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Migraine Disorders: HELP
Articles from Bronx
Based on 183 articles published since 2008
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These are the 183 published articles about Migraine Disorders that originated from Bronx during 2008-2019.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8
1 Editorial Monoclonal Antibodies for Migraine Prevention: Progress, but Not a Panacea. 2018

Loder, Elizabeth W / Robbins, Matthew S. ·Division of Headache, Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Jack D. Weiler Hospital, Montefiore Medical Center, Inpatient Services, Montefiore Headache Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. ·JAMA · Pubmed #29800193.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Editorial Why Migraine Forecasting Matters. 2017

Lipton, Richard B / Pavlovic, Jelena M / Buse, Dawn C. ·Department of Neurology and the Montefiore Headache Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine/Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USA. ·Headache · Pubmed #28699331.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Editorial Peripheral nerve blocks, steroid injections and their niche in headache medicine. 2015

Robbins, Matthew S. ·Montefiore Headache Center, Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, USA marobbin@montefiore.org. ·Cephalalgia · Pubmed #25527508.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Editorial Inflaming the need for migraine biomarkers. 2014

Lipton, Richard B. ·From the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY. Richard.lipton@einstein.yu.edu. ·Neurology · Pubmed #25378680.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Editorial Eager for better migraine therapies: keep your (telcage)PANTs on. 2014

Lipton, Richard B / Sandor, Peter S. ·From the Department of Neurology (R.B.L.), Montefiore Headache Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY · and the Neurology ANNR RehaClinic and University of Zurich (P.S.S.), Cantonal Hospital Baden, Switzerland. ·Neurology · Pubmed #25107883.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Review Health Behaviors in Episodic Migraine: Why Behavior Change Matters. 2018

Rosenberg, Lauren / Butler, Nicole / Seng, Elizabeth K. ·Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University, New York, NY, USA. · Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University, New York, NY, USA. Elizabeth.Seng@einstein.yu.edu. · Saul R. Korey Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA. Elizabeth.Seng@einstein.yu.edu. · Montefiore Headache Center, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USA. Elizabeth.Seng@einstein.yu.edu. ·Curr Pain Headache Rep · Pubmed #30062453.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Episodic migraine is common. Everyday behavioral patterns are associated with migraine attacks and disability. This paper reviews health behaviors that can be targeted in people with episodic migraine to enhance migraine-related outcomes. RECENT FINDINGS: Stressful events and perceived stress have demonstrated associations with migraine attack onset among people with episodic migraine. Consistency in daily patterns (eating, sleeping, exercise, and hydration status) is also associated with migraine activity. Sleep deprivation, fatigue, and poor quality sleep have demonstrated relationships with migraine attack onset, as well as headache frequency and headache-related disability in people with episodic migraine. The health behaviors implicated in episodic migraine are part of everyday patterns and can be targeted routinely in clinical practice to improve migraine management. Behavior change is challenging and should ideally be supported by a multidisciplinary team. Future research should focus on evaluating specific behavior change interventions and the relative impact of behavior on migraine outcomes in high- and low-frequency episodic migraine.

7 Review Migraine Care Challenges and Strategies in US Uninsured and Underinsured Adults: A Narrative Review, Part 1. 2018

