Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Migraine Disorders: HELP
Articles from Austria
Based on 92 articles published since 2010
||||

These are the 92 published articles about Migraine Disorders that originated from Austria during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4
1 Guideline European Headache Federation consensus on technical investigation for primary headache disorders. 2015

Mitsikostas, D D / Ashina, M / Craven, A / Diener, H C / Goadsby, P J / Ferrari, M D / Lampl, C / Paemeleire, K / Pascual, J / Siva, A / Olesen, J / Osipova, V / Martelletti, P / Anonymous5320857. ·Neurology Department, Athens Naval Hospital, Athens, Greece. dimosmitsikostas@me.com. · Danish Headache Center, Rigshospitalet Glostrup, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. ashina@dadlnet.dk. · European Headache Alliance, President, Dublin, Ireland. audreycraven@migraine.ie. · Department of Neurology, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany. hans.diener@uk-essen.de. · Basic and Clinical Neurosciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, and King's Clinical Research Facility, Kings College London, Wellcome Foundation Building, King's College Hospital, London, SE5 9PJ, UK. peter.goadsby@kcl.ac.uk. · Center for Proteomics and Metabolomics, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333 ZA, Leiden, The Netherlands. M.D.Ferrari@lumc.nl. · Medical Headache Center, Hospital Sisters of Mercy, Seilerstaette Linz, Linz, 4020, Austria. christian.lampl@bhs.at. · Department of Neurology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. Koen.Paemeleire@uzgent.be. · University Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla and IDIVAL, 39011, Santander, Spain. juliopascual@telefonica.net. · Department of Neurology, Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Istanbul University, Millet Cad, 34390, Capa/Istanbul, Turkey. akselsiva@gmail.com. · Danish Headache Centre and Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet, Glostrup, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. jes.olesen@regionh.dk. · Department of Neurology, First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, Russia. osipova_v@mail.ru. · Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy. paolo.martelletti@uniroma1.it. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #26857820.

ABSTRACT: The diagnosis of primary headache disorders is clinical and based on the diagnostic criteria of the International Headache Society (ICHD-3-beta). However several brain conditions may mimic primary headache disorders and laboratory investigation may be needed. This necessity occurs when the treating physician doubts for the primary origin of headache. Features that represent a warning for a possible underlying disorder causing the headache are new onset headache, change in previously stable headache pattern, headache that abruptly reaches the peak level, headache that changes with posture, headache awakening the patient, or precipitated by physical activity or Valsalva manoeuvre, first onset of headache ≥50 years of age, neurological symptoms or signs, trauma, fever, seizures, history of malignancy, history of HIV or active infections, and prior history of stroke or intracranial bleeding. All national headache societies and the European Headache Alliance invited to review and comment the consensus before the final draft. The consensus recommends brain MRI for the case of migraine with aura that persists on one side or in brainstem aura. Persistent aura without infarction and migrainous infarction require brain MRI, MRA and MRV. Brain MRI with detailed study of the pituitary area and cavernous sinus, is recommended for all TACs. For primary cough headache, exercise headache, headache associated with sexual activity, thunderclap headache and hypnic headache apart from brain MRI additional tests may be required. Because there is little and no good evidence the committee constructed a consensus based on the opinion of experts, and should be treated as imperfect.

2 Editorial The pharmacology of TRP channels. 2014

Holzer, Peter / Izzo, Angelo A. ·Research Unit of Translational Neurogastroenterology, Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. ·Br J Pharmacol · Pubmed #24773265.

ABSTRACT: This themed issue of the British Journal of Pharmacology contains review and research articles on recent advances in transient receptor potential (TRP) channel pharmacology. The review articles, written by a panel of distinguished experts, address the rapid progress in TRP channel research in fields as diverse as oncology, urology, dermatology, migraine, inflammation and pain. These reviews are complemented by original research reports focusing, among others, on the emerging roles of TRPV1 in osteoporosis and cystitis and on evodiamine as a lead structure for the development of potent TRPV1 agonists/desensitizers. Other papers highlight the differences in TRPV3 pharmacology between recombinant and native systems, the mechanisms of TRPM3 activation/inhibition and TRPP2 as a target of naringenin, a dietary flavonoid with anticancer actions. New therapeutic opportunities in pain may arise from the strategy to combine TRP channel and cell membrane impermeant sodium channel blockers to inhibit sensory nerve activity.

3 Review From transformation to chronification of migraine: pathophysiological and clinical aspects. 2020

Torres-Ferrús, M / Ursitti, F / Alpuente-Ruiz, A / Brunello, F / Chiappino, D / de Vries, T / Di Marco, S / Ferlisi, S / Guerritore, L / Gonzalez-Garcia, N / Gonzalez-Martinez, A / Khutorov, D / Kritsilis, M / Kyrou, A / Makeeva, T / Minguez-Olaondo, A / Pilati, L / Serrien, A / Tsurkalenko, O / Van den Abbeele, D / van Hoogstraten, W S / Lampl, C / Anonymous5031189. ·Headache and Craniofacial Pain Unit, Neurology Department, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Headache and Neurological Pain Research Group, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), Departament de Medicina, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. marttorr@vhebron.net. · Headache Center, Child Neurology Unit, Bambino Gesu' Children's Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Headache and Craniofacial Pain Unit, Neurology Department, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Headache and Neurological Pain Research Group, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), Departament de Medicina, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Juvenile Headache Centre, Department of Woman's and Child's Health, University Hospital of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of Internal medicine, Sant'Andrea Hospital, University of Rome, Sapienza, Italy. · Division of Vascular Medicine and Pharmacology, Department of Internal Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Biomedicine Neuroscience and Advanced Diagnostics, Policlinico Paolo Giaccone Hospital, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy. · Headache and Craniofacial Pain Unit, Neurology Department, Hospital Universitario Clínico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain. · Neurology Department, Hospital Universitario de La Princesa & Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de La Princesa, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM), Madrid, Spain. · Department of Clinical Neurology and Sleep Medicine, The Nikiforov Russian Center of Emergency and Radiation Medicine of EMERCOM of Russia, Saint-Petersburg, Russia. · Grevena General Hospital, Grevena, Greece. · University Hospital of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Bern, Switzerland University Hospital of Psychiatry, Bern, Switzerland. · Headache Unit, Department of Neurology, Medical center "New Medical Technologies", Voronezh, Russia. · Department of Neurology, Universitary Hospital of Donostia, San Sebastian, Spain. · Department of Neurology, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. · Department of Neurology, Hospital Quironsalud Donostia, San Sebastian, Spain. · Department of Neurology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, State Institution "Dnipropetrovsk medical akademy MOH Ukraine", Dnipro, Ukraine. · Department of Neurology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Department of Neuroscience, Erasmus University Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Headache Medical Center Linz, Ordensklinikum Linz Barmherzige Schwestern, Linz, Austria. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #32349653.

