Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Migraine Disorders: HELP
Articles from VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System
Based on 2 articles published since 2010
||||

These are the 2 published articles about Migraine Disorders that originated from VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Peripheral Sensory Neurons Expressing Melanopsin Respond to Light. 2016

Matynia, Anna / Nguyen, Eileen / Sun, Xiaoping / Blixt, Frank W / Parikh, Sachin / Kessler, Jason / Pérez de Sevilla Müller, Luis / Habib, Samer / Kim, Paul / Wang, Zhe Z / Rodriguez, Allen / Charles, Andrew / Nusinowitz, Steven / Edvinsson, Lars / Barnes, Steven / Brecha, Nicholas C / Gorin, Michael B. ·Department of Ophthalmology, Jules Stein Eye Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLALos Angeles, CA, USA; Brain Research Institute, UCLALos Angeles, CA, USA. · Department of Ophthalmology, Jules Stein Eye Institute, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Department of Neurobiology and Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Division of Experimental Vascular Research, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University Lund, Sweden. · Brain Research Institute, UCLALos Angeles, CA, USA; Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLALos Angeles, CA, USA. · Department of Neurobiology and Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLALos Angeles, CA, USA; Departments of Physiology & Biophysics and Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Dalhousie UniversityHalifax, NS, Canada. · Brain Research Institute, UCLALos Angeles, CA, USA; Department of Neurobiology and Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLALos Angeles, CA, USA; Veterans Administration Greater Los Angeles Health SystemLos Angeles, CA, USA. ·Front Neural Circuits · Pubmed #27559310.

ABSTRACT: The ability of light to cause pain is paradoxical. The retina detects light but is devoid of nociceptors while the trigeminal sensory ganglia (TG) contain nociceptors but not photoreceptors. Melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are thought to mediate light-induced pain but recent evidence raises the possibility of an alternative light responsive pathway independent of the retina and optic nerve. Here, we show that melanopsin is expressed in both human and mouse TG neurons. In mice, they represent 3% of small TG neurons that are preferentially localized in the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve and are likely nociceptive C fibers and high-threshold mechanoreceptor Aδ fibers based on a strong size-function association. These isolated neurons respond to blue light stimuli with a delayed onset and sustained firing, similar to the melanopsin-dependent intrinsic photosensitivity observed in ipRGCs. Mice with severe bilateral optic nerve crush exhibit no light-induced responses including behavioral light aversion until treated with nitroglycerin, an inducer of migraine in people and migraine-like symptoms in mice. With nitroglycerin, these same mice with optic nerve crush exhibit significant light aversion. Furthermore, this retained light aversion remains dependent on melanopsin-expressing neurons. Our results demonstrate a novel light-responsive neural function independent of the optic nerve that may originate in the peripheral nervous system to provide the first direct mechanism for an alternative light detection pathway that influences motivated behavior.

2 Article An unusual case of cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy with occipital lobe involvement. 2016

Trikamji, Bhavesh / Thomas, Mariam / Hathout, Gasser / Mishra, Shrikant. ·Department of Neurology, Olive View-UCLA Medical Center, Sylmar, Los Angeles, California, USA; Department of Radiology, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Neurology, Olive View-UCLA Medical Center, Sylmar, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Neurology, Olive View-UCLA Medical Center, Sylmar, Los Angeles, California, USA; Department of Radiology, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, California, USA; University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), California, USA. · Department of Neurology, Olive View-UCLA Medical Center, Sylmar, Los Angeles, California, USA; Department of Radiology, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, California, USA; University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), California, USA; Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California (USC), Los Angeles, California, USA. ·Ann Indian Acad Neurol · Pubmed #27293347.

ABSTRACT: Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is an autosomal dominant angiopathy caused by a mutation in the notch 3 gene on chromosome 19. Clinically, patients may be asymptomatic or can present with recurrent ischemic episodes and strokes leading to dementia, depression, pseudobulbar palsy, and hemi- or quadraplegia. Additional manifestations that have been described include migraine (mostly with aura), psychiatric disturbances, and epileptic seizures. Neuroimaging is essential to the diagnosis of CADASIL. On imaging CADASIL is characterized by symmetric involvement by confluent lesions located subcortically in the frontal and temporal lobes as well as in the insula, periventricularly, in the centrum semiovale, in the internal and external capsule, basal ganglia, and brain stem; with relative sparing of the fronto-orbital and the occipital subcortical regions. We describe a 49 year old male with CADASIL with absence of temporal lobe findings on MRI but predominant lesions within the periventricular white matter, occipital lobes with extension into the subcortical frontal lobes, corpus callosum and cerebellar white matter. Although CADASIL characteristically presents with anterior temporal lobe involvement, these findings may be absent and our case addresses the atypical imaging findings in CADASIL.