Charleston, Larry / Royce, Jeffrey / Monteith, Teshamae S / Broner, Susan W / O'Brien, Hope L / Manrriquez, Salvador L / Robbins, Matthew S. ·Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Neuro and Headache Center, SwedishAmerican Hospital, Rockford, IL, USA. · Headache Division, Department of Neurology, University of Miami, Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA. · Weill Cornell Medicine Headache Program, Department of Neurology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Neurology, Cincinnati Children's Medical Center, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA. · Herman Ostrow School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Headache Center, Bronx, NY, USA. ·Headache · Pubmed #29516470.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To review the scope of the problem facing individuals with migraine who are under- or uninsured. In this first of a 2-part narrative review, we will explore migraine epidemiology and the challenges that face this vulnerable population. BACKGROUND: Implementation of the Affordable Care Act has improved access to health care for many individuals who were previously uninsured, but there are many, particularly those of certain demographics, who are at high risk for worse outcomes. METHODS: A narrative review was performed after a series of discussions within the Underserved Populations in Headache Medicine Special Interest Section meetings of the American Headache Society. Literature was reviewed for key concepts underpinning conceptual boundaries and a broad overview of the subject matter. Published guidelines, state-specific Medicaid websites, headache quality measurement set, literature review, and expert opinion were used to tailor suggested treatment options and therapeutic strategies. RESULTS: Migraine is common, yet remains underdiagnosed and associated with worse outcomes among those of under-represented backgrounds and those who are underinsured or uninsured. Low socioeconomics may play an important role in the disease progression, characteristics, outcome, and quality of life of patients with migraine and other headache disorders. Other barriers to optimal care include time constraints, lack of access to specialty providers, transportation, and financial limitations. CONCLUSION: There are many barriers and challenges that affect people with migraine who are underinsured or uninsured, particularly those of under-represented racial backgrounds and of lower socioeconomic status.

8 Review Emergent management of primary headache: a review of current literature. 2018

Naeem, Farnia / Schramm, Chris / Friedman, Benjamin W. ·Medical College. · Department of Emergency Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Health System, Bronx, New York, USA. ·Curr Opin Neurol · Pubmed #29461426.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The current article reviews recent data on treatment of acute headache patients in the acute care setting. RECENT FINDINGS: Intravenous fluid hydration, a common component of emergency department (ED) migraine therapy, does not improve pain outcomes and leads to longer ED lengths of stay. Therefore, intravenous fluids should be administered only to migraine patients with clinical evidence of dehydration. Similarly, intravenous ketamine has garnered interest as a treatment for acute pain but does not provide substantial relief to migraine patients. New studies on the serotonin (5-HT3; 5-hydroxytryptamine-3) antagonist granisetron, intranasal lidocaine, and high-flow oxygen have reported conflicting results for migraine patients. Finally, although experts recommend avoiding opioids in migraine treatment, opioid administration remains prevalent in the ED. A new study has demonstrated that patients who receive intravenous hydromorphone in the ED are much less likely to attain acute headache relief. Standardized headache protocols may decrease opioid use and provide significant pain relief for patients. SUMMARY: Recent data have clarified the role of opioids and ketamine in the ED (do not use!). The role of treatment protocols and intravenous fluids is still ill-defined. Subpopulations of migraine patients may benefit from high-flow oxygen and intranasal lidocaine.

9 Review Experts' opinion about the primary headache diagnostic criteria of the ICHD-3rd edition beta in children and adolescents. 2017

