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Migraine Disorders: HELP
Articles from London, EN
Based on 401 articles published since 2010
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These are the 401 published articles about Migraine Disorders that originated from London, EN during 2010-2020.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17
1 Guideline Aids to management of headache disorders in primary care (2nd edition) : on behalf of the European Headache Federation and Lifting The Burden: the Global Campaign against Headache. 2019

Steiner, T J / Jensen, R / Katsarava, Z / Linde, M / MacGregor, E A / Osipova, V / Paemeleire, K / Olesen, J / Peters, M / Martelletti, P. ·Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Edvard Griegs Gate, Trondheim, Norway. t.steiner@imperial.ac.uk. · Division of Brain Sciences, Imperial College London, London, UK. t.steiner@imperial.ac.uk. · Danish Headache Centre, Department of Neurology, University of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet Glostrup, Glostrup, Denmark. · Department of Neurology, Evangelical Hospital Unna, Unna, Germany. · Medical Faculty, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany. · Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Edvard Griegs Gate, Trondheim, Norway. · Norwegian Advisory Unit on Headache, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. · Centre for Neuroscience and Trauma, Blizard Institute of Cell and Molecular Science, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK. · Research Department of Neurology, First "I. Sechenov" Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, Russian Federation. · Research Center for Neuropsychiatry, Moscow, Russian Federation. · Department of Neurology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. · Health Services Research Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy. · Regional Referral Headache Centre, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #31113373.

ABSTRACT: The Aids to Management are a product of the Global Campaign against Headache, a worldwide programme of action conducted in official relations with the World Health Organization. Developed in partnership with the European Headache Federation, they update the first edition published 11 years ago.The common headache disorders (migraine, tension-type headache and medication-overuse headache) are major causes of ill health. They should be managed in primary care, firstly because their management is generally not difficult, and secondly because they are so common. These Aids to Management, with the European principles of management of headache disorders in primary care as the core of their content, combine educational materials with practical management aids. They are supplemented by translation protocols, to ensure that translations are unchanged in meaning from the English-language originals.The Aids to Management may be individually downloaded and, as is the case for all products of the Global Campaign against Headache, are available without restriction for non-commercial use.

2 Guideline Latest clinical recommendations on valproate use for migraine prophylaxis in women of childbearing age: overview from European Medicines Agency and European Headache Federation. 2018

Vatzaki, Efstratia / Straus, Sabine / Dogne, Jean-Michel / Garcia Burgos, Juan / Girard, Thomas / Martelletti, Paolo. ·European Medicines Agency, 30 Churchill Place, London, E14 5EU, UK. Efstratia.Vatzaki@ema.europa.eu. · Medicines Evaluation Board, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · PRAC member, European Medicines Agency, London, UK. · Department of Pharmacy, Namur Thrombosis and Haemostasis Centre - Narilis University of Namur, Namur, Belgium. · European Medicines Agency, 30 Churchill Place, London, E14 5EU, UK. · European Headache Federation,. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #30109437.

ABSTRACT: Migraine is a common and burdensome neurological condition which affects mainly female patients during their childbearing years. Valproate has been widely used for the prophylaxis of migraine attacks and is also included in the main European Guidelines. Previous (2014) European recommendations on limiting the use of valproate in women of childbearing age did not achieve their objective in terms of limiting the use of valproate in women of childbearing age and raising awareness regarding the hazardous effect of valproate to children exposed in utero. The teratogenic and foetotoxic effects of valproate are well documented, and more recent studies show that there is an even greater neurodevelopmental risk to children exposed to valproate in the womb. The latest 2018 European review from the European Medicines Agency, with the active participation of the European Headache Federation, concluded that not enough has been done to mitigate the risks associated with in utero exposure to valproate. The review called for more extensive restrictions to the conditions for prescribing, better public awareness, and a more effective education campaign in migrainous women.