ABSTRACT: Chronic migraine is a neurological disorder characterized by 15 or more headache days per month of which at least 8 days show typical migraine features. The process that describes the development from episodic migraine into chronic migraine is commonly referred to as migraine transformation or chronification. Ample studies have attempted to identify factors associated with migraine transformation from different perspectives. Understanding CM as a pathological brain state with trigeminovascular participation where biological changes occur, we have completed a comprehensive review on the clinical, epidemiological, genetic, molecular, structural, functional, physiological and preclinical evidence available.

4 Review The impact of external trigeminal nerve stimulator (e-TNS) on prevention and acute treatment of episodic and chronic migraine: A systematic review. 2020

Stanak, Michal / Wolf, Sarah / Jagoš, Harald / Zebenholzer, Karin. ·Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Health Technology Assessment, Vienna, Austria; Department of Philosophy, University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: michal.stanak@hta.lbg.ac.at. · Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Health Technology Assessment, Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: sarah.wolf@hta.lbg.ac.at. · Ludwig Boltzmann Institute for Health Technology Assessment, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Neurology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: karin.zebenholzer@meduniwien.ac.at. ·J Neurol Sci · Pubmed #32087428.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The aim of this systematic review was to analyze the effectiveness and safety of the external trigeminal nerve stimulator (eTNS) for the prevention and acute treatment of migraine attacks in episodic and chronic migraine patients. METHODS: We have conducted a systematic literature search in four databases that yielded 433 citations and additional seven citations were found via hand-search. Two randomised placebo-controlled trials and five prospective case series were included in the analysis. RESULTS: Concerning prevention, statistically significant differences were found with respect to reduction of migraine attacks (0.67 less migraine attacks per month), migraine days (1.74 less migraine days per month), headache days (2.28 less headache days per month), and acute antimigraine drug intake (4.24 less instances of acute drug intake per month). Concerning acute treatment, statistically significant differences were found with respect to pain reduction on a visual analogue scale at 1/2/24 h post-acute treatment (1.68/1.02/1.08 improvement, respectively). No serious adverse events occurred in any of the studies. CONCLUSIONS: While e-TNS has the potential to improve migraine symptoms, for its establishment in the standard practice, high quality comparative data, studies with larger sample sizes, and studies with standard and relevant primary outcome parameters are needed.

5 Review Association of diet and headache. 2019

Razeghi Jahromi, Soodeh / Ghorbani, Zeinab / Martelletti, Paolo / Lampl, Christian / Togha, Mansoureh / Anonymous3401096. ·Department of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Nutrition and Food Technology, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Headache Department, Iranian Center of Neurological Research, Neuroscience Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Cardiovascular Diseases Research Center, Department of Cardiology, Heshmat Hospital, School of Medicine, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran. · Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Headache Medical Center, Ordensklinikum Linz Barmherzige Schwestern, Linz, Austria. · Headache Department, Iranian Center of Neurological Research, Neuroscience Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. toghae@sina.tums.ac.ir. · Headache Department, Neurology Ward, Sina University Hospital, School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. toghae@sina.tums.ac.ir. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #31726975.

ABSTRACT: The global prevalence of migraine as a primary headache has been estimated as 14.4% in both sexes. Migraine headache has been ranked as the highest contributor to disability in under 50 years old population in the world. Extensive research has been conducted in order to clarify the pathological mechanisms of migraine. Although uncertainties remains, it has been indicated that vascular dysfunction, cortical spreading depression (CSD), activation of the trigeminovascular pathway, pro-inflammatory and oxidative state may play a putative role in migraine pain generation. Knowledge about pathophysiological mechanisms of migraine should be integrated into a multimodal treatment approach to increase quality of life in patients. With respect to this, within the integrative health studies growing interest pertains to dietary interventions. Although the number of studies concerning effects of diet on headache/migraine is not yet very large, the current article will review the available evidence in this area. All publications on headache/migraine and dietary interventions up to May 2019 were included in the present review through a PubMed/MEDLINE and ScienceDirect database search. According to the current findings, Ketogenic diet and modified Atkins diet are thought to play a role in neuroprotection, improving mitochondrial function and energy metabolism, compensating serotoninergic dysfunction, decreasing calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) level and suppressing neuro-inflammation. It can also be speculated that prescription of low glycemic diet may be promising in headache/migraine control through attenuating the inflammatory state. Moreover, obesity and headaches including migraine could be attributed to each other through mechanisms like inflammation, and irregular hypothalamic function. Thereby, applying dietary strategies for weight loss may also ameliorate headache/migraine. Another important dietary intervention that might be effective in headache/migraine improvement is related to balance between the intake of essential fatty acids, omega-6 and omega-3 which also affect inflammatory responses, platelet function and regulation of vascular tone. Regarding elimination diets, it appears that targeted these diets in migraine patients with food sensitivities could be effective in headache/migraine prevention. Taken together, dietary approaches that could be considered as effective strategies in headache/migraine prophylaxis include weight loss diets in obese headache patients, ketogenic and low-calorie diets, reducing omega-6 and increasing omega-3 fatty acid intakes.

6 Review Migraine and cluster headache - the common link. 2018

Vollesen, Anne Luise / Benemei, Silvia / Cortese, Francesca / Labastida-Ramírez, Alejandro / Marchese, Francesca / Pellesi, Lanfranco / Romoli, Michele / Ashina, Messoud / Lampl, Christian / Anonymous6920962. ·Danish Headache Center and Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet Glostrup, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Health Sciences Department, University of Florence and Headache Centre, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy. · Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Sapienza, University of Rome, Polo Pontino, Latina, Italy. · Dep Internal Medicine, Division of Vascular Pharmacology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Child Neuropsichiatry Unit, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy. · Medical Toxicology, Headache and Drug Abuse Center, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy. · Neurology Clinic, University of Perugia - S.M. Misericordiae Hospital, Perugia, Italy. · Department of Neurogeriatric Medicine, Headache Medical Center Linz, Ordensklinikum Linz Barmherzige Schwestern, Seilerstaette 4, 4010, Linz, Austria. christian.lampl@ordensklinikum.at. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #30242519.

