production of excess free radicals. High cortisol levels and excess free radicals may increase the brains vulnerability to oxidative stress which may have adverse effects on neurobehavioral health. We reviewed studies linking neurophysiological symptoms to aspartame usage and conclude that aspartame may be responsible for adverse neurobehavioral health outcomes. Aspartame consumption needs to be approached with caution due to the possible effects on neurobehavioral health. Whether aspartame and its metabolites are safe for general consumption is still debatable due to a lack of consistent data. More research evaluating the neurobehavioral effects of aspartame are required.

21 Review [Mechanism of neural plasticity of acupuncture on chronic migraine]. 2017

Xu, Xiaobai / Liu, Lu / Zhao, Luopeng / Qu, Zhengyang / Zhu, Yupu / Zhang, Yajie / Wang, Linpeng. ·Center of Acupuncture and Moxibustion, Beijing TCM Hospital of Capital Medical University, Beijing 100010, China. · Beijing University of CM. ·Zhongguo Zhen Jiu · Pubmed #29354986.

ABSTRACT: Chronic migraine is one of neurological disorders with high rate of disability, but sufficient attention has not been paid in this field. A large number of clinical studies have shown traditional Chinese acupuncture is a kind of effective treatment with less side effects. Through the analysis of literature regarding acupuncture and migraine published from 1981 to 2017 in CNKI and PubMed databases, the mechanism of neural plasticity of acupuncture on chronic migraine was explored. It was believed the progress of chronic migraine involved the changes of neural plasticity in neural structure and function, and the neural plasticity related with neural sensitization during the process of chronic migraine was discussed from three aspects of electrophysiology, molecular chemistry and radiography. Acupuncture could treat and prevent chronic migraine via the mechanism of neural plasticity, but there was no related literature, hindering the further spreading and development of acupuncture for chronic migraine.

22 Review [PSYCHO-MEDICAL ASPECTS OF PRIMARY HEADACHES]. 2017

Hammerman, Oded / Ifergane, Gal / Ezra, Yacov. ·Medical Psychology Unit, Hadassah University Medical Center, Jerusalem. · Department of Neurology, Soroka University Medical Center, Beer Sheba. ·Harefuah · Pubmed #29292614.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Primary headaches such as migraine and tension type headaches are extremely common and present a significant clinical challenge. These conditions involve a complex interaction between biological and psychological processes. As part of a "vicious cycle" effect, primary headaches can be deleterious to patients, causing stress, anxiety and catastrophization, while at the same time becoming exacerbated by those very same cognitive and emotional states. OBJECTIVES: Medications often have a limited effect in treating chronic primary headache. Additionally, there are a number of sub-populations for whom many common medications are contraindicated, such as: pregnant women, patients with sensitivities to medication and patients in danger of medication overuse. Mind-body therapies for reducing stress, such as relaxation training and biofeedback, as well as cognitive and behavioral therapies have been used to treat primary headache for the better part of the last four decades. These treatments have been shown to be efficacious in reducing symptoms as well as in improving patient functioning and quality of life. Treatment effects have been shown to continue even after termination of therapy, as patients are given tools to regulate their sympathetic arousal and taught to adopt more constructive coping behaviors and thought processes regarding their condition. Despite the plethora of studies demonstrating the effectiveness of mind-body and cognitive-behavioral therapies and despite recommendations made by various consensus groups, these therapies remain under-used in routine medical practice. DISCUSSION: In order to address this problem we propose a graded, integrative model currently being implemented in the "Functional Neurology Clinic" at 'Soroka' University Medical Center. This model contains a three-step treatment algorithm for quickly and effectively teaching patients self-relaxation techniques. The model is meant to be used in conjunction with pharmacological treatments for primary headaches and can be used in inpatient hospitalization, outpatient clinics or multi-disciplinary treatment centers.

23 Review Severe enteropathy with villous atrophy in prolonged mefenamic acid users - a currently under-recognized in previously well-recognized complication: Case report and review of literature. 2017

Kaosombatwattana, Uayporn / Limsrivilai, Julajak / Pongpaibul, Ananya / Maneerattanaporn, Monthira / Charatcharoenwitthaya, Phunchai. ·aDivision of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine bDepartment of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. ·Medicine (Baltimore) · Pubmed #29095288.