Özge, Aynur / Faedda, Noemi / Abu-Arafeh, Ishaq / Gelfand, Amy A / Goadsby, Peter James / Cuvellier, Jean Christophe / Valeriani, Massimiliano / Sergeev, Alexey / Barlow, Karen / Uludüz, Derya / Yalın, Osman Özgür / Lipton, Richard B / Rapoport, Alan / Guidetti, Vincenzo. ·Department of Neurology, Mersin University Medical Faculty, Mersin, Turkey. · Phd program in Behavioural Neuroscience, Department of Paediatrics and Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Royal Hospital for Sick Children, Glasgow, G3 8SJ, UK. · UCSF Headache Center and UCSF Benioff Children's Hospital, Pediatric Brain Center 2330 Post St 6th Floor San Francisco, Campus Box 1675, San Francisco, CA, 94115, USA. · NIHR-Wellcome Trust King's Clinical Research Facility, King's College London, London, England. · Division of Paediatric Neurology, Department of Paediatrics, Lille Faculty of Medicine and Children's Hospital, Lille, France. · Division of Neurology, Ospedale Pediatrico Bambino Gesù, Piazza Sant'Onofrio 4, 00165, Rome, Italy. · Center for Sensory-Motor Interaction Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. · Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, University Headache Clinic, Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, Russia. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Alberta Children's Hospital, C4-335, 2888 Shaganappi Trail NW, Calgary, AB, T3B 6A8, Canada. · Cerrahpaşa Medical Faculty, Department of Neurology, İstanbul University, Kocamustafapaşa, İstanbul, Turkey. · İstanbul Research and Education Hospital, Kocamustafapaşa, İstanbul, Turkey. · Department of Neurology Montefiore Headache Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Louis and Dora Rousso Building, 1165 Morris Park Avenue, Room 332, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA. · The David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Department of Pediatrics and Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy. vincenzo.guidetti@uniroma1.it. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #29285570.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The 2013 International Classification of Headache Disorders-3 (ICHD-3) was published in a beta version to allow the clinicians to confirm the validity of the criteria or to suggest improvements based on field studies. The aim of this work was to review the Primary Headache Disorders Section of ICHD-3 beta data on children and adolescents (age 0-18 years), and to suggest changes, additions, and amendments. METHODS: Several experts in childhood headache across the world applied different aspects of ICHD-3 beta in their normal clinical practice. Based on their personal experience and the literature available on pediatric headache, they made observations and proposed suggestions for the primary headache disorders section of ICHD-3 beta data on children and adolescents. RESULTS: Some headache disorders in children have specific features which are different from those seen in adults and which should be acknowledged and considered. Some features in children were found to be age-dependent: clinical characteristics, risks factors and etiologies have a strong bio psycho-social basis in children and adolescents making primary headache disorders in children distinct from those in adults. CONCLUSIONS: Several recommendations are presented in order to make ICHD-3 more appropriate for use with children.

10 Review Caffeine in the management of patients with headache. 2017

Lipton, Richard B / Diener, Hans-Christoph / Robbins, Matthew S / Garas, Sandy Yacoub / Patel, Ketu. ·Montefiore Headache Center, Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Louis and Dora Rousso Building, 1165 Morris Park Avenue, Room 332, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA. rlipton@aecom.yu.edu. · Department of Neurology, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany. · Montefiore Headache Center, Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Louis and Dora Rousso Building, 1165 Morris Park Avenue, Room 332, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA. · GlaxoSmithKline Consumer Healthcare, Parsippany, NJ, USA. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #29067618.

ABSTRACT: Caffeinated headache medications, either alone or in combination with other treatments, are widely used by patients with headache. Clinicians should be familiar with their use as well as the chemistry, pharmacology, dietary and medical sources, clinical benefits, and potential safety issues of caffeine. In this review, we consider the role of caffeine in the over-the-counter treatment of headache. The MEDLINE and Cochrane databases were searched by combining "caffeine" with the terms "headache," "migraine," and "tension-type." Studies that were not placebo-controlled or that involved medications available only with a prescription, as well as those not assessing patients with migraine and/or tension-type headache (TTH), were excluded. Compared with analgesic medication alone, combinations of caffeine with analgesic medications, including acetaminophen, acetylsalicylic acid, and ibuprofen, showed significantly improved efficacy in the treatment of patients with TTH or migraine, with favorable tolerability in the vast majority of patients. The most common adverse events were nervousness (6.5%), nausea (4.3%), abdominal pain/discomfort (4.1%), and dizziness (3.2%). This review provides evidence for the role of caffeine as an analgesic adjuvant in the acute treatment of primary headache with over-the-counter drugs, caffeine doses of 130 mg enhance the efficacy of analgesics in TTH and doses of ≥100 mg enhance benefits in migraine. Additional studies are needed to assess the relationship between caffeine dosing and clinical benefits in patients with TTH and migraine.