ABSTRACT: Although clinically distinguishable, migraine and cluster headache share prominent features such as unilateral pain, common pharmacological triggers such glyceryl trinitrate, histamine, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and response to triptans and neuromodulation. Recent data also suggest efficacy of anti CGRP monoclonal antibodies in both migraine and cluster headache. While exact mechanisms behind both disorders remain to be fully understood, the trigeminovascular system represents one possible common pathophysiological pathway and network of both disorders. Here, we review past and current literature shedding light on similarities and differences in phenotype, heritability, pathophysiology, imaging findings and treatment options of migraine and cluster headache. A continued focus on their shared pathophysiological pathways may be important in paving future treatment avenues that could benefit both migraine and cluster headache patients.

7 Review Effect of exogenous estrogens and progestogens on the course of migraine during reproductive age: a consensus statement by the European Headache Federation (EHF) and the European Society of Contraception and Reproductive Health (ESCRH). 2018

Sacco, Simona / Merki-Feld, Gabriele S / Ægidius, Karen Lehrmann / Bitzer, Johannes / Canonico, Marianne / Gantenbein, Andreas R / Kurth, Tobias / Lampl, Christian / Lidegaard, Øjvind / Anne MacGregor, E / MaassenVanDenBrink, Antoinette / Mitsikostas, Dimos-Dimitrios / Nappi, Rossella Elena / Ntaios, George / Paemeleire, Koen / Sandset, Per Morten / Terwindt, Gisela Marie / Vetvik, Kjersti Grøtta / Martelletti, Paolo / Anonymous30240960. ·Department of Applied Clinical Sciences and Biotechnology, University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy. simona.sacco@univaq.it. · Clinic for Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Gynecology, University Hospital, Zürich, Switzerland. · Department of Neurology, Bispebjerg Hospital and University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital of Basel, Basel, Switzerland. · Université Paris-Saclay, University Paris-Sud, UVSQ, CESP, Inserm UMRS1018, Paris, France. · Neurology & Neurorehabilitation, RehaClinic, Bad Zurzach, University of Zurich, Zürich, Switzerland. · Institute of Public Health, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Headache Medical Center Seilerstaette Linz, Linz, Austria. · Department of Geriatric Medicine Ordensklinikum Linz, Linz, Austria. · Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Rigshospitalet, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Centre for Neuroscience & Trauma, BICMS, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK. · Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK. · Erasmus Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Vascular Medicine and Pharmacology, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Neurology, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Research Centre for Reproductive Medicine, Gynecological Endocrinology and Menopause, IRCCS S. Matteo Foundation, Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Pediatric Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy. · University Consortium for Adaptive Disorders and Head Pain (UCADH), University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy. · Department of Medicine, University of Thessaly, Larissa, Greece. · Department of Neurology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · University Hospital Rikshospitalet, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Neurology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands. · Department of Neurology, Akershus University Hospital, Lørenskog, Norway. · Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #30171365.

ABSTRACT: We systematically reviewed data about the effect of exogenous estrogens and progestogens on the course of migraine during reproductive age. Thereafter a consensus procedure among international experts was undertaken to develop statements to support clinical decision making, in terms of possible effects on migraine course of exogenous estrogens and progestogens and on possible treatment of headache associated with the use or with the withdrawal of hormones. Overall, quality of current evidence is low. Recommendations are provided for all the compounds with available evidence including the conventional 21/7 combined hormonal contraception, the desogestrel only oral pill, combined oral contraceptives with shortened pill-free interval, combined oral contraceptives with estradiol supplementation during the pill-free interval, extended regimen of combined hormonal contraceptive with pill or patch, combined hormonal contraceptive vaginal ring, transdermal estradiol supplementation with gel, transdermal estradiol supplementation with patch, subcutaneous estrogen implant with cyclical oral progestogen. As the quality of available data is poor, further research is needed on this topic to improve the knowledge about the use of estrogens and progestogens in women with migraine. There is a need for better management of headaches related to the use of hormones or their withdrawal.

8 Review Headache in mitochondrial disorders. 2018

Finsterer, Josef / Zarrouk-Mahjoub, Sinda. ·Krankenanstalt Rudolfstiftung, Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: fifigs1@yahoo.de. · University of Tunis El Manar and Genomics Platform, Pasteur Institute of Tunis, Tunisia. ·Clin Neurol Neurosurg · Pubmed #29408771.

ABSTRACT: Headache is a prominent feature in mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) but no comprehensive overview is currently available. This review aims at summarising and discussing findings concerning type, frequency, pathogenesis, and treatment of headache in MIDs. The most frequent headache types in MIDs are migraine and migraine-like headache (MLH). MLH is classified as secondary headache. More rarely, tension-type headache, trigemino-autonomic headache, or different secondary headaches can be found. Migraine or MLH may manifest with or without aura. MLH is frequently associated with an ongoing or previous stroke-like episode (SLE) or a seizure but may also occur independently of other neurological features. MLH may be associated with prolonged aura or visual phenomena after headache. Except for MLH, treatment of headache in MIDs is not at variance from other causes of headache. Beyond the broadly accepted subtype-related headache treatment, diet, cofactors, vitamins, and antioxidants may provide a supplementary benefit. Midazolam, l-arginine, or l-citrulline may be beneficial for MLH. The pathogenesis of headache in MIDs largely remains unsolved. However, since migraine and MLH respond both to triptanes, a shared pathomechanism is likely. In conclusion, migraine and MLH are the prominent headache types in MIDs. MLH may or may not be associated with current or previous SLEs. MLH is pathophysiologically different from migraine and requires treatment at variance from that of migraine with aura.

9 Review Triptans and CGRP blockade - impact on the cranial vasculature. 2017

Benemei, Silvia / Cortese, Francesca / Labastida-Ramírez, Alejandro / Marchese, Francesca / Pellesi, Lanfranco / Romoli, Michele / Vollesen, Anne Luise / Lampl, Christian / Ashina, Messoud / Anonymous70923. ·Health Sciences Department, University of Florence, and Headache Centre, Careggi University Hospital, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50134, Florence, Italy. silvia.benemei@unifi.it. · Department of Medico-Surgical Sciences and Biotechnologies, Sapienza University of Rome, Polo Pontino, Latina, Italy. · Dept Internal Medicine, Division of Vascular Pharmacology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. · Child Neuropsichiatry Unit, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy. · Medical Toxicology Headache and Drug Abuse Center, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy. · Neurology Clinic, University Hospital of Perugia, Perugia, Italy. · Danish Headache Center and Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet Glostrup, Faculty of Health and Medicl Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Neurogeriatric Medicine, Headache Medical Center Linz, Linz, Austria. · Danish Headache Center and Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet Glostrup, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #29019093.