3 Guideline Guidelines of the International Headache Society for controlled trials of preventive treatment of chronic migraine in adults. 2018

Tassorelli, Cristina / Diener, Hans-Christoph / Dodick, David W / Silberstein, Stephen D / Lipton, Richard B / Ashina, Messoud / Becker, Werner J / Ferrari, Michel D / Goadsby, Peter J / Pozo-Rosich, Patricia / Wang, Shuu-Jiun / Anonymous6710938. ·1 Headache Science Center, C. Mondino Foundation, Pavia, Italy. · 2 Department of Brain and Behavioral Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy. · 3 Department of Neurology, University Hospital Essen, Essen, Germany. · 4 Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, AZ, USA. · 5 Jefferson Headache Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · 6 Montefiore Headache Center, Department of Neurology and Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · 7 Danish Headache Center, Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet Glostrup, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Glostrup, Denmark. · 8 Dept of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · 9 Hotchkiss Brain Institute, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. · 10 Department of Neurology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands. · 11 National Institute for Health Research-Wellcome Trust King's Clinical Research Facility, King's College Hospital, London, England. · 12 Headache Research Group, VHIR, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona Spain. · 13 Neurology Department, Hospital Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain. · 14 Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan. ·Cephalalgia · Pubmed #29504482.

ABSTRACT: Background Quality clinical trials form an essential part of the evidence base for the treatment of headache disorders. In 1991, the International Headache Society Clinical Trials Standing Committee developed and published the first edition of the Guidelines for Controlled Trials of Drugs in Migraine. In 2008, the Committee published the first specific guidelines on chronic migraine. Subsequent advances in drug, device, and biologicals development, as well as novel trial designs, have created a need for a revision of the chronic migraine guidelines. Objective The present update is intended to optimize the design of controlled trials of preventive treatment of chronic migraine in adults, and its recommendations do not apply to trials in children or adolescents.

4 Guideline European Headache Federation consensus on technical investigation for primary headache disorders. 2015

Mitsikostas, D D / Ashina, M / Craven, A / Diener, H C / Goadsby, P J / Ferrari, M D / Lampl, C / Paemeleire, K / Pascual, J / Siva, A / Olesen, J / Osipova, V / Martelletti, P / Anonymous5320857. ·Neurology Department, Athens Naval Hospital, Athens, Greece. dimosmitsikostas@me.com. · Danish Headache Center, Rigshospitalet Glostrup, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. ashina@dadlnet.dk. · European Headache Alliance, President, Dublin, Ireland. audreycraven@migraine.ie. · Department of Neurology, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany. hans.diener@uk-essen.de. · Basic and Clinical Neurosciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, and King's Clinical Research Facility, Kings College London, Wellcome Foundation Building, King's College Hospital, London, SE5 9PJ, UK. peter.goadsby@kcl.ac.uk. · Center for Proteomics and Metabolomics, Leiden University Medical Center, Albinusdreef 2, 2333 ZA, Leiden, The Netherlands. M.D.Ferrari@lumc.nl. · Medical Headache Center, Hospital Sisters of Mercy, Seilerstaette Linz, Linz, 4020, Austria. christian.lampl@bhs.at. · Department of Neurology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium. Koen.Paemeleire@uzgent.be. · University Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla and IDIVAL, 39011, Santander, Spain. juliopascual@telefonica.net. · Department of Neurology, Cerrahpasa School of Medicine, Istanbul University, Millet Cad, 34390, Capa/Istanbul, Turkey. akselsiva@gmail.com. · Danish Headache Centre and Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet, Glostrup, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. jes.olesen@regionh.dk. · Department of Neurology, First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, Russia. osipova_v@mail.ru. · Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Sapienza University, Rome, Italy. paolo.martelletti@uniroma1.it. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #26857820.

ABSTRACT: The diagnosis of primary headache disorders is clinical and based on the diagnostic criteria of the International Headache Society (ICHD-3-beta). However several brain conditions may mimic primary headache disorders and laboratory investigation may be needed. This necessity occurs when the treating physician doubts for the primary origin of headache. Features that represent a warning for a possible underlying disorder causing the headache are new onset headache, change in previously stable headache pattern, headache that abruptly reaches the peak level, headache that changes with posture, headache awakening the patient, or precipitated by physical activity or Valsalva manoeuvre, first onset of headache ≥50 years of age, neurological symptoms or signs, trauma, fever, seizures, history of malignancy, history of HIV or active infections, and prior history of stroke or intracranial bleeding. All national headache societies and the European Headache Alliance invited to review and comment the consensus before the final draft. The consensus recommends brain MRI for the case of migraine with aura that persists on one side or in brainstem aura. Persistent aura without infarction and migrainous infarction require brain MRI, MRA and MRV. Brain MRI with detailed study of the pituitary area and cavernous sinus, is recommended for all TACs. For primary cough headache, exercise headache, headache associated with sexual activity, thunderclap headache and hypnic headache apart from brain MRI additional tests may be required. Because there is little and no good evidence the committee constructed a consensus based on the opinion of experts, and should be treated as imperfect.