11 Review Association Between Obesity and Migraine in Women. 2017

Pavlovic, Jelena M / Vieira, Julio R / Lipton, Richard B / Bond, Dale S. ·Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Van Etten 3C9B, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA. jpavlovi@montefiore.org. · Montefiore Headache Center, Bronx, NY, USA. jpavlovi@montefiore.org. · Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Van Etten 3C9B, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA. · Health Quest Neurology, Kingston, NY, USA. · Montefiore Headache Center, Bronx, NY, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, The Miriam Hospital/Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center, Providence, RI, USA. ·Curr Pain Headache Rep · Pubmed #28842821.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Migraine is a common and highly disabling condition that is particularly prevalent among women and especially women of reproductive age. The tremendous rise in adiposity in the Western world has led to an epidemic of obesity in women. The particular effects of obesity on women with migraine of various ages are the focus of this review. RECENT FINDINGS: Conflicting findings from various studies with different approaches and populations have made challenging definitive conclusions about associations between migraine and obesity. While the association between obesity and migraine frequency has been consistently demonstrated and obesity is considered a risk factor for progression from episodic to chronic migraine, the association between obesity and migraine prevalence is still somewhat debated and appears to be dependent on gender and age, with the most consistent effects observed in women younger than 55 years of age. Association between migraine and obesity is most commonly observed in women of reproductive age. The multimodal changes associated with age and hormonal change in women likely play a role in this relationship, as obesity does not appear to be related to migraine in women over 55 years of age. Future studies focusing on the migraine-obesity relationship in women should examine the effects of age, endogenous hormonal state, and exogenous hormones on migraine and obesity.

12 Review Sex-related influences in migraine. 2017

Pavlovic, Jelena M / Akcali, Didem / Bolay, Hayrunnisa / Bernstein, Carolyn / Maleki, Nasim. ·Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York. · Montefiore Headache Center, Bronx, New York. · Department of Neurology and Neuropsychiatry Centre, Gazi University School of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. · Department of Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Psychiatric Neuroimaging, Department of Psychiatry, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, Massachusetts. ·J Neurosci Res · Pubmed #27870430.

ABSTRACT: Migraine is a common neurological disorder with significantly higher incidence and prevalence in women than men. The presentation of the disease in women is modulated by changes in sex hormones from adolescence to pregnancy and menopause. Yet, the effect of sex influences has often been neglected in both basic and clinical and in clinical management of the disease. In this review, evidence from epidemiological, clinical, animal, and neuroimaging studies on the significance of the sex-related influences in migraine is presented, and the unmet needs in each area are discussed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

13 Review Managing Migraine. 2017

Friedman, Benjamin W. ·Department of Emergency Medicine, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY. Electronic address: bwfriedmanmd@gmail.com. ·Ann Emerg Med · Pubmed #27510942.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Review How Well Does the ICHD 3 (Beta) Help in Real-Life Migraine Diagnosis and Management? 2016

Ashina, Sait / Olesen, Jes / Lipton, Richard B. ·Department of Neurology, NYU Lutheran Headache Center, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. Sait.Ashina@nyumc.org. · Danish Headache Center, Department of Neurology, University of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet Glostrup, Glostrup, Denmark. · Department of Neurology, Montefiore Headache Center, and Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA. ·Curr Pain Headache Rep · Pubmed #27873122.

ABSTRACT: Classification has played a major role in the diagnosis of primary headache conditions including migraine with and without aura. With many updates and changes, the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD)-3 beta is currently considered as the gold standard for classification of migraine and other headaches. Correct diagnosis of migraine and its subtypes is a first step toward appropriate treatment and crucial to minimizing disability and optimizing health-related quality of life. The ICHD-3 beta version represents the state of the art in migraine diagnosis but is expected to evolve as biological knowledge advances. Future research should focus on identification of biologically homogeneous subgroups of migraine based on genes and biomarkers.