ABSTRACT: The trigeminovascular system plays a key role in the pathophysiology of migraine. The activation of the trigeminovascular system causes release of various neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, including serotonin and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which modulate pain transmission and vascular tone. Thirty years after discovery of agonists for serotonin 5-HT

10 Review Adipokines and Migraine: A Systematic Review. 2016

Peterlin, B Lee / Sacco, Simona / Bernecker, Claudia / Scher, Ann I. ·Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Baltimore, MD, USA. · University of L'Aquila, Department of Applied Clinical Sciences and Biotechnology, Institute of Neurology, L'Aquila, Italy. · Medical University of Graz, Clinical Institute of Medical and Chemical Laboratory Diagnostics, Graz, Austria. · Medical University of Graz, Department of Blood Group Serology and Transfusion Medicine, Graz, Austria. · Uniformed Services University, Bethesda, MD, USA. ·Headache · Pubmed #27012149.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Migraine is comorbid with obesity. Recent research suggests an association between migraine and adipocytokines, proteins that are predominantly secreted from adipose tissue and which participate in energy homeostasis and inflammatory processes. OBJECTIVES: In this review, we first briefly discuss the association between migraine and obesity and the importance of adipose tissue as a neuroendocrine organ. We then present a systematic review of the extant literature evaluating circulating levels of adiponectin and leptin in those with migraine. METHODS: A search of the PubMed database was conducted using the keywords "migraine," "adiponectin," and "leptin." In addition reference lists of relevant articles were reviewed for possible inclusion. English language studies published between 2005 and 2015 evaluating circulating blood concentration of adiponectin or leptin in those with migraine were included. CONCLUSIONS: While the existing data are suggestive that adipokines may be associated with migraine, substantial study design differences and conflicting results limit definitive conclusions. Future research utilizing carefully considered designs and methodology is warranted. In particular careful and systematic characterization of pain states at the time of samples, as well as systematic consideration of demographic (e.g., age, sex) and other vital covariates (e.g., obesity status, lipids) are needed to determine if adipokines play a role in migraine pathophysiology and if any adipokine represents a viable, novel migraine biomarker, or drug target.

11 Review Epidemiology of migraine and headache in children and adolescents. 2013

Wöber-Bingöl, Ciçek. ·Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090, Vienna, Austria. yasar.woeber-bingoel@meduniwien.ac.at ·Curr Pain Headache Rep · Pubmed #23700075.

ABSTRACT: Migraine and headache are global disabling conditions causing considerable individual suffering and impaired quality of life in adults as well as in children and adolescents. Therefore, epidemiological studies are essential to assess the scope of the problem. This review covers epidemiological studies on migraine and headache in children and adolescents published in the past 25 years. A total of 64 cross-sectional studies have been identified, published in 32 different countries and including a total of 227,249 subjects. The estimated overall mean prevalence of headache was 54.4% (95% CI 43.1-65.8) and the overall mean prevalence of migraine was 9.1% (95% CI 7.1-11.1). There is a lack of population-based studies from low and low-middle income countries. In addition, there is very little information about the prevalence of probable migraine and chronic migraine and no information about menstrual migraine in the young.

12 Review Pharmacological treatment of acute migraine in adolescents and children. 2013

Wöber-Bingöl, Çiçek. ·Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna, Austria. yasar.woeber-bingoel@meduniwien.ac.at ·Paediatr Drugs · Pubmed #23575981.

ABSTRACT: Migraine is a common disease in children and adolescents. The incidence of migraine has increased alarmingly in the general population during recent decades. Migraine causes considerable individual suffering and impaired quality of life. Therefore, appropriate management is essential. In this article, the treatment of acute migraine in children and adolescents will be reviewed. Only a few randomized controlled studies have been published and high placebo rates are a major problem for proving superiority of active drugs. Generally, acetaminophen (paracetamol) and ibuprofen are accepted as drugs of first choice, even though the evidence is poor for the former and limited for latter. Among 14 studies on triptans in adolescents, 9 showed some superiority over placebo with respect to pain relief and pain freedom, and among 6 studies in children, 5 suggest some superiority over placebo. Sumatriptan nasal spray and zolmitriptan nasal spray have been approved for adolescents in Europe; almotriptan has been approved for adolescents in the USA, as has rizatriptan for patients aged 6-17 years. A recent study demonstrated the efficacy of a fixed combination of sumatriptan and naproxen in adolescents with migraine. In conclusion, evidence for the pharmacological treatment of acute migraine in children is very poor and evidence for adolescents is better but still limited.

13 Review [Migraine - diagnostic features, acute therapy and prophylactics]. 2011

Lampl, Christian. ·Konventhospital Barmherzige Brüder Linz, Österreich. christian.lampl@bblinz.at ·Ther Umsch · Pubmed #21882146.

ABSTRACT: Migraine is a chronic. disabling, biologically determined, inherited brain disorder rendering life much less tolerable. The International Headache Society (IHS) offers guidelines for the classification and diagnosis of migraine headaches, in a document called 'The International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd edition' (ICHD-2). Migraine affects 10-16% of the population world-wide. For the 20-30% of migraine sufferers who experience migraine with aura, this aura comprises focal neurological phenomena that precede or accompany the attack. There are three main aspects of treatment: trigger avoidance, acute symptomatic control, and pharmacological prevention. Acute medications are more effective if used earlier in an attack. The goals of preventive therapy are to reduce the frequency, painfulness, and/or duration of migraines, and to increase quality of life.

14 Review Sex hormones and primary headaches other than migraine. 2011

Lieba-Samal, Doris / Wöber, Christian. ·Department of Neurology, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna, Austria. ·Curr Pain Headache Rep · Pubmed #21573925.

ABSTRACT: The relation between sex hormones and migraine has been examined in a series of studies, leading to the definitions of pure menstrual migraine and menstrually-related migraine. The relation between sex hormones and other types of primary headache has been studied less extensively, but there is at least some evidence that hormones in general, and menstruation, pregnancy, or menopause in particular, also impact these disorders. This article reviews the available literature on changes of tension-type headache, cluster headache, other trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias, and hemicrania continua during women's reproductive periods.