5 Editorial Cluster Headache and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide-More on Quantum Therapeutics in Headache Medicine. 2018

Gelfand, Amy A / Goadsby, Peter J. ·Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco. · Section Editor. · National Institute for Health Research-Wellcome Trust, King's Clinical Research Facility, King's College London, London, United Kingdom. ·JAMA Neurol · Pubmed #29987331.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

6 Editorial Foreword: The CGRP Pathway and Migraine Prevention: Reducing the Burden of Disease. 2018

Holland, Philip R. ·Headache Group, Basic & Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom. ·Headache · Pubmed #29697155.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Editorial Migraine Therapy: Current Approaches and New Horizons. 2018

Goadsby, Peter J / Holland, Philip R. ·NIHR-Wellcome Trust, King's Clinical Research Facility, King's College Hospital, London, UK. peter.goadsby@kcl.ac.uk. · Headache Group, Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College, London, UK. peter.goadsby@kcl.ac.uk. · Headache Group, Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College, London, UK. ·Neurotherapeutics · Pubmed #29667112.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Editorial Migraine is first cause of disability in under 50s: will health politicians now take notice? 2018

Steiner, Timothy J / Stovner, Lars J / Vos, Theo / Jensen, R / Katsarava, Z. ·Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Edvard Griegs Gate, Trondheim, Norway. t.steiner@imperial.ac.uk. · Division of Brain Sciences, Imperial College London, London, UK. t.steiner@imperial.ac.uk. · Department of Neuromedicine and Movement Science, NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Edvard Griegs Gate, Trondheim, Norway. · Norwegian Advisory Unit on Headache, Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, St Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. · Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · Danish Headache Centre, Department of Neurology, University of Copenhagen, Rigshospitalet Glostrup, Glostrup, Denmark. · Department of Neurology, Evangelical Hospital Unna, Unna, Germany. · Medical Faculty, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #29468450.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

9 Editorial Cilostazol as a chemically induced preclinical model of migraine. 2018

Holland, Philip R / Strother, Lauren. ·Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, Headache Group, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. ·Cephalalgia · Pubmed #28952338.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

10 Editorial Migraine: More than 'just a mere headache,' yet common. 2017

Varma, Anoop Ranjan. ·Department of Neurology, Santokba Durlabhji Memorial Hospital and Research Institute, Bhawani Singh Marg, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India; Department of Neurology, Institute of Brain, Behaviour and Mental Health, University of Manchester, UK. ·Neurol India · Pubmed #29133702.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Editorial GBD 2015: migraine is the third cause of disability in under 50s. 2016

Steiner, Timothy J / Stovner, Lars J / Vos, Theo. ·Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Edvard Griegs Gate, Trondheim, Norway. t.steiner@imperial.ac.uk. · Division of Brain Sciences, Imperial College London, London, UK. t.steiner@imperial.ac.uk. · Department of Neuroscience, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Edvard Griegs Gate, Trondheim, Norway. · Norwegian Advisory Unit on Headache, Department of Neurology and Clinical Neurophysiology, St Olavs University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway. · Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME), University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #27844455.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Editorial The effects of stress on the dorsal raphe nucleus of the reticular formation and its role in the aetiology of disparate medical and neuropsychiatric disorders. 2016

Puri, B K. ·Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK. Electronic address: basant.puri@imperial.ac.uk. ·Med Hypotheses · Pubmed #27663632.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Editorial Putting migraine to sleep: Rexants as a preventive strategy. 2015

Goadsby, Peter J. ·NIHR-Wellcome Trust King's Clinical Research Facility, King's College London, UK Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco, USA peter.goadsby@kcl.ac.uk. ·Cephalalgia · Pubmed #25576464.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