ABSTRACT: RATIONALE: Mefenamic acid-induced enteropathy may be an under-recognized condition because few reported cases and no review of literature to comprehensively describe all reported cases exist. From inception until February 2017, a systematic literature search identified twenty original reports of cases of mefenamic acid-induced enteropathy. Additional five cases were identified at our hospital. All cases were included in the analyses. PATIENT CONCERNS: Most patients had been regularly taking therapeutic dosages of mefenamic acid for at least three months before symptoms developed. All patients presented with chronic diarrhea with significant weight loss. Approximately one-third of the cases had some degree of anemia and hypoalbuminemia. DIAGNOSES: Endoscopic findings could range from very mild abnormalities, such as mild atrophic mucosa, to marked abnormalities, such as blunted villi with scalloping appearance in the small intestine and inflamed mucosa with a few superficial ulcers in the ileum and colon. Pathological findings included flattened small intestinal villi and mixed inflammatory infiltrates including eosinophils in lamina propria. INTERVENTION: After identifying history of prolong mefenamic acid exposure, all patients were prescribed to stop this medication. Nutritional support and substitutional treatment for mefenamic acid were provided as well. OUTCOMES: All symptoms responded dramatically to drug withdrawal. Some patients could change to use other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) without symptoms reoccurring. LESSONS: Unlike other traditional NSAIDs, mefenamic acid could induce intestinal villous atrophy. An adequate drug history is crucial to identifying the condition. Protracted diarrhea occurring during treatment should be the indication to cease the medicine promptly.

24 Review Influence of greater occipital nerve block on pain severity in migraine patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2017

Tang, Yongguo / Kang, Junfang / Zhang, Yu / Zhang, Xuejun. ·Department of Neurology, Fenghua People's Hospital, Fenghua 315500, China. · Department of Blood Purification Center, Fenghua People's Hospital, Fenghua 315500, China. Electronic address: Flyingeagle911@163.com. ·Am J Emerg Med · Pubmed #28844531.

ABSTRACT: AIMS: Greater occipital nerve (GON) block may be a promising approach to treat migraine. However, the results remained controversial. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to explore the efficacy of GON block in migraine patients. METHODS: PubMed, EMbase, Web of science, EBSCO, and Cochrane library databases were systematically searched. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the efficacy of GON block versus placebo in migraine patients were included. Two investigators independently searched articles, extracted data, and assessed the quality of included studies. Meta-analysis was performed using the random-effect model. RESULTS: Six RCTs were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, compared with control intervention in migraine patients, GON block intervention was found to significantly reduce pain score (Std. mean difference=-0.51; 95% CI=-0.81 to -0.21; P=0.0008), number of headache days (Std. mean difference=-0.68; 95% CI=-1.02 to -0.35; P<0.0001), and medication consumption (Std. mean difference=-0.35; 95% CI=-0.67 to -0.02; P=0.04), but demonstrated no influence on duration of headache per four weeks (Std. mean difference=-0.07; 95% CI=-0.41 to 0.27; P=0.70). CONCLUSIONS: Compared to control intervention, GON block intervention can significantly alleviate pain, reduce the number of headache days and medication consumption, but have no significant influence on the duration of headache per four weeks for migraine patients.

25 Review Novel Therapeutic Targets Against Spreading Depression. 2017

Chen, Shih-Pin / Ayata, Cenk. ·Neurovascular Research Lab, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA, USA. · Department of Neurology, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan. · Stroke Service and Neuroscience Intensive Care Unit, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA, USA. ·Headache · Pubmed #28842982.

ABSTRACT: Migraine is among the most prevalent and disabling neurological diseases in the world. Cortical spreading depression (SD) is an intense wave of neuronal and glial depolarization underlying migraine aura, and a headache trigger, which has been used as an experimental platform for drug screening in migraine. Here, we provide an overview of novel therapeutic targets that show promise to suppress SD, such as acid-sensing ion channels, casein kinase Iδ, P2X7-pannexin 1 complex, and neuromodulation, and outline the experimental models and essential quality measures for rigorous and reproducible efficacy testing.

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