15 Clinical Trial Early onset of efficacy with erenumab in patients with episodic and chronic migraine. 2018

Schwedt, Todd / Reuter, Uwe / Tepper, Stewart / Ashina, Messoud / Kudrow, David / Broessner, Gregor / Boudreau, Guy P / McAllister, Peter / Vu, Thuy / Zhang, Feng / Cheng, Sunfa / Picard, Hernan / Wen, Shihua / Kahn, Joseph / Klatt, Jan / Mikol, Daniel. ·Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, 5777 E Mayo Blvd, Phoenix, AZ, 85054, USA. Schwedt.Todd@mayo.edu. · Department of Neurology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA. · Danish Headache Center and Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet Glostrup, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · California Medical Clinic for Headache, Santa Monica, CA, USA. · Department of Neurology, Headache Outpatient Clinic, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria. · Clinique de la Migraine et Céphalées, Département de Neurologie, Centre Hospitalier de L'Université de Montréal, Hôpital Notre-Dame, Montréal, QC, Canada. · New England Institute for Neurology & Headache, Stamford, CT, USA. · Amgen Inc., Thousand Oaks, CA, USA. · Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp., East Hanover, NJ, USA. · Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #30276500.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Subcutaneous erenumab reduced monthly migraine days and increased the likelihood of achieving a ≥ 50% reduction at all monthly assessment points tested in 2 pivotal trials in episodic migraine (EM) and chronic migraine (CM). Early efficacy of migraine preventive medications is an important treatment characteristic to patients. Delays in achievement of efficacy can result in failed adherence. The objective of these post-hoc analyses were to evaluate efficacy in the first 4 weeks after initial subcutaneous administration of erenumab 70 mg, erenumab 140 mg, or placebo. METHODS: There is no generally accepted methodology to measure onset of action for migraine preventive medications. We used a comprehensive approach with data from both studies to evaluate change from baseline in weekly migraine days (WMD), achievement of ≥ 50% reduction in WMD, and proportion of patients experiencing migraine measured on a daily basis. The 7-day moving averages were overlaid with observed data. RESULTS: In both studies (EM: N = 955; CM: N = 667), there was evidence of onset of efficacy of erenumab vs. placebo during the first week of treatment, which in some cases reached nominal significance. For EM the changes in WMD were (least squares mean [LSM] [95% CI]): placebo, - 0.1 (- 0.3, 0.0); erenumab 70 mg, - 0.3 (- 0.5, - 0.2) p = 0.130; erenumab 140 mg, - 0.6 (- 0.7, - 0.4) p < 0.001. For CM the changes were: placebo, - 0.5 (- 0.8, - 0.3); erenumab 70 mg, - 0.9 (- 1.2, - 0.7) p = 0.047; erenumab 140 mg, - 0.8 (- 1.1, - 0.5) p = 0.18. Achievement of ≥ 50% reduction in WMD was observed as early as Week 1 (adjusted OR [95% CI] erenumab vs placebo) in EM: erenumab 70 mg, 1.3 (1.0, 1.9) p = 0.097; erenumab 140 mg, 2.0 (1.4, 2.7) p < 0.001. A similar outcome was observed for CM: erenumab 70 mg, 1.8 (1.1, 2.8) p = 0.011; erenumab 140 mg, 1.9 (1.2, 2.9) p = 0.009. Seven-day moving averages of observed data showed each treatment arm differed from placebo by Week 1 (OR [95% CI]): in EM Day 3 for erenumab 140 mg, 0.7 (0.5, 1.0) p = 0.031 and at Day 7 for 70 mg, 0.6 (0.4, 0.8) p = 0.002; in CM: Day 6 for erenumab 70 mg, 0.6 (0.4, 0.9) p = 0.022 and at Day 7 for 140 mg, 0.7 (0.4, 1.0); p = 0.038. CONCLUSION: Erenumab showed early onset of efficacy with separation from placebo within the first week of treatment in both chronic and episodic migraine patients.

16 Clinical Trial A Controlled Trial of Erenumab for Episodic Migraine. 2017

Goadsby, Peter J / Reuter, Uwe / Hallström, Yngve / Broessner, Gregor / Bonner, Jo H / Zhang, Feng / Sapra, Sandhya / Picard, Hernan / Mikol, Daniel D / Lenz, Robert A. ·From the National Institute for Health Research-Wellcome Trust King's Clinical Research Facility, King's College Hospital, London (P.J.G.) · the Department of Neurology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (U.R.) · the Neuro Center, St. Göran Hospital, Stockholm (Y.H.) · the Department of Neurology, Headache Outpatient Clinic, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria (G.B.) · Mercy Research, St. Louis (J.H.B.) · and the Departments of Global Biostatistical Science (F.Z.), Global Health Economics (S.S.), and Global Development (H.P., D.D.M., R.A.L.), Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA. ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #29171821.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: We tested erenumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody that inhibits the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor, for the prevention of episodic migraine. METHODS: We randomly assigned patients to receive a subcutaneous injection of either erenumab, at a dose of 70 mg or 140 mg, or placebo monthly for 6 months. The primary end point was the change from baseline to months 4 through 6 in the mean number of migraine days per month. Secondary end points were a 50% or greater reduction in mean migraine days per month, change in the number of days of use of acute migraine-specific medication, and change in scores on the physical-impairment and everyday-activities domains of the Migraine Physical Function Impact Diary (scale transformed to 0 to 100, with higher scores representing greater migraine burden on functioning). RESULTS: A total of 955 patients underwent randomization: 317 were assigned to the 70-mg erenumab group, 319 to the 140-mg erenumab group, and 319 to the placebo group. The mean number of migraine days per month at baseline was 8.3 in the overall population; by months 4 through 6, the number of days was reduced by 3.2 in the 70-mg erenumab group and by 3.7 in the 140-mg erenumab group, as compared with 1.8 days in the placebo group (P<0.001 for each dose vs. placebo). A 50% or greater reduction in the mean number of migraine days per month was achieved for 43.3% of patients in the 70-mg erenumab group and 50.0% of patients in the 140-mg erenumab group, as compared with 26.6% in the placebo group (P<0.001 for each dose vs. placebo), and the number of days of use of acute migraine-specific medication was reduced by 1.1 days in the 70-mg erenumab group and by 1.6 days in the 140-mg erenumab group, as compared with 0.2 days in the placebo group (P<0.001 for each dose vs. placebo). Physical-impairment scores improved by 4.2 and 4.8 points in the 70-mg and 140-mg erenumab groups, respectively, as compared with 2.4 points in the placebo group (P<0.001 for each dose vs. placebo), and everyday-activities scores improved by 5.5 and 5.9 points in the 70-mg and 140-mg erenumab groups, respectively, as compared with 3.3 points in the placebo group (P<0.001 for each dose vs. placebo). The rates of adverse events were similar between erenumab and placebo. CONCLUSIONS: Erenumab administered subcutaneously at a monthly dose of 70 mg or 140 mg significantly reduced migraine frequency, the effects of migraines on daily activities, and the use of acute migraine-specific medication over a period of 6 months. The long-term safety and durability of the effect of erenumab require further study. (Funded by Amgen and Novartis; STRIVE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02456740 .).