15 Review Management of Adults With Acute Migraine in the Emergency Department: The American Headache Society Evidence Assessment of Parenteral Pharmacotherapies. 2016

Orr, Serena L / Friedman, Benjamin W / Christie, Suzanne / Minen, Mia T / Bamford, Cynthia / Kelley, Nancy E / Tepper, Deborah. ·University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. · Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA. · New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA. · Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, PA, USA. · Beth Israel Deaconess, Sandwich, MA, USA. ·Headache · Pubmed #27300483.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To provide evidence-based treatment recommendations for adults with acute migraine who require treatment with injectable medication in an emergency department (ED). We addressed two clinically relevant questions: (1) Which injectable medications should be considered first-line treatment for adults who present to an ED with acute migraine? (2) Do parenteral corticosteroids prevent recurrence of migraine in adults discharged from an ED? METHODS: The American Headache Society convened an expert panel of authors who defined a search strategy and then performed a search of Medline, Embase, the Cochrane database and clinical trial registries from inception through 2015. Identified articles were rated using the American Academy of Neurology's risk of bias tool. For each medication, the expert panel determined likelihood of efficacy. Recommendations were created accounting for efficacy, adverse events, availability of alternate therapies, and principles of medication action. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: The search identified 68 unique randomized controlled trials utilizing 28 injectable medications. Of these, 19 were rated class 1 (low risk of bias), 21 were rated class 2 (higher risk of bias), and 28 were rated class 3 (highest risk of bias). Metoclopramide, prochlorperazine, and sumatriptan each had multiple class 1 studies supporting acute efficacy, as did dexamethasone for prevention of headache recurrence. All other medications had lower levels of evidence. RECOMMENDATIONS: Intravenous metoclopramide and prochlorperazine, and subcutaneous sumatriptan should be offered to eligible adults who present to an ED with acute migraine (Should offer-Level B). Dexamethasone should be offered to these patients to prevent recurrence of headache (Should offer-Level B). Because of lack of evidence demonstrating efficacy and concern about sub-acute or long-term sequelae, injectable morphine and hydromorphone are best avoided as first-line therapy (May avoid-Level C).

16 Review Understanding migraine and psychiatric comorbidity. 2016

Seng, Elizabeth K / Seng, Cynthia D. ·aSaul R. Korey Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University, New York City, New York bNeurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. ·Curr Opin Neurol · Pubmed #26886355.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article describes recent trends in our understanding of the role of psychiatric disorders in the experience and treatment of migraine, and the role of migraine in the experience and treatment of psychiatric disorders. RECENT FINDINGS: Although the majority of studies evaluating psychiatric comorbidity in migraine have focused on depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorders are highly associated with migraine and relevant for prognosis and treatment planning. Comorbid psychiatric disorders may be associated with poorer treatment response for some acute pharmacotherapies; however, people with comorbid migraine and mood or anxiety disorders can achieve large responses to preventive pharmacologic and behavioral therapies. Emerging research is developing and evaluating behavioral treatments designed to manage cooccurring migraine and mood or anxiety disorders. Stigma related to psychiatric disorders has been well characterized, and could exacerbate extant migraine-related stigma. SUMMARY: Anxiety and mood disorders are prevalent in people with migraine, although not ubiquitous. Psychiatric comorbidity is associated with greater migraine symptoms and disability; however, people with comorbid depression or anxiety are amenable to preventive migraine treatment. Research regarding migraine treatment strategies optimized for people with comorbid psychiatric disorders is critical to advancing care and reducing stigma for this important subpopulation of people with migraine.

17 Review Behavioral Weight Loss Treatments for Individuals with Migraine and Obesity. 2016

Cervoni, Cynthia / Bond, Dale S / Seng, Elizabeth K. ·Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University, 1165 Morris Park Avenue, New York, 10461, NY, USA. cynthia.cervoni@mail.yu.edu. · The Miriam Hospital and Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, 196 Richmond Street, Providence, RI, 02903, USA. dbond@lifespan.org. · Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University, 1165 Morris Park Avenue, New York, 10461, NY, USA. Elizabeth.Seng@einstein.yu.edu. · Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Ave, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA. Elizabeth.Seng@einstein.yu.edu. ·Curr Pain Headache Rep · Pubmed #26862055.