14 Editorial Stress and migraine: something expected, something unexpected. 2014

Goadsby, Peter J. ·From the Headache Group, NIHR-Wellcome Trust Clinical Research Facility, King's College London, UK; and Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco. ·Neurology · Pubmed #24670890.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

15 Review SCN1A variants from bench to bedside-improved clinical prediction from functional characterization. 2019

Brunklaus, Andreas / Schorge, Stephanie / Smith, Alexander D / Ghanty, Ismael / Stewart, Kirsty / Gardiner, Sarah / Du, Juanjiangmeng / Pérez-Palma, Eduardo / Symonds, Joseph D / Collier, Abby C / Lal, Dennis / Zuberi, Sameer M. ·The Paediatric Neurosciences Research Group, Royal Hospital for Children, Glasgow, UK. · School of Medicine, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Clinical and Experimental Epilepsy, Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, UK. · School of Pharmacy, University College London, London, UK. · Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. · West of Scotland Genetic Services, Level 2B, Laboratory Medicine, Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Glasgow, UK. · Cologne Center for Genomics, University Hospital Cologne, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. · Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts. · Analytic and Translational Genetics Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · Epilepsy Center, Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. · Genomic Medicine Institute, Lerner Research Institute Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio. ·Hum Mutat · Pubmed #31782251.

ABSTRACT: Variants in the SCN1A gene are associated with a wide range of disorders including genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+), familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM), and the severe childhood epilepsy Dravet syndrome (DS). Predicting disease outcomes based on variant type remains challenging. Despite thousands of SCN1A variants being reported, only a minority has been functionally assessed. We review the functional SCN1A work performed to date, critically appraise electrophysiological measurements, compare this to in silico predictions, and relate our findings to the clinical phenotype. Our results show, regardless of the underlying phenotype, that conventional in silico software correctly predicted benign from pathogenic variants in nearly 90%, however was unable to differentiate within the disease spectrum (DS vs. GEFS+ vs. FHM). In contrast, patch-clamp data from mammalian expression systems revealed functional differences among missense variants allowing discrimination between disease severities. Those presenting with milder phenotypes retained a degree of channel function measured as residual whole-cell current, whereas those without any whole-cell current were often associated with DS (p = .024). These findings demonstrate that electrophysiological data from mammalian expression systems can serve as useful disease biomarker when evaluating SCN1A variants, particularly in view of new and emerging treatment options in DS.

16 Review Migraine: navigating the hormonal minefield. 2019

Afridi, Shazia K. ·Neurology Department, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK Shazia.Afridi@gstt.nhs.uk. ·Pract Neurol · Pubmed #31753858.

ABSTRACT: Migraine affects 959 million people worldwide,1 with the highest prevalence being in women of childbearing age. The interplay between female hormones and migraine can be a challenging area to navigate since issues relating to pregnancy, contraception and the menopause are often out of the neurology comfort zone. This review aims to help the neurologist to manage women with migraine, from menarche to menopause.

17 Review A Review of Motion and Orientation Processing in Migraine. 2019

Shepherd, Alex J. ·Department of Psychological Sciences, Birkbeck, University of London, Malet St, London WC1E 7HX, UK. ·Vision (Basel) · Pubmed #31735813.

ABSTRACT: Visual tests can be used as noninvasive tools to test models of the pathophysiology underlying neurological conditions, such as migraine. They may also be used to track changes in performance that vary with the migraine cycle or can track the efficacy of prophylactic treatments. This article reviews the literature on performance differences on two visual tasks, global motion discrimination and orientation, which, of the many visual tasks that have been used to compare differences between migraine and control groups, have yielded the most consistent patterns of group differences. The implications for understanding the underlying pathophysiology in migraine are discussed, but the main focus is on bringing together disparate areas of research and suggesting those that can reveal practical uses of visual tests to treat and manage migraine.

18 Review An Update: Pathophysiology of Migraine. 2019

Goadsby, Peter J / Holland, Philip R. ·Headache Group, Basic and Clinical Neurosciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, UK. Electronic address: peter.goadsby@kcl.ac.uk. · Headache Group, Basic and Clinical Neurosciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, UK. ·Neurol Clin · Pubmed #31563225.