17 Clinical Trial Hypoxia triggers high-altitude headache with migraine features: A prospective trial. 2016

Broessner, Gregor / Rohregger, Johanna / Wille, Maria / Lackner, Peter / Ndayisaba, Jean-Pierre / Burtscher, Martin. ·Department of Neurology, Headache Outpatient Clinic, Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria gregor.broessner@i-med.ac.at. · Department of Sport Science, Medical Section, University of Innsbruck, Austria. · Department of Neurology, Headache Outpatient Clinic, Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria. ·Cephalalgia · Pubmed #26487467.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Given the high prevalence and clinical impact of high-altitude headache (HAH), a better understanding of risk factors and headache characteristics may give new insights into the understanding of hypoxia being a trigger for HAH or even migraine attacks. METHODS: In this prospective trial, we simulated high altitude (4500 m) by controlled normobaric hypoxia (FiO2 = 12.6%) to investigate acute mountain sickness (AMS) and headache characteristics. Clinical symptoms of AMS according to the Lake Louise Scoring system (LLS) were recorded before and after six and 12 hours in hypoxia. O2 saturation was measured using pulse oximetry at the respective time points. History of primary headache, especially episodic or chronic migraine, was a strict exclusion criterion. FINDINGS: In total 77 volunteers (43 (55.8%) males, 34 (44.2%) females) were enrolled in this study. Sixty-three (81.18%) and 40 (71.4%) participants developed headache at six or 12 hours, respectively, with height and SpO2 being significantly different between headache groups at six hours (p < 0.05). Binary logistic regression model revealed a significant association of SpO2 and headache development (p < 0.05, OR 1.123, 95% CI 1.001-1.259). In a subgroup of participants, with history of migraine being a strict exclusion criterion, hypoxia triggered migraine-like headache according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD-3 beta) in n = 5 (8%) or n = 6 (15%), at six and 12 hours, respectively. INTERPRETATION: Normobaric hypoxia is a trigger for HAH and migraine-like headache attacks even in healthy volunteers without any history of migraine. Our study confirms the pivotal role of hypoxia in the development of AMS and beyond that suggests hypoxia may be involved in migraine pathophysiology.

18 Article Vancouver Declaration II on Global Headache Patient Advocacy 2019. 2020

Dodick, David W / Ashina, Messoud / Sakai, Fumihiko / Grisold, Wolfgang / Miyake, Hitoshi / Henscheid-Lorenz, Deborah / Craven, Audrey / Ruiz de la Torre, Elena / Koh, Rachel / Reznik, Nikita / Bance, Lisa / Leroux, Elizabeth / Edvinsson, Lars / Anonymous4791184. ·Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, AZ, USA. · Danish Headache Center, Glostrup, Denmark. · Saitama International Headache Center, Saitama, Japan. · Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. · Fujitsu Ltd, Tokyo, Japan. · Patient Advocate, Phoenix, AZ, USA. · Migraine Association of Ireland, Dublin, Ireland. · European Headache Alliance, Brussels, Belgium. · INvisible Project, Middletown, Connecticut, USA. · ZS Consulting, New York, NY, USA. · Brunswick Medical Center, Quebec, Canada. · Lund University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. ·Cephalalgia · Pubmed #32345038.

ABSTRACT: In 2017, the International Headache Society convened a Global Patient Advocacy Summit (GPAS-1) to begin a collaborative effort involving patients, patient advocates, patient advocacy organizations, healthcare professionals, scientists, professional pain, neurology, and headache societies, pharmaceutical manufacturers, and regulatory agencies to advance issues of importance to patients affected by headache worldwide. In September 2019, the second Global Patient Advocacy Summit (GPAS-2) was convened to revisit issues from the inaugural meeting, assess the progress of the International Headache Society Global Patient Advocacy Coalition (IHS-GPAC) in meeting the goals set forth therein, and discuss strategies for achieving established goals and supporting future development. Short- and long-term mandates from the first Summit were realized, including publishing the Vancouver Declaration on Global Headache Patient Advocacy 2018, determining the governing and operational structures of the IHS-GPAC, and helping to facilitate the first World Federation of Neurology World Brain Day dedicated to migraine. Another short-term mandate, creating a unified advocacy strategy, was fulfilled by the Coalition's decision to focus on encouraging support from employers and implementing employee support programs for people with migraine. To help execute the strategy, the Coalition is developing an employer engagement toolkit that will educate employers and employees about the impact of migraine in the workplace, reduce stigma directed toward employees with migraine, and facilitate the care of employees with migraine to reduce the burden of illness and improve workplace productivity. Coalition members will disseminate the toolkit and encourage the adoption of migraine workplace programs by employers worldwide. The Coalition has established an alliance with two global, multinational employers to expand migraine awareness and support among policy makers and other stakeholders around the world. The IHS-GPAC met many of the goals established at GPAS-1, and it has initiated a global strategy focused on the psychosocial and economic toll of headache disorders, especially migraine, in the workplace. Ongoing and future activities will explore a range of opportunities with employers and across the full spectrum of advocacy goals.

19 Article Medication overuse headache in 787 patients admitted for inpatient treatment over a period of 32 years. 2020

Salhofer-Polanyi, Sabine / Zebenholzer, Karin / Berndl, Thomas / Kastrati, Kastriot / Raab, Sandra / Schweitzer, Patricia / Stria, Tim / Topic, Pavao / Wöber, Christian. ·Department of Neurology, Krankenhaus Hietzing mit Neurologischem Zentrum [General Hospital Hietzing with Neurological Center] Rosenhügel, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Neurology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. ·Cephalalgia · Pubmed #32153204.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Definitions of medication overuse headache have changed over time. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical characteristics of medication overuse headache patients admitted for inpatient withdrawal therapy over a period of 32 years. METHODS: We included all patients with medication overuse headache treated from 1 January 1984 to 31 December 2015. We obtained all data from the medical reports and defined three periods, P1 (1984-1993), P2 (1994-2003), and P3 (2004-2015). The RESULTS: Within 32 years, a total of 787 patients accounted for 904 admissions for MOH. From P1 to P3, the proportion of patients with preexisting migraine increased from 44.3% to 53.3% (chi CONCLUSION: This retrospective study in a large number of patients with medication overuse headache admitted for inpatient withdrawal therapy over a period of 32 years shows a trend towards changes in the preexisting headache type, a decrease in the time since onset of headache and medication overuse headache, a decrease in the number of drug doses used per month, changes in the type of drugs overused, and an increase in, but still low rate, of prophylactic medication prior to admission.