ABSTRACT: Migraine and obesity are each prevalent disorders involving significant personal and societal burden. Epidemiologic research demonstrates a link between migraine and obesity that is further substantiated by putative behavioral, psychosocial, and physiological mechanisms. As obesity is considered a modifiable risk factor for exacerbation of migraine, weight loss may be a particularly useful treatment option for people with comorbid migraine and obesity. Behavioral weight loss interventions complement existing behavioral treatments for migraine and offer patients evidence-based effective strategies for achieving weight loss that could help reduce frequency, severity, and impact of migraine attacks.

18 Review Migraine and its psychiatric comorbidities. 2016

Minen, Mia Tova / Begasse De Dhaem, Olivia / Kroon Van Diest, Ashley / Powers, Scott / Schwedt, Todd J / Lipton, Richard / Silbersweig, David. ·Department of Neurology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Internal Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York, USA. · Division of Behavioral Medicine and Clinical Psychology, Cincinnati Children's Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. · Cincinnati Children's Medical Center, Headache Center, Office for Clinical and Translational Research, Center for Child Behavior and Nutrition Research and Training, Pediatrics, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. · Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, USA. · Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA. · Department of Psychiatry, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ·J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry · Pubmed #26733600.

ABSTRACT: Migraine is a highly prevalent and disabling neurological disorder associated with a wide range of psychiatric comorbidities. In this manuscript, we provide an overview of the link between migraine and several comorbid psychiatric disorders, including depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. We present data on psychiatric risk factors for migraine chronification. We discuss the evidence, theories and methods, such as brain functional imaging, to explain the pathophysiological links between migraine and psychiatric disorders. Finally, we provide an overview of the treatment considerations for treating migraine with psychiatric comorbidities. In conclusion, a review of the literature demonstrates the wide variety of psychiatric comorbidities with migraine. However, more research is needed to elucidate the neurocircuitry underlying the association between migraine and the comorbid psychiatric conditions and to determine the most effective treatment for migraine with psychiatric comorbidity.

19 Review Aerobic Exercise for Reducing Migraine Burden: Mechanisms, Markers, and Models of Change Processes. 2016

Irby, Megan B / Bond, Dale S / Lipton, Richard B / Nicklas, Barbara / Houle, Timothy T / Penzien, Donald B. ·Department of Anesthesiology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, Brenner FIT, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA. · Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Alpert Medical School of Brown University/The Miriam Hospital Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center, Providence, RI, USA. · Department of Neurology, Montefiore Headache Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA. · Department of Gerontology and Geriatric Medicine, Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine Research, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA. · Department of Neurology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, USA. ·Headache · Pubmed #26643584.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Engagement in regular exercise routinely is recommended as an intervention for managing and preventing migraine, and yet empirical support is far from definitive. We possess at best a weak understanding of how aerobic exercise and resulting change in aerobic capacity influence migraine, let alone the optimal parameters for exercise regimens as migraine therapy (eg, who will benefit, when to prescribe, optimal types, and doses/intensities of exercise, level of anticipated benefit). These fundamental knowledge gaps critically limit our capacity to deploy exercise as an intervention for migraine. OVERVIEW: Clear articulation of the markers and mechanisms through which aerobic exercise confers benefits for migraine would prove invaluable and could yield insights on migraine pathophysiology. Neurovascular and neuroinflammatory pathways, including an effect on obesity or adiposity, are obvious candidates for study given their role both in migraine as well as the changes known to accrue with regular exercise. In addition to these biological pathways, improvements in aerobic fitness and migraine alike also are mediated by changes in psychological and sociocognitive factors. Indeed a number of specific mechanisms and pathways likely are operational in the relationship between exercise and migraine improvement, and it remains to be established whether these pathways operate in parallel or synergistically. As heuristics that might conceptually benefit our research programs here forward, we: (1) provide an extensive listing of potential mechanisms and markers that could account for the effects of aerobic exercise on migraine and are worthy of empirical exploration and (2) present two exemplar conceptual models depicting pathways through which exercise may serve to reduce the burden of migraine. CONCLUSION: Should the promise of aerobic exercise as a feasible and effective migraine therapy be realized, this line of endeavor stands to benefit migraineurs (including the many who presently remain suboptimally treated) by providing a new therapeutic avenue as an alternative or augmentative compliment to established interventions for migraine.