ABSTRACT: Migraine is the most common disabling primary headache globally. Attacks typically present with unilateral throbbing headache and associated symptoms including, nausea, multisensory hypersensitivity, and marked fatigue. In this article, the authors address the underlying neuroanatomical basis for migraine-related headache, associated symptomatology, and discuss key clinical and preclinical findings that indicate that migraine likely results from dysfunctional homeostatic mechanisms. Whereby, abnormal central nervous system responses to extrinsic and intrinsic cues may lead to increased attack susceptibility.

19 Review Aura and Head pain: relationship and gaps in the translational models. 2019

Bolay, Hayrunnisa / Vuralli, Doga / Goadsby, Peter J. ·Department of Neurology and Algology, Gazi University Faculty of Medicine, Besevler, 06510, Ankara, Turkey. hbolay@gazi.edu.tr. · Neuropsychiatry Center, Gazi University, Besevler, Ankara, Turkey. hbolay@gazi.edu.tr. · Neuropsychiatry Center, Gazi University, Besevler, Ankara, Turkey. · Department of Algology, Bakirkoy Sadi Konuk Training and Research Hospital, Bakirkoy, Istanbul, Turkey. · Headache Group, Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. · NIHR-Wellcome Trust King's Clinical Research Facility, King's College Hospital, London, UK. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #31481015.

ABSTRACT: Migraine is a complex brain disorder and initiating events for acute attacks still remain unclear. It seems difficult to explain the development of migraine headache with one mechanism and/or a single anatomical location. Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is recognized as the biological substrate of migraine aura and experimental animal studies have provided mechanisms that possibly link CSD to the activation of trigeminal neurons mediating lateralized head pain. However, some CSD features do not match the clinical features of migraine headache and there are gaps in translating CSD to migraine with aura. Clinical features of migraine headache and results from research are critically evaluated; and consistent and inconsistent findings are discussed according to the known basic features of canonical CSD: typical SD limited to the cerebral cortex as it was originally defined. Alternatively, arguments related to the emergence of SD in other brain structures in addition to the cerebral cortex or CSD initiated dysfunction in the thalamocortical network are proposed. Accordingly, including thalamus, particularly reticular nucleus and higher order thalamic nuclei, which functions as a hub connecting the visual, somatosensory, language and motor cortical areas and subjects to modulation by brain stem projections into the CSD theory, would greatly improve our current understanding of migraine.

20 Review Animal models of migraine and experimental techniques used to examine trigeminal sensory processing. 2019

Harriott, Andrea M / Strother, Lauren C / Vila-Pueyo, Marta / Holland, Philip R. ·Neurovascular Research Lab, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, USA. · Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Headache Group, Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience, King's College London, James Black Centre, 125 Coldharbour Lane, London, SE5 9NU, UK. · Headache Group, Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, Institute of Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience, King's College London, James Black Centre, 125 Coldharbour Lane, London, SE5 9NU, UK. Philip.holland@kcl.ac.uk. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #31464579.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Migraine is a common debilitating condition whose main attributes are severe recurrent headaches with accompanying sensitivity to light and sound, nausea and vomiting. Migraine-related pain is a major cause of its accompanying disability and can encumber almost every aspect of daily life. MAIN BODY: Advancements in our understanding of the neurobiology of migraine headache have come in large from basic science research utilizing small animal models of migraine-related pain. In this current review, we aim to describe several commonly utilized preclinical models of migraine. We will discuss the diverse array of methodologies for triggering and measuring migraine-related pain phenotypes and highlight briefly specific advantages and limitations therein. Finally, we will address potential future challenges/opportunities to refine existing and develop novel preclinical models of migraine that move beyond migraine-related pain and expand into alternate migraine-related phenotypes. CONCLUSION: Several well validated animal models of pain relevant for headache exist, the researcher should consider the advantages and limitations of each model before selecting the most appropriate to answer the specific research question. Further, we should continually strive to refine existing and generate new animal and non-animal models that have the ability to advance our understanding of head pain as well as non-pain symptoms of primary headache disorders.

21 Review Identifying and managing refractory migraine: barriers and opportunities? 2019

D'Antona, Linda / Matharu, Manjit. ·Headache and Facial Pain Group, UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology and The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London, WC1N 3BG, UK. · Headache and Facial Pain Group, UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology and The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, London, WC1N 3BG, UK. m.matharu@uclmail.net. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #31443629.

ABSTRACT: The term refractory migraine has been used to describe persistent headache that is difficult to treat or fails to respond to standard and/or aggressive treatments. This subgroup of migraine patients are generally highly disabled and experience impaired quality of life, despite optimal treatments. Several definitions and criteria for refractory migraine have been published, but as yet, an accepted or established definition is not available. This article reviews the published criteria and proposes a new set of criteria. The epidemiology, pathophysiology and management options are also reviewed.

22 Review Review of migraine incidence and management in obstetrics and gynaecology. 2019

Tanos, Vasilios / Raad, Elissa Abi / Berry, Kelsey Elizabeth / Toney, Zara Abigail. ·University of Nicosia, Medical School, and Aretaeio Hospital, 55-57 Andrea Avraamides Street, 2024, Strovolos, Nicosia, Cyprus. Electronic address: v.tanos@aretaeio.com. · St. George's University of London Medical School, Nicosia University, 93 Agiou Nikolaou Street, Engomi 2408 Nicosia, Cyprus. Electronic address: abiraad.e@live.sgul.ac.cy. · St. George's University of London Medical School, Nicosia University, 93 Agiou Nikolaou Street, Engomi 2408 Nicosia, Cyprus. Electronic address: berry.k@live.sgul.ac.cy. · St. George's University of London Medical School, Nicosia University, 93 Agiou Nikolaou Street, Engomi 2408 Nicosia, Cyprus. Electronic address: toney.z@live.sgul.ac.cy. ·Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol · Pubmed #31336231.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Migraines are the third most prevalent disorder, and seventh-highest specific cause of disability worldwide. Migraines have a multitude of underlying aetiologies; the pathology may come as a result of hormonal treatment or as a sole symptom during menstrual cycle or pregnancy, with variable intensity and duration. In addition, clinicians should be fully aware of the potential complications and well-versed in management options. METHODS: A systematic review of the incidence, symptoms, treatment options and complications among women suffering from migraines in gynaecology, as well as obstetrical cases has been performed. The significance of migraines as a marker in antenatal care and contraception treatment has also been investigated. RESULTS: The incidence of migraines in gynaecological and obstetrical cases, and contraceptive users were 11.7-12.5 %, 9-38.5 %, and 16.7-54.7% respectively. There is an average six-fold increase in the risk of stroke in women who take combined hormonal contraception and suffer from migraines. Four papers with 1565 patients proposed the combination of triptans along with the progesterone only pill. Desogestrel 75mcg/day was found to reduce the intensity of migraines compared to the combined hormonal contraceptives. The risk of gestational hypertension, pre-eclampsia, low birth weight, and preterm birth was found to be increased in pregnant women suffering from migraines. CONCLUSION: Migraines have a high incidence in gynaecology and obstetrics. Health care providers must include screening questions when history taking to identify women with migraines and effectively manage them. Proper follow-up and treatment is required for all women with migraines in order to minimize the risk of cerebrovascular events, and negative pregnancy outcomes. Women with migraines are advised to avoid combined hormonal contraception and use progesterone only pills.

23 Review Targeting CGRP and 5-HT 2019

Moreno-Ajona, David / Chan, Calvin / Villar-Martínez, María Dolores / Goadsby, Peter J. ·Basic and Clinical Neurosciences, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. · NIHR-Wellcome Trust King's Clinical Research Facility/SLaM Biomedical Research Centre, King's College Hospital, London, UK. ·Headache · Pubmed #31291016.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To review and highlight current literature on emerging acute migraine treatments, focusing on CGRP receptor antagonists, gepants, and 5-HT BACKGROUND: Current acute migraine therapy consists of nonspecific analgesia and triptans. Limitations to these medicines, including lack of efficacy in many patients, side effects and the contraindication of triptans in patients with cardiovascular disease, suggest that there is an unmet need for new treatments. Studies of serotonin pharmacology led to the development of triptans, 5-HT METHOD: The authors performed a literature search of Pubmed and Cochrane databases as well as reviewed abstracts presented at meetings: American Headache Society, American Academy of Neurology, European Headache Federation and the Migraine Trust International Symposium, as well as on-line sources. The authors briefly detail the relevant migraine pathophysiology pertaining to 5-HT RESULTS: Two 5-HT CONCLUSION: Current available therapies have either been nonspecific or had important limitations, including in patients with cardiovascular risk factors. Phase III clinical trials of lasmiditan, rimegepant and ubrogepant all met their primary endpoints, so the options for migraine-targeted acute therapy will likely soon increase.

24 Review Primary headaches during lifespan. 2019

Straube, Andreas / Andreou, Anna. ·Department of Neurology, University Hospital LMU, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, 81377, Munich, Germany. andreas.straube@med.uni-muenchen.de. · Headache Research, Wolfson CARD, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience, King's College London, London, UK. · The Headache Centre, Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. ·J Headache Pain · Pubmed #30961531.

ABSTRACT: Primary headaches are one of the most prevalent neurological disorders and can occur during a wide range of lifespan. Primary headaches, especially migraine, are cyclic disorders with a complex sequence of symptoms within every headache attack. There is no systematic review of whether these symptoms changes during lifespan. Indeed, the clinical presentation of migraine shows an age-dependent change with a significantly shorter duration of the attacks and occurrence of different paroxysmal symptoms, such as vomiting, abdominal pain or vertigo, in childhood and, in contrast, largely an absence of autonomic signs and a more often bilateral headache in the elderly. The age-dependent differences in the clinical presentation are less distinct in cluster headache and, especially, in tension-type headache. The differences in the clinical presentation are in agreement with the idea that the connectivity of hypothalamic areas with different brainstem areas, especially the central parasympathetic areas, is important for the clinical manifestation of migraine, as well as, the change during lifespan.

25 Review Treating Chronic Migraine With Neuromodulation: The Role of Neurophysiological Abnormalities and Maladaptive Plasticity. 2019

Viganò, Alessandro / Toscano, Massimiliano / Puledda, Francesca / Di Piero, Vittorio. ·Headache Research Centre and Neurocritical Care Unit, Department of Human Neuroscience, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Molecular and Cellular Networks Lab, Department of Anatomy, Histology, Forensic Medicine and Orthopaedics, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of Neurology, Fatebenefratelli Hospital, Rome, Italy. · Headache Group, Department of Basic and Clinical Neuroscience, King's College Hospital, King's College London, London, United Kingdom. · University Consortium for Adaptive Disorders and Head Pain - UCADH, Pavia, Italy. ·Front Pharmacol · Pubmed #30804782.

ABSTRACT: Chronic migraine (CM) is the most disabling form of migraine, because pharmacological treatments have low efficacy and cumbersome side effects. New evidence has shown that migraine is primarily a disorder of brain plasticity and migraine chronification depends on a maladaptive process favoring the development of a brain state of hyperexcitability. Due to the ability to induce plastic changes in the brain, researchers started to look at Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation (NIBS) as a possible therapeutic option in migraine field. On one side, NIBS techniques induce changes of neural plasticity that outlast the period of the stimulation (a fundamental prerequisite of a prophylactic migraine treatment, concurrently they allow targeting neurophysiological abnormalities that contribute to the transition from episodic to CM. The action may thus influence not only the cortex but also brainstem and diencephalic structures. Plus, NIBS is not burdened by serious medication side effects and drug-drug interactions. Although the majority of the studies reported somewhat beneficial effects in migraine patients, no standard intervention has been defined. This may be due to methodological differences regarding the used techniques (e.g., transcranial magnetic stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation), the brain regions chosen as targets, and the stimulation types (e.g., the use of inhibitory and excitatory stimulations on the basis of opposite rationales), and an intrinsic variability of stimulation effect. Hence, it is difficult to draw a conclusion on the real effect of neuromodulation in migraine. In this article, we first will review the definition and mechanisms of brain plasticity, some neurophysiological hallmarks of migraine, and migraine chronification-related (dys)plasticity. Secondly, we will review available results from therapeutic and physiological studies using neuromodulation in CM. Lastly we will discuss the results obtained in these preventive trials in the light of a possible effect on brain plasticity.

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