20 Article Manifestation of migraine in adolescents: Does it change in puberty? 2020

Böttcher, B / Kyprianou, A / Lechner, C / Kößler, M / Heinz-Erian, E / Neururer, S / Abdel Azim, S / Wildt, L / Toth, B / Baumann, M / Rauchenzauner, M / Rostásy, K. ·Department of Gynecological Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine, Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria. Electronic address: bettina.boettcher@i-med.ac.at. · Department of Pediatric Neurology, Children's Hospital Datteln, University of Witten Herdecke, Germany. · Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics I, Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria. · Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Health Economics, Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria. · Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria. · Department of Gynecological Endocrinology and Reproductive Medicine, Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria. · Division of Pediatric Neurology, Department of Pediatrics I, Medical University of Innsbruck, Austria; Department of Pediatrics, Hospital Ostallgäu-Kaufbeuren, Kaufbeuren, Germany. ·Eur J Paediatr Neurol · Pubmed #32115367.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To analyze the association between pubertal stage, menstrual cycle and migraine attacks in girls with migraine. In addition, headache frequency, accompanying symptoms, duration and onset in relation to the specific phase of the cycle were investigated. METHODS: Girls between 7 and 18 years old, diagnosed with headaches that met "International Classification of Headache Disorders II" diagnostic criteria for migraine without aura, kept a daily headache and menstrual cycle diary over 8 weeks. Ovulatory cycles were identified by weekly progesterone saliva tests. RESULTS: 47 girls participated in the study and were divided into three groups according to Tanner stage and onset of regular menstruation: pre- (n = 16), peri- (n = 19) and post-pubertal (n = 12). A significant difference in migraine frequency was found between pre- and post-pubertal girls (p = 0.005). No significant differences with regard to headache characteristics were detected. Interestingly, a higher frequency of attacks in follicular phase occurred compared to luteal phase in peri- and post-pubertal girls (p = 0.030). CONCLUSION: During puberty, migraine patterns in girls change to a typical adult pattern of migraine in a stepwise manner not clearly related to menarche. The first sign of this transition phase could be the higher frequency of migraine attacks in post-pubertal girls.

21 Article Migraine, low-dose combined hormonal contraceptives, and ischemic stroke in young women: a systematic review and suggestions for future research. 2020

Ornello, Raffaele / Canonico, Marianne / Merki-Feld, Gabriele S / Kurth, Tobias / Lidegaard, Øjvind / MacGregor, E Anne / Lampl, Christian / Nappi, Rossella Elena / Martelletti, Paolo / Sacco, Simona. ·Neuroscience Section, Department of Applied Clinical Sciences and Biotechnology, University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy. · UVSQ, CESP, Université Paris-Saclay, University Paris-Sud, Paris, France. · Clinic for Reproductive Endocrinology, Department of Gynecology, University Hospital, Zürich, Switzerland. · Institute of Public Health, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Rigshospitalet, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Centre for Neuroscience, Surgery & Trauma, BICMS, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK. · Barts Health NHS Trust, London, UK. · Headache Medical Center, Seilerstaette Linz, Linz, Austria. · Department of Geriatric Medicine, Ordensklinikum Linz, Linz, Austria. · Research Centre for Reproductive Medicine, Gynecological Endocrinology and Menopause, IRCCS S. Matteo Foundation, Department of Clinical, Surgical, Diagnostic and Pediatric, Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy. · University Consortium for Adaptive Disorders and Head Pain (UCADH), University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy. · Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy. ·Expert Rev Neurother · Pubmed #32056462.

ABSTRACT:

22 Article Prevalence and burden of headache in children and adolescents in Austria - a nationwide study in a representative sample of pupils aged 10-18 years. 2019

Philipp, Julia / Zeiler, Michael / Wöber, Christian / Wagner, Gudrun / Karwautz, Andreas F K / Steiner, Timothy J / Wöber-Bingöl, Çiçek. ·Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Neurology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Vienna, Austria. gudrun.wagner@meduniwien.ac.at. · Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090, Vienna, Austria. andreas.karwautz@meduniwien.ac.at. · Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. · Division of Brain Sciences, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Dr Gönül Bingöl-Dr Muammer Bingöl Çocuk ve Ergen Başağrısı Derneği, Society for Headache in Children and Adolescents, Tan Sokak 2/7, Suadiye, Istanbul, Turkey. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #31694547.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Headache disorders are highly prevalent worldwide, but not so well investigated in children and adolescents as in adults: few studies have included representative nationwide samples. No data exist for Austria until now. In a representative sample of children and adolescents in Austria, we estimated the prevalence and attributable burden of headache disorders, including the new diagnostic category of "undifferentiated headache" (UdH) defined as mild headache lasting less than 1 hour. METHODS: Within the context of a broader national mental health survey, children and adolescents aged 10-18 years were recruited from purposively selected schools. Mediated self-completed questionnaires included sociodemographic enquiry (gender, age, socioeconomic status, family constellation, residence [urban or rural] and migration background). Prevalence and attributable burden of all headache, UdH, migraine (definite plus probable), tension-type headache (TTH: definite plus probable) and headache on ≥15 days/month (H15+) were assessed using the Headache-Attributed Restriction, Disability, Social Handicap and Impaired Participation (HARDSHIP) questionnaire for children and adolescents. Health-related quality of life (HrQoL) was assessed using the KIDSCREEN questionnaire. RESULTS: Of 7643 selected pupils, 3386 (44.3%) completed the questionnaires. The 1-year prevalence of headache was 75.7%, increasing with age and higher in girls (82.1%) than in boys (67.7%; p < 0.001). UdH, migraine, TTH and H15+ were reported by 26.1%, 24.2%, 21.6% and 3.0% of participants. Attributable burden was high, with 42% of those with headache experiencing restrictions in daily activities. Medication use (50% overall) was highest in H15+ (67%) and still considerable in UdH (29%). HrQoL was reduced for all headache types except UdH. Participants in single parent or patchwork families had a higher probability of migraine (respectively, OR 1.5, p < 0.001; OR 1.5, p < 0.01). Participants with a migration background had a lower probability of TTH (OR 0.7, p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Headache disorders are both very common and highly burdensome in children and adolescents in Austria. This study contributes to the global atlas of headache disorders in these age groups, and corroborates and adds knowledge of the new yet common and important diagnostic category of UdH. The findings call for action in national and international health policies, and for further epidemiological research.