20 Review Improving medication adherence in migraine treatment. 2015

Seng, Elizabeth K / Rains, Jeanetta A / Nicholson, Robert A / Lipton, Richard B. ·Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology of Yeshiva University, 1165 Morris Park Ave, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA, Elizabeth.Seng@einstein.yu.edu. ·Curr Pain Headache Rep · Pubmed #26040703.

ABSTRACT: Medication adherence is integral to successful treatment of migraine and other headache. The existing literature examining medication adherence in migraine is small, and the methodologies used to assess adherence are limited. However, these studies broadly suggest poor adherence to both acute and preventive migraine medications, with studies using more objective monitoring reporting lower adherence rates. Methods for improving medication adherence are described, including organizational strategies, provider-monitoring and self-monitoring of adherence, regimen strategies, patient education, self-management skills training (e.g., stimulus control, behavioral contracts), and cognitive-behavioral therapy techniques. The article concludes by discussing the future of research regarding adherence to medications for migraine and other headaches.

21 Review Behavioral treatments for migraine management: useful at each step of migraine care. 2015

Singer, Alexandra B / Buse, Dawn C / Seng, Elizabeth K. ·Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, 1165 Morris Park Ave, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA, alexandra.singer@psych.ferkauf.yu.edu. ·Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep · Pubmed #25708673.

ABSTRACT: Migraine is a disabling and prevalent disorder. Migraine is most effectively treated with a stepped care approach, where patients initially receive a broad level of care (primary care) and proceed to receive increasingly specialized care throughout the course of treatment. Behavioral treatments for migraine modify behaviors of people with migraine with the intention to prevent migraine episodes and secondary consequence of migraine. Behavioral treatments can be incorporated into each level of the stepped care approach for migraine treatment. In this article, we provide a rationale for including behavioral treatment strategies in the treatment of migraine. We then describe and review the evidence for behavioral treatment strategies for migraine, including patient education, relaxation strategies, biofeedback, and cognitive behavioral treatment strategies. Finally, we describe how behavioral treatments can be integrated into a stepped care approach for migraine care.

22 Review Episodic and chronic migraine headache: breaking down barriers to optimal treatment and prevention. 2015

Lipton, Richard B / Silberstein, Stephen D. ·Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Department of Epidemiology & Population Health, Montefiore Headache Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA. ·Headache · Pubmed #25662743.

ABSTRACT: Migraine is a common disabling primary headache disorder that affects an estimated 36 million Americans. Migraine headaches often occur over many years or over an individual's lifetime. By definition, episodic migraine is characterized by headaches that occur on fewer than 15 days per month. According to the recent International Classification of Headache Disorders (third revision) beta diagnostic criteria, chronic migraine is defined as "headaches on at least 15 days per month for at least 3 months, with the features of migraine on at least 8 days per month." However, diagnostic criteria distinguishing episodic from chronic migraine continue to evolve. Persons with episodic migraine can remit, not change, or progress to high-frequency episodic or chronic migraine over time. Chronic migraine is associated with a substantially greater personal and societal burden, more frequent comorbidities, and possibly with persistent and progressive brain abnormalities. Many patients are poorly responsive to, or noncompliant with, conventional preventive therapies. The primary goals of migraine treatment include relieving pain, restoring function, and reducing headache frequency; an additional goal may be preventing progression to chronic migraine. Although all migraineurs require abortive treatment, and all patients with chronic migraine require preventive treatment, there are no definitive guidelines delineating which persons with episodic migraine would benefit from preventive therapy. Five US Food and Drug Association strategies are approved for preventing episodic migraine, but only injections with onabotulinumtoxinA are approved for preventing chronic migraine. Identifying persons who require migraine prophylaxis and selecting and initiating the most appropriate treatment strategy may prevent progression from episodic to chronic migraine and alleviate the pain and suffering associated with frequent migraine.

23 Review Therapeutic antibodies against CGRP or its receptor. 2015

Bigal, Marcelo E / Walter, Sarah / Rapoport, Alan M. ·Vice President, Migraine & Headache Clinical Development, Teva Pharmaceuticals, Frazer, PA. · Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY. · Director of Preclinical Research, Labrys Biologics, Inc, San Mateo, CA. · Director-Emeritus, New England Center for Headache, Stamford, CT. · Clinical Professor of Neurology, The David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USA. ·Br J Clin Pharmacol · Pubmed #25614243.

ABSTRACT: CGRP is an extensively studied neuropeptide that has been implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine. While a number of small molecule antagonists against the CGRP receptor have demonstrated that targeting this pathway is a valid and effective way of treating migraine, off-target hepatoxicity and formulation issues have hampered the development for regulatory approval of any therapeutic in this class. The development of monoclonal antibodies to CGRP or its receptor as therapeutic agents has allowed this pathway to be re-investigated. Herein we review why CGRP is an ideal target for the prevention of migraine and describe four monoclonal antibodies against either CGRP or its receptor that are in clinical development for the treatment of both episodic and chronic migraine. We describe what has been publically disclosed about their clinical trials and future clinical development plans.

24 Review The risk and management of kidney stones from the use of topiramate and zonisamide in migraine and idiopathic intracranial hypertension. 2015

Jion, Yasmin Idu / Raff, Amanda / Grosberg, Brian M / Evans, Randolph W. ·Department of Neurology, National Neuroscience Institute, Singapore; Montefiore Headache Center, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, USA. ·Headache · Pubmed #25486999.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

25 Review Auditory hallucinations associated with migraine: Case series and literature review. 2015

Miller, Eli E / Grosberg, Brian M / Crystal, Sara C / Robbins, Matthew S. ·Albert Einstein College of Medicine, USA. · Montefiore Headache Center, Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, USA. · New York University Langone Medical Center, Department of Neurology, USA. · Montefiore Headache Center, Department of Neurology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, USA marobbin@montefiore.org. ·Cephalalgia · Pubmed #25480808.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to describe auditory hallucinations (paracusias) associated with migraine attacks to yield insights into their clinical significance and pathogenesis. BACKGROUND: Isolated observations have documented rare associations of migraine with auditory hallucinations. Unlike visual, somatosensory, language, motor, and brainstem symptoms, paracusias with acute headache attacks are not a recognized aura symptom by the International Headache Society, and no systematic review has addressed this association. METHODS: We retrospectively studied patients experiencing paracusias associated with migraine at our center and in the literature. RESULTS: We encountered 12 patients (our center = 5, literature = 7), 58% were female, and 75% had typical migraine aura. Hallucinations most commonly featured voices (58%), 75% experienced them during headache, and the duration was most often <1 hour (67%). No patients described visual aura evolving to paracusias. Most patients (50%) had either a current or previous psychiatric disorder, most commonly depression (67%). The course of headache and paracusias were universally congruent, including improvement with headache prophylaxis (58%). CONCLUSION: Paracusias uncommonly co-occur with migraine and usually feature human voices. Their timing and high prevalence in patients with depression may suggest that paracusias are not necessarily a form of migraine aura, though could be a migraine trait symptom. Alternative mechanisms include perfusion changes in primary auditory cortex, serotonin-related ictal perceptual changes, or a release phenomenon in the setting of phonophobia with avoidance of a noisy environment.

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