23 Article Headaches in the emergency department -a survey of patients' characteristics, facts and needs. 2019

Doretti, Alberto / Shestaritc, Irina / Ungaro, Daniela / Lee, John-Ih / Lymperopoulos, Loukas / Kokoti, Lili / Guglielmetti, Martina / Mitsikostas, Dimos Dimitrios / Lampl, Christian / Anonymous2691080. ·Department of Neurology-Stroke Unit and Laboratory of Neuroscience, Istituto Auxologico Italiano, Milan, Italy. · Department of Neurorehabilitation, Yaroslavl regional clinical hospital of War Veterans, Yaroslavl, Russian Federation. · Department of Neurology, Medical Faculty, Heinrich-Heine-University, Duesseldorf, Germany. · 80th Battalion of Medical Corps, General Ioannis Makrygiannis Camp, Pyli, Kos, Greece. · General Hospital of Grevena, Grevena, Greece. · Regional Referral Headache Centre, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Department of Medical, Surgical and Experimental Sciences, University of Sassari, Rome, Italy. · 1st Neurology Department, Aeginition Hospital, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Headache Medical Center Linz, Ordensklinikum Barmherzige Schwestern, Seilerstaette 2-4, 4020, Linz, Austria. christian.lampl@ordensklinikum.at. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #31690261.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIM: Headache is very often the cause for seeking an emergency department (ED). However, less is known about the different diagnosis of headache disorders in the ED, their management and treatment. The aim of this survey is to analyse the management of headache patients in two different ED in Europe. METHODS: This retrospective survey was performed from September 2018 until January 2019. Patients were collected from the San Luca Hospital, Milan, Italy and the Ordensklinikum Barmherzige Schwestern, Linz, Austria. Only patients with a non-traumatic headache, as the primary reason for medical clarification, were included. Patients were analysed for their complexity and range of examination, their diagnoses, acute treatment and overall efficacy rate. RESULTS: The survey consists of 415 patients, with a mean age of 43.32 (SD ±17.72); 65% were female. Technical investigation was performed in 57.8% of patients. For acute treatment non-steroidal-anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) were the most used, whereas triptans were not given. A primary headache disorder was diagnosed in 45.3% of patients, being migraine the most common, but in 32% of cases the diagnosis was not further specified. Life-threatening secondary headaches accounted for less than 2% of cases. CONCLUSIONS: The vast majority of patients attending an ED because of headache are suffering from a primary headache disorder. Life-threatening secondary headaches are rare but seek attention. NSAIDs are by far the most common drugs for treating headaches in the ED, but not triptans.

24 Article Interictal Hyperperfusion in the Higher Visual Cortex in Patients With Episodic Migraine. 2019

Michels, Lars / Villanueva, Jeanette / O'Gorman, Ruth / Muthuraman, Muthuraman / Koirala, Nabin / Büchler, Roman / Gantenbein, Andreas R / Sandor, Peter S / Luechinger, Roger / Kollias, Spyros / Riederer, Franz. ·Department of Neuroradiology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Center for MR-Research, University Children's Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Biomedical Statistics and Multimodal Signal Processing Unit, Movement Disorders and Neurostimulation, Department of Neurology, Focus Program Translational Neuroscience (FTN), Johannes-Gutenberg-University Hospital, Mainz, Germany. · University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · RehaClinic Bad Zurzach, Bad Zurzach, Switzerland. · Institute for Biomedical Engineering, ETH Zurich and University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. · Neurological Center Rosenhuegel and Karl Landsteiner Institute for Epilepsy Research and Cognitive Neurology, Vienna, Austria. ·Headache · Pubmed #31680242.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Migraine pathophysiology is complex and probably involves cortical and subcortical alterations. Structural and functional brain imaging studies indicate alterations in the higher order visual cortex in patients with migraine. Arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging (ASL-MRI) is a non-invasive imaging method for assessing changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) in vivo. OBJECTIVE: To examine if interictal CBF differs between patients with episodic migraine (EM) with or without aura and healthy controls (HC). METHODS: We assessed interictal CBF using 2D pseudo-continuous ASL-MRI on a 3 Tesla Philips scanner (University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland) in EM (N = 17, mean age 32.7 ± 9.9, 13 females) and HC (N = 19, mean age 31.0 ± 9.3, 11 females). RESULTS: Compared to HC, EM showed exclusively hyperperfusion in the right MT+ and Cohen's d effect size was 0.99 (HC mean CBF ± SD: 33.1 ± 5.9 mL/100 g/minutes; EM mean CBF: 40.9 ± 9.4 mL/100 g/minutes). EM with aura (N = 13, MwA) revealed hyperperfusion compared to HC in the right MT+ and superior temporal gyrus. For MT, Cohen's d effect size was 1.34 (HC mean CBF ± SD: 33.1 ± 5.9 mL/100 g/minutes; MwA mean CBF: 43.3 ± 8.6 mL/100 g/minutes). For the superior temporal gyrus, Cohen's d effect size was 1.28 (HC mean CBF ± SD: 40.1 ± 4.9 mL/100 g/minutes; MwA mean CBF: 47.4 ± 6.4 mL/100 g/minutes). In EM, anxiety was positively associated with CBF in the parietal operculum and angular gyrus. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that extrastriate brain regions probably involved in cortical spreading depression are associated with CBF changes in the interictal state. We conclude that ASL-MRI is a sensitive method to identify local neuro-functional abnormalities in CBF in patients with EM in the interictal state.

25 Article Autosomal dominant optic atrophy plus due to the novel OPA1 variant c.1463G>C. 2019

Finsterer, Josef / Laccone, Franco. ·Krankenanstalt Rudolfstiftung, Messerli Institute, Postfach 20, 1180, Vienna, Austria. fifigs1@yahoo.de. · Institute of Medical Genetics, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Strasse 10, 1090, Vienna, Austria. ·Metab Brain Dis · Pubmed #31152339.

ABSTRACT: OPA1 variants most frequently manifest phenotypically with pure autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) or with ADOA plus. The most frequent abnormalities in ADOA plus in addition to the optic nerve affection include hypoacusis, migraine, myopathy, and neuropathy. Hypertelorism and atrophy of the acoustic nerve have not been reported. The patient is a 48yo Caucasian female with slowly progressive, visual impairment since childhood, bilateral hypoacusis since age 10y, and classical migraine since age 20y. The family history was positive for diabetes (father, mother) and visual impairment (daughter). Clinical examination revealed hypertelorism, visual impairment, hypoacusis, tinnitus, weakness for elbow flexion and finger straddling, and generally reduced tendon reflexes. MRI of the cerebrum was non-informative but hypoplasia of the acoustic nerve bilaterally was described. Visually-evoked potentials revealed markedly prolonged P100-latencies bilaterally. Acoustically-evoked potentials were distorted with poor reproducibility and prolonged latencies. Muscle biopsy revealed reduced activities of complexes I, II, and IV. Genetic work-up revealed the novel variant c.1463G>C in the OPA1 gene. This case provides novel information regarding the genotype of ADOA plus. The novel OPA1 variant c.1463G>C not only manifests with visual impairment, hypoacusis, migraine, and myopathy, but also with hypertelorisms and acoustic nerve atrophy